Pharmacy Practice

Pharmacy Practice

Graduate Certificate in Pharmacy Practice

Students must complete 24 credit points, comprising:
(i) Core units and electives
(a) students who hold current pharmacist practitioner registration must complete four elective units, which must not include PHAR7111 or PHAR7121 (Intern Training Program)
(b) students who are eligible to undertake the Intern Training Program must complete PHAR7111 and PHAR7121 plus two elective units.

Intern training program

PHAR7111 Pharmacy Intern Training A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Irene Um Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2-day seminar series for face-to-face teaching and learning, four moderated online discussion blocks, and continuous self-directed learning. Assessment: Satisfactory completion of learning portfolio activities, intern competencies assessments and continuing professional development requirements. Satisfactory contribution to online discussion groups. Satisfactory mark in multiple choice quiz. Attendance and satisfactory participation during small group tutorials and other seminar activities (100%). Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Current provisional pharmacist registration is a requirement of the unit, together with employment in a workplace approved by the Pharmacy Board of Australia.
Pharmacy Intern Training A is designed to be undertaken by pharmacy interns undertaking supervised professional practice while working towards general registration as a pharmacist, and is intended to complement the learning which occurs in the workplace. It further develops the technical, clinical, personal and professional skills gained during the completion of an initial pharmacy degree that form the basis of future practice. This unit of study uses multiple methods of delivery to explore the range of issues that are relevant to the day-to-day practice of pharmacy. The issues include: systematic approach to problem solving; therapeutics; evidence based practice; patient monitoring; symptomology; patient outcomes; methods of improving adherence; multiple medication management; pharmaceutical care; standards and competencies for pharmacy practice; community pharmacy practice; hospital pharmacy practice; ethics; legal aspects; multidisciplinary approach to healthcare; primary care; over- the-counter medicines; communication and counselling; public health; pharmaceutical calculations; risk management; developing professional communication skills with patients, employees and other health care practitioners. This unit of study comprises monthly case problems related to specific practice issues which explore relevant professional issues for pharmacy practitioners. Moderated discussion forums in small groups explore the relevant issues around the case problem each month. Face to face seminars offer opportunities to refine expertise in evidence based practice, professional competencies, communication and counselling and specific aspects of ethical, legal and clinical pharmacy. Emphasis is given to problem-solving, communication and responding to symptoms. Scenarios where legal, social and workplace issues come into play are included. The syllabus is orientated to issues that arise in the day-to-day practice of pharmacy and to the requirements for general registration as a pharmacist in Australia. Pharmacy graduates undertaking their intern experience in community pharmacy will be exposed to issues relevant to hospital pharmacy, and vice versa. This unit of study will develop graduates' independence and life-long learning skills of communication, capacity for enquiry and research, critical thought and analysis, problem solving, teamwork, numeracy and effective use of information technology.
PHAR7121 Pharmacy Intern Training B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Irene Um Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 2-day seminars series for face-to-face teaching and learning, three moderated online discussion blocks, and continuous self-directed learning. Assessment: Satisfactory completion of learning portfolio activities, intern competencies assessments and continuing professional development requirements. Satisfactory contribution to online discussion groups. Completion of forensic quiz. Attendance and satisfactory participation during small group tutorials and other seminars activities. (100%). Practical field work: Some activities to be completed in the workplace. Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Current provisional pharmacist registration is a requirement of the unit, together with employment in a workplace approved by the Pharmacy Board of Australia.
Pharmacy Intern Training B is designed to be undertaken by pharmacy interns undertaking supervised professional practice while working towards general registration as a pharmacist, and is intended to complement the learning which occurs in the workplace. It further develops the technical, clinical, personal and professional skills gained during the completion of an initial pharmacy degree that form the basis of future practice. This unit of study uses multiple methods of delivery to explore the range of issues that are relevant to the day-to-day practice of pharmacy. The issues include: systematic approach to problem solving; therapeutics; evidence based practice; patient monitoring; symptomology; patient outcomes; methods of improving adherence; multiple medication management; pharmaceutical care; standards and competencies for pharmacy practice; community pharmacy practice; hospital pharmacy practice; ethics; legal aspects; multidisciplinary approach to healthcare; primary care; over- the-counter medicines; communication and counselling; public health; pharmaceutical calculations; risk management; developing professional communication skills with patients, employees and other health care practitioners. This unit of study comprises monthly case problems related to specific practice issues which explore relevant professional issues for pharmacy practitioners. Moderated discussion forums in small groups explore the relevant issues around the case problem each month. Face to face seminars offer opportunities to refine expertise in evidence based practice, professional competencies, communication and counselling and specific aspects of ethical, legal and clinical pharmacy. Emphasis is given to problem-solving, communication and responding to symptoms. Scenarios where legal, social and workplace issues come into play are included. The syllabus is orientated to issues that arise in the day-to-day practice of pharmacy and to the requirements for general registration as a pharmacist in Australia. Pharmacy graduates undertaking their intern experience in community pharmacy will be exposed to issues relevant to hospital pharmacy, and vice versa. This unit of study will develop graduates' independence and life-long learning skills of communication, capacity for enquiry and research, critical thought and analysis, problem solving, teamwork, numeracy and effective use of information technology.

