Surgery

 

Surgery

Core unit

Students select one of the following core units:
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan, Dr Erin Cvejic Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%), 1 x 1hr online test (20%) and 1x1.5hr open-book exam (50%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online (no fixed-time webinars) and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of Study.
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis, screening and clinical guidelines.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.

Dissertation units of study

Students pursuing a research path must enrol in 18 credit points of dissertation units, which may be in one semester or split over two semesters. Students must be enrolled in order to submit their dissertation. If a student is not able to submit his/her dissertation after enrolling in 18 credit points of dissertation units of study, he/she must re-enrol in a minimum of 9 credit points of dissertation units of study, with the concomitant financial liability, every semester until he/she submits.
SURG5007 Dissertation A

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Clinical Professor Pierre Chapuis Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6hrs per week of self directed research with regular consultation with supervisor Assessment: Candidates will be required to submit the dissertation in the form of a paper dealing with research on a specific topic. It should be the equivalent of one paper which would be acceptable for publication in a peer reviewed scientific, academic or professional journal. In keeping with Academic Board policy there is an option to submit published work based on research undertaken while enrolled for this degree. Such publications should include additional information such as: (i) An introduction with more information on previous work by others (ii) More detail on Methodology including figures (iii) Insert paper at this point (iv) Commentary on the significance of the findings. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The dissertation is a formal piece of writing relevant to the subject area of the masters degree. Candidates will work on a specified research project under appropriate supervision. At least one of the project supervisors must be an academic staff member of the University. The dissertation is in Parts A and B, both of which will be completed in a minimum of one year of full time study or two years of part time study.
SURG5008 Dissertation B

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Clinical Professor Pierre Chapuis Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6hrs per week of self directed research with regular consultation with supervisor Assessment: Candidates will be required to submit the dissertation in the form of a paper dealing with research on a specific topic. It should be the equivalent of one paper which would be acceptable for publication in a peer reviewed scientific, academic or professional journal. In keeping with Academic Board policy there is an option to submit published work based on research undertaken while enrolled for this degree. Such publications should include additional information such as: (i) An introduction with more information on previous work by others (ii) More detail on Methodology including figures (iii) Insert paper at this point (iv) Commentary on the significance of the findings. Mode of delivery: Supervision
The dissertation is a formal piece of writing relevant to the subject area of the masters degree. Candidates will work on a specified research project under appropriate supervision. At least one of the project supervisors must be an academic staff member of the University. The dissertation is in Parts A and B, both of which will be completed in a minimum of one year of full time study or two years of part time study.

Stream-specific core units

Breast Surgery Stream

SURG5037 Basic Sciences and Benign Breast Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jocelyn Lippey, Prof Andrew Spillane Session: Semester 1 Classes: Weekly online lectures, discussion boards and webinars. Assumed knowledge: Applicants must have completed basic surgical training. Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); 2 x short essays (20%); clinical case discussions (20%); 1 x online examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is designed as the first part of a curriculum for contemporary breast surgery for PFT and assumes practical skills training is obtained on the BreastSurgANZ PFT Program (or equivalent). Students completing all 4 breast surgery units must complete them in sequence ie SURG5037, SURG5038, SURG5039, SURG5040.
Breast surgery requires comprehensive knowledge of the basic sciences of the breast and also the various elements of benign breast diseases. This unit of study aims to prepare candidates for a career in breast surgery. The unit focuses on:
1. The anatomy of the breast, axilla and donor sites for reconstruction flaps;
2. Anatomical variations and physiological changes in the breast and axilla;
3. Benign breast diseases including mastitis, mastalgia, nipple discharge and aberrations of normal development and involution (ANDI);
4. Current radiological modalities in breast disease imaging and risk assessment for patients; and
5. Genetic and non-genetic risk assessment for patients.
6. Importance of oestrogen and HER 2 receptors in breast cancer.
Textbooks
ABC of Breast Diseases: 3rd Edition : Michael Dixon
SURG5038 Malignant Breast Disease and MDTs

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Patsy Soon, A/Prof Sanjay Warrier Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly online lectures, discussion boards and webinars. Assessment: online quizzes (10%); video assignment (10%); clinical case discussion (10%); short essay (10%); participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); 1 x online examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is designed as the second part of a curriculum for contemporary breast surgery for PFT and assumes practical skills training is obtained on the BreastSurgANZ PFT Program (or equivalent). The unit assumes knowledge from SURG5037 Basic Sciences and Benign Breast Disease.
Breast surgery requires a thorough knowledge of the science and management of malignant breast disease. This unit of study aims to prepare the post fellowship candidate for a career in breast surgery. The content focuses on the pathology and recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of malignant breast disease. Candidates will gain an in depth understanding of: available prognostic assessment tools; multidisciplinary care of breast cancer patients, including adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy as well as the integral role of the breast care nurse and other allied health staff; risk reduction interventions and survivorship issues. Specific surgical decision algorithms and surgical options for malignant and insitu disease will be thoroughly explored and explained.
SURG5039 Oncoplastic Breast Surgery Level 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ben Green, A/Prof Sanjay Warrier Session: Semester 1 Classes: Weekly online lectures; online discussion boards and webinars Assumed knowledge: Applicants must have completed general or plastic surgical training and have a strong interest in breast surgery. Assessment: 3 x case reports (50%); short essay (20%); clinical case discussion (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is designed as the third part of a curriculum for contemporary breast surgery for PFT and assumes practical skills training is obtained on the BreastSurgANZ PFT Program (or equivalent). The unit assumes knowledge from SURG5037 Basic Sciences and Benign Breast Disease and SURG5038 Malignant Breast Disease and MDTs.
Breast surgery requires a thorough knowledge of the science and management of malignant breast disease. This unit of study is aimed at post-fellowship training (PFT) candidates committed to a career in breast surgery. The unit focusses on principles of oncoplastic breast surgery where techniques are used to extend the role of breast conservation and improve the aesthetics of breast conservation surgery. Techniques of volume displacement, mammoplasty, volume replacement, symmetry procedures and good mastectomy technique are covered. There is a considerable focus on clinical judgement regarding use of different techniques and their integration with the multidisciplinary management of breast cancer.
SURG5040 Oncoplastic Breast Surgery Level 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Samriti Sood, Prof Andrew Spillane Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly online lectures, online discussion boards and webinars Assumed knowledge: Applicants must have completed general or plastic surgical training and have a strong interest in breast surgery. Assessment: 3x case reports (50%); short essay (20%); clinical case discussions (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is designed as the forth and final part of a curriculum for contemporary breast surgery for PFT and assumes practical skills training is obtained on the BreastSurgANZ PFT Program (or equivalent). The unit assumes knowledge from SURG5037 Basic Sciences and Benign Breast Disease, SURG5038 Malignant Breast Disease and MDTs and SURG5039 Oncoplastic Breast Surgery Level 1.
This unit of study concludes the specialist breast surgery curriculum. The focus is on breast reconstruction after mastectomy but includes a full range of topics including lipofilling and nipple reconstruction techniques. The unit also covers the full range of breast reconstruction techniques including implant based reconstruction, latissimus dorsi reconstruction and free flap tissue options. Students will participate in multi-surgeon meeting case discussions with complex decision-making and management of complications.

