Master of Pharmacy

Unit of study descriptions

Year 1

PCOL5001 Current Topics in Pharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: DrHilary Lloyd Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hrs per week consisting of lectures (1 per week), 2 laboratory classes and 9 case-based learning workshops. Assessment: final examination (55%), two lecture quizzes (10%) in-semester assessments (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop students' understanding of the therapeutic applications of drugs based on their underlying pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, concentrating on the pharmacology of agentsthat arewidely used in Australia and exploring issues related to the use and safety of these agents.
PHAR5513 Pharmaceutical Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Balle Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x lectures/wk, 5 x 2hr tutorials, 4 x 4hr workshops and self-directed learning Assessment: Exam (60%), laboratories (20%), and molecular modeling (20%) Practical field work: 3 x 4hr labs Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the physicochemical properties of drugs and how this determines the interactions of small molecules (drugs) with biological macromolecules (enzymes and receptors). All stages in the process of drug design and development will be investigated, including computational drug design, structure activity studies, synthesis and activity assays. Students will also gain experience in a variety of experimental techniques related to drug design. In addition, students will develop skills including critical thinking, the use of information technology and report writing.
Textbooks
Patrick GL. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry (5th ed). Oxford University Press, 2013
PHAR5515 Pharmaceutical Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ramin Rohanizadeh Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x lec/week Assessment: 2 x 1.5hr exams (60%), microbiology labs and workshops (10%), drug molecular properties workshops (10%), metabolism workshops (10%), toxicology workshops (10%) Practical field work: 1 x 3hr workshop or lab/week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will provide an introduction to the concepts required for the study of Pharmacy and integrate knowledge from the various sub-disciplines within the Pharmaceutical Sciences. Topics studied include sterilisation methods, chemical antimicrobial agents, cleanroom technology, physicochemical/molecular properties underlying drug action, drug metabolism, bioactivation and inactivation, identification of drugs and their metabolites, and toxicology. These concepts will be further explored in workshop formats.
Textbooks
Denyer SP, Hodges NA & Gorman SP. Hugo & Russell's Pharmaceutical Microbiology, 7th edition, Blackwell, 2004. D.A. Williams & T.L. Lemke eds. Foye's Principles of Medicinal Chemistry, 5th edition, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2002. Wallwork, S.C. & Grant, D.J.W. Physical Chemistry for students of Pharmacy and Biology, 3rd edition, New York: Longman, 1977. Casarett and Doull's toxicology: the basic science of poisons. 6th edition, 2001. D.G. Watson. Pharmaceutical Analysis, 2nd edition, Churchill-Livingstone, 2005.
PHAR5516 Pharmaceutical Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Hibbs Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures/tutorials per week, 10 hours of self-directed learning Corequisites: PHAR5513 and PHAR5515 Assessment: 2 x 1.5 hr exams (65%); laboratories & workshops (35%) Practical field work: 4hr laboratory practical and 2 x 3hrs herbal workshops Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study utilises the knowledge gained in PHAR5513 Pharmaceutical Chemistry 1A to develop students' ability to apply basic scientific and medicinal chemistry concepts in the rationalization of observed biological activities for a series of drug molecules. The unit of study will be presented as a series of discrete topic areas based on therapeutic classes (hormonal, cardiovascular, herbal medicines, central nervous system, chemotherapy, antihistamines, photochemotherapy and sunscreens) and macromolecular targets (enzyme, G-protein coupled receptor, nuclear receptor). Lectures will be supported by self-directed learning and tutorials. Students will also undertake quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) computer-based workshops and herbal medicine practicals as well as prepare a herbal medicine assay and oral presentation. These learning activities will further develop students' skills in critical thinking, the use of information technology and report writing.
Textbooks
Foye's Principles of Medicinal Chemistry (6th edn), edited by TL Lemke&DA Williams, Williams & Wilkins, 2008
PHAR5517 Pharmaceutics 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Veysel Kayser Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures/week Corequisites: PHAR5515 Assessment: Final exam (60%), minor exam (10%), laboratory practicals (30%) Practical field work: Laboratory work, 4hr/week for consecutive 2 weeks Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study students learn to evaluate the physicochemical principles, design, formulation, and manufacture of pharmaceutical dose forms. The formulation of liquid dose forms including parenteral, nasal, ophthalmic and aural products is discussed. Related topics such as diffusion and dissolution of drugs, drug solubilisation, surface and interfacial tension, surface active materials, micelle formation, pharmaceutical complexes and drug-packaging interactions are covered. Other topics covered in this unit include solid dose forms and particle science, rheology, dispersion dose forms including suspensions, colloidal dispersions, and emulsions; topical dose forms and semisolids; inhalation pharmaceutical aerosols; protein and peptide drugs and formulations; rectal products; novel drug delivery technologies. Aspects pertaining to the stability of dose forms are also presented in this unit.
Textbooks
Aulton M.E. Pharmaceutics: The Science of Dosage Form Design (7th edn) Churchill Livingston
PHAR5518 Pharmacy Practice A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erica Sainsbury Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures/wk and 2 x 2hr tutorials/wk Corequisites: PHAR5505 Assessment: Tutorial contribution (30%), exams (oral and written) (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is the first of three integrated units (Pharmacy Practice A, Pharmacy Practice B and Pharmacy Practice C) that will be completed during the MPharm program. It will commence with an introduction to the profession of pharmacy, the Australian health care and drug distribution systems, and the National Medicines Policy, including the National Strategy for Quality Use of Medicines. Themes such as evidence based practice, pharmacoepidemiology, drug information, medication safety, ethics and communication skills will be introduced early in the unit of study and will then be revisited and reinforced in the remainder of Pharmacy Practice A, as well as throughout Pharmacy Practice B and C. There will be lectures and tutorials which cover over the counter medications in preparation for your placement units. During the second half of semester, a number of therapeutics topics will be covered in a problem-based learning format. Practice-based tutorials will be supplemented with relevant therapeutics lectures and other learning resources. Students will explore the role of the pharmacist in advising on primary and self care, performing clinical interventions, conducting medication reviews, monitoring therapeutic outcomes and participating in therapeutic decision making within these therapeutic areas. There will also be an introduction to workplace communication and Pharmacy management at the end of semester.
Textbooks
Therapeutic Guidelines, Therapeutic Guidelines Ltd, North Melbourne, Vic. (latest editions)
PHAR5505 Clinical Residency 1

