General Practice and Primary Health Care descriptions

 

General Practice and Primary Health Care

Compulsory units

Graduate Diploma in Medicince Students
Graduate Diploma in Medicine students and Master of Medicine students must complete 6 credit points of compulsary units of study
CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online (no fixed-time webinars) and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of Study.
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis, screening and clinical guidelines.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.
Master of Medicine students must complete and additional 6 credit points of compulsary units of study

Stream specific units

Graduate Certificate in Medicine students must complete 24 credit points of stream specific units of study.
Graduate Diploma in Medicine students must complete 24 credit points of stream specific units of study.
Master of Medicine students must complete 24 credit points of stream specific units of study.
GPPC5001 Primary Health Care Fundamentals

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marguerite Tracy, Dr Narelle Shadbolt Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lectures and materials and discussion board and self-directed online learning activities Assessment: graded participation in discussion boards (10%); community case study presentation, (20%) evidence based case study analysis 1x 1000 2000 wd, ( 50%) multiple choice and clinical judgment test (20%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit aims to introduce clinicians to managing the health of the community in primary health care environments. Primary care models and settings will be discussed. Concepts of shared decision making, collaborative and team care models, and clinical reasoning in managing chronic conditions will be explored. Health priority areas and public health approaches will be introduced. Rational prescribing, patient safety, and doctor and patient well-being will also be covered.
GPPC5002 Complex problems in primary health care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marguerite Tracy and Dr Narelle Shadbolt Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online lectures, discussion board and self-directed online learning activities Assessment: graded discussion board participation (20%); case study 1x500wd (20%); written assignment 1x1500wd (40%); single best answer test (20%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit aims to introduce or extend clinical reasoning skills to address complex problems in primary health care. Foundations of clinical reasoning will be covered and then be used to analyse case scenarios across a broad range of presentations in primary health care. Case scenarios will be used to explore a patient centred approach across a broad range of presentations of these conditions in primary health care. There will be a strong focus on clinical reasoning, shared decision making, collaborative and team care in this context as well as the personal, social and structural impacts on decision making. Errors in decision making, health priority areas, public health approaches and the social determinants of health will also be addressed. Rational prescribing, patient safety, and doctor and patient well-being will also be covered.
BMRI5019 Psychiatry in Clinical Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sonia Kumar, A/Prof Louise Nash Session: Semester 1 Classes: online discussion forums; 1 day face to face workshop. it is compulsory that the workshop be attended/viewed live online or by download. students are required to give their oral presentation at the workshop or to submit a video of the presentation if not attending. Prohibitions: BMRI5003 BMRI5050 Assumed knowledge: MBBS or equivalent Assessment: online case based discussions 30%; oral presentation 30%; clinical case study (2000 words) 40% Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This unit is designed for medical practitioners such as general practitioners, emergency physicians, physicians, paediatricians and surgeons. Students will develop skills in the recognition and management of mental health conditions that frequently present in primary health and hospital settings. The unit will cover high prevalence mental disorders including mood, anxiety, stress and trauma-related disorders, including complex trauma as well as the low prevalence disorders such as psychosis. Managing psychiatric emergencies, the use of the Mental Health Act and medical comorbidites will be demonstrated. Students will develop skills in assessment, mental state examination, and the biopsychosocial approach to formulation, management and trauma-informed care. The range of evidence-based pharmacological, biopsychosocial and lifestyle interventions for mental disorders will be introduced. Other topics will include somatic presentations of psychological and psychosocial problems, addiction medicine, old age psychiatry, youth mental health and doctors' health. Students will participate in casebased learning activities and assessments.
Textbooks
Recommended text Kaplan and Sadock Synopsis of Psychiatry, 2014.
DERM5001 Essential Dermatology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Pablo Fernandez-Penas Session: Semester 1 Classes: compulsory 1 day face to face workshop; online lectures and webinar tutorials and discussion forums Assessment: online exam (40%), workshop participation and skills assessment (20%), case based discussion boards (20%), participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%), online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Essential Dermatology will cover most of the common skin diseases, providing a comprehensive review of: clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, impact on quality of life, and management. The unit will also cover the clinicopathological correlation and aetiopathogenesis of skin disease and will equip students to interpret histology reports. Diseases are organised by body region and clinical characteristics and include: inflammatory diseases (acne, psoriasis, eczema), autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases (lupus, morphea, pustulosis), cutaneous drug reactions, infections; and cancer. The use of new technologies in diagnosis and treatment is also discussed. On completion of the unit, students should be able to diagnose the most common cutaneous presentations, recognise possible alternative diagnoses, and complete an appropriate management plan.
Textbooks
Goldsmith LA, Katz SI, Gilchrest BA, Paller AS, Lefell DJ and Wolff K. (2012). Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. Ed 8, New York: McGraw-Hill
MBHT5001 Diabetes Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Victoria Rudland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Weekly online lectures and podcasts. Practical on campus half day workshop and 3x90 minute online webinars. It is compulsory that all of these sessions be attended/viewed live or by download. Attendance at the workshop is strongly encouraged. All students are required to complete a compulsory learning activity that related to the workshop.. Assessment: 3 x clinical case study tasks of 500 words (3 x 10%), 1 x 1500 word assignment (20%), online exam (30%), online quizzes (10%), participation in online discussion boards (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Students in this unit of study will learn how to effectively manage diabetes mellitus. Current data and concepts in epidemiology and classification, pathogenesis, and screening for diabetes and its complications will be addressed. This will be followed by an intensive focus on patient centred management of diabetes, including patient engagement, lifestyle interventions, bariatric surgery, medication options and regimens, new technology and monitoring. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes as well as prediabetes and diabetes in pregnancy will each be explored with a personalised, case-based approach. Differing health care delivery methods in diabetes and team based approaches to care will be discussed. Learning will be enhanced by individual and group online methods plus a practical on campus half-day workshop.
Textbooks
Endocrinology Expert Group. Therapeutic Guidelines: Endocrinology. Version 5. Melbourne: Therapeutic Guidelines Limited; 2014.ISBN9780980825374; additional required reading: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes. Diabetes Care January 2018 vol. 41 no. Supplement 1 S1-S159; NHMRC Clinical Care Guidelines in Diabetes, especially: Craig ME, Twigg SM, Donaghue KC, Cheung NW, Cameron FJ, Conn J, Jenkins AJ, Silink M, for the Australian Type 1 Diabetes Guidelines Expert Advisory Group. National evidence-based clinical care guidelines for type 1 diabetes in children, adolescents and adults, Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra 2011. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. General practice management of type 2 diabetes: 2016-2018. East Melbourne, Vic: RACGP, 2016.
MEDF5002 Teaching in the Clinical Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marguerite Tracy Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 day face to face workshop 9am - 3pm (not compulsory) and online learning. Students who do not attend the workshop will be required to complete an alternative ungraded learning activity. Assessment: Personal learning plan (20%); online presentation (20%); portfolio of evidence of learning (50%); participation in online discussion forums (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Almost all healthcare professionals are involved in education and training throughout their careers. This unit of study provides a practical introduction to the theory and practice of teaching and learning in the health environment. The unit will cover 3 main areas: planning for and facilitating learning in the clinical environment; assessing performance and providing constructive feedback; and fostering the development of students as professionals. Each of these areas will be underpinned by best evidence from clinical education research and will address current challenges and opportunities in the learning environment. This will include the role of new technologies from the perspective of both educators and learners. Participants in the course will gain a framework they can use to support their teaching, and will develop a portfolio of evidence to support their professional development as clinician educators.
PAED5008 Common Childhood Presentations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: online. students will spend about 10 hours/week (x 13 weeks) engaging in case-based learning, including online discussion of case scenarios, self-directed case reviews and literature appraisal. Assessment: 1x1500 word written assignment (or its equivalent) (30%); online quizzes (30%); and short answer questions in online discussion forums (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is only offered in odd numbered years
This unit covers a range of clinical conditions likely to be encountered by clinicians working in both primary health care settings such as general practice and general paediatric inpatient and outpatient settings. Through clinical scenarios, students will consider the assessment, diagnosis and management of challenging but common and important clinical presentations of childhood and adolescence.
PAIN5001 Introduction to Pain Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Devonshire and Professor Michael Nicholas Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
To introduce participants to the problem of pain within a multidisciplinary team framework and to highlight the extent of the problem in the community. The unit provides an overview of historical and philosophical models of pain and its management methods over time. Current classifications of pain are examined and the interrelationship between various paradigms of health and illness are outlined. Participants also begin to consider the principles of research design and biostatistics, and explore professional and ethical issues.

