Global Health

 

Global Health

Core units

Students complete 24 credit points of core units of study. Full-time students take 24 credit points of core units in Semester 1 of a given year; part-time students usually take 12 credit points in Semester 1 in each of two consecutive years. Note - students commencing enrolment in Semester 2 of a given year will need to do elective units before core units.
GLOH5101 Foundations of Global Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Seye Abimbol, Dr Giselle Manalo Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar per week for 12 weeks, 1x1day group presentations Prohibitions: MIPH5131 or MIPH5132 Assessment: 1x1500 word assignment (25%), 1x asynchronized group presentation for online and f2f students (25%), 1x2500 word assignment (40%), assessable tutorial discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This core unit for the Master of Global Health will give students insight into historical and contemporary contexts of global health and global health interventions, as well as looking at global health as a system. Students will engage critically with the essential issues of global health, including cultural relativism and ethics, equity, human rights, measuring global health, global responsibility and securitisation of health, the role of non-health entities impact on global health, and foreign aid.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
GLOH5102 Skills for Working in Global Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Bernays Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1.5-hour facilitated face to face/ online content and 2-hour tutorial/distance learning session for 12 weeks, ¿-day session student presentation (face-to-face and online) Assessment: 1x1500 word assignment (25%), 1x training session evaluation with written and oral components (1500 word equivalent) (25%), 1x2500 word assignment (40%), tutorial discussion (1000 word equivalent) (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online, Distance education
This core unit for the Master of Global Health will give students some of the practical skills for working in the field of global health. Skills developed will fall within the broad categories of Leadership, Context, Communication, and Methods. This interactive unit will both teach principles of the skills and allow students to practice and hone these skills for themselves. The content will be grounded in global health concerns and aim to equip student with the core competenices to work in this complex field.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
PUBH5010 Epidemiology Methods and Uses

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erin Mathieu, Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr tutorial per week for 13 weeks - face to face or their equivalent online Prohibitions: BSTA5011 or CEPI5100 Assessment: 1x 6 page assignment (25%), 10 weekly quizzes (5% in total) and 1x 2.5hr supervised open-book exam (70%). For distance students, it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit provides students with core skills in epidemiology, particularly the ability to critically appraise public health and clinical epidemiological research literature regarding public health and clinical issue. This unit covers: study types; measures of frequency and association; measurement bias; confounding/effect modification; randomized trials; systematic reviews; screening and test evaluation; infectious disease outbreaks; measuring public health impact and use and interpretation of population health data. In addition to formal classes or their on-line equivalent,it is expected that students spend an additional 2-3 hours at least each week preparing for their tutorials.
Textbooks
Webb, PW. Bain, CJ. and Pirozzo, SL. Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals Second Edition: Cambridge University Press 2017.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan, Dr Erin Cvejic Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%), 1 x 1hr online test (20%) and 1x1.5hr open-book exam (50%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.

