Pharmacy

Pharmacy

Students must complete a prescribed course of 96 credit points of units of study set out below.

Year 1

PHAR5711 Introductory Professional Practice

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Betty Chaar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Assumed knowledge: 3 credit points of Statistics, 12 credit points of Pharmacology, 12 credit points of Physiology. Assessment: MASUS assignment (S/U), tutorial and workshop participation (20%), group presentation (10%), interprofessional workshop reflective piece (5%), final oral exam (30%), 1.5hr final written exam (35%). Satisfactory performance in the Readiness to Practice quiz for experiential placement. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Introductory Professional Practice is a broad introduction to the discipline of pharmacy, the roles that pharmacists play in health care and the ideas, issues, skills and knowledge base required of a professional pharmacist.
This unit of study introduces students to concepts that underpin disease states management, including those which are managed directly by the pharmacist as a primary care provider, together with foundational communication skills and knowledge which equip students for clinical decision-making and problem-solving. The place of pharmacy within the Australian health care system is explored and basic principles of interprofessional learning are also included. In addition, students will be introduced to technical skills used in pharmacy such as dispensing and compounding. Lectures are supported by online material, tutorial and laboratory classes, which allow students to practice and apply skills and knowledge. Themes of evidence based practice, drug information, ethics, clinical reasoning and intervention and communication skills run throughout. Learning gained in this unit prepares students for clinical placements and later units of study, which will build on both the skills and clinical topics covered in this unit.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary Handbook - Ed 23 (or the latest edition)
PHAR5712 Pharmaceutical Microbiology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hien Duong Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x3hr practicals (3 weeks) Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry, 12 credit points of Pharmacology, 12 credit points of Physiology. Assessment: 1.5hr final exam (60%), microbiology lab attendance and participation (2%), microbiology lab report (5%), online quizzes and pre-lab tasks (8%), antibiotic resistance workshop presentation (15%), antibiotic stewardship workshop assignment (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide knowledge on the role of micro-organisms in pharmacy and the pharmaceutical sciences. It applies basic microbiological principles to the production of clean and sterile pharmaceutical products in both community and hospital pharmacy, and in industrial manufacture, and antimicrobial therapies. Topics include the structure, function and importance of the major groups of micro-organisms; host defence mechanisms; pathogenicity and epidemiology of infectious diseases; disinfectants; preservatives; antiseptics; antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, and antimicrobial stewardship; principles and methods of sterilisation, aseptic preparation and techniques; cleanroom technology and good manufacturing practice (GMP).
Textbooks
Recommended Texts: Denyer S., Stephen P. (2011). Hugo And Russell's Pharmaceutical Microbiology (8th ed) Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell
PHAR5713 Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Balle Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 4x2hr tutorials, 2x4hr labs, 4x4hr workshops Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry, 12 credit points of Pharmacology, 12 credit points of Physiology. Assessment: 3hr final exam (60%); Lab report and presentation (20%); Molecular Modeling Reports - Report 1 (5%) and Report 2 (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the early phases of the drug discovery process from identification of a biological target molecule (enzyme or receptor) to identification of lead molecules and how chemical synthesis and biological screening is applied to develop lead molecules into drugs with desired molecular properties. Topics include drug discovery, protein structure and function, protein structure determination, drug synthesis, spectroscopic analysis, functional groups, molecular properties, molecular modelling, structure based drug design, drug screening. Students will also gain experience in a variety of experimental techniques related to drug design. In addition, students will develop skills including critical thinking, the use of information technology and report writing.
Textbooks
Patrick, GL (2017). An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry (6th ed). Oxford University Press
PHAR5714 Pharmaceutics and Formulations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Veysel Kayser Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week, 2x4hr tabletting practicals, 5x3hr physical chemistry practicals and 3x2.5hr compounding practicals Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry, 12 credit points of Pharmacology, 12 credit points of Physiology. Assessment: 2hr final exam (55%), mid semester quiz (10%) and laboratory practicals (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study students learn to evaluate the physicochemical principles, design, formulation, and manufacture of pharmaceutical dose forms. The formulation of liquid dose forms including parenteral, nasal, ophthalmic and aural products is discussed. Related topics such as diffusion and dissolution of drugs, drug solubilisation, surface and interfacial tension, surface active materials, micelle formation, pharmaceutical complexes and drug-packaging interactions are covered. Other topics covered in this unit include biomaterials; solid dose forms and particle science that comprise tableting and capsule technology; rheology, freezing point depression, osmosis, dispersion dose forms including suspensions, colloidal dispersions, and emulsions; topical dose forms and semisolids; inhalation pharmaceutical aerosols; biopharmaceuticals including protein and peptide drugs, vaccines and their formulations; rectal products; novel drug delivery technologies. Aspects pertaining to the stability of dose forms are also presented in this unit.