General elective units

Graduate Diploma in Medicine students complete 6 credit points of stream specific or general elective units of study.
Master of Medicine students complete 12 credit points of stream specific or general elective units of study.
BETH5204 Clinical Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x8hr Intensives or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode Assessment: 1x1500wd case study (30%); 1x2500wd essay (50%); continuous assessment (short weekly tasks) (10%); 2x400wd Short Tasks (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Note: If an insufficient number of students opt to attend seminars on campus, the co-ordinator may choose to teach this Unit of Study in online mode only. Students will be contacted if this occurs.
This unit will facilitate students to critically review the ethical issues that underlie the delivery of healthcare. Students will explore: dominant theoretical approaches to ethical reasoning in the clinical context; key ethical concepts in the clinical encounter (such as consent, professionalism and confidentiality); major contexts in which ethical issues arise in clinical practice; and the role of clinical ethics consultation. The unit will also consider specific issues and populations within clinical practice, such as ethical aspects of healthcare at the beginning and end of life.
Textbooks
All readings are accessed online via elearning.
CEPI5312 Diagnostic and Screening Tests (1 and 2)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Katy Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr synchronous seminar/week for 12 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Prohibitions: PUBH5208 or CEPI5202 or CEPI5311 Assessment: Class discussion/presentations (40%) and two written assignments (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit of study introduces the student to basic concepts behind diagnostic and screening tests, including: test accuracy, sources of bias in test evaluation, critical appraisal of test evaluation studies, principles and use of evidence in making decisions about population screening. It will then move to more advanced topics including: application of test results to individual patients, place of tests in diagnostic pathways, impact of tests on patient outcome, tests with continuous outcome, receiver-operator characteristic curves, systematic review of diagnostic tests, predictive models, monitoring, diagnostic tests in the health system, and over-diagnosis. After completing this unit of study, the student should have a comprehensive understanding of contemporary issues and the methodology underlying, diagnostic and screening test evaluation and application.
Textbooks
Course notes will be provided
GMED5001 Genomics in Clinical Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof R Jamieson, Dr M Tchan Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures and case discussions Assessment: online quizzes (10%), participation in online discussion forums (10%), generation and peer review of assessment items (10%), short answer questions (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Recent major advances in understanding of the human genome and the relationship between genetic variation and disease have changed clinical practice. This unit provides contemporary knowledge of genetic disease, diagnosis, genomic testing, prognosis, management, inheritance and impact across a range of chromosomal, single gene and heterogeneous genetic conditions. Common conditions such as intellectual disability, inherited cancer and paediatric and adult-onset disorders will be discussed. Students will gain knowledge of genomic mechanisms and genetic variations which lead to human disease. Case based approaches will be used for development of skills in interpretation of clinical, family history and genomic test results and also for appropriate diagnosis and accurate genetic risk information. Ethical issues in genomic medicine will also be considered. Advances in treatments for genetic diseases will be discussed along with possible uses and limitations of new technologies, including genome editing approaches.
Textbooks
Strachan, T and Read, A. Human Molecular Genetics (4th Edition). Garland Science. Read, A and Donnai, D. New Clinical Genetics (3rd Edition). Scion Publishing Ltd.
HPOL5000 Health Policy and Health Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Marie Thow, A/Prof Alison Hayes Session: Semester 1 Classes: online students: week by week online activities including online lectures and/or videos, 6 interactive tutorials with online content via discussion boards, interactive reading (approx 10 hours per week) block mode students: 2 x 1 day workshops plus 6 interactive tutorials (either face to face or online) with online lectures and/or videos (approx 10 hours per week) Prohibitions: PUBH5032 Assessment: assessable tutorials (30%) multiple choice online exam, 2 hr, open book (30%) 6 short reports (300-500 words each) on health policy and health economic evaluation, submitted online (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit aims to develop a critical and comparative understanding of the history, theory and practice of health policy as well as provide students with an understanding of the main concepts and analytical methods of health economics and political economy. It gives an overview of the political choices and frameworks that shape decision making in health. By the end of this unit students will be able to: Define the boundaries and key features of health policy; Identify policy instruments and how they function; Understand the main frameworks used for analysing health policy, and different approaches and perspectives regarding setting priorities in health policy; Apply methods and principles of health economics e.g. resource scarcity, opportunity cost, efficiency and equity to practical real-life examples; Critically analyse the role of economic evidence in informing policy decisions in health decision-making in Australia.
Textbooks
Recommended: Buse, K, Mays, N and Walt, G. Making Health Policy (2nd Ed). Open University Press, 2012. Copies of the text are available in the University of Sydney library. Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
INFO9003 IT for Health Professionals

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: INFO5003 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Information technologies (IT) and systems have emerged as the primary platform to support communication, collaboration, research, decision making, and problem solving in contemporary health organisations. The essential necessity for students to acquire the fundamental knowledge and skills for applying IT effectively for a wide range of tasks is widely recognised. This is an introductory unit of study which prepares students in the Health discipline to develop the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities to be competent in the use of information technology for solving a variety of problems. The main focus of this unit is on modelling and problem solving through the effective use of using IT. Students will learn how to navigate independently to solve their problems on their own, and to be capable of fully applying the power of IT tools in the service of their goals in their own health domains while not losing sight of the fundamental concepts of computing.
Students are taught core skills related to general purpose computing involving a range of software tools such as spreadsheets, database management systems, internet search engine. Students will undertake practical tasks including scripting languages and building a small scale application for managing information. In addition, the course will address the issues arising from the wide-spread use of information technology in a variety of Health area.
INTM5002 Basic Neurology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Justin Garber Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, webinars, discussion boards and podcasts Assessment: on-line exam (50%) 1 x 1000 word case study (25%); online quizzes (10%); participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); participation in online discussion forums (5%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is available only to registered medical graduates with experience working in an Australian or New Zealand clinical setting.
The Basic Neurology syllabus covers the requirements of trainee physician practice. The content is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of common neurological conditions and the essentials of management of these conditions. The module learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important neurological conditions.
Textbooks
Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 19th ed, Mcgraw-Hill 2015; Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 5th ed Oxford Medicine Online 2016.
INTM5003 Basic Rheumatology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Simon Chatfield Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, webinars, discussion boards and podcasts Assessment: on-line exam (50%) 1 x 1000 word case study (25%) online quizzes (10%), participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%), and participation in online discussion forums (5%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is available only to registered medical gradautes with experience working in an Australian or New Zealand clinical setting.
The Basic Rheumatology syllabus covers the requirements of trainee physician practice. The content is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of common rheumatologic conditions and the essentials of management of these conditions. The module learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important rheumatologic and immunologic conditions.
Textbooks
Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 19th ed, Mcgraw-Hill 2015; Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 5th ed Oxford Medicine Online 2016.
INTM5004 Basic Respiratory Medicine

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joe Duncan Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, webinars, discussion boards and podcasts Assessment: on-line exam (50%) 1 x 1000 word case study (25%); online quizzes (10%); participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); participation in online discussion forums (5%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is available only to registered medical graduates with experience working in an Australian or New Zealand clinical setting.
The Basic Respiratory medicine syllabus covers the requirements of trainee physician practice. The content is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of common respiratory conditions and the essentials of management of these conditions. The module learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important respiratory conditions.
Textbooks
Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 19th ed, Mcgraw-Hill 2015; Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 5th ed Oxford Medicine Online 2016.
INTM5005 Basic Gastroenterology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ken Liu Session: Semester 2 Classes: online lectures, webinars, discussion boards and podcasts Assessment: on-line exam (50%) 1 x 1000 word case study (25%) online quizzes (10%), participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%) and participation in online forums (5%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is available only to registered medical graduates working in an Australian clinical setting.
The Basic Gastroenterology syllabus covers the requirements of trainee physician practice. The content is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of common gastroenterological conditions and the essentials of management of these conditions. The module learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important gastroenterological conditions.
Textbooks
Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 19th ed, Mcgraw-Hill 2015; Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 5th ed Oxford Medicine Online 2016.
INTM5006 Basic Endocrinology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Clinical A/Prof Roger Chen Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, webinars, discussion boards and podcasts Assessment: on-line exam (50%); 1 x 1000 word case study (25%) online quizzes (10%); participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); participation in online discussion forums (5%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is available only to registered medical graduates with experience working in an Australian or New Zealand clinical setting.
The Basic Endocrinology syllabus covers the requirements of trainee physician practice. The content is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of common endocrine conditions and the essentials of management of these conditions. The module learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important endocrine conditions.
Textbooks
Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 19th ed, Mcgraw-Hill 2015; Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 5th ed Oxford Medicine Online 2016.
INTM5007 Basic Renal Medicine