Surgical Anatomy Stream

Students must successfully complete the requirements of the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Clinical Skills (Surgical Anatomy), without graduating, to meet the stream specific core unit requirements of the Surgical Anatomy stream.

Surgical Skills Stream

SURG5031 Surgical Skills

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tom Hugh Session: Semester 2 Classes: Classes: 2.5 days of technical and non-technical competencies (compulsory attendance), online discussion forums Practical Work: Day 1 Basic surgical skills: (1) Instrument and hand knot tying (2) Excision of skin lesions (pig skin) and suturing (3) Safe handling of sharps and diathermy (4) Tissue handling and dissection (kidney blocks) (5) Patient positioning on the operating table. Day 2 Non-technical skills: This workshop will be run in conjunction with the Pam McLean Centre for Communication at the Kolling Institute. It will focus on how to obtain appropriate consent, breaking bad news, the ethics of surgical practice, and identifying and managing bullying/harassment. Day 3 Basic laparoscopic and anastomotic skills: Hands-on basic laparoscopic and anastomotic skills (vascular and bowel) using synthetic and tissue models. Assessment: ethics case discussion (10%), ethics written assignment (20%), workshop assessment (20%), workshop reflection essay (10%), short answer quizzes (30%), skills demonstration video (10%) Practical field work: Day 1 Basic Open Surgical Skills: (1) Instrument and hand knot tying (2) Excision of skin lesions (pig skin) and suturing (3) Safe handling of sharps and diathermy (4) Tissue handling and dissection (Kidney blocks) (5) Patient positioning on the operating table. Day 2 Basic Laparoscopic and anastomotic skills: Hands-on basic laparoscopic and anastomotic skills (vascular and bowel) course using synthetic and tissue models. Day 3 Non-technical skills: This workshop will be run in conjunction with the Pam McLean Centre for communication at the Kolling Institute. It will focus on how to perform appropriate consent, breaking bad news, the ethics of surgical practice, and identifying and managing bullying/harassment. Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Places in this unit are strictly limited, please contact Jayne Seward in the Discipline of Surgery office to be placed on the waitlist at jayne.seward@sydney.edu.au
Two sets of competencies that are essential for a career in surgery will be taught: firstly, the
non-clinical competencies of communication, collaboration, health advocacy, scholar and teacher plus the essentials of health law, and an introduction to key ethical concepts and methods of ethical analysis relevant to surgical practice and research.; and secondly, the essential technical skills involved with open and endoscopic/ laparoscopic surgery.
Textbooks
The Australian Medico-Legal Handbook Stewart, Kerridge and Parker. Safety at the Sharp End Flin, O'Connor and Crichton. Tissue Approximation in Endoscopic Surgery Cuschieri and Szabo. The SAGES Manual Fundamentals of Laparoscopy, Thoracoscopy and GI Endoscopy CEH Scott-Conner.
SURG5032 Physiology and Pharmacology for Surgeons

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Miguel Iglesias Session: Semester 2 Classes: online lectures will provide an overview of topics to supplement Ganong and other resources. Assessment: online quizzes (30%), participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (20%), online exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study covers most of the basic and advanced physiology, pharmacology and some pathophysiology that training surgeons need to have at their fingertips. With a focus on the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary systems, the systems and concepts studied confer a deep understanding of those at play during surgery. It provides students with a solid basis for the preparation of the GSSE exam of the Royal Australian College of Surgeons.
Textbooks
Ganong's Review of Medical Physiology, 25th Edition. McGraw-Hill Education/ Medical and West's Respiratory Physiology, 10th Edition. Wolters Kluwer.
SURG5034 Surgical Anatomy based on GSSE

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Professor Lindsay Wing, Adjunct Associate Professor Allan Meares and Clinical Professor Pierre Chapuis Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials and practical classes with exercises. Please check the surgery timetable for dates. Assessment: Assessment will be based on both attendance and participation in weekly classes. self directed study is required before each of the sessions of approximately 10 hours per session as a minimum. A 90% attendance is required for the course, and a satisfactory pass mark in classwork. There will be a final compulsory trial GSSE exam of 80 MCQs and 20 Spots (held on the final day of the course). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of the course is to assist students in the preparation of the Anatomy component of GSSE conducted by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS). These modules comprise: upper limb, lower limb, head and neck thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Each module has three components: a) Identification and SCORPIOS of anatomical structures in wet prosections of the anatomical area for the session. b) Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) exercises c) 'Spot' questions on anatomical prosection photographs.
Textbooks
Last's Anatomy 9th Edition, Editor: McMinn; Clinically Oriented Anatomy by Keith L Moore; Color Atlas of Anatomy, (Rohen, Yokochi, Lutjen, Drecoll); Lecture Notes on Anatomy, D.B.Moffat.
PATH5000 Surgical Pathology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Brett Hambly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr video streamed tutorials/week Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (30%), 13x15min weekly quizzes (40%), 1x1hr final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
The Surgical Pathology Unit of Study course in an online course available in Semester 1 or 2. It is based on examination of macroscopic pathology specimens (bottles) available through the Pathology Museum collection and examination of microscopic slides of relevant pathological processes. The course runs over 13 weeks and covers 12 topics. Each week several streamed videos, corresponding Powerpoint presentations and additional reading, are provided to students. This material will take approximately 2-3 hours per week to complete. Following viewing of the teaching media, students complete an online quiz, which contributes to the final assessment. Additionally, students will prepare astructured essay on a pathological process, where possible relevant to their particular interests. Topics that will be covered in the course will include basic pathological processes (eg immunology, inflammation, neoplasia etc) and systems pathology (eg cardiovascular, respiratory, gastroenterology, neurology, genitourinary, etc).
Textbooks
Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease 9th Ed (Kumar, Abbas, Fausto, Aster) Saunders Elsevier, online version available from University Library following enrolment, plus course materials.