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jo-anne Brien Session: Intensive February Classes: Practical experience Prerequisites: PHAR5518 Assessment: Preceptor Evaluation (50%), Portfolio including reflective diary (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this unit of study is required. Practical field work: 4 weeks (or equivalent) experiential placement - ~35hrs per week. To be conducted between the end of Semester Two in Year One and completed before the the beginning ofSemester Onein Year Two. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
The overall objective of the Unit of Study is to complement Units of Study already undertaken in on-campus course work, and to develop experience in practice and knowledge of professional settings. This Unit of Study is focussed on professional practice settings, and is normally conducted in community pharmacies, although may include some hospital pharmacy placements (as available) - where the student will observe, and participate in - professional practice. A portfolio of activities designed for the practice setting is a guide to assist self-directed learning. The activities also are triggers for students to appreciate and develop their knowledge of the Professional Competencies Framework for pharmacists. Students are prompted to be reflective in their learning through the experiential learning program and will write a reflective commentary during the placement for assessment - to be included in the portfolio.

Year 2

PHAR5507 Dispensing Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erica Sainsbury Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6hrs of lectures, 19 x 2hr tutorials Prerequisites: PHAR5517 Assessment: Practical exams (30%), written exam (30%), continuous practical assessment (30%), dispensing portfolio (10%). Satisfactory performance in all areas of this unit of study is required. Practical field work: 7 x 3hr practicals and 5 x 2hr practicals Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study gives an introduction to dispensing practice, accuracy in dispensing, legal aspects of dispensing prescriptions, procedures for dispensing prescriptions, documentation of dispensing procedures, containers and labelling of dispensed medicines, dispensing of particular formulations, effect of changing formulation variables on the physical properties and efficacy of pharmaceutical products, dispensing and therapeutics and dosage. A series of workshops and practical classes assists students to develop the skills necessary to dispense and critically assess a variety of pharmaceutical products and a range of proprietary items, as well as facilitating the development of error-detection skills. During the second half of the semester, the process of dispensing is extended to include therapeutic aspects and recommendations. The lectures cover legal aspects of the prescribing and supply of scheduled medicines.
Textbooks
Australian Medicines Handbook 2014 or 2015
PHAR5508 Pharmacy Practice B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Betty Chaar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x lectures/wk and 2 x 2hr tutorials/wk Prerequisites: PHAR5518 and PHAR5505 Assessment: Tutorial participation and contribution (10%), written medication review report (10%), mid-semester exam (20%), final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is a continuation of Pharmacy Practice A. A number of therapeutics topics will be covered in a problem-based learning format. Practice-based case-study tutorials will be supplemented with relevant therapeutics lectures and other learning resources. Students will explore the role of the pharmacist in advising on primary and self care, performing clinical interventions, conducting medication reviews, oral and written communication skills with consumers and other healthcare professionals; monitoring therapeutic outcomes and participating in therapeutic decision making within these therapeutic areas. This unit of study will facilitate students to gain in-depth knowledge about the pharmacotherapy of disease states and delivery of cognitive pharmacy services in practice through both educational lectures and self-directed learning techniques.