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brendan Smyth Session: Semester 2 Classes: online lectures, webinars, discussion boards and podcasts Assessment: on-line exam (50%); 1 x 1000 word case study (25%;) online quizzes (10%);, participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); participation in online discussion forums (5%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is available only to registered medical graduates with experience working in an Australian or New Zealand clinical setting.
The Basic Renal Medicine syllabus covers the requirements of trainee physician practice. The content is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of common renal conditions and the essentials of management of these conditions. The module learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important renal conditions.
Textbooks
Johnson, Feehally and Floege, Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology, 5th edition, Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders 2015, 2014; Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 19th ed, Mcgraw-Hill 2015; Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 5th ed Oxford Medicine Online 2016.
INTM5014 Cardiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rachael Cordina, Dr Mark Dennis Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures and discussion boards Assumed knowledge: Theoretical and practical knowledge of cardiology at least at the level of a registered medical practitioner Assessment: on-line exam (30%); 1x 2000 word literature review (30%); online quizzes (10%); participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); case discussions (20%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is available only to registered medical graduates with experience working in an Australian or New Zealand clinical setting.
The Cardiology syllabus is designed to meet the needs of medical practitioners who are either trainee physicians or have a special interest in the practice of cardiology. The content is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of common cardiologic conditions and the essentials of management of these conditions. The module learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important cardiologic conditions.
Textbooks
Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, Eleventh Edition
MBHT5002 Advanced Diabetes Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Victoria Rudland Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly online lectures and podcasts. Practical on-campus half-day workshop. It is compulsory that the workshop be attended/viewed live or by download. Attendance at the workshop is strongly encouraged. All students are required to complete a compulsory learning activity related to the workshop. Assumed knowledge: It is recommended that students first complete MBHT5001 (Diabetes Management) unless they have a reasonable working knowledge of how to approach assessment and management of diabetes mellitus in a variety of clinical settings. Assessment: 3 x clinical case study tasks of 500 words (3x 10%), 1x 1500 word assignment (20%), online exam (30%), participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (20%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Departmental permission required unless MBHT5001 satisfactorily completed.
This unit of study provides students with an advanced level of understanding of the effective management of diabetes mellitus. It will builds on the Diabetes Management unit of study by focusing on more complex cases of diabetes, with a particular focus on type 1 diabetes. Topics addressed will include atypical, unusual and difficult to classify diabetes, intensive therapy in diabetes including complex insulin regimens, and managing diabetes related complications such as heart failure, painful neuropathy, diabetic foot disease, advanced retinopathy, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and end-stage renal disease. New technologies including state of the art insulin pump therapy and real time continuous blood glucose monitoring will be exemplified using real life cases. The role of pancreas transplant and closed loop/artificial pancreas systems in diabetes are also addressed. Diabetes translational research across the bench, clinic and bedside, are examined. Learning will be enhanced by individual and group online methods plus a practical on-campus half-day workshop.
Textbooks
Required reading (accessible on line): Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes. Diabetes Care January 2018 vol. 41 no. Supplement 1 S1-S159; NHMRC Clinical Care Guidelines in Diabetes, especially: Craig ME, Twigg SM, Donaghue KC, Cheung NW, Cameron FJ, Conn J, Jenkins AJ, Silink M, for the Australian Type 1 Diabetes Guidelines Expert Advisory Group. National evidence-based clinical care guidelines for type 1 diabetes in children, adolescents and adults, Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra 2011.
MBHT5003 Obesity and Pre-diabetes: Prevention and Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof. Tim Gill Session: Semester 1 Classes: Weekly online lectures and podcasts. Practical half day on campus workshop and 1hr introductory webinar. It is compulsory that all of these sessions be attended/viewed live or by download. Attendance at the workshop is strongly encouraged. All students are required to complete a compulsory learning activity related to the workshop. Assumed knowledge: this unit is intended for students who have experience in clinical care of patients. Most of the subject matter and assessments are based on clinical management processes. Assessment: 3 x clinical case study work tasks including participation in online discussion boards (39%); 1500 word critical thinking essay on key topics (25%); short answer questions (36%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This unit of study will develop student's understanding of how to effectively manage overweight, obesity and pre-diabetes. It will facilitate increased confidence in the prevention and practical medical management of these conditions. Current data and concepts in epidemiology and classification and pathogenesis of overweight and obesity and pre-diabetes and related public health issues are addressed. An intensive focus on state of the art patient-centred management of obesity and pre-diabetes follows, including patient engagement with behavioural and psychological approaches, lifestyle interventions in nutrition and exercise, bariatric surgery, medication options and regimens, new technology and sustainability of outcomes. New technology to enhance health is a focus. Overweight and obesity, as well as pre-diabetes is examined with a personalised, case-based approach. Differing health care delivery methods, commercial options and team based approaches to care is explored.Discussion boards and webinars plus a practical on campus workshop enhance learning.
Textbooks
There is no required textbook for this unit but suggested reading is provided within each module. General background texts include: World Health Organization .Obesity: preventing and managing the global epidemic. Report of a WHO Consultation (WHO Technical Report Series 894) Geneva 2000, http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/obesity/WHO_TRS_894/en/; 'NHMRC Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Overweight and Obesity for Adults, Adolescents and Children in Australia' (2013), https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/guidelines-publications/n57; National Preventative Health Taskforce. Australia: the healthiest country by 2020 A discussion paper, Canberra, Commonwealth of Australia 2008. https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc/publications/attachments/di20.pdf
NURS5096 Expanding Primary Health Care Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: four intensive, on-campus study days Assessment: project proposal (satisfactory/unsatisfactory), project evidence (35%) and project report (65%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit of study, students will explore the ways in which nurses can articulate their personal practice knowledge and enhance this with an understanding of primary health care educational and policy-based perspectives to make a significant contribution to the development of their own practice, the practice of others, the inter-professional delivery of evidence-based care and evidence-informed policy. The unit explores local, state, national and international social, technological and political issues that impact on and inform primary health care in Australia and the key government and professional bodies involved in primary health care policy. Additionally, as part of expanding the individual nurse's repertoire, students will be encouraged to broaden their specialty knowledge and nursing practice and will have the opportunity to further develop specialist knowledge and/or practice related to a specific practice topic.
PAED5001 Paediatric Immunisation

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Wood Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online. Students will spend approx 10 hours/week (x 13 weeks) engaging in case-based learning, incl. online discussion of case scenarios, self-directed case reviews and literature appraisal. Regular access to an internet connected computer is vital. Corequisites: Students who commence after 01 January 2016 are required to complete the Blackboard Academic Honesty Education Module. It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of Study Assessment: 2x1000wd essays (40%), MCQ exam (10%) and participation in online discussion forum (50%). Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is only offered in odd numbered years
This unit of study will cover the important and latest aspects of immunisation in childhood. Basic science aspects covered will include the immunology of immunisation, the process of development of new vaccines and latest research developments in new vaccines. The clinical features of the currently vaccine preventable conditions of childhood will be covered through clinical scenarios, integrating the epidemiology, basic science and current immunisation schedule. Immunisation in special populations and situations will be covered and the social and philosophical implications of immunisation will be explored.
PAED5002 Adolescent Medicine

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rachel Skinner Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online. Students will spend approx 10 hours/week (x 13 weeks) engaging in case-based learning, incl. online discussion of case scenarios, self-directed case reviews and literature appraisal. Regular access to an internet connected computer is vital. Assessment: 2 x 1000 word project (or its equivalent) (50%), and participation in online discussion forum (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is only offered in even numbered years
This unit examines the medical and psychosocial issues affecting the adolescent age group. Modules include eating disorders, chronic illness, drugs and alcohol and adolescent gynaecology, sexual health and adolescent mental health. There will be a focus on the approach to the adolescent patient, the clinical issues related to the most commonly encountered diseases affecting adolescents as well as consideration of public health policy as it relates to adolescents.
PAED5003 Neurology and Developmental Paediatrics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shekeeb Mohammad and Dr Sandra Johnson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online. Students will spend approx 10 hours/week (x 13 weeks) engaging in case-based learning, incl. online discussion of case scenarios, self-directed case reviews and literature appraisal. Regular access to an internet connected computer is vital. Assessment: 2x 2000 word project (or its equivalent) (50%) and participation in online discussion forum (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is only offered in even numbered years.
This unit examines some of the common medical and developmental conditions encountered in paediatric practice. There will be a focus on the approach to the child with a developmental disability and behavioural disorders, as well as latest evidence for diagnosis, investigation, prognosis and management of other common and important medical conditions. Specific modules include developmental disability, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, child protection, enuresis, feeding disorders of infancy and common neurological and renal conditions.
PAIN5002 Pain Mechanisms and Contributors