Surgical Sciences Stream

SURG5012 Surgical Metabolism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Vincent Lam Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online Assessment: Compulsory participation in 6 online modules x 5% (30%) Complete a 2000-5000 word assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Online
The aims of the unit are for the student to acquire knowledge of nutrition in surgery and to understand adaptive response of the body to stress, trauma and sepsis. By the end of the unit the student will become competent in providing enteral and parenteral nutritional therapy to metabolically compromised patients. Content includes Nutrition assessment, Surgical Complications in Malnourished, Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition, Complications in Obese, Obesity and Surgery, Short Bowel Syndrome and Enterocutaneous fistula.
Textbooks
Reading materials will be posted online prior to the sessions
SURG5035 Surgical Research and Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kerry Hitos Session: Semester 1 Classes: Weekly online lectures and tutorial discussion board over 10 weeks (the unit will be delivered online): limit of 50 in semester 1 and 25 in semester 2 Assumed knowledge: It would be helpful if candidates have completed Introductory Biostatistics PUBH5018 Assessment: On-line short answer questions cover the knowledge acquired. Each set of questions must be completed and submitted by the due date and before students proceed to the next module. Answers to each module will contribute (30%) to the final score of the unit. A written assignment will also contribute (70%). Mode of delivery: Online
The objective of this unit is to provide candidates with an understanding of key methodological concepts of level one evidence based studies needed to conduct high quality surgical research. It will cover basic concepts and principles of good clinical research practice and provide the necessary skills on how to measure the quality of care. Key topics focus on how to identify, appraise, select and synthesise a systematic review and meta-analysis. The use of databases and registries and how to best present statistical analysis and summarise data. This unit will provide candidates with the skills to measure the quality of surgical care as well as evaluate surgical performance and measures of effects. Candidates will be able to critically appraise published statistics and learn to identify publication bias before applying the findings to their own clinical practice.
Textbooks
Notes will be linked to online teaching material.
SURG5036 Surg Research: Translation and Innovation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Associate Professor Kerry Hitos Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1 hr lec and 1x1 hr tut/wk over 10 weeks (The unit will be delivered on line) Assessment: On-line short answer questions cover the knowledge acquired. Each set of questions must be completed and submitted by the due date and before students proceed to the next module. Answers to each module will contribute (40%) to the final score of the unit. A written assignment will also contribute (60%). Mode of delivery: Online
The objective of this unit is to introduce candidates to the basic concepts of innovation. Participants will be able to identify and evaluate surgical innovation as well as focus on the methodological and practical challenges to rigorous surgical research. Candidates will be have the skills to design and complete level one evidence based research in surgery with a key focus on randomised and non-randomised controlled trials. The course will evaluate the complexity of surgical innovation and how to identify related factors influencing outcome. Candidates should be able to identify challenges facing the surgical research community when performing an evaluation of a therapeutic, procedure-based intervention. How to pinpoint the issues and deconstruct these into constituent methodological parts such that several important areas will be targeted for developing a systematic process that would guide appropriate, evidence based surgical practice. Ethical aspects in research and innovation will be addressed and the process of translational research will be reviewed. Other broad topics will focus on surgical oncology and survival analysis; evaluating performance when measuring the value of surgical research and the key concepts in diagnostic tests and accuracy in surgery.
Textbooks
Notes will be linked to online teaching material.
PATH5000 Surgical Pathology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Brett Hambly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr video streamed tutorials/week Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (30%), 13x15min weekly quizzes (40%), 1x1hr final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
The Surgical Pathology Unit of Study course in an online course available in Semester 1 or 2. It is based on examination of macroscopic pathology specimens (bottles) available through the Pathology Museum collection and examination of microscopic slides of relevant pathological processes. The course runs over 13 weeks and covers 12 topics. Each week several streamed videos, corresponding Powerpoint presentations and additional reading, are provided to students. This material will take approximately 2-3 hours per week to complete. Following viewing of the teaching media, students complete an online quiz, which contributes to the final assessment. Additionally, students will prepare astructured essay on a pathological process, where possible relevant to their particular interests. Topics that will be covered in the course will include basic pathological processes (eg immunology, inflammation, neoplasia etc) and systems pathology (eg cardiovascular, respiratory, gastroenterology, neurology, genitourinary, etc).
Textbooks
Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease 9th Ed (Kumar, Abbas, Fausto, Aster) Saunders Elsevier, online version available from University Library following enrolment, plus course materials.

Elective units

SURG5003 Scientific Communication for Surgeons

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Kerry Hitos, Professor Pierre Chapuis, Professor Henry Pleass Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: This unit is delivered online and with weekly lectures and discussions. The John Loewenthal Society will be held for one day in Sydney for those candidates that select this presentation option. Assessment: Compulsory participation and assessment of 6 online modules (30%), research presentation component either online or at the John Loewenthal Society (70%). Mode of delivery: Online
This unit is designed to promote academic surgery pari passu with the objectives of the Section of Academic Surgery (SAS) of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS). Candidates will develop the skills and art of delivering powerful professional presentations. They will learn how to craft a suitable abstract for a scientific paper or conference using their research findings in a format acceptable for adjudication as an oral presentation at a meeting of a Surgical Research Society or the Annual Scientific Congress of the RACS and its subspecialties. This includes critical steps to successful abstract preparation, visual presentation, content, structure, coherent design and delivery. Key topics include the formation of an effective argument and focus point, style of delivery, avoiding critical errors, including analysing, understanding and handling the audience. On completion, candidates will be confident and have the core skills to present findings of their research effectively in a way that is engaging, persuasive and will maximise impact. This unit is strongly recommended for all undertaking Dissertation A (SURG 5007) and B (SURG 5008) for the Masters of Surgery. As part of their assessment, candidates will be provided with the opportunity to either present online or at the John Loewenthal Society which is an integral component of the Discipline of Surgery that promotes the development and organisation of academic surgery and participate in a live interactive research seminar.
Textbooks
Notes will be linked to online teaching material.
SURG5011 Imaging Surgical Patients

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Stuart Grieve Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online lectures, case-based discussion boards and/or webinars Assessment: online quizzes (20%), case based assignments (25%), participation in online case discussion forums (15%), final online examination (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study aims to introduce imaging relevant to the practice of surgery. Students will learn the underlying physical and technological principles upon which imaging relies and the indications for use and complications of imaging. On completion of the unit students will understand the scientific basis of the various imaging modalities and the indications for their use and appreciate the importance of protection of patients and personnel from the harmful effects of imaging. Imaging types covered in this unit include: B mode, spectral analysis and duplex ultrasound; computerised tomography; magnetic resonance; positron emission tomography; radio isotope imaging; angiography; and imaging guided therapeutic techniques.
SURG5012 Surgical Metabolism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Vincent Lam Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online Assessment: Compulsory participation in 6 online modules x 5% (30%) Complete a 2000-5000 word assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Online
The aims of the unit are for the student to acquire knowledge of nutrition in surgery and to understand adaptive response of the body to stress, trauma and sepsis. By the end of the unit the student will become competent in providing enteral and parenteral nutritional therapy to metabolically compromised patients. Content includes Nutrition assessment, Surgical Complications in Malnourished, Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition, Complications in Obese, Obesity and Surgery, Short Bowel Syndrome and Enterocutaneous fistula.
Textbooks
Reading materials will be posted online prior to the sessions
SURG5016 Vascular and Endovascular Surgery

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Anthony Freeman Session: Semester 2 Classes: online modules, compulsory 1 day face to face skills session (limit 12 students) Assessment: online quizzes (10%), participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (10%), 6 x 300 word assignments and participation in discussion forums (30%), 1800 word written assignment (30%), skills session attendance and assessment (20%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Limit 12 students per semester. Departmental permission required.
This unit of study aims to provide students with a greater understanding of the anatomy, pathophysiology and treatment options for vascular surgical disorders by open or endovascular means. It will introduce students to key areas of vascular anatomy, pathology and imaging at an advanced level. On completion of the unit, students will be conversant with the academic basis for contemporary vascular surgery.
Textbooks
McMinn RMH. Last's Anatomy: Regional and Applied. 12th edition. Churchill Livingstone, 2011; Wind GG and Valentine JR. Anatomical Exposures in Vascular Surgery, 3rd edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2013; Fitridge R and Thompson M. Mechanisms Of Vascular Disease: A Reference Book for Vascular Specialists. University of Adelaide Press, 2011; Hallett JW. Comprehensive Vascular and Endovascular Surgery. Mosby. 2nd Edition 2009; Pellerito J and Polak JF. Introduction to Vascular Ultrasonography. 6th edition. 2012; Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC II). Norgren L; Hiatt WR; Dormandy JA; Nehler MR; Harris KA; Fowkes FG; TASC II Working Group. Journal of Vascular Surgery. 45 Suppl S:S5-67, 2007 Jan; Management of Chronic Venous Disease: Clinical Practice Guidelines of the European Society for Vascular Surgery (ESVS). Wittens C et.al. European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery. 49(6):678-737, 2015 Jun; Rutherford RB (Ed) Vascular Surgery, 8th Edition 2014.
SURG5017 Microsurgery