Core Elective units Stream 1: Policy/System/Management

Candidates for the master's degree must choose a minimum of 6 credit points from each stream. Students who have not completed all core units should be aware of prerequisites before enrolling in electives.
GLOH5219 Global Health Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mu Li Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5 hr lecture per week for 10 weeks, 1x1 day workshop, 1x1.5 hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks, 1x1 day group presentations Prerequisites: GLOH5101 and GLOH5102 OR (PUBH5010 and PUBH5018) Assessment: 1x20 min plus 10min questions group presentation (20%), peer evaluation on group project contribution (15%), 1x4000 word group written assignment (40%), 1x 1000 word individual written assignment (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Effective health projects design and management contributes to the achievement of health and development in developing countries. The Unit aims to give students a good understanding of the concepts and key elements of project design and evaluation, and to demonstrate tools and techniques used in effective project management at different stages. A detailed step by step application of the Logical Framework Approach (LFA) in project design will be presented, including stakeholder analysis, problem and objective analysis, and the logframe matrix. The Unit also gives students an opportunity for hands-on practice through the design of a project in a global setting and allows them to consider the challenges and practical issues faced by people involved in international health project management. The key topic areas covered include: concepts and principles of global health project management; context and situation analysis; the LFA for project design; project management functions including managing information, resources, risk, quality and change; and project monitoring and evaluation. At the end of the course, students should be able to: apply a systematic approach to project planning and management in international settings, apply the key aspects of the LFA to project design; develop a project proposal; recognise challenges and practical issues faced by people involved in global health project management and incorporate those in the project proposal.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
HPOL5007 Global Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carmen Huckel Schneider, Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode 2 x 2 day workshops plus 4 tutorials (tutorials offered face-to-face or online). Online mode: pre-recorded lectures plus 4 online tutorials and week-by-week online activities and discussion. Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (35%), Tutorial discussion papers or online discussion (15%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
The aim of this unit is to equip students with the knowledge and skills to identify and articulate political and policy processes at the global level, become familiar with institutions and actors involved in global health policy, and utilize strategies for influencing policy making at the global level. We analyse the influence and power of institutions and actors in the development and implementation of global health policy, and investigate the governance of global health policy responses. Teaching makes extensive use of current case studies from recognised experts in the field. By the end of this unit students will be able to: Explain the effects of globalization on health of populations; Demonstrate how events and trends in health and non-health areas affect global health policy; Identify and classify the different types of actors/institutions that influence health policy; Undertake a policy stakeholder analysis with reference to power, influence and interests; Develop strategies to influence global health policy development and implementation; Define global health governance and its role in structuring and regulating global health policy.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London.
HPOL5001 Health Systems and Financing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor James Gillespie, Dr Carmen Huckel Schneider Session: Semester 1 Classes: online students: 12 x week by week online tasks and activities (lectures, discussion boards, quizzes, short videos, interactive readings) block mode students 2 x 2 full day workshops, plus 12 x week by week online tasks Assessment: online quiz (20%), assignment 1: 2500 word individual written report on comparative health systems analysis (40%) assignment 2: 2500 word individual written report on analysis of health finance and policy objectives (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit aims to equip students with operational knowledge of the structures and financing of health systems. The focus will be on Australia and comparable countries. However, we will also look at the particular issues around lower income and aid dependent health systems. Topics covered include funding priorities and mechanisms, the debates over the public-private mix, governance and accountability. The unit addresses questions such as: Who makes decisions about funding priorities? To whom should decision makers be held accountable and for what aspects of their work? How does health financing shape universal health coverage? By the end of this unit students will be able to: Apply a critical understanding of the basic history and features of the Australian and comparable health systems; Debate the main models and principles of health system funding, including principles of insurance, risk-pooling, equity, delivery and governance; Undertake a cross-country comparative analysis of health system features and outcomes, including low and middle income countries; Critically analyse national health budgets and funding programs; Locate finance policy in the wider context of health systems and economies.
Textbooks
Recommended: Blank, RH and Burau, V. Comparative Health Policy (5th Edition) Macmillan, 2017. (Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site)