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Devonshire and Professor Michael Nicholas Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assumed knowledge: this unit is case based and is only suitable for experienced clinicians. Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
To introduce and develop participants understanding about the basic neuroscience of pain and the interrelationship between psychological, physiological and environmental processes in pain. Neuro-anatomical, physiological, pharmacological, and biochemical mechanisms involved in nociception, including peripheral and central sensitisation are discussed. Theoretical bases are introduced and the ways in which psychological and environmental factors modify or maintain pain perception and behaviour are explored.
PAIN5003 Pain Treatment and Management Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Devonshire and Dr Charles Brooker Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assumed knowledge: this unit is case based and is only suitable for experienced clinicians. Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
To introduce participants to the core principles of pain assessment, treatment and management. Participants consider the biopsychosocial model and the scientific basis for assessment, diagnosis and treatment. They explore principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, together with routes of drug administration. The role of physiotherapy and rehabilitation management, and the use of procedures such as neural blockade, simulation techniques and surgery are also considered.
PAIN5004 Pain Conditions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Devonshire and Professor Philip Siddall Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
The unit provides an introduction to a range of pain conditions. Participants are encouraged to integrate and apply previous learning to specific pain problems, acute, chronic and cancer pain. Recent advances in pain relief techniques are introduced and specific issues in the management of pain in children and older people are considered.
PAIN5014 Cancer Pain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ghauri Aggarwal and Dr Kat Urban Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit addresses the biopsychosocial assessment and management of pain associated with cancer. Recent advances in pain relief techniques including delivery systems for patient control of pain are reviewed, together with appropriate assessment and treatment approaches for psychological factors such as depression, grief and stress.
PAIN5017 Disability and Pain Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Duncan Sanders and Mr Matthew Forster Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
The interface between pain assessment and treatment and the system of compensation for workplace-related injury and disability is the focus of this subject. Accordingly the role of pain management in rehabilitation following occupational injury or illness is addressed, together with the medical, legal, insurer, employer, trade union and rehabilitation provider perspectives and roles in providing protection, advocacy, compensation and treatment. Legislative and attitudinal changes in the social environment relating to occupational injury and treatment are considered together with challenges for pain management arising from dysfunction in the system of rehabilitation following injury.
PAIN5019 Pain in Older People

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brad Wood, Dr Sarah Overton Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
Readings and case studies will highlight the unique difficulties of elderly people who suffer from degenerative, painful conditions, often exacerbated by multiple losses, role changes, limited mobility and mood disorder. The emphasis will be on assessment and management of pain when complicated by these conditions.
PAIN5020 Complementary Therapies: Pain Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Devonshire and Dr Russell Vickers Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit explores complementary therapies that may accompany conventional medical approaches in the management of pain. The evidence base is discussed, as well as the implications, costs and side effects of these therapies. The historical basis of each therapy is considered, together with current knowledge about their application and potential interactions with conventional medicines and treatments. Topics include: acupuncture, herbalism, homeopathy, hypnosis and relaxation techniques, yoga and meditation, osteopathy and chiropractic.
PAIN5021 Acute Pain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philip Corke Session: Semester 1 Classes: Approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assumed knowledge: this unit is case based and is only suitable for experienced clinicians. Assessment: Participation in online discussion (25%), 4000-5000 written assignment/s or equivalent (75%) Mode of delivery: Online
The aims of this unit are to provide a theoretical framework for the management of acute pain, to examine the specific contributors that are important in the development of acute pain conditions and to examine pharmacological and other approaches used in the management of acute pain. Topics that will be covered will include the principles of pre-emptive analgesia and evidence of effectiveness in preventing pain, pharmacological management of acute pain including approaches such as patient controlled analgesia, adjunctive approaches in managing acute pain and the transition from acute to chronic pain.
PMED5100 Paediatric Infectious Diseases

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shekeeb Mohammad, Dr Philip Britton Session: Semester 1 Classes: online. students will spend approx 10 hours/week (x 13 weeks) engaging in case-based learning, incl. online discussion of case scenarios, self-directed case reviews and literature appraisal. regular access to an internet connected computer is vital. Assessment: 2x2000-word project (or its equivalent) (50%)and participation in online discussion forum (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is only offered in odd numbered years
This unit investigates in-depth the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of paediatric infectious diseases. Modules of study within this unit will include: worldwide patterns of infectious disease, including assessment of scope of problem and burden of disease; common paediatric infectious diseases; current evidence- based practice for diagnosis and treatment of common childhood infectious diseases; infectious diseases in special populations such as immunocompromised, malnourished and indigenous populations; issues of policy and public health and emerging infectious diseases in paediatric settings.
PMED5101 Paediatric Allergy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Dianne Campbell and Dr Paul Robinson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online. Students will spend approx 10 hours/week (x 13 weeks) engaging in case-based learning, incl. online discussion of case scenarios, self-directed case reviews and literature appraisal. Regular access to an internet connected computer is vital. Assessment: 2 x 1500word essay (50%), and participation in online forum (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is only offered in even numbered years
This unit examines the worldwide status and trends in child and adolescent asthma and allergic disease. It explores the determinants, clinical assessment, medical complications, management and prevention of these important public health problems. Our aim is to inspect the current clinical practice and principles that underlie the diagnosis and management of paediatric asthma and allergic disorders. There is a close integration of epidemiology; basic science and best available evidence in management that are revealed through clinically based scenarios. Important cutting edge and controversial concepts and treatments are explored.
PMED5102 Paediatric Nutrition and Obesity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Louise Baur, Dr Shirley Alexander Session: Semester 2 Classes: online. students will spend approx 10 hours/week (x 13 weeks) engaging in case-based learning, incl. online discussion of case scenarios, self-directed case reviews and literature appraisal. regular access to an internet connected computer is vital. Assessment: 2x2000 word essay (50%)and participation in online forum (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit examines the worldwide status and trends in child and adolescent obesity, incorporating a focus on paediatric nutrition. It explores the determinants, clinical assessment, medical complications, management and prevention of this important public health problem. There is a close integration of epidemiology, basic science and best available evidence in management and prevention into clinically based scenarios. Our aim is to provide you with a broad knowledge base and ability to apply scientific theory and clinical evidence to the diagnosis and management of obesity in childhood. This will include grounding in the complex social, cultural and environmental factors contributing to the continuance of childhood obesity throughout the world.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan, Dr Erin Cvejic Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%), 1 x 1hr online test (20%) and 1x1.5hr open-book exam (50%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5120 Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Suzanne Plater Session: Semester 2 Classes: face-to-face students 5 x 1 day workshops over 12 weeks; participation assessable online students 5 x 3 days tutorials and discussions (equivalent to workshops) over 12 weeks; participation and online tutorial discussion assessable Prohibitions: PUBH5118 Assessment: workshop and online participation 15% 1 x 1000 word reflective essay 20% 1 x online multiple choice quiz 15% 1 x 3500 word report 50% Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit will significantly advance your philosophical, theoretical and practical understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and societies within the context of public health. We will use case studies grounded in diverse urban, regional and remote communities and the life experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to explore key constructs. These include transgenerational psychic trauma, racism, political structures and systems, cultural determinants, ethics, and global indigenous epistemologies. Together we will investigate the reasons why Australia has so far been unable to close the gap across almost all indicators of health and wellbeing, and explore innovative, ethical and effective solutions. Throughout this unit you will be encouraged to interact with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander academics, health professionals and community members, and your unit coordinator, tutors and fellow students, and feel confident to ask difficult questions and debate the responses. Our aim is to give you the practical and conceptual knowledge and skills necessary to work respectfully and effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples from across the nation.
Textbooks
None, readings provided
PUBH5116 Genetics and Public Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Anne Cust, Dr Gabrielle Williams Session: Intensive October Classes: 1x 2.5 day workshop Assessment: 3x 30min online quiz (15%), small group assignment (20%), in-class group debate (10%), and take home exam of 6 questions (250 words each) (50%). 5% will also be allocated to peer-assessed teamwork Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Pre-readings and some lectures will be posted on the unit's eLearning site 2-3 weeks before the course starts, and it is expected that you will look at this content before coming to the first day of the course. This will enable more time for class discussion.
This unit caters for practitioners, policy and decision-makers, students and researchers in public health, public policy, journalism, law, epidemiology, medicine, science, industry, ethics, philosophy, communication and advocacy. It gives a basic introduction to genetics and genetic epidemiology and covers issues like genetic determinants of disease, genetic testing and screening, psychosocial, legal and ethical aspects of genetics and genetic testing, genetic education and genetics and public policy.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5510 Healthy ageing and fall prevention

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Anne Tiedemann, Professor Cathie Sherrington, Professor Bob Cumming Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8x1 hour online lectures and 4x1 hour online discussions with a period of intensive attendance at 2 day face-to-face workshop (8 hours/ day) Prohibitions: PUBH5419 Assessment: participation in 4x400wd online discussions (20%) 1x1500wd assignment (30%) and 1x3000wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit comprises a series of online lectures and discussions followed by a 2 day face-to-face workshop. The unit aims to teach students about the demography, epidemiology and economics of population ageing in Australia and globally, and about common health conditions that impact on healthy ageing, including dementia, frailty and falls, and the evidence regarding prevention and management of these health conditions. This unit will also include teaching about the structure and role of health and aged care services. The 2 day workshop will focus on fall prevention, from the epidemiology and economic cost of falls to fall risk factors and evidence-based strategies for the prevention of falls and physical activity strategies for healthy ageing, areas of particular expertise in the School of Public Health.
Textbooks
Recorded lectures, lecture notes, case studies and journal articles will be provided online from a password-protected site.
PUBH5422 Health and Risk Communication