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Clinical Senior Lecturer Bernard Schick Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6x 2 hour labs/tutorials, plus 3 x 2.5hr (Saturday) labs (limit 10 students) Assessment: Presentation of logbook and attendance at each tutorial/lab session (40%), technical competence (40%), assignment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Waitlist: Due to the limitation of students, please contact the Discipline of Surgery office to be waitlisted for this course.
The course will deliver focused sessions on applied Microsurgical anatomy, and practical training in Microsurgery - Micro vascular and micro neural techniques. Real time demonstrations, Video, other visual and printed material will be used to aid teaching and to supplement the 'eyes on scope' sessions. Sessions will comprise of brief lecture, demonstration of techniques to be developed in the class, followed by supervised Microsurgical practice with set objectives and standards. Students will keep a detailed log book and present a discussion paper on an element of Microsurgery they find challenging or stimulating.
Textbooks
Notes will be distributed prior to the course commencing.
SURG5020 Advanced Laparoscopic Abdominal Anatomy

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Vincent Lam Session: Semester 1 Classes: 8 x 2hr tutorials Assessment: presentation of quiz answer and attendance at each tutorial (40%), assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Note: Students must contact Unit of Study coordinator as early as possible to receive pre-reading material
The course will deliver focused sessions on applied laparoscopic anatomy, pertinent to specific procedures in colorectal, upper gastrointestinal, general and urological surgery. Video, other visual and others material will be used to aid teaching of the abdominal, pelvic and retroperitoneal laparoscopic anatomy involved in these procedures. Printed material and worksheets will be read and completed prior to each session. Sessions will comprise eight 2-hour sessions.
Textbooks
Reading materials will be posted online prior to the sessions.
SURG5021 Surgical Immunology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Alexandra Sharland Session: Semester 2 Classes: The unit is delivered online and will require approximately 10 hours study per week. Assessment: Formative multiple choice question assessment of pre-existing knowledge in Immunobiology allows students to identify strengths and weaknesses before starting the leaning modules. Short-answer questions cover the knowledge acquired in each module. Students may access reference materials and other resources whilst completing the questions. Each set of questions must be completed and submitted by the due date (listed on the website in the document 'Schedule and Important dates for SURG_5021'), and before students proceed to the next module. Answers to each module contribute 12% to the final score for the Unit (total 60% for the 5 modules), and a multiple choice quiz to be completed in the final week of the UOS contributes 40% to the final score. Mode of delivery: Online
Inflammation and immunopathology are encountered frequently in surgical practice, in settings such as acute pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel disease and rejection of organ transplants. Manipulation of the immune system through treatment with checkpoint inhibitors and other forms of immunotherapy is assuming increasing importance in the treatment of malignant melanoma and various other cancers. This unit of study will introduce students to the fundamental aspects of innate and cognate immune responses and their relationship to the clinical manifestations of some common surgical conditions.
Textbooks
Abbas, Lichtman and Pillai, Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 7th edition, Saunders; Current transplantation literature - linked to online teaching materials. These are listed in the 'Recommended Reading' document for each module.
SURG5025 Adv. Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Vincent Lam Session: Semester 2 Classes: Semester 2, four full consecutive days: Concord Medical Education Centre. Assessment: Presentation of worksheets and attendance at each tutorial (20%=4x5% per tutorial), assignment (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The objective of this unit of study is for participants to develop greater understanding of the operative anatomy, pathophysiology and treatment options for complex hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases by laparoscopic or open means. This unit of study will introduce participants to key areas of operative anatomy, pathology, imaging and surgical techniques at an advanced level. By the end of the course, participants will have developed the ability to critically appraise contemporary hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgical practice.
Textbooks
Reading Materials will be posted online prior to the sessions.
SURG5027 Head and Neck by Dissection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Professor Lindsay Wing, Adjunct Associate Professor Allan Meares, Clinical Professor Pierre Chapuis Session: Semester 2 Classes: Please refer to Surgery timetable for dates. Assumed knowledge: This is an advanced course and it is recommended for advanced trainees who are preparing for the GSSE or for a SET program. It is also available if you have completed other Anatomy courses/training. Assessment: Regular viva voce on wet specimens, MCQs, Spot tests. There is a compulsory test at the end of each module similar to that used in the GSSE. Attendance is compulsory without a signed medical certificate within 5 days. You must attend 90% of the course. 30% for attendance, 40% for dissection, and 30% for final spot tests. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum of 12, maximum of 18 students.
This is a face to face teaching course. Candidates dissect in supervised groups of 6, according to a strict daily dissection schedule, utilising team based learning (TBL) methods. This is a proven technique for teaching clinical topographical anatomy to surgical trainees. Throughout this course there is a strong emphasis on applied clinical and surgical anatomy. Supervision is by surgeons. All candidates are given allotted tasks to prepare for presentation to the class prior to dissection. Self directed study is required before each of the sessions of approximately 10 hours per session as a minimum. The student is expected to have read and learnt the appropriate texts, before coming to class. There are ongoing SCORPIOs carried out during the dissection. At the end of each module there is a summative examination. The areas covered by the dissection include skull, cranial nerves, face, special senses, gross neuroanatomy, superficial neck, salivary glands, infratemporal fossa, pterygopalatine fossa, deep neck, suboccipital triangle, mouth, pharynx, larynx, thyroid, parathyroids, root of neck, vertebral canal and spinal cord.
Textbooks
Lasts Anatomy 9th Edition. Editor McMinn. Churchill Livingstone Publisher; 'Color Atlas of Anatomy', Rohen, Yokochi, Lutjen, Drecoll; Grant's Dissector, Alan J Detton, 16th Edition.
SURG5028 Thorax, Back, Spinal Cord by Dissection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Professor Lindsay Wing, Adjunct Associate Professor Allan Meares, Clinical Professor Pierre Chapuis Session: Semester 1 Classes: Please refer to Surgery timetable for dates Assumed knowledge: This is an advanced course and it is recommended for advanced trainees who are preparing for the GSSE or for a SET program. It is also available if you have completed other Anatomy courses/training. Assessment: Regular viva voce on wet specimens, MCQs, Spot tests There is a final exam at the end of the module similar to that used in the GSSE. Attendance is compulsory without a signed medical certificate within 5 days. You must attend 90% of the course. 30% for attendance, 40% for dissection, and 30% for final spot tests. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum of 12, maximum of 18 students.
This is a face to face teaching course. Candidates dissect in supervised groups of 6, according to a strict daily dissection schedule, utilising team based learning (TBL) methods. This is a proven technique for teaching clinical topographical anatomy to surgical trainees. Throughout this course there is a strong emphasis on applied clinical and surgical anatomy. Supervision is by surgeons. All candidates are given allotted tasks to prepare for presentation to the class prior to dissection. Self-directed study is required before each of the sessions of approximately 10 hours per session as a minimum. The student is expected to have read and learnt the appropriate texts before coming to class. There are ongoing SCORPIOs carried out during the dissection. At the end of each module there is a summative examination. The dissection covers all aspects of the thorax, including body wall, thoracic wall, diaphragm, thoracic cavity, superior, anterior, middle and posterior mediastinum, pleura, lungs, heart, oesophagus, and osteology of thorax.
Textbooks
Lasts Anatomy 9th Edition. Editor McMinn. Churchill Livingstone Publisher; 'Color Atlas of Anatomy', Rohen, Yokochi, Lutjen,Drecoll; Grant's Dissector, Alan J Detton, 16th Edition.
SURG5029 Upper and Lower Extremities by Dissection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Professor Lindsay Wing, Adjunct Associate Professor Allan Meares, Professor Pierre Chapuis Session: Semester 1 Classes: Please refer to Surgery timetable for dates Assumed knowledge: This is an advanced course and it is recommended for advanced trainees who are preparing for the GSSE or for a SET program. It is also available if you have completed other Anatomy courses/training. Assessment: Regular viva voce on wet specimens, MCQs, Spot tests. There is a compulsory test at the end of each module. This test is at the same level of knowledge of the GSSE. Attendance is compulsory without a signed medical certificate within 5 days. You must attend 90% of the course. 30% for attendance, 40% for dissection, and 30% for final spot tests. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum of 12, maximum of 18 students.
This is a face to face teaching course. Candidates dissect in supervised groups of 6, according to a strict daily dissection schedule, utilising team based learning (TBL) methods. This is a proven technique for teaching clinical topographical anatomy to surgical trainees. Throughout this course there is a strong emphasis on applied clinical and surgical anatomy. Supervision is by specialist surgeons. All candidates are given allotted tasks to prepare for presentation to the class prior to dissection. Self directed study is required before each of the sessions of approximately 10 hours per session as a minimum. The student is expected to have read and learnt the appropriate texts before coming to class. There are ongoing SCORPIOs carried out during the dissection. At the end of each module there is a summative examination. The dissection course covers anterior compartment of the thigh, medial compartment of the thigh, gluteal region and hip joint, posterior compartment of thigh, popliteal fossa and knee joint, anterior compartment of the leg, dorsum of foot, lateral compartment of the leg, posterior compartment of the leg, sole of foot, ankle and foot joints, osteology of lower limb.
Textbooks
Lasts Anatomy 9th Edition. Editor McMinn. Churchill Livingstone Publisher; 'Color Atlas of Anatomy' Rohen, Yokochi, Lutjen,Drecoll; Grant's Dissector, Alan J Detton, 16th Edition.
SURG5030 Abdomen, Pelvis, Perineum by Dissection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Professor Lindsay Wing, Adjunct Associate Professor Allan Meares, Professor Pierre Chapuis Session: Semester 1 Classes: Please refer to Surgery timetable for dates Assumed knowledge: This is an advanced course and it is recommended for advanced trainees who are preparing for the GSSE or for a SET program. It is also available if you have completed other Anatomy courses/training. Assessment: Regular viva voce on wet specimens, MCQs, Spot tests. There is a compulsory test at the end of each module, similar to that used in the GSSE. Attendance is compulsory without a signed medical certificate within 5 days. You must attend 90% of the course. 30% for attendance, 40% for dissection, and 30% for final spot tests. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum of 12, maximum of 18 students.
This is a face to face teaching course. Candidates dissect in supervised groups of 6, according to a strict daily dissection schedule, utilising team based learning (TBL) methods. This is a proven technique for teaching clinical topographical anatomy to surgical trainees. Throughout this course there is a strong emphasis on applied clinical and surgical anatomy. Supervision is by specialist surgeons. All candidates are given allotted tasks to prepare for presentation to the class prior to dissection. Self directed study is required before each of the sessions of approximately 10 hours per session as a minimum. The student is expected to have read and learnt the appropriate texts before coming to class. There are ongoing SCORPIOs carried out during the dissection. At the end of each module there is a summative examination. The course covers the anterior abdominal wall, abdominal cavity, peritoneum, vessels and nerves of the gut, gastro and inteatinal tract, liver and biliary tract, pancreas, spleen, posterior abdominal wall, kidneys, ureters, and suprarenal glands, rectum, urinary bladder and ureters is in the pelvis, male internal genital organs, female internal genital organs and urethra, pelvic peritoneum, vessels and nerves, perineum, male urogenital region, female urogenital region, pelvic joints and ligaments, lumbosacral plexus.
Textbooks
Lasts Anatomy 9th Edition. Editor McMinn. Churchill Livingstone Publisher; 'Color Atlas of Anatomy' Rohen, Yokochi, Lutjen, Drecoll; Grant's Dissector, Alan J Detton, 16th Edition.
SURG5031 Surgical Skills