Textbooks
Aulton, M.E. (1988). Pharmaceutics: The Science of Dosage Form Design (7th ed). Churchill Livingston
PHAR5715 Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fanfan Zhou Session: Semester 2a Classes: 3x4hr lectures/week, 2x3hr workshops/week Assumed knowledge: 3 credit points of Calculus, 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry. Assessment: Workshop quiz (20%), Mid-term quiz (20%) and 2hr final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is intended to provide an understanding of drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenetics, and the clinical application of these concepts to support the safe and effective use of medicines. Lecture topics will include metabolic enzymes and pathways, identification of metabolites, pharmacokinetics, drug absorption and distribution, protein binding and bioavailability.
These fundamental areas of knowledge start with an understanding of the relationship between drugs interacting with target sites in the body and the effect produced (i.e. pharmacodynamic principles) and understanding the physiological and physicochemical factors that govern the effect of the body on drugs (metabolism), the movement of drugs around the body and the time course of exposure of body tissues and blood to drugs (i.e. pharmacokinetics). These principles involve developing concepts and models to explain drug activity in patients and to guide appropriate drug dosage selection. This unit will also explore reasons behind the factors affecting drug efficacy and variability in response to medicines among different individuals. The effects of disease, other drugs, demographics and the genetic basis for variable response will be introduced. Basic pharmacogenetic principles for explaining and predicting pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic variability in response will be explored.
Textbooks
Shargel, Wu-Pong and Yu (2012). Applied Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics
PHAR5716 Integrated Primary Healthcare 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Tina Xu Ung Session: Semester 2b Classes: 5x1hr lectures/week, 1x3hr workshop/week, 3x3hr labs/semester Assumed knowledge: 3 credit points of Calculus, 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry. Assessment: 2hr exam (50%), dispensing activities (S/U), oral exam (30%), participation in workshops (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies, with a focus on OTC medications. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. These cases will also exemplify the population diversity at the pharmacy interface and will help students gain skills in counselling or making therapeutic decisions for a range of diverse population scenarios. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders. This units will also explore interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge required to implement pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review. Students will become familiar with drug information software and computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will help students to develop the language and non-verbal skills pharmacists need to communicate effectively with patients, doctors, and other health care professionals.
Textbooks
Walker, R. and Whittlesea, C. (2012). Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics (5th Ed)
PHAR5717 Integrated Primary Healthcare 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Hibbs Session: Semester 2b Classes: 5x1hr lectures/week, 1x3hr workshop/week Assumed knowledge: 3 credit points of Calculus, 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry. Assessment: 2hr final written exam (50%), oral exam (30%), workshop participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on medicines available over the counter (OTC), or prescribed, for therapeutic use in a number of common disorders affecting the musculoskeletal, dermatological, special senses, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems. The pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies will be covered. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of these disorders. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with these disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a multitude of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will help students to develop the language and non-verbal skills pharmacists need to communicate effectively with patients, doctors, and other health care professionals. This unit of study complements the practical experiences undertaken during experiential placements.
Textbooks
Walker, R and Whittlesea, C. (2012). Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics (5th ed)
PHAR5718 Experiential Placement 1A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Ong Session: Intensive July Classes: 1x1hr placement debrief Assessment: Preceptor evaluation (50%) and e-Portfolio (50%). Practical field work: Approximately 80 hours of experiential placements. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney and as set by the faculty prior to commencing this unit of study. Students who have not met verification requirements will not be eligible to attend placements or participate in this unit of study. Students must have successfully passed the Readiness to Practice quiz (scheduled during semester 1) to be eligible to attend placements.
Experiential Placement 1A is the first of a series of three units of study where students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings.
The overall objectives of the experiential placements program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the experiential placements program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus debriefing sessions. Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (latest edition)
PHAR5719 Experiential Placement 1B