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Hooker, Associate Professor Julie Leask, Professor Phyllis Butow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block/intensive 2 blocks of 2 x 9-5 full days; please check with the coordinator for scheduling Assessment: Assignment 1: 1 x 2500 word (35%), Assignment 2: 1 x 2500 words or equivalent (35%), online activities (30%). Attendance at intensives is compulsory and 80% attendance is required to pass the unit of study. Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit, students learn how to communicate effectively with respect to health risks, both to individuals with health concerns, and with respect to risks to the public. The first half covers individual health risk communication in clinical settings, including: theories of health communication, patient centred care and shared decision making; evidence-based communication skills; research paradigms including interaction analysis; cross-cultural communication in health care; discussing prognosis; and informed consent. The second half explores risk communication for public health, including: how to effectively manage outbreak or other crisis situations; how to communicate about issues where the risk is low but ublic concern is high (such as with respect to the fluoridation of water); and how to best manage controversies. We teach theories of risk perception and communication with particular application to public health incident responses. We give practical guides to media messages, risk message framing, public engagement, traditional and social media, and the ethical aspects of public communication. The unit offers students the opportunity to learn from outstanding guest lecturers who work in these areas and interactive opportunities for students to try their skills in risk communication and decision making.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format). Most supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
PUBH5500 Advanced Qualitative Health Research

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers (Semester 1); Andrea Smith (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x3 full day workshop in March/April (semester 1); 2x3 full day workshops in August/September (semester 2) Prohibitions: QUAL5005 or QUAL5006 Assessment: interviewing activity with reflection (25%); 2000wd essay (25%); 2x group presentations (20%); multiple choice quizzes (20%); in-class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides a comprehensive introduction to qualitative inquiry in health. It is designed for beginners and people who want an advanced-level introduction. Over the course of the unit we will address: What is qualitative research? How is it different from quantitative research? What is its history? What research problems can it address? How do I design a qualitative study? What are the different (and best) ways to generate data? How do you analyse qualitative data? Is methodology different to method? What are ontology and epistemology? What is reflexivity (and aren't qualitative researchers biased)? What are the ethical issues? What is good quality qualitative research? Can I generalise qualitative findings? You will get practical experience and skills through carrying out an observation, participating in a focus group, conducting an interview, analysing data, arguing for qualitative research in health, and appraising the quality of published literature. In both workshops you will meet working qualitative researchers and hear about their projects. This advanced unit will show you a new way of thinking critically about research and researching, and give you the skills and confidence to begin evaluating and doing qualitative research for yourself.
SEXH5205 Adolescent Sexual Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fiona Robards, Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Fully online Assessment: Discussion board participation (30%); Case study (30%); 1500 Word essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit aims to introduce the constructs of adolescent sexuality, explore the determinants of adolescent sexual health and to discuss the personal and public health implications of adolescent sexuality from a global perspective. The main areas of learning are: adolescent sexuality, adolescent sexual health, reproductive health issues in adolescence, diversity, legal and ethical issues and sexual health promotion. Additional emphasis on a deeper exploration of an area of adolescent sexual health that is of particular interest to the student. On completion of this unit of study, students should be able to: (i) Describe the biological, developmental and socio-cultural contexts of adolescent sexual health as well as the constructs, challenges and diversities of adolescent sexuality. They will learn techniques used to optimise communication with adolescents and explore legal, ethical and public health implications of adolescent sexuality; and (ii) Understand and describe one area of adolescent sexual health that the student chooses to study in depth from a list of suggestions.
SEXH5401 Introduction: Sexual and Reproductive Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Arlie Rochford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Fully online Assessment: Discussion board participation (10%); online quizzes (20%); Group assignment (20%); 1 x 1500 word essay (20%); 1 x 2000 word essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit will cover the foundational aspects of sexual and reproductive health (SRH), including relevant anatomy and physiology, sexuality, gender, sexual orientation and behaviour. The social, medical and public health aspects of SRH will be introduced including preconception care, pregnancy, unplanned pregnancy and abortion, fertility, and contraception. Students will develop an awareness of the diversity of values, opinions and behaviours in sexual orientation.The effect of socio-economic, ethnic, religious and cultural factors and current theories of sexuality and sexual behaviours will be discussed.
The basic principles of the prevention and management of common STIs and HIV will be introduced and emphasis will be given to the sexual and reproductive health rights of all individuals as well as the importance of healthy sexuality.
Textbooks
Van Look, P., (2011). Sexual and Reproductive Health: A Public Health Perspective. 1st Ed. Elsevier: ISBN: 9780128102329
SEXH5402 Counselling for Health Professionals

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Fox, Amanda Robb Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: On-line plus blockintensive mode, 4 days, 9am-5pm Prohibitions: BIOS5071 Assessment: 1 x Group work task (25%); Online quiz (20%); 1 x 2000 Word assignment (20%); 1 x 2500 Word assignment (25%); Discussion board participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will introduce students to the microskills and basic theories of counselling in a health setting. This unit of study has two parts: an online component and a face-to-face intensive teaching block component. The intensive teaching block will include an extension of online content and provide skills development sessions. The intensive teaching block is compulsory. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: (i) Demonstrate the application of microskills to interpersonal communication, professional communication and in a counselling context; (ii) Apply basic counselling interventions in a health context; (iii) Critique the application of counselling and psychotherapy theories in health settings; (iv) Critique and discuss ethical issues in counselling; (v) Demonstrate the ability to develop a basic management plan for an individual or couple based on best available research and clinical evidence; and (vi) Develop an understanding of the self in practise.
Textbooks
Corey, Gerald (2013) Theory and Practice of Counselling and Psychotherapy. 9th Edition ISBN: 9780840028549; and McLeod, John (2013) An introduction to Counselling (e-Book). 5th edition. ISBN: 9780335247226.
SEXH5405 Contraception and Preconception Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Kirsten Black Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online plus block intensive mode, 3 days, 9am-5pm Assessment: Discussion board participation (10%); Online quiz (20%); Group case study presentation and reflective report (20%); Written assignments(50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study aims to provide students with an understanding of fertility control across the reproductive lifespan including: hormonal and non-hormonal reversible contraceptive methods; emergency contraception; and permanenet methods of contraception. The impact of age, culture, tradition, society, personal beliefs, disability and health on contraceptive choices and reproductive health will be explored. The consequences of unintended pregnancy and the impact of unsafe abortion will be discussed. The unit is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills in the field of preconception care. The latest evidence regarding optimisation of preconception health will be emphasized particularly for women with diabetes, obesity and other medical conditions.
Textbooks
Prescribed: Contraception: An Australian clinical practice handbook. 4th Edition, 2017. Recommended: Reproductive and sexual health: an Australian clinical practice handbook. 3rd Edition. Family Planning NSW, 2016.
SEXH5407 Sex Gender and Sexuality

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Amanda Robb Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online plus block intensive mode, 4 days, 9am-5pm Assessment: Essay (30%); Presentation (30%); Reflective essay (30%); Discussion board participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will equip students to develop a foundational knowledge and skills to work with gender and sexuality issues, including gender and sexual discourses and practices. Students will develop an understanding of sensitive practice skills to work with the LGBTIQ community. The unit will also introduce the social construction and attitudes in modern society regarding gendered violence, gendered inequality, and gender performativity. Students will be able to formulate therapeutic applications respond ethically and empathically to the specific gendered issues which present in client groups. On completion of the unit, students should be able to: (i) Have a foundational knowledge and sensitivity with gender terminology; (ii) Evaluate various sexual differences and practices within gender and sexual diverse individuals and communities; (iii) Explore the psychosocial issues surrounding gender and sexual minorities in the community; (iv) Respond to issues related gendered violence; and (v) Apply therapeutic skills and tools in response to gender and sexuality, including gender and sexual diverse individuals/communities.

Compulsory units

Graduate Diploma in Science in Medicine students
Graduate Diploma in Science in Medicine students must complete 6 credit points of compulsory units of study
CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online (no fixed-time webinars) and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of Study.
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis, screening and clinical guidelines.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.
Master of Medicine students must complete 12 credit points of compulsory units of study
CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online (no fixed-time webinars) and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of Study.
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis, screening and clinical guidelines.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.