Core Elective units Stream 2: Advanced Skills

Candidates for the master's degree must choose a minimum of 6 credit points from each stream. Students who have not completed all core units should be aware of prerequisites before enrolling in electives.
GLOH5201 Global Qualitative Health Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Bernays Session: Semester 2 Classes: ol: 12 weeks/ weekly (module) lecture: lecture+ content reading+ exemplar reading+ case study video+ individual activity bm: 9am-3.30pm x 4 days, 9am-12pm x 1 day. workshops made up of individual modules: f2f lecture + content reading + exemplar reading+ case study video+ f2f individual activity. Prohibitions: PUBH5500 or QUAL5005 or QUAL5006 or PUBH5005 Assessment: 1xinterviewing activity (35%); 1x2000-word essay (35%); 3 x multiple choice quizzes (20%); assessable tutorial discussion(10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit of study introduces you to qualitative research in a global health setting, providing you with core concepts and skills. It is designed for beginners and people who want an advanced-level introduction. Over the course of the unit we will address: What is qualitative research? How is it different from quantitative research? What is its history? What research problems can it address? How do I design a qualitative study? What are the different (and best) ways to generate data? How do you analyse qualitative data? Is methodology different to method? What are ontology and epistemology? What is reflexivity (and aren't qualitative researchers biased)? What are the ethical issues? What is good quality qualitative research? How can I use qualitative evidence in policy or practice? You will get practical experience and skills through carrying out an observation, participating in a focus group, conducting an interview, analysing data, arguing for qualitative research in health, and appraising the quality of published literature. You will hear from working qualitative researchers about how they use qualitative methods in their work. This unit will give you the skills and confidence to begin conducting and using qualitative research.
PUBH5224 Advanced Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly classes (combined lectures and tutorials) for 13 weeks. Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment or equivalent class presentation (30%); 1x 4000 word assignment (or equivalent answers to specific methodological questions) (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is intended for students who have completed Epidemiology Methods and Uses (or an equivalent unit of study) at a credit or higher level. It is designed to extend students' practical and theoretical knowledge of epidemiology beyond basic principles, provide students with an opportunity to consolidate critical appraisal skills and to acquire some of the practical knowledge and skills needed to design epidemiological research.
PUBH5217 Regression Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erin Cvejic, Dr Kevin McGeechan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lec and 2hrs tuts / pracs per wk for 13wks Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Prohibitions: (PUBH5211 or PUBH5212 or PUBH5213) Assessment: 1x 4pg data analysis assignment (equivalent to 1200wds) (25%) and 10x online quizzes (15%) and 1x 10pg data analysis assignment (equivalent to 3000wds) (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: The statistical software package used in this unit is web-based. There is no cost/fee to use this software. Course notes will be provided, along with links to additional readings through the library.
In this unit, you will learn how to select and apply the appropriate regression modelling techniques for continuous, categorical, and time-to-event outcome data. Building on the skills developed in PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics, this unit will teach you how to compare two or more groups, incorporate several explanatory variables into a regression model, identify and adjust for confounders, test for effect modification, calculate adjusted effect estimates, conduct appropriate model checking, build the 'best' regression model, and interpret the results of a model. You will gain practical experience in fitting multiple linear regression, logistic regression, and proportional hazards (survival) models using the statistical software package SAS. This unit serves as a prerequisite for an advanced unit of study in biostatistics (CEPI5310 Advanced Statistical Modelling).
Textbooks
Course notes are provided, along with links to additional readings through the library.
PUBH5317 Decision modelling for economic evaluation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kirsten Howard and A/Prof Andrew Martin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1 day workshops plus 1 x 2 day workshop Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Corequisites: PUBH5312 Prohibitions: PUBH5205 PUBH5307 Assessment: completion of in class practicals (10%) 2 x in-class quizzes (30%) 2 x assignments (60% - 2 x 30%) (2 x 2000 word written assignments) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit combines decision theory and more advanced health economic concepts to provide students with hands-on skills in specialised analysis methods, and modelling techniques, for evaluating healthcare options and reaching recommendations in the face of uncertainty. Students will calculate and analyse data from clinical studies, extrapolate clinical study results to other settings, and construct models that synthesise evidence (and expert opinion) from multiple sources. Specific topics of study include: decision trees; expected utility theory; sensitivity and threshold analysis; the value of information (including screening and diagnostic tests); the calculation and analysis of costs and quality-adjusted survival using individual patient data (including bootstrapping techniques); Markov processes and micro-simulation; and presenting and interpreting the results of (health economic) evaluations. Lectures are accompanied by practical exercises and readings. Students gain experience applying the methods presented in lectures via computer practicals using Excel and decision analysis software (TreeAge).
Textbooks
Reading materials are provided