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tom Hugh Session: Semester 2 Classes: Classes: 2.5 days of technical and non-technical competencies (compulsory attendance), online discussion forums Practical Work: Day 1 Basic surgical skills: (1) Instrument and hand knot tying (2) Excision of skin lesions (pig skin) and suturing (3) Safe handling of sharps and diathermy (4) Tissue handling and dissection (kidney blocks) (5) Patient positioning on the operating table. Day 2 Non-technical skills: This workshop will be run in conjunction with the Pam McLean Centre for Communication at the Kolling Institute. It will focus on how to obtain appropriate consent, breaking bad news, the ethics of surgical practice, and identifying and managing bullying/harassment. Day 3 Basic laparoscopic and anastomotic skills: Hands-on basic laparoscopic and anastomotic skills (vascular and bowel) using synthetic and tissue models. Assessment: ethics case discussion (10%), ethics written assignment (20%), workshop assessment (20%), workshop reflection essay (10%), short answer quizzes (30%), skills demonstration video (10%) Practical field work: Day 1 Basic Open Surgical Skills: (1) Instrument and hand knot tying (2) Excision of skin lesions (pig skin) and suturing (3) Safe handling of sharps and diathermy (4) Tissue handling and dissection (Kidney blocks) (5) Patient positioning on the operating table. Day 2 Basic Laparoscopic and anastomotic skills: Hands-on basic laparoscopic and anastomotic skills (vascular and bowel) course using synthetic and tissue models. Day 3 Non-technical skills: This workshop will be run in conjunction with the Pam McLean Centre for communication at the Kolling Institute. It will focus on how to perform appropriate consent, breaking bad news, the ethics of surgical practice, and identifying and managing bullying/harassment. Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Places in this unit are strictly limited, please contact Jayne Seward in the Discipline of Surgery office to be placed on the waitlist at jayne.seward@sydney.edu.au
Two sets of competencies that are essential for a career in surgery will be taught: firstly, the
non-clinical competencies of communication, collaboration, health advocacy, scholar and teacher plus the essentials of health law, and an introduction to key ethical concepts and methods of ethical analysis relevant to surgical practice and research.; and secondly, the essential technical skills involved with open and endoscopic/ laparoscopic surgery.
Textbooks
The Australian Medico-Legal Handbook Stewart, Kerridge and Parker. Safety at the Sharp End Flin, O'Connor and Crichton. Tissue Approximation in Endoscopic Surgery Cuschieri and Szabo. The SAGES Manual Fundamentals of Laparoscopy, Thoracoscopy and GI Endoscopy CEH Scott-Conner.
SURG5032 Physiology and Pharmacology for Surgeons