Stream specific units

Graduate Certificate in Science in Medicine students must complete 24 credit points of stream specific units of study.
Graduate Diploma in Science in Medicine students must complete 24 credit points of stream specific units of study.
Master of Science in Medicine students must complete 24 credit points of stream specific units of study.
GPPC5001 Primary Health Care Fundamentals

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marguerite Tracy, Dr Narelle Shadbolt Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lectures and materials and discussion board and self-directed online learning activities Assessment: graded participation in discussion boards (10%); community case study presentation, (20%) evidence based case study analysis 1x 1000 2000 wd, ( 50%) multiple choice and clinical judgment test (20%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit aims to introduce clinicians to managing the health of the community in primary health care environments. Primary care models and settings will be discussed. Concepts of shared decision making, collaborative and team care models, and clinical reasoning in managing chronic conditions will be explored. Health priority areas and public health approaches will be introduced. Rational prescribing, patient safety, and doctor and patient well-being will also be covered.
GPPC5002 Complex problems in primary health care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marguerite Tracy and Dr Narelle Shadbolt Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online lectures, discussion board and self-directed online learning activities Assessment: graded discussion board participation (20%); case study 1x500wd (20%); written assignment 1x1500wd (40%); single best answer test (20%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit aims to introduce or extend clinical reasoning skills to address complex problems in primary health care. Foundations of clinical reasoning will be covered and then be used to analyse case scenarios across a broad range of presentations in primary health care. Case scenarios will be used to explore a patient centred approach across a broad range of presentations of these conditions in primary health care. There will be a strong focus on clinical reasoning, shared decision making, collaborative and team care in this context as well as the personal, social and structural impacts on decision making. Errors in decision making, health priority areas, public health approaches and the social determinants of health will also be addressed. Rational prescribing, patient safety, and doctor and patient well-being will also be covered.
BMRI5019 Psychiatry in Clinical Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sonia Kumar, A/Prof Louise Nash Session: Semester 1 Classes: online discussion forums; 1 day face to face workshop. it is compulsory that the workshop be attended/viewed live online or by download. students are required to give their oral presentation at the workshop or to submit a video of the presentation if not attending. Prohibitions: BMRI5003 BMRI5050 Assumed knowledge: MBBS or equivalent Assessment: online case based discussions 30%; oral presentation 30%; clinical case study (2000 words) 40% Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This unit is designed for medical practitioners such as general practitioners, emergency physicians, physicians, paediatricians and surgeons. Students will develop skills in the recognition and management of mental health conditions that frequently present in primary health and hospital settings. The unit will cover high prevalence mental disorders including mood, anxiety, stress and trauma-related disorders, including complex trauma as well as the low prevalence disorders such as psychosis. Managing psychiatric emergencies, the use of the Mental Health Act and medical comorbidites will be demonstrated. Students will develop skills in assessment, mental state examination, and the biopsychosocial approach to formulation, management and trauma-informed care. The range of evidence-based pharmacological, biopsychosocial and lifestyle interventions for mental disorders will be introduced. Other topics will include somatic presentations of psychological and psychosocial problems, addiction medicine, old age psychiatry, youth mental health and doctors' health. Students will participate in casebased learning activities and assessments.
Textbooks
Recommended text Kaplan and Sadock Synopsis of Psychiatry, 2014.
DERM5001 Essential Dermatology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Pablo Fernandez-Penas Session: Semester 1 Classes: compulsory 1 day face to face workshop; online lectures and webinar tutorials and discussion forums Assessment: online exam (40%), workshop participation and skills assessment (20%), case based discussion boards (20%), participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%), online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Essential Dermatology will cover most of the common skin diseases, providing a comprehensive review of: clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, impact on quality of life, and management. The unit will also cover the clinicopathological correlation and aetiopathogenesis of skin disease and will equip students to interpret histology reports. Diseases are organised by body region and clinical characteristics and include: inflammatory diseases (acne, psoriasis, eczema), autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases (lupus, morphea, pustulosis), cutaneous drug reactions, infections; and cancer. The use of new technologies in diagnosis and treatment is also discussed. On completion of the unit, students should be able to diagnose the most common cutaneous presentations, recognise possible alternative diagnoses, and complete an appropriate management plan.
Textbooks
Goldsmith LA, Katz SI, Gilchrest BA, Paller AS, Lefell DJ and Wolff K. (2012). Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. Ed 8, New York: McGraw-Hill
MBHT5001 Diabetes Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Victoria Rudland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Weekly online lectures and podcasts. Practical on campus half day workshop and 3x90 minute online webinars. It is compulsory that all of these sessions be attended/viewed live or by download. Attendance at the workshop is strongly encouraged. All students are required to complete a compulsory learning activity that related to the workshop.. Assessment: 3 x clinical case study tasks of 500 words (3 x 10%), 1 x 1500 word assignment (20%), online exam (30%), online quizzes (10%), participation in online discussion boards (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Students in this unit of study will learn how to effectively manage diabetes mellitus. Current data and concepts in epidemiology and classification, pathogenesis, and screening for diabetes and its complications will be addressed. This will be followed by an intensive focus on patient centred management of diabetes, including patient engagement, lifestyle interventions, bariatric surgery, medication options and regimens, new technology and monitoring. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes as well as prediabetes and diabetes in pregnancy will each be explored with a personalised, case-based approach. Differing health care delivery methods in diabetes and team based approaches to care will be discussed. Learning will be enhanced by individual and group online methods plus a practical on campus half-day workshop.
Textbooks
Endocrinology Expert Group. Therapeutic Guidelines: Endocrinology. Version 5. Melbourne: Therapeutic Guidelines Limited; 2014.ISBN9780980825374; additional required reading: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes. Diabetes Care January 2018 vol. 41 no. Supplement 1 S1-S159; NHMRC Clinical Care Guidelines in Diabetes, especially: Craig ME, Twigg SM, Donaghue KC, Cheung NW, Cameron FJ, Conn J, Jenkins AJ, Silink M, for the Australian Type 1 Diabetes Guidelines Expert Advisory Group. National evidence-based clinical care guidelines for type 1 diabetes in children, adolescents and adults, Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra 2011. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. General practice management of type 2 diabetes: 2016-2018. East Melbourne, Vic: RACGP, 2016.
MBHT5003 Obesity and Pre-diabetes: Prevention and Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof. Tim Gill Session: Semester 1 Classes: Weekly online lectures and podcasts. Practical half day on campus workshop and 1hr introductory webinar. It is compulsory that all of these sessions be attended/viewed live or by download. Attendance at the workshop is strongly encouraged. All students are required to complete a compulsory learning activity related to the workshop. Assumed knowledge: this unit is intended for students who have experience in clinical care of patients. Most of the subject matter and assessments are based on clinical management processes. Assessment: 3 x clinical case study work tasks including participation in online discussion boards (39%); 1500 word critical thinking essay on key topics (25%); short answer questions (36%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This unit of study will develop student's understanding of how to effectively manage overweight, obesity and pre-diabetes. It will facilitate increased confidence in the prevention and practical medical management of these conditions. Current data and concepts in epidemiology and classification and pathogenesis of overweight and obesity and pre-diabetes and related public health issues are addressed. An intensive focus on state of the art patient-centred management of obesity and pre-diabetes follows, including patient engagement with behavioural and psychological approaches, lifestyle interventions in nutrition and exercise, bariatric surgery, medication options and regimens, new technology and sustainability of outcomes. New technology to enhance health is a focus. Overweight and obesity, as well as pre-diabetes is examined with a personalised, case-based approach. Differing health care delivery methods, commercial options and team based approaches to care is explored.Discussion boards and webinars plus a practical on campus workshop enhance learning.
Textbooks
There is no required textbook for this unit but suggested reading is provided within each module. General background texts include: World Health Organization .Obesity: preventing and managing the global epidemic. Report of a WHO Consultation (WHO Technical Report Series 894) Geneva 2000, http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/obesity/WHO_TRS_894/en/; 'NHMRC Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Overweight and Obesity for Adults, Adolescents and Children in Australia' (2013), https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/guidelines-publications/n57; National Preventative Health Taskforce. Australia: the healthiest country by 2020 A discussion paper, Canberra, Commonwealth of Australia 2008. https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc/publications/attachments/di20.pdf
MEDF5002 Teaching in the Clinical Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marguerite Tracy Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 day face to face workshop 9am - 3pm (not compulsory) and online learning. Students who do not attend the workshop will be required to complete an alternative ungraded learning activity. Assessment: Personal learning plan (20%); online presentation (20%); portfolio of evidence of learning (50%); participation in online discussion forums (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Almost all healthcare professionals are involved in education and training throughout their careers. This unit of study provides a practical introduction to the theory and practice of teaching and learning in the health environment. The unit will cover 3 main areas: planning for and facilitating learning in the clinical environment; assessing performance and providing constructive feedback; and fostering the development of students as professionals. Each of these areas will be underpinned by best evidence from clinical education research and will address current challenges and opportunities in the learning environment. This will include the role of new technologies from the perspective of both educators and learners. Participants in the course will gain a framework they can use to support their teaching, and will develop a portfolio of evidence to support their professional development as clinician educators.
NURS5096 Expanding Primary Health Care Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: four intensive, on-campus study days Assessment: project proposal (satisfactory/unsatisfactory), project evidence (35%) and project report (65%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit of study, students will explore the ways in which nurses can articulate their personal practice knowledge and enhance this with an understanding of primary health care educational and policy-based perspectives to make a significant contribution to the development of their own practice, the practice of others, the inter-professional delivery of evidence-based care and evidence-informed policy. The unit explores local, state, national and international social, technological and political issues that impact on and inform primary health care in Australia and the key government and professional bodies involved in primary health care policy. Additionally, as part of expanding the individual nurse's repertoire, students will be encouraged to broaden their specialty knowledge and nursing practice and will have the opportunity to further develop specialist knowledge and/or practice related to a specific practice topic.
SEXH5405 Contraception and Preconception Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Kirsten Black Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online plus block intensive mode, 3 days, 9am-5pm Assessment: Discussion board participation (10%); Online quiz (20%); Group case study presentation and reflective report (20%); Written assignments(50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study aims to provide students with an understanding of fertility control across the reproductive lifespan including: hormonal and non-hormonal reversible contraceptive methods; emergency contraception; and permanenet methods of contraception. The impact of age, culture, tradition, society, personal beliefs, disability and health on contraceptive choices and reproductive health will be explored. The consequences of unintended pregnancy and the impact of unsafe abortion will be discussed. The unit is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills in the field of preconception care. The latest evidence regarding optimisation of preconception health will be emphasized particularly for women with diabetes, obesity and other medical conditions.
Textbooks
Prescribed: Contraception: An Australian clinical practice handbook. 4th Edition, 2017. Recommended: Reproductive and sexual health: an Australian clinical practice handbook. 3rd Edition. Family Planning NSW, 2016.