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Ong Session: Intensive December Classes: 1x1hr briefing session, 1x1hr debrief session Prerequisites: PHAR5718 Assessment: Preceptor evaluation (50%) and e-Portfolio (50%) Practical field work: Approximately 160 hours of experiential placements Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney and as set by the faculty prior to commencing this unit of study. Students who have not met verification requirements will not be eligible to attend their placement.
Experiential Placement 1B is a continuation of Experiential Placement 1A where students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings.
The overall objectives of the experiential placements program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the experiential placements program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus briefing and debriefing sessions. Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (latest edition)

Year 2

PHAR5721 Neurology and Mental Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire O'Reilly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x4hr lecture/wk, 1x3hr workshop/wk Prerequisites: PHAR5711, PHAR5712, PHAR5713, PHAR5714, PHAR5715, PHAR5716, PHAR5717, PHAR5718 Corequisites: PHAR5722, PHAR5723 Assessment: 2hr written exam (50%), OSCE (30%) and workshop participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of neurology and mental health including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of neurology and mental health. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with neurology and mental health disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a number of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will be used to develop students' communication skills for interaction between pharmacists and their clients (patients, doctors, other health professionals).
Textbooks
Walker, R and Whittlesea, C. (2012). Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics (5th ed)
PHAR5722 Endocrine, Renal and Cardiovascular

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Betty Chaar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x4hr lecture/week, 1x3hr workshop/week Prerequisites: PHAR5711, PHAR5712, PHAR5713, PHAR5714, PHAR5715, PHAR5716, PHAR5717, PHAR5718 Corequisites: PHAR5721, PHAR5723 Assessment: 2hr written exam (50%), compounding practicals and exam (S/U), pharmaceutical calculations quiz (S/U), OSCE (30%), workshop participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of endocrine, renal and cardiovascular disorders including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of endocrine, renal and cardiovascular disorders. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with endocrine, renal and cardiovascular disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a number of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will be used to develop students' communication skills for interaction between pharmacists and their clients (patients, doctors, other health professionals).
Textbooks
Walker, R. and Whittlesea, C. (2012). Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics (5th Ed)
PHAR5723 Immunology and Cancer

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rebecca Roubin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x4hr lecture/wk, 1x3hr workshop/wk, 4x3hr compounding practicals Prerequisites: PHAR5711, PHAR5712, PHAR5713, PHAR5714, PHAR5715, PHAR5716, PHAR5717, PHAR5718 Corequisites: PHAR5721, PHAR5722 Assessment: 2hr written exam (50%), OSCE (30%), workshop participation (20%), compounding exam (S/U), pharmaceutical calculations quiz (S/U) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of immunology and cancer including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of immunology and cancer. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with cancer and immunological disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a number of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will be used to develop students' communication skills for interaction between pharmacists and their clients (patients, doctors, other health professionals).
Textbooks
Walker, R. and Whittlesea, C. (2012). Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics (5th Ed)
PHAR5724 Experiential Placement 2