Themes such as evidence based practice, pharmacoepidemiology, drug information including the use of Consumer Medicine Information statements [CMI], medication safety, cognitive pharmacy services, ethics and communication skills will be incorporated throughout the unit of study. Pharmacy management, human resources and career building are also covered in this unit of study.
Textbooks
Therapeutic Guidelines, Therapeutic Guidelines Ltd, North Melbourne, Vic. (latest edition) Australian Medicines Handbook, Rossi S (latest edition) Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics (latest edition), Walker R, Whittlesea C (latest edition) Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary and Handbook ISBN Number: 9780646570198
PHAR5514 Pharmaceutics 2A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ingrid Gelissen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3-5 x lectures/wk and 2hr workshops scheduled as required Assessment: Quizzes (summative and formative) (30%), workshops formative, (10%), final examination (summative) (60%). All assessments are compulsory. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is intended to provide knowledge in a number of fundamental areas that guide and provide evidence to support the safe, effective and ethical use of medicines. These fundamental areas of knowledge start with an understanding of the relationship between drugs interacting with target sites in the body and the effect produced (i.e. pharmacodynamic principles) and understanding the physiological and physicochemical factors that govern the movement of drugs around the body and the time course of exposure of body tissues and blood to drugs (i.e. pharmacokinetics). These principles involve developing concepts and models to explain drug activity in patients and to guide appropriate drug dosage selection.
This unit will also explore reasons behind variability in response to medicines among different individuals. The effects of disease, other drugs, demographics and the genetic basis for variable response will be introduced. Basic pharmacogenetic principles for explaining and predicting pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic variability in response will be explored.
Students are also exposed to the notion that medicines may produce adverse effects (as well as beneficial ones). The mechanisms underlying adverse reactions to drugs and how these are classified are explored as are the principles for detecting and avoiding these effects.
Ultimately, many options often exist to manage illness. While the fundamental principles described above assist in understanding how individual drugs should be used, they do not alone provide knowledge to select among alternative options. This unit will introduce students to methods that are used to provide evidence of efficacy and safety of different therapeutic options and to define the place in therapy of these options. To do this, the principles that underpin evidence based medicine (including the clinical trial and pharmacoepidemiology) and the notion of levels of evidence are introduced. Exposure to these principles is intended to develop in students a basic understanding of how to critically evaluate therapeutic options.
PHAR5506 Pharmaceutical Chemistry 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rebecca Roubin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures/wk and 7 x 3hr workshops as well as self-directed learning Prerequisites: PHAR5513, PHAR5516 Assessment: Exam (50%), Biopharmaceuticals workshop (15%), Antibiotics resistance workshop (15%), Emerging therapeutics workshop (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim of this unit of study is to explore recent advances in drug technology and to illustrate how basic research underpins clinical practice and pharmaceutical care. Students will be exposed to the newly developed and "up-and-coming" biotechnologies such as gene therapy, immunotherapies and prodrugs in the context of neurological disorders, inflammatory diseases, cancer and AIDS. Students will also obtain molecular insights into the actions of natural products. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will: be aware of the latest advances in drug technology; understand how basic research underpins clinical practice and pharmaceutical care; have developed advanced literature searching skills and be able to comprehend the work in original research articles and extract the relevant information from those articles; have improved their writing and oral communication skills; and comprehend the role chemistry plays in determining the molecular basis of drug action. This unit of study will hone the student's critical thinking, literature searching and scientific presentation skills - thus equipping the students with the essential skills for life-long learning.