General elective units

Graduate Diploma in Science in Medicine students complete 6 credit points of stream specific or general elective units of study.
Master of Science in Medicine students complete 12 credit points of stream specific or general elective units of study.
BETH5204 Clinical Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x8hr Intensives or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode Assessment: 1x1500wd case study (30%); 1x2500wd essay (50%); continuous assessment (short weekly tasks) (10%); 2x400wd Short Tasks (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Note: If an insufficient number of students opt to attend seminars on campus, the co-ordinator may choose to teach this Unit of Study in online mode only. Students will be contacted if this occurs.
This unit will facilitate students to critically review the ethical issues that underlie the delivery of healthcare. Students will explore: dominant theoretical approaches to ethical reasoning in the clinical context; key ethical concepts in the clinical encounter (such as consent, professionalism and confidentiality); major contexts in which ethical issues arise in clinical practice; and the role of clinical ethics consultation. The unit will also consider specific issues and populations within clinical practice, such as ethical aspects of healthcare at the beginning and end of life.
Textbooks
All readings are accessed online via elearning.
CEPI5312 Diagnostic and Screening Tests (1 and 2)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Katy Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr synchronous seminar/week for 12 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Prohibitions: PUBH5208 or CEPI5202 or CEPI5311 Assessment: Class discussion/presentations (40%) and two written assignments (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit of study introduces the student to basic concepts behind diagnostic and screening tests, including: test accuracy, sources of bias in test evaluation, critical appraisal of test evaluation studies, principles and use of evidence in making decisions about population screening. It will then move to more advanced topics including: application of test results to individual patients, place of tests in diagnostic pathways, impact of tests on patient outcome, tests with continuous outcome, receiver-operator characteristic curves, systematic review of diagnostic tests, predictive models, monitoring, diagnostic tests in the health system, and over-diagnosis. After completing this unit of study, the student should have a comprehensive understanding of contemporary issues and the methodology underlying, diagnostic and screening test evaluation and application.
Textbooks
Course notes will be provided
HPOL5000 Health Policy and Health Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Marie Thow, A/Prof Alison Hayes Session: Semester 1 Classes: online students: week by week online activities including online lectures and/or videos, 6 interactive tutorials with online content via discussion boards, interactive reading (approx 10 hours per week) block mode students: 2 x 1 day workshops plus 6 interactive tutorials (either face to face or online) with online lectures and/or videos (approx 10 hours per week) Prohibitions: PUBH5032 Assessment: assessable tutorials (30%) multiple choice online exam, 2 hr, open book (30%) 6 short reports (300-500 words each) on health policy and health economic evaluation, submitted online (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit aims to develop a critical and comparative understanding of the history, theory and practice of health policy as well as provide students with an understanding of the main concepts and analytical methods of health economics and political economy. It gives an overview of the political choices and frameworks that shape decision making in health. By the end of this unit students will be able to: Define the boundaries and key features of health policy; Identify policy instruments and how they function; Understand the main frameworks used for analysing health policy, and different approaches and perspectives regarding setting priorities in health policy; Apply methods and principles of health economics e.g. resource scarcity, opportunity cost, efficiency and equity to practical real-life examples; Critically analyse the role of economic evidence in informing policy decisions in health decision-making in Australia.
Textbooks
Recommended: Buse, K, Mays, N and Walt, G. Making Health Policy (2nd Ed). Open University Press, 2012. Copies of the text are available in the University of Sydney library. Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
INFO9003 IT for Health Professionals

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: INFO5003 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Information technologies (IT) and systems have emerged as the primary platform to support communication, collaboration, research, decision making, and problem solving in contemporary health organisations. The essential necessity for students to acquire the fundamental knowledge and skills for applying IT effectively for a wide range of tasks is widely recognised. This is an introductory unit of study which prepares students in the Health discipline to develop the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities to be competent in the use of information technology for solving a variety of problems. The main focus of this unit is on modelling and problem solving through the effective use of using IT. Students will learn how to navigate independently to solve their problems on their own, and to be capable of fully applying the power of IT tools in the service of their goals in their own health domains while not losing sight of the fundamental concepts of computing.
Students are taught core skills related to general purpose computing involving a range of software tools such as spreadsheets, database management systems, internet search engine. Students will undertake practical tasks including scripting languages and building a small scale application for managing information. In addition, the course will address the issues arising from the wide-spread use of information technology in a variety of Health area.
MBHT5002 Advanced Diabetes Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Victoria Rudland Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly online lectures and podcasts. Practical on-campus half-day workshop. It is compulsory that the workshop be attended/viewed live or by download. Attendance at the workshop is strongly encouraged. All students are required to complete a compulsory learning activity related to the workshop. Assumed knowledge: It is recommended that students first complete MBHT5001 (Diabetes Management) unless they have a reasonable working knowledge of how to approach assessment and management of diabetes mellitus in a variety of clinical settings. Assessment: 3 x clinical case study tasks of 500 words (3x 10%), 1x 1500 word assignment (20%), online exam (30%), participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (20%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Departmental permission required unless MBHT5001 satisfactorily completed.
This unit of study provides students with an advanced level of understanding of the effective management of diabetes mellitus. It will builds on the Diabetes Management unit of study by focusing on more complex cases of diabetes, with a particular focus on type 1 diabetes. Topics addressed will include atypical, unusual and difficult to classify diabetes, intensive therapy in diabetes including complex insulin regimens, and managing diabetes related complications such as heart failure, painful neuropathy, diabetic foot disease, advanced retinopathy, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and end-stage renal disease. New technologies including state of the art insulin pump therapy and real time continuous blood glucose monitoring will be exemplified using real life cases. The role of pancreas transplant and closed loop/artificial pancreas systems in diabetes are also addressed. Diabetes translational research across the bench, clinic and bedside, are examined. Learning will be enhanced by individual and group online methods plus a practical on-campus half-day workshop.
Textbooks
Required reading (accessible on line): Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes. Diabetes Care January 2018 vol. 41 no. Supplement 1 S1-S159; NHMRC Clinical Care Guidelines in Diabetes, especially: Craig ME, Twigg SM, Donaghue KC, Cheung NW, Cameron FJ, Conn J, Jenkins AJ, Silink M, for the Australian Type 1 Diabetes Guidelines Expert Advisory Group. National evidence-based clinical care guidelines for type 1 diabetes in children, adolescents and adults, Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra 2011.
MEDF5005 Health Research Methods and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Timothy Schlub Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x compulsory in person interactive full day workshops, 4x optional in person 3hr tutorials, 5x online lectures and discussions, 2x online elective module readings Assessment: Study design and ethics assignment (40%), statistics assignment (20%), statistics exam (20%), online self-study elective task (10%), online quizes (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study introduces students to the fundamental skills that are required for postgraduate research in medicine and health. Students will learn how to conduct research that is scientifically and ethically sound, and be able to critically appraise and review literature. Students will understand the strengths and limitations of common study designs and develop simple but important statistical analysis skills, including how to present and interpret data, basic data management skills, and how to determine the required sample size for a study. Obtaining ethics approval is necessary for any study involving the collection or analysis of data involving humans, animals or their tissues. Hence, this unit will also cover ethics in research and when and how to apply for ethics approval. These fundamental skills promote a scholarly attitude towards knowledge and understanding, and are essential for engagement with the research community.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan, Dr Erin Cvejic Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%), 1 x 1hr online test (20%) and 1x1.5hr open-book exam (50%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5120 Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Suzanne Plater Session: Semester 2 Classes: face-to-face students 5 x 1 day workshops over 12 weeks; participation assessable online students 5 x 3 days tutorials and discussions (equivalent to workshops) over 12 weeks; participation and online tutorial discussion assessable Prohibitions: PUBH5118 Assessment: workshop and online participation 15% 1 x 1000 word reflective essay 20% 1 x online multiple choice quiz 15% 1 x 3500 word report 50% Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit will significantly advance your philosophical, theoretical and practical understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and societies within the context of public health. We will use case studies grounded in diverse urban, regional and remote communities and the life experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to explore key constructs. These include transgenerational psychic trauma, racism, political structures and systems, cultural determinants, ethics, and global indigenous epistemologies. Together we will investigate the reasons why Australia has so far been unable to close the gap across almost all indicators of health and wellbeing, and explore innovative, ethical and effective solutions. Throughout this unit you will be encouraged to interact with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander academics, health professionals and community members, and your unit coordinator, tutors and fellow students, and feel confident to ask difficult questions and debate the responses. Our aim is to give you the practical and conceptual knowledge and skills necessary to work respectfully and effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples from across the nation.
Textbooks
None, readings provided
PUBH5116 Genetics and Public Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Anne Cust, Dr Gabrielle Williams Session: Intensive October Classes: 1x 2.5 day workshop Assessment: 3x 30min online quiz (15%), small group assignment (20%), in-class group debate (10%), and take home exam of 6 questions (250 words each) (50%). 5% will also be allocated to peer-assessed teamwork Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Pre-readings and some lectures will be posted on the unit's eLearning site 2-3 weeks before the course starts, and it is expected that you will look at this content before coming to the first day of the course. This will enable more time for class discussion.
This unit caters for practitioners, policy and decision-makers, students and researchers in public health, public policy, journalism, law, epidemiology, medicine, science, industry, ethics, philosophy, communication and advocacy. It gives a basic introduction to genetics and genetic epidemiology and covers issues like genetic determinants of disease, genetic testing and screening, psychosocial, legal and ethical aspects of genetics and genetic testing, genetic education and genetics and public policy.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5422 Health and Risk Communication