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jo-anne Brien Session: Intensive July Classes: 1x1hr briefing session, 1x1hr debrief session Prerequisites: PHAR5718, PHAR5719 Assessment: Preceptor evaluation (50%) and portfolio (50%) Practical field work: Approximately 140 hours of experiential placements Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney and as set by the faculty prior to commencing this unit of study. Students who have not met verification requirements will not be permitted to undertake the unit of study.
Experiential Placement 2 is a continuation of Experiential Placement 1A and 1B where students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings. The overall objectives of the experiential placements program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours. Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the experiential placements program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus briefing and debriefing sessions. Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors and their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (latest edition)
PHAR5725 Public Health and Pharmaceutical Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Barbara Mintzes Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr lectures/week, 1x3hr workshop/week Prerequisites: PHAR5711, PHAR5712, PHAR5713, PHAR5714, PHAR5715, PHAR5716, PHAR5717 Corequisites: PHAR5726, PHAR5727, PHAR5728 Assessment: Final exam (50%), group assignment/presentation (40%), workshop participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on developing students' understanding of public health and the health care system, including the role of pharmacy, health policy and regulation affecting health in Australia and internationally. Students will develop skills in identifying, accessing and interpreting relevant policy, regulation and literature. Topics which underpin understanding of public health including epidemiology/pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacoeconomics will also be addressed. Through workshops and assignments, students will be given the opportunity to integrate their learning and apply this knowledge to address population health care problems with a special emphasis on achieving the quality, safety and judicious use of medicines in health care.
Textbooks
Kue Young, T. (2004). Population Health: Concepts and Methods (2nd ed). Oxford University Press
PHAR5726 Dispensing Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Irene Um Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 3x2hr labs Prerequisites: PHAR5711, PHAR5712, PHAR5713, PHAR5714, PHAR5715, PHAR5716, PHAR5717 Corequisites: PHAR5725, PHAR5727, PHAR5728 Assessment: Students must achieve satisfactory performance in each component of this unit of study (continuous weekly assessments, forensic exam). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study consolidates and brings together the skills and knowledge that students have developed in previous units from year one to semester 1 of year two of the curriculum. The emphasis is on clinical practice and develops the theme that providing medicines is not a single event but a process. Students will dispense or prescribe medicines (including prescription, non-prescription and compounded medicines), assess clinical appropriateness, ensure appropriate legislative requirements are met, provide primary care and promote judicious use of medicines, liaise with prescribers to recommend any changes in the treatment regimen, and communicate effectively. This is achieved using a simulated practice environment. The unit of study is Pass/Fail.
Textbooks
Current Australian Medicines Handbook
PHAR5727 Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jocelyn Bussing Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr lectures/wk, 2x2hr workshops/wk, special workshops and inter-professional learning activities Prerequisites: PHAR5711, PHAR5712, PHAR5713, PHAR5714, PHAR5715, PHAR5716, PHAR5717 Corequisites: PHAR5725, PHAR5726, PHAR5728 Assessment: Medication Review (30%), Simulated cases (30%), Community health project (30%), IPL activity (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study consolidates previous units from the entire Master of Pharmacy curriculum through the presentation and solving of clinical and ethical problems. It has a focus on knowledge application in a simulated pharmacy workplace and includes professional services including disease state management. Case based role-plays will be used to develop students' communication and clinical skills for future interactions with patients, doctors, other health professionals and pharmacy colleagues. The unit consists of lectures, on-line learning and simulated case-based competency assessment and learning.
PHAR5728 Pharmacy Capstone

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Hibbs Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture, 6x2hr sessions for project work Prerequisites: PHAR5711, PHAR5712, PHAR5713, PHAR5714, PHAR5715, PHAR5716, PHAR5717, PHAR5718, PHAR5719 Corequisites: PHAR5725, PHAR5726, PHAR5727 Assessment: Oral presentation (40%), critical reflection (25%), peer assessment of presentation (20%), peer assessment of participation and contribution to project (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides students with an opportunity to draw together learning from across the entire MPharm degree and synthesise this with their prior knowledge and experience, developing ideas for further studies and intellectual and/or professional growth in their practice. Students will work in teams to undertake a project that reflects the interests of the team members. Projects can range from mini-research projects to undertaking a series of medication management reviews or developing an educational program for use in pharmacy. This unit will offer students an opportunity to critically evaluate their existing practice and provision, and gain skills to promote change, improve services and affect outcomes in their patients. Outcomes will be assessed by presentations at a student seminar day at the end of semester.