Elective units

GLOH5115 Women's and Children's Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Camille Raynes-Greenow Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1.5-2hr lecture per week for 12 weeks, 1x1hr tutorial per week for 10 weeks Prohibitions: MIPH5115 Assessment: 1x2500 word assignment (40%), 1x 8 pages group written report (30%), peer-evaluation of group work contribution (10%), assessable tutorial discussion and facilitation (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit gives an introduction to the health status of women and children in low and middle income countries and highlights the interconnectedness of women's and children's health, and why it is important to understand women and children's health. It presents some of the major causes of mortality and morbidity and interventions and approaches to improving outcomes from a public health perspective. We discuss case studies, and how public health can address these problems. Each week an expert describes a different topic and discusses their field experiences
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
GLOH5136 Nutrition in Global Settings

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Michael Dibley Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr interactive learning sessions (summary of main points in learning materials plus exercises or discussion tasks) per week for 10 weeks, which for ol students will be self-paced online discussions; plus 2x0.5 day workshops, which for ol students will be self-paced online discussions using the materials presented to nd students. Assumed knowledge: Introductory knowledge of epidemiology Assessment: 1x2500wd nutrition assessment submission (30%), 1x3500wd nutrition intervention design submission (60%), assessable discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit aims to provide students with insights into the major nutrition-related public health problems in low- and middle-income countries; knowledge and practical skills about nutritional assessment; and the design and evaluation of nutritional interventions. The content areas include an overview of nutrition as a major determinant of health and disease; methods to assess community nutritional status; the impact of maternal and child under-nutrition on mortality and overall disease burden; design and evaluation of effective interventions; issues surrounding food security; agriculture and nutrition; and nutrition policies and resources. The unit has two major segments with the first focusing on nutritional assessment and major nutrition-related public health problems in low- and middle-income countries, and the second focusing on design and evaluation of interventions. On completion, students should be able to recognise key nutritional problems facing low- and middle-income countries; have acquired knowledge and practical skills as to how to assess these problems, and have gained insights into different multi-sectoral approaches to address these problems.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
GLOH5112 Global Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne, Ms Kerri Anton Session: Semester 2 Classes: face to face students: 13x1.5hr lecture and 11x1.5hr tutorial, 1x4hr workshop and 1x8hr presentation online students: 13x1.5hr online lecture and 11 weeks of tutorial discussion, 4hr online workshop content and 8hr online presentation content Assessment: 1x3000 word written essay (50%) tutorial facilitation and participation (20%) -face-to-face students will each facilitate a 1.5hr tutorial session -online students will each facilitate a 1-week online discussion board 1 x student group presentation (25%) -face-to-face student groups will give a 30-min oral presentation (accompanied by a powerpoint) -online student groups will upload a 30-min powerpoint presentation peer evaluation of student presentation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit gives candidates essential knowledge of prevention and control of communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries using country-specific examples. After successfully completing this unit of study, candidates will understand the key issues in communicable diseases and their control in developing countries, as well as gain the knowledge and insight on how prevention and control mechanisms and programs are developed for these diseases in resource-poor settings. The unit covers disease emergence, respiratory tract infections (including TB), vector-borne infections, food- and water-borne infections, neurological infections, neglected tropical diseases, bloodborne and sexually transmitted infections (including HIV) and drug-resistant infections.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
GLOH5124 Humanitarian Crises and Refugee Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Lyndal Trevena, Mrs Priyanthi Abeyratne Session: Intensive October Classes: 15 hours of online lectures and interactive tasks as preparation followed by 4 consecutive days of workshops from October 28th 2019 to 1st November 2019 including a tabletop simulation exercise which is part of the assessment. Prohibitions: MIPH5124 Assessment: reflective writing task - 750 words (10%), simulation performance score (40%), assessable discussion (10%) and assignment - 2500 word- (40%) Mode of delivery: Online, Block mode