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Hooker, Associate Professor Julie Leask, Professor Phyllis Butow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block/intensive 2 blocks of 2 x 9-5 full days; please check with the coordinator for scheduling Assessment: Assignment 1: 1 x 2500 word (35%), Assignment 2: 1 x 2500 words or equivalent (35%), online activities (30%). Attendance at intensives is compulsory and 80% attendance is required to pass the unit of study. Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit, students learn how to communicate effectively with respect to health risks, both to individuals with health concerns, and with respect to risks to the public. The first half covers individual health risk communication in clinical settings, including: theories of health communication, patient centred care and shared decision making; evidence-based communication skills; research paradigms including interaction analysis; cross-cultural communication in health care; discussing prognosis; and informed consent. The second half explores risk communication for public health, including: how to effectively manage outbreak or other crisis situations; how to communicate about issues where the risk is low but ublic concern is high (such as with respect to the fluoridation of water); and how to best manage controversies. We teach theories of risk perception and communication with particular application to public health incident responses. We give practical guides to media messages, risk message framing, public engagement, traditional and social media, and the ethical aspects of public communication. The unit offers students the opportunity to learn from outstanding guest lecturers who work in these areas and interactive opportunities for students to try their skills in risk communication and decision making.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format). Most supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
PUBH5500 Advanced Qualitative Health Research

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers (Semester 1); Andrea Smith (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x3 full day workshop in March/April (semester 1); 2x3 full day workshops in August/September (semester 2) Prohibitions: QUAL5005 or QUAL5006 Assessment: interviewing activity with reflection (25%); 2000wd essay (25%); 2x group presentations (20%); multiple choice quizzes (20%); in-class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides a comprehensive introduction to qualitative inquiry in health. It is designed for beginners and people who want an advanced-level introduction. Over the course of the unit we will address: What is qualitative research? How is it different from quantitative research? What is its history? What research problems can it address? How do I design a qualitative study? What are the different (and best) ways to generate data? How do you analyse qualitative data? Is methodology different to method? What are ontology and epistemology? What is reflexivity (and aren't qualitative researchers biased)? What are the ethical issues? What is good quality qualitative research? Can I generalise qualitative findings? You will get practical experience and skills through carrying out an observation, participating in a focus group, conducting an interview, analysing data, arguing for qualitative research in health, and appraising the quality of published literature. In both workshops you will meet working qualitative researchers and hear about their projects. This advanced unit will show you a new way of thinking critically about research and researching, and give you the skills and confidence to begin evaluating and doing qualitative research for yourself.
SEXH5205 Adolescent Sexual Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fiona Robards, Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Fully online Assessment: Discussion board participation (30%); Case study (30%); 1500 Word essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit aims to introduce the constructs of adolescent sexuality, explore the determinants of adolescent sexual health and to discuss the personal and public health implications of adolescent sexuality from a global perspective. The main areas of learning are: adolescent sexuality, adolescent sexual health, reproductive health issues in adolescence, diversity, legal and ethical issues and sexual health promotion. Additional emphasis on a deeper exploration of an area of adolescent sexual health that is of particular interest to the student. On completion of this unit of study, students should be able to: (i) Describe the biological, developmental and socio-cultural contexts of adolescent sexual health as well as the constructs, challenges and diversities of adolescent sexuality. They will learn techniques used to optimise communication with adolescents and explore legal, ethical and public health implications of adolescent sexuality; and (ii) Understand and describe one area of adolescent sexual health that the student chooses to study in depth from a list of suggestions.
SEXH5401 Introduction: Sexual and Reproductive Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Arlie Rochford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Fully online Assessment: Discussion board participation (10%); online quizzes (20%); Group assignment (20%); 1 x 1500 word essay (20%); 1 x 2000 word essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit will cover the foundational aspects of sexual and reproductive health (SRH), including relevant anatomy and physiology, sexuality, gender, sexual orientation and behaviour. The social, medical and public health aspects of SRH will be introduced including preconception care, pregnancy, unplanned pregnancy and abortion, fertility, and contraception. Students will develop an awareness of the diversity of values, opinions and behaviours in sexual orientation.The effect of socio-economic, ethnic, religious and cultural factors and current theories of sexuality and sexual behaviours will be discussed.
The basic principles of the prevention and management of common STIs and HIV will be introduced and emphasis will be given to the sexual and reproductive health rights of all individuals as well as the importance of healthy sexuality.
Textbooks
Van Look, P., (2011). Sexual and Reproductive Health: A Public Health Perspective. 1st Ed. Elsevier: ISBN: 9780128102329
SEXH5402 Counselling for Health Professionals

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Fox, Amanda Robb Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: On-line plus blockintensive mode, 4 days, 9am-5pm Prohibitions: BIOS5071 Assessment: 1 x Group work task (25%); Online quiz (20%); 1 x 2000 Word assignment (20%); 1 x 2500 Word assignment (25%); Discussion board participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will introduce students to the microskills and basic theories of counselling in a health setting. This unit of study has two parts: an online component and a face-to-face intensive teaching block component. The intensive teaching block will include an extension of online content and provide skills development sessions. The intensive teaching block is compulsory. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: (i) Demonstrate the application of microskills to interpersonal communication, professional communication and in a counselling context; (ii) Apply basic counselling interventions in a health context; (iii) Critique the application of counselling and psychotherapy theories in health settings; (iv) Critique and discuss ethical issues in counselling; (v) Demonstrate the ability to develop a basic management plan for an individual or couple based on best available research and clinical evidence; and (vi) Develop an understanding of the self in practise.
Textbooks
Corey, Gerald (2013) Theory and Practice of Counselling and Psychotherapy. 9th Edition ISBN: 9780840028549; and McLeod, John (2013) An introduction to Counselling (e-Book). 5th edition. ISBN: 9780335247226.
SEXH5407 Sex Gender and Sexuality

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Amanda Robb Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online plus block intensive mode, 4 days, 9am-5pm Assessment: Essay (30%); Presentation (30%); Reflective essay (30%); Discussion board participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will equip students to develop a foundational knowledge and skills to work with gender and sexuality issues, including gender and sexual discourses and practices. Students will develop an understanding of sensitive practice skills to work with the LGBTIQ community. The unit will also introduce the social construction and attitudes in modern society regarding gendered violence, gendered inequality, and gender performativity. Students will be able to formulate therapeutic applications respond ethically and empathically to the specific gendered issues which present in client groups. On completion of the unit, students should be able to: (i) Have a foundational knowledge and sensitivity with gender terminology; (ii) Evaluate various sexual differences and practices within gender and sexual diverse individuals and communities; (iii) Explore the psychosocial issues surrounding gender and sexual minorities in the community; (iv) Respond to issues related gendered violence; and (v) Apply therapeutic skills and tools in response to gender and sexuality, including gender and sexual diverse individuals/communities.