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Miguel Iglesias Session: Semester 2 Classes: online lectures will provide an overview of topics to supplement Ganong and other resources. Assessment: online quizzes (30%), participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (20%), online exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study covers most of the basic and advanced physiology, pharmacology and some pathophysiology that training surgeons need to have at their fingertips. With a focus on the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary systems, the systems and concepts studied confer a deep understanding of those at play during surgery. It provides students with a solid basis for the preparation of the GSSE exam of the Royal Australian College of Surgeons.
Textbooks
Ganong's Review of Medical Physiology, 25th Edition. McGraw-Hill Education/ Medical and West's Respiratory Physiology, 10th Edition. Wolters Kluwer.
SURG5034 Surgical Anatomy based on GSSE

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Professor Lindsay Wing, Adjunct Associate Professor Allan Meares and Clinical Professor Pierre Chapuis Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials and practical classes with exercises. Please check the surgery timetable for dates. Assessment: Assessment will be based on both attendance and participation in weekly classes. self directed study is required before each of the sessions of approximately 10 hours per session as a minimum. A 90% attendance is required for the course, and a satisfactory pass mark in classwork. There will be a final compulsory trial GSSE exam of 80 MCQs and 20 Spots (held on the final day of the course). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of the course is to assist students in the preparation of the Anatomy component of GSSE conducted by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS). These modules comprise: upper limb, lower limb, head and neck thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Each module has three components: a) Identification and SCORPIOS of anatomical structures in wet prosections of the anatomical area for the session. b) Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) exercises c) 'Spot' questions on anatomical prosection photographs.
Textbooks
Last's Anatomy 9th Edition, Editor: McMinn; Clinically Oriented Anatomy by Keith L Moore; Color Atlas of Anatomy, (Rohen, Yokochi, Lutjen, Drecoll); Lecture Notes on Anatomy, D.B.Moffat.
SURG5035 Surgical Research and Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kerry Hitos Session: Semester 1 Classes: Weekly online lectures and tutorial discussion board over 10 weeks (the unit will be delivered online): limit of 50 in semester 1 and 25 in semester 2 Assumed knowledge: It would be helpful if candidates have completed Introductory Biostatistics PUBH5018 Assessment: On-line short answer questions cover the knowledge acquired. Each set of questions must be completed and submitted by the due date and before students proceed to the next module. Answers to each module will contribute (30%) to the final score of the unit. A written assignment will also contribute (70%). Mode of delivery: Online
The objective of this unit is to provide candidates with an understanding of key methodological concepts of level one evidence based studies needed to conduct high quality surgical research. It will cover basic concepts and principles of good clinical research practice and provide the necessary skills on how to measure the quality of care. Key topics focus on how to identify, appraise, select and synthesise a systematic review and meta-analysis. The use of databases and registries and how to best present statistical analysis and summarise data. This unit will provide candidates with the skills to measure the quality of surgical care as well as evaluate surgical performance and measures of effects. Candidates will be able to critically appraise published statistics and learn to identify publication bias before applying the findings to their own clinical practice.
Textbooks
Notes will be linked to online teaching material.
SURG5036 Surg Research: Translation and Innovation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Associate Professor Kerry Hitos Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1 hr lec and 1x1 hr tut/wk over 10 weeks (The unit will be delivered on line) Assessment: On-line short answer questions cover the knowledge acquired. Each set of questions must be completed and submitted by the due date and before students proceed to the next module. Answers to each module will contribute (40%) to the final score of the unit. A written assignment will also contribute (60%). Mode of delivery: Online
The objective of this unit is to introduce candidates to the basic concepts of innovation. Participants will be able to identify and evaluate surgical innovation as well as focus on the methodological and practical challenges to rigorous surgical research. Candidates will be have the skills to design and complete level one evidence based research in surgery with a key focus on randomised and non-randomised controlled trials. The course will evaluate the complexity of surgical innovation and how to identify related factors influencing outcome. Candidates should be able to identify challenges facing the surgical research community when performing an evaluation of a therapeutic, procedure-based intervention. How to pinpoint the issues and deconstruct these into constituent methodological parts such that several important areas will be targeted for developing a systematic process that would guide appropriate, evidence based surgical practice. Ethical aspects in research and innovation will be addressed and the process of translational research will be reviewed. Other broad topics will focus on surgical oncology and survival analysis; evaluating performance when measuring the value of surgical research and the key concepts in diagnostic tests and accuracy in surgery.
Textbooks
Notes will be linked to online teaching material.
SURG5037 Basic Sciences and Benign Breast Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jocelyn Lippey, Prof Andrew Spillane Session: Semester 1 Classes: Weekly online lectures, discussion boards and webinars. Assumed knowledge: Applicants must have completed basic surgical training. Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); 2 x short essays (20%); clinical case discussions (20%); 1 x online examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is designed as the first part of a curriculum for contemporary breast surgery for PFT and assumes practical skills training is obtained on the BreastSurgANZ PFT Program (or equivalent). Students completing all 4 breast surgery units must complete them in sequence ie SURG5037, SURG5038, SURG5039, SURG5040.
Breast surgery requires comprehensive knowledge of the basic sciences of the breast and also the various elements of benign breast diseases. This unit of study aims to prepare candidates for a career in breast surgery. The unit focuses on:
1. The anatomy of the breast, axilla and donor sites for reconstruction flaps;
2. Anatomical variations and physiological changes in the breast and axilla;
3. Benign breast diseases including mastitis, mastalgia, nipple discharge and aberrations of normal development and involution (ANDI);
4. Current radiological modalities in breast disease imaging and risk assessment for patients; and
5. Genetic and non-genetic risk assessment for patients.
6. Importance of oestrogen and HER 2 receptors in breast cancer.
Textbooks
ABC of Breast Diseases: 3rd Edition : Michael Dixon
SURG5038 Malignant Breast Disease and MDTs