This unit gives students an overview of global health aspects of forced migration and humanitarian emergencies. This includes considering problems faced by government and non-government organisations in humanitarian emergency relief efforts as well as the increasing pressures of forced migration resulting from these. Topics covered in the unit include international and human rights law, the role of donor agencies, refugee health, nutritional emergencies, site planning for refugee camps, water and sanitation, sexual violence, protection of vulnerable groups, and communicable disease surveillance and control.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
PUBH5019 Cancer Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Jane Young Session: Semester 2 Classes: 10 x online modules (each comprising online lectures, readings, quiz), approx. 4 hours per week x 10 weeks, 4 x online group interactions (1 x peer assessment and 3 x online discussions) approx. 2 hours per session for preparation and posting. Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Assessment: 10 x online quizzes (10%); 1 x 1200-word individual written assignment ¿ critical appraisal task (20%); 1 x peer assessment exercise (5%); 1 x 400-word written assignment + anonymous peer assessment of each other's work based on pre-determined criteria. Final mark will be the median of all the peer marks. (10%); participation in 3 x online discussions (15%); 1 x 2500 word individual written assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces students to the concepts, methods and applications underpinning cancer prevention and control at population level. It is designed to a offer a broad-based perspective on public health approaches to cancer control across the continuum from prevention through diagnosis, screening, treatment, survivorship and palliative and supportive care. We will critically appraise policies and interventions that have potential to reduce cancer incidence and mortality, prolong survival and improve quality of life. Although each topic will be presented in the context of specific cancers and the Australian health care system, the principles and frameworks will be relevant for regional and global cancer control efforts. At the completion of the unit, students will be equipped with the basic tools to design, plan, implement and evaluate cancer control strategies and programs.
Textbooks
Elwood JM, Sutcliffe SB (Eds). Cancer Control. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010 (pp1-469)
PUBH5020 Chronic Disease Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Adrian Bauman Session: Semester 1 Classes: 20 hrs online lectures; 16 hrs online discussions Assumed knowledge: PUBH5033, PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 or equivalent Assessment: 1000 word assignment (20%), 2000 word assignment (40%), on-line discussions (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: PUBH5020 is an advanced MPH elective, and some epidemiological concepts, such as population attributable risk are expected knowledge for understanding the Burden of Disease concept, that is important in NCD (chronic disease) prevention, and is part of Module 2 of this unit. In addition, this MPH elective predominantly takes a population and global perspective on NCD prevention, rather than a clinical or health services perspective
This course offers a public health approach to examining the global issue of chronic diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, chronic lung disease) and their prevention. The course examines why chronic disease is a global problem, and describes WHO frameworks for chronic disease prevention. It also reviews the epidemiology of specific chronic diseases including trends in and surveillance of these conditions, and the global (and country level) burden of disease. Teaching will focus on clinical prevention, in particular, the role of primary care, other clinicians and allied health professionals in providing lifestyle advice for people with chronic disease (tertiary prevention) and for people without chronic disease (primary prevention). Students will be involved in evaluating the effectiveness of different prevention strategies and will examine the role of health policy and strategic planning in developing effective and sustainable chronic disease management programs and health services in different settings (in Australia and the region).
Textbooks
Readings for this unit will be available on the eLearning site
PUBH5033 Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Philayrath Phongsavan, James Kite Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 half-day workshops, 9 face-to-face tutorials or online discussion; fully online version available Assessment: 1x1500 word assignment (25%); 1 presentation (15%); 1 x 2500 word assignment (50%); tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This core unit of study introduces students to evidence-based health promotion as a fundamental approach to promoting and improving health and well being, preventing disease and reducing health inequalities in populations. The unit is divided into three modules: (i) the building blocks of disease prevention and health promotion, (ii) using evidence to develop disease prevention and health promotion interventions, and (iii) evaluating disease prevention and health promotion programs to inform policy and practice. This unit will give students an understanding of disease prevention and health promotion and their relationship to public health, introduce design, implementation, and evaluation of disease prevention and health promotion interventions, and develop and refine students' research, critical appraisal, and communication skills.
Textbooks
Course Readings Provided
PUBH5422 Health and Risk Communication