Textbooks
Foye's Principles of Medicinal Chemistry; Thomas L Lemke, David A Williams, Victoria F Roche & S. William Zito, LWW, 6th Ed, 2008. Immunology for Pharmacy; Flaherty, Elsevier, 2012.
PHAR5509 Integrated Pharmaceutics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fanfan Zhou Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1hr lectures/wk and 1 x 3hr workshop/wk Prerequisites: PHAR5517 Corequisites: PHAR5514 Assessment: Exam (40%) and workshop presentations/assignments/reports (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to expose students to several themes associated with new drug development. As an integrated pharmaceutics course, this unit covers the topics of preclinical screening, ADME and animal testing, pre-formulation, formulation, bioinformatics in drug development and finally product marketing and post marketing responsibilities. Themes will be introduced in the form of lectures presented by the faculty as well as invited scientific professionals.
PHAR5510 Pharmacy Practice C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures/wk and 2 x 2hr tutorials/wk Corequisites: PHAR5508 Assessment: Tutorial contribution (30%) and exams (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is a continuation of Pharmacy Practice A and B. A number of therapeutics topics will be covered in a problem-based learning format. Practice-based tutorials will be supplemented with relevant therapeutics lectures and other learning resources. Students will explore the role of the pharmacist in advising on primary and self care, performing clinical interventions, conducting medication reviews, monitoring therapeutic outcomes, participating in therapeutic decision making and involvement in health promotion and public health within these therapeutic areas. Themes such as evidence based practice, pharmacoepidemiology, drug information, medication safety, ethics and communication skills will be incorporated throughout the unit of study.
Textbooks
Therapeutic Guidelines. Therapeutic Guidelines Ltd, North Melbourne, Vic., latest editions Australian Medicines Handbook, Rossi S (ed), 2012
PHAR5512 Clinical Residency 2

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Andrew McLachlan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Clinical experience Corequisites: PHAR5508 and PHAR5510 Assessment: For each block: Preceptor Evaluation (50%), Portfolio, Case/Project and Reflective Diary (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this unit of study is required Practical field work: 3 weeks clinical placement - ~35hrs per week normally in July. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
This is an experiential unit of study. Off-campus placements will provide students with opportunities to enhance their knowledge and skill-base within clinical and professional settings. The sites may include primary and tertiary health care settings (community and hospital), general and specialist practice in rural and metropolitan areas, professional organisations and Quality Use of Medicines settings, as well as, government and the pharmaceutical industry. Students will create a portfolio that records their activities during the placement block. The activities are triggers for students to appreciate and develop their knowledge of the Professional Competencies Framework for pharmacists. The portfolio materials for students at a clinical site will also include a case report prepared by the student. The Case Report can be submitted for formative feedback, and the Case Report will be submitted as part of the Portfolio for summative assessment. Students at non clinical placement sites may submit the results of a placement project as part of their Portfolio. Students are prompted to be reflective in their learning through the experiential learning program and will write a reflective diary during the placement for assessment to be included in the Portfolio.