Electives

PHAR7112 Medications Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lisa Kouladjian-O'Donnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Classes will be delivered through on-line reading and discussions, webinars, case studies and practice based experiences. Assessment: online webinar participation (12%), learning module activities (42%), medication review assignments (46%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: PHAR7112: Medications Management is accredited for Stage One (preparatory) Training with the Australian Association of Consultant Pharmacy. On satisfactory completion of this unit of study, students will be able to proceed to Stage 2 Accreditation Assessment Process for the delivery of medication management reviews to community-based individuals and residents of aged care facilities. See https://www.aacp.com.au for details.
This unit of study aims to develop an in-depth understanding and advanced skills in fulfilling the role of pharmacists in medication management for older people. The course readings cover the following content areas: Epidemiology of common health problems affecting older people; physiological changes associated with ageing and their implications for therapeutic response and medicines management; health promotion and disease prevention (with emphasis on pharmacological interventions designed to reduce mortality and chronic disease); management of common chronic diseases of older people; and medication management in hospitals and the community. Skills development will focus on communication with patients; pharmacist, physician, and allied-health inter-professional communication; preparation of medication reviews; and home/residential aged-care facility visits.
Textbooks
Current versions of AMH and AMH Aged-Care Companion
PHAR7123 Diabetes Mellitus

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kate Ziser Session: Semester 1 Classes: Self-directed learning modules, workplace based assessment tasks, and online webinars. Assessment: online webinar participation (26%), learning module activities (40%), diabetes devices assignment (10%), documentation of advanced diabetes patient care (14%), reflective diary (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study is intended to develop a clear understanding of the role of pharmacists in the care of patients with diabetes mellitus and the knowledge and skills needed to provide comprehensive pharmaceutical care to this growing section of the Australian population. More specifically, the unit seeks to provide an in-depth understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of the regulation of glucose metabolism; aetiology, treatment and monitoring of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological management; psychosocial issues in diabetes; management and prevention of co-morbidities and complications and public health approaches to the prevention of diabetes. It aims to develop pharmacists' skills in interpretation of relevant clinical and laboratory tests and patterns of blood glucose; supporting patient self-management through advice on appropriate use of blood glucose meters, insulin pens, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), medication regimen adherence and review, lifestyle changes, management of hypoglycaemia, and sick days. Appropriate pharmacist/patient and inter-professional communication skills will be fostered.
PHAR7811 Evidence-based Complementary Medicines 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joanna Harnett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 11hrs of online lectures per semester accompanied by 8-10 hrs/week of independent study including self-directed learning and set module readings and activities Assessment: Online questionnaires following lectures, professional practice journaling Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study will provide an introduction to the background, regulation and quality of complementary medicine products and practices. In addition, the ethical and legal considerations surrounding the provision of complementary medicine advice and supply of products by health care professionals will be covered. Students will be familiarised with reputable and reliable resources of complementary medicine information. These foundational topics will be followed by a series of system-based lectures discussing the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of common complementary medicines used in the management of cardiovascular, respiratory and gastrointestinal health and disease. A combination of lectures, essential reading, evidence and reflective practice reports and online questionnaires will ensure students have a broad understanding of the topics covered.
Textbooks
Access to The University of Sydney Library database on enrolment
PHAR7815 Regulation of Complementary Medicines

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joanna Harnett, Dr Rania Salama, Dr Hui Xin Ong Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, podcasts, discussion boards, webinars, interactive media Assumed knowledge: Students will be expected to have a relevant health care, health science or science related undergraduate qualification or experience working in this sector. Assessment: online quizzes (20%), short answer questions/case studies (40%), written assignment(s) (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit provides a detailed overview of the processes involved in the development, production and regulation of complementary medicines and devices (with a focus on herbal and nutritional supplement products). In this unit, students will learn foundation concepts and principles of complementary medicines, the regulatory framework, relevant policies and ethical implications (including evidence claims) governing this industry, good manufacturing practice (GMP) and quality standards, submission of product dossiers requirements as well as internationalisation of complementary medicine products (e. g. regulation in Asia and other key areas for export). Students will gain an understanding of the processes and guidelines involved in registering complementary products with the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) in Australia and will be able to assess the level and quality of evidence to support the manufacturer's claim. This unit is suitable for postgraduate students who are working in or interested in entering the complementary medicine development, manufacturing and regulation sector.
Textbooks
Online resources, readings and other learning recourses will be provided or accessible via the Library
PHAR7122 Mental Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Timothy Chen Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online discussion forums, assignments and readings. Assessment: online webinar participation (5%), online learning module activities (40%), case study assignments (40%), essay (15%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study will cover the aetiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of the following common mental health problems: anxiety disorders, depression, substance abuse, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders amongst other conditions. This unit of study will focus particularly on medication management issues in consumers with these conditions and the pharmacist's role in managing these consumers. It will also focus on the role of the pharmacist within the broader mental health care system in Australia.
Textbooks
The Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines in Psychiatry (13th ed). Wiley Blackwell
PHAR7113 Cardiovascular and Renal

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kiplin Patanwala Session: Semester 2 Classes: Classes will be delivered through on-line discussions, webinars, case studies and role plays. Assessment: webinar participation (5%), module assignments (30%), case study and medicine review assignments (40%), reflective diary (25%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study aims to develop an in-depth understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular and renal systems; aetiology, treatment, management and monitoring of patients with renal (including acute and chronic renal failure) and cardiovascular disease (including hypertension, heart failure, coronary heart disease, lipid disorders); It will also explore the role of the specialist cardiovascular/renal pharmacist in management and education of patients and other health care practitioners; public health approaches to the prevention of cardiovascular and renal disease; management and prevention of co-morbidities. Skills development will focus on application of this knowledge to the medication management of patient with cardiovascular and renal disease including interpretation of relevant clinical and laboratory tests, medication review and formulation of appropriate pharmacological and non-pharmacological care plans for these patients.