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Patsy Soon, A/Prof Sanjay Warrier Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly online lectures, discussion boards and webinars. Assessment: online quizzes (10%); video assignment (10%); clinical case discussion (10%); short essay (10%); participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); 1 x online examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is designed as the second part of a curriculum for contemporary breast surgery for PFT and assumes practical skills training is obtained on the BreastSurgANZ PFT Program (or equivalent). The unit assumes knowledge from SURG5037 Basic Sciences and Benign Breast Disease.
Breast surgery requires a thorough knowledge of the science and management of malignant breast disease. This unit of study aims to prepare the post fellowship candidate for a career in breast surgery. The content focuses on the pathology and recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of malignant breast disease. Candidates will gain an in depth understanding of: available prognostic assessment tools; multidisciplinary care of breast cancer patients, including adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy as well as the integral role of the breast care nurse and other allied health staff; risk reduction interventions and survivorship issues. Specific surgical decision algorithms and surgical options for malignant and insitu disease will be thoroughly explored and explained.
SURG5039 Oncoplastic Breast Surgery Level 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ben Green, A/Prof Sanjay Warrier Session: Semester 1 Classes: Weekly online lectures; online discussion boards and webinars Assumed knowledge: Applicants must have completed general or plastic surgical training and have a strong interest in breast surgery. Assessment: 3 x case reports (50%); short essay (20%); clinical case discussion (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is designed as the third part of a curriculum for contemporary breast surgery for PFT and assumes practical skills training is obtained on the BreastSurgANZ PFT Program (or equivalent). The unit assumes knowledge from SURG5037 Basic Sciences and Benign Breast Disease and SURG5038 Malignant Breast Disease and MDTs.
Breast surgery requires a thorough knowledge of the science and management of malignant breast disease. This unit of study is aimed at post-fellowship training (PFT) candidates committed to a career in breast surgery. The unit focusses on principles of oncoplastic breast surgery where techniques are used to extend the role of breast conservation and improve the aesthetics of breast conservation surgery. Techniques of volume displacement, mammoplasty, volume replacement, symmetry procedures and good mastectomy technique are covered. There is a considerable focus on clinical judgement regarding use of different techniques and their integration with the multidisciplinary management of breast cancer.
SURG5040 Oncoplastic Breast Surgery Level 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Samriti Sood, Prof Andrew Spillane Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly online lectures, online discussion boards and webinars Assumed knowledge: Applicants must have completed general or plastic surgical training and have a strong interest in breast surgery. Assessment: 3x case reports (50%); short essay (20%); clinical case discussions (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is designed as the forth and final part of a curriculum for contemporary breast surgery for PFT and assumes practical skills training is obtained on the BreastSurgANZ PFT Program (or equivalent). The unit assumes knowledge from SURG5037 Basic Sciences and Benign Breast Disease, SURG5038 Malignant Breast Disease and MDTs and SURG5039 Oncoplastic Breast Surgery Level 1.
This unit of study concludes the specialist breast surgery curriculum. The focus is on breast reconstruction after mastectomy but includes a full range of topics including lipofilling and nipple reconstruction techniques. The unit also covers the full range of breast reconstruction techniques including implant based reconstruction, latissimus dorsi reconstruction and free flap tissue options. Students will participate in multi-surgeon meeting case discussions with complex decision-making and management of complications.
SURG5041 Surgical Oncology: Principles and Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Clinical Professor Pierre Chapuis, Associate Professor Brett Hambly Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online lectures, videos, tutorials and formative assessment. Prerequisites: PATH5000 Assumed knowledge: Candidates are expected generally to be undertaking advanced surgical training or similar Assessment: 1) one online MDT scenario 30% 2) critical review of a tumour-specific, current publication of your choice from the primary literature (max: 1,000 words, excluding references) 20% 3) weekly quizzes 50% Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: May apply via special permission for advanced surgical trainees
The course runs over 13 weeks with the final week confined to assessment by face-to-face participation in an OSCE style format using a number of multidisciplinary team (MDT) meeting scenarios. The emphasis is on multimodality patient care which offers the best chance for a favourable outcome for a variety of common tumour types including breast, colorectal, prostate, gastro-oesophageal junction and melanoma. The unit is designed to address each cancer type with an overview highlighting those issues of importance when discussing management at an MDT meeting including: Pathology, ,Staging and Reporting, advances in Molecular Biology, Imaging, Surgery, Radiation and Medical oncology, new biologic therapies and the place of palliation of advanced disease. The emphasis is largely on self- directed learning with on-line lectures and reading material provided by a Faculty of clinicians drawn from various metropolitan teaching hospitals.
Specific Learning objectives: 1) to develop the skills to advocate evidence-based management for the individual needs of a patient in an MDT meeting and to understand the contribution of each clinical discipline in the decision making process 2) to demonstrate an adequate back ground knowledge of the natural history and classification of common tumours 3) to formulate a cancer specific management plan based on standardised reporting of the extent of tumour burden 4) to understand the influence of evidence-based, independent prognostic factors on outcomes and evolving concepts in cancer biology.
Textbooks
Due to the contemporary nature of the course an extensive bibliography of current reading material will be provided. These will be accessible electronically through the library.
SURG5042 Urological Oncology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Manish Patel Session: Semester 1 Classes: Compulsory 1 day face to face workshop, online discussion forums Assessment: 4 x 600 word case-based discussion board assignments (40%); workshop participation (20%); participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (20%); online quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Urological oncology comprises a substantial proportion of clinical urology. The management of urological cancers requires a thorough knowledge and understanding of the pathological basis, imaging and diagnosis as well as treatment options for all stages. This unit of study aims to prepare the training surgeon interested in urology or surgical oncology for a career managing urological cancers. The unit will include cancers of the prostate, bladder, kidney, testis, penile cancer and other rarer cancers. By the end of the unit, a deep understanding of uro-oncology will be gained and students will have a sound understanding of how to effectively manage patients with urological cancers in the ward and clinic. This includes diagnosis, staging, and management of localised and advanced cancers. Not only will students have a thorough understanding of the role and outcomes of surgery in the management of these cancers, but also the role of radiotherapy, medical oncology and importance of imaging and pathology.
Textbooks
Fast Facts Prostate Cancer, 9th Edition. Published 2017. Health Press
SURG5043 Surgical Endoscopy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Symons Session: Semester 2 Classes: online lectures and tutorials; compulsory face to face 1 day workshop with simulation training Assumed knowledge: Candidates are advised to have completed a surgical internship or similar, with some prior exposure to endoscopy Assessment: simulation assessment (30%); 1, 000 word critical appraisal (20%); weekly online quizzes (10 x 5% = 50%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Endoscopy has rapidly become the mainstay of modern, minimally invasive surgery, and includes both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. This unit of study provides an introduction to endoscopy, it's current and potential future surgical application. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the principles of endoscopy, its history, safety considerations and general troubleshooting, along with an overview of its uses in multiple subspecialties. Students will receive practical experience at a compulsory simulation workshop.
PATH5000 Surgical Pathology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Brett Hambly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr video streamed tutorials/week Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (30%), 13x15min weekly quizzes (40%), 1x1hr final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
The Surgical Pathology Unit of Study course in an online course available in Semester 1 or 2. It is based on examination of macroscopic pathology specimens (bottles) available through the Pathology Museum collection and examination of microscopic slides of relevant pathological processes. The course runs over 13 weeks and covers 12 topics. Each week several streamed videos, corresponding Powerpoint presentations and additional reading, are provided to students. This material will take approximately 2-3 hours per week to complete. Following viewing of the teaching media, students complete an online quiz, which contributes to the final assessment. Additionally, students will prepare astructured essay on a pathological process, where possible relevant to their particular interests. Topics that will be covered in the course will include basic pathological processes (eg immunology, inflammation, neoplasia etc) and systems pathology (eg cardiovascular, respiratory, gastroenterology, neurology, genitourinary, etc).
Textbooks
Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease 9th Ed (Kumar, Abbas, Fausto, Aster) Saunders Elsevier, online version available from University Library following enrolment, plus course materials.
HPOL5006 Business of Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof James Gillespie, Prof John Buchanan Session: Intensive July Classes: block/intensive mode - 5 days, 9am-5pm with preliminary online readings. Corequisites: HPOL5001 or SMBA6001 Assessment: workshop tutorial assessments and presentation (20%); 1x2000wd report (30%); 1x3000 wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students who do not meet the recommended co-requisites may be granted entry if they have at least one year's work experience in a related field.
Healthcare is now one of the largest employers and sectors in the Australian economy. Approximately two thirds of its funding comes from government, while two thirds of services are provided by the private sector. This unit explores this complex mix, building an understanding of the inter-relationships among the players in the industry, public and private. The course will explore the financial and regulatory environment in which providers operate and identify the main business models used by different players in the industry, including service providers, private insurers, employers, and government regulators. The unit draws on expert lecturers, international comparisons and case studies to give an understanding of the incentives and constraints that shape strategies to create value in health care. By the end of the unit students will: Have an understanding of the 'eco-system' of health care; Be able to navigate the regulatory and technological aspects of business in the health sector; Be able to identify and evaluate public and private business strategies in the main health care sectors.
Textbooks
Required and recommended readings and reference lists will be available through eLearning.
HAEM5001 Thrombosis and Haemostasis in Acute Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Curnow Session: Semester 2 Classes: online lectures and case discussions, video tutorials, podcasts of experts discussing controversies Assessment: online quizzes (10%); generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); case-based discussion boards (10%); short answer questions (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Thrombosis and haemostasis affect all areas of clinical practice. This unit of study will familiarise students with normal and pathological haemostasis, interpretation of coagulation laboratory tests, and practical management of bleeding and clotting disorders in the perioperative and critical care setting. Case-based discussions will explore strategies for diagnosis, investigation and management in theatres, ICU and the emergency department to assist in making optimal clinical decisions.
Textbooks
Consultative Hemostasis and Thrombosis; Kitchens, Kessler and Konkle 2013 (Pub:Elsevier)

