Master of Pharmacy

Unit of study descriptions

Year 1

PHAR5711 Introductory Professional Practice

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paulina Stehlik Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x lecs/week, 1 x 2hr tutorial/week Assumed knowledge: 3 credit points of Statistics, 6 credit points of Human Biology, 12 credit points of Pharmacology, 12 credit points of Physiology. Students who have not completed up to 12 credit points of pre-requisite subjects are strongly advised to take the corresponding Bridging Course offered in February or July and as a distance course at other times of the year. Assessment: Group report (10%), group presentation (10%), quiz (10%), practical exam (35%), final exam (35%), MASUS (Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory) and ePortfolio (Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Introductory Professional Practice is a broad introduction to the discipline of pharmacy, the roles that pharmacists play in health care and ideas, issues, skills and knowledge base required of a professional pharmacist.
It introduces students to concepts that underpin disease states management, including those which are managed directly by the pharmacist as a primary care provider, together with foundational skills and knowledge which equip students for clinical decision-making and problem-solving. The place of pharmacy within the Australian health care system is explored, and basic principles of management are also included. In addition, students will be introduced to technical skills used in pharmacy such as dispensing and compounding. Lectures are supported by online material, tutorial and laboratory classes, which allow students to practice and apply skills and knowledge. Themes of evidence based practice, drug information, ethics, clinical reasoning and intervention and communication skills run throughout. Learning gained in this unit prepares students for clinical placements and later units of study, which will build on both the skills and clinical topics covered in this unit.
Textbooks
Communication Skills in Pharmacy Practice. R.S. Beardsley et al. 6th Edition. LWW, 2011
PHAR5712 Pharmaceutical Microbiology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ramin Rohanizadeh Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hrs/week Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Human Biology, 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry, 12 credit points of Pharmacology, 12 credit points of Physiology. Students who have not completed up to 12 credit points of pre-requisite subjects are strongly advised to take the corresponding Bridging Course offered in February or July and as a distance course at other times of the year. Assessment: Final exam (60%), Lab Report (10%), Online quizzes (10%), Antibiotic workshop assignment (10%), Pharmatopia quiz (10%) Practical field work: 1.5hrs/week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide knowledge on the role of micro-organisms in pharmacy and the pharmaceutical sciences. It applies basic microbiological principles to the production of clean and sterile pharmaceutical products in both community and hospital pharmacy, and in industrial manufacture, and antimicrobial therapies. Topics include the structure, function and importance of the major groups of micro-organisms; host defence mechanisms; pathogenicity and epidemiology of infectious diseases; disinfectants; preservatives; antiseptics; antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, and antimicrobial stewardship; principles and methods of sterilisation, aseptic preparation and techniques; cleanroom technology and good manufacturing practice (GMP).
PHAR5713 Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Balle Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hrs/week Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry, 12 credit points of Pharmacology, 12 credit points of Physiology. Students who have not completed up to 12 credit points of pre-requisite subjects are strongly advised to take the corresponding Bridging Course offered in February or July and as a distance course at other times of the year. Assessment: Final exam (60%); Laboratory report and presentation (20%); Molecular Modeling Reports (5% + 15%) Practical field work: 11hrs tutorials, 20hrs lab/workshops and self-directed learning Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the early phases of the drug discovery process from identification of a biological target molecule (enzyme or receptor) to identification of lead molecules and how chemical synthesis and biological screening is applied to develop lead molecules into drugs with desired molecular properties. Topics include drug discovery, protein structure and function, protein structure determination, drug synthesis, spectroscopic analysis, functional groups, molecular properties, molecular modelling, structure based drug design, drug screening. Students will also gain experience in a variety of experimental techniques related to drug design. In addition, students will develop skills including critical thinking, the use of information technology and report writing.
Textbooks
Patrick GL. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry (5th ed). Oxford University Press, 2013
PHAR5714 Pharmaceutics and Formulations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Veysel Kayser Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x lecs/week, 1 x tutorial/week Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry, 12 credit points of Pharmacology, 12 credit points of Physiology. Students who have not completed up to 12 credit points of pre-requisite subjects are strongly advised to take the corresponding Bridging Course offered in February or July and as a distance course at other times of the year. Assessment: Final exam (60%), minor exam (10%), laboratory practicals (30%) Practical field work: Laboratory work - 4hrs/week for two consecutive weeks Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study students learn to evaluate the physicochemical principles, design, formulation, and manufacture of pharmaceutical dose forms. The formulation of liquid dose forms including parenteral, nasal, ophthalmic and aural products is discussed. Related topics such as diffusion and dissolution of drugs, drug solubilisation, surface and interfacial tension, surface active materials, micelle formation, pharmaceutical complexes and drug-packaging interactions are covered. Other topics covered in this unit include solid dose forms and particle science, rheology, dispersion dose forms including suspensions, colloidal dispersions, and emulsions; topical dose forms and semisolids; inhalation pharmaceutical aerosols; biopharmaceuticals including protein and peptide drugs, vaccines and their formulations; rectal products; novel drug delivery technologies. Aspects pertaining to the stability of dose forms are also presented in this unit.
Textbooks
Aulton M.E. Pharmaceutics: The Science of Dosage Form Design (7th edn) Churchill Livingston and
PHAR5715 