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Hooker, Associate Professor Julie Leask, Professor Phyllis Butow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block/intensive 2 blocks of 2 x 9-5 full days; please check with the coordinator for scheduling Assessment: Assignment 1: 1 x 2500 word (35%), Assignment 2: 1 x 2500 words or equivalent (35%), online activities (30%). Attendance at intensives is compulsory and 80% attendance is required to pass the unit of study. Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit, students learn how to communicate effectively with respect to health risks, both to individuals with health concerns, and with respect to risks to the public. The first half covers individual health risk communication in clinical settings, including: theories of health communication, patient centred care and shared decision making; evidence-based communication skills; research paradigms including interaction analysis; cross-cultural communication in health care; discussing prognosis; and informed consent. The second half explores risk communication for public health, including: how to effectively manage outbreak or other crisis situations; how to communicate about issues where the risk is low but ublic concern is high (such as with respect to the fluoridation of water); and how to best manage controversies. We teach theories of risk perception and communication with particular application to public health incident responses. We give practical guides to media messages, risk message framing, public engagement, traditional and social media, and the ethical aspects of public communication. The unit offers students the opportunity to learn from outstanding guest lecturers who work in these areas and interactive opportunities for students to try their skills in risk communication and decision making.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format). Most supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
PUBH5551 Climate Change and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ying Zhang, Melody Ding Session: Semester 2 Classes: For face to face students - block workshops and tutorials (1 x 2 days early semester + 1 x 2 days late semester); for online students - recorded seminars and online tutorials (1 x 1 week early semester + 1 x 1 week late semester) Assessment: 1x 1500 word annotated climate change bibliography - individual assignment (30%) 1x quiz - equivalent to 1000 words (20%) 1x 3500 word essay - individual assignment (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
The unit presents critical views of climate change and the ways in which it interacts with human behaviour and population health from various disciplines, e. g. planetary health, international environmental governance and law, environmental economics, urban planning and environmental and social injustice. It addresses major public health risks associated with climate change and extremes, e. g. infectious disease, nutrition, cardiovascular disease, mental health, and indigenous health, in a broader concept of sustainability and global change. Scenarios with regards to responses to climate change, including adaptation and mitigation, will be introduced to build community resilience. This unit will provide both Australian and international perspectives on climate change and health, supported by theoretical and empirical research in both developed and developing countries.
Textbooks
None, readings will be provided
PUBH5600 Biosecurity Seminar Series

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Walsh; Dr Gabriella Scandurra Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 2-hr lectures plus 8 x 1-hr seminar/tutorial plus 18-hrs online curated content requiring student responses Prerequisites: CISS6004 or GOVT6316 or MECO6909 or WORK6130 or unit of study coordinator permission. Assessment: 1 x 2500wd detailed assignment plus 3 x 1000wd written policy briefs plus seminar participation and online responses Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the capstone unit for the Master of Health Security. The unit is designed to bring together the knowledge achieved throughout the degree for students to use critical thinking and leadership skills to solve global health security issues presented to them. The unit will consist of a series of eight lectures and seminars that will present students with complex health security issues. Students will then critically evaluate the human and animal, biosafety and biodefense, and agrosecurity perspectives to understand how they are interconnected and appreciate the difficulty in realistically and appropriately solving these issues.
BETH5203 Ethics and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x7hour intensives; or Distance Education (online). Prohibitions: BETH5206 Assessment: 5xOnline Quiz (50%); 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit provides students with an overview of the ethical and political issues that underlie public health and public health research. The unit begins with some fundamentals: the nature of ethics, of public health (and how it might be different to clinical medicine) and of public health ethics. It introduces key concepts in public health ethics including liberty, utility, justice, solidarity and reciprocity, and introduces students to different ways of reasoning about the ethics of public health. A range of practical public health problems and issues will be considered, including ethical dimensions of communicable and non-communicable diseases in populations, and the ethical challenges of public health research. Throughout, the emphasis is on learning to make sound arguments about the ethical aspects of public health policy, practice and research. Most learning occurs in the context of five teaching intensives, which are highly interactive and focus on the development and application of reasoning skills.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format).