The following Elective Units are ONLY available for students undertaking the Surgical Sciences stream in an online/distance mode. Note: these units do not transfer to other streams.

CEPI5315 Introduction to Systematic Reviews

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sharon Reid Session: Semester 1 Classes: all students will work through four online-modules and participate asynchronously in weekly online tutorials or in-campus tutorials (depending on mode enrolled) over 12 weeks Corequisites: CEPI5100 or PUBH5010 Prohibitions: CEPI5203 or CEPI5102 or CEPI5314 Assessment: module assessment tasks (30%) and 1 x 4500 word assignment (70%) after the modules are completed Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
In this unit of study, we aim to introduce you to systematic reviews and meta-analyses of relevance to healthcare with a particular focus on systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials. Students can choose to learn in online or normal day (on-campus) mode. All students will work through four online modules, delivered over twelve weeks, addressing the following topics at an introductory level: What and why systematic reviews (and meta-analysis); How to formulate answerable healthcare questions and searching for systematic reviews; How a systematic review is conducted and understanding the principles of meta-analysis; and How to appraise, interpret and apply the results of systematic reviews (and meta-analyses). Students will have the opportunity to discuss unit of study learning materials in online tutorials or via weekly (on-campus) tutorials. Readings and other learning materials will be available via eLearning.
Textbooks
Readings and access to other learning resources are available through the unit's elearning site
PUBH5010 Epidemiology Methods and Uses

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erin Mathieu, Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr tutorial per week for 13 weeks - face to face or their equivalent online Prohibitions: BSTA5011 or CEPI5100 Assessment: 1x 6 page assignment (25%), 10 weekly quizzes (5% in total) and 1x 2.5hr supervised open-book exam (70%). For distance students, it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit provides students with core skills in epidemiology, particularly the ability to critically appraise public health and clinical epidemiological research literature regarding public health and clinical issue. This unit covers: study types; measures of frequency and association; measurement bias; confounding/effect modification; randomized trials; systematic reviews; screening and test evaluation; infectious disease outbreaks; measuring public health impact and use and interpretation of population health data. In addition to formal classes or their on-line equivalent,it is expected that students spend an additional 2-3 hours at least each week preparing for their tutorials.
Textbooks
Webb, PW. Bain, CJ. and Pirozzo, SL. Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals Second Edition: Cambridge University Press 2017.
PUBH5019 Cancer Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gemma Jacklyn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 10 x online modules (each comprising online lectures, readings, quiz), approx. 4 hours per week x 10 weeks, 4 x online group interactions (1 x peer assessment and 3 x online discussions) approx. 2 hours per session for preparation and posting. Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Assessment: 10 x online quizzes (10%); 1 x 1200-word individual written assignment ¿ critical appraisal task (20%); 1 x peer assessment exercise (5%); 1 x 400-word written assignment + anonymous peer assessment of each other's work based on pre-determined criteria. Final mark will be the median of all the peer marks. (10%); participation in 3 x online discussions (15%); 1 x 2500 word individual written assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces students to the concepts, methods and applications underpinning cancer prevention and control at population level. It is designed to a offer a broad-based perspective on public health approaches to cancer control across the continuum from prevention through diagnosis, screening, treatment, survivorship and palliative and supportive care. We will critically appraise policies and interventions that have potential to reduce cancer incidence and mortality, prolong survival and improve quality of life. Although each topic will be presented in the context of specific cancers and the Australian health care system, the principles and frameworks will be relevant for regional and global cancer control efforts. At the completion of the unit, students will be equipped with the basic tools to design, plan, implement and evaluate cancer control strategies and programs.
Textbooks
Elwood JM, Sutcliffe SB (Eds). Cancer Control. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010 (pp1-469)
PUBH5020 Chronic Disease Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Adrian Bauman Session: Semester 1 Classes: 20 hrs online lectures; 16 hrs online discussions Assumed knowledge: PUBH5033, PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 or equivalent Assessment: 1000 word assignment (20%), 2000 word assignment (40%), on-line discussions (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: PUBH5020 is an advanced MPH elective, and some epidemiological concepts, such as population attributable risk are expected knowledge for understanding the Burden of Disease concept, that is important in NCD (chronic disease) prevention, and is part of Module 2 of this unit. In addition, this MPH elective predominantly takes a population and global perspective on NCD prevention, rather than a clinical or health services perspective
This course offers a public health approach to examining the global issue of chronic diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, chronic lung disease) and their prevention. The course examines why chronic disease is a global problem, and describes WHO frameworks for chronic disease prevention. It also reviews the epidemiology of specific chronic diseases including trends in and surveillance of these conditions, and the global (and country level) burden of disease. Teaching will focus on clinical prevention, in particular, the role of primary care, other clinicians and allied health professionals in providing lifestyle advice for people with chronic disease (tertiary prevention) and for people without chronic disease (primary prevention). Students will be involved in evaluating the effectiveness of different prevention strategies and will examine the role of health policy and strategic planning in developing effective and sustainable chronic disease management programs and health services in different settings (in Australia and the region).
Textbooks
Readings for this unit will be available on the eLearning site
In exceptional circumstances, on application to and with written approval from the Head of Discipline or course coordinator, a student may enrol in an elective unit of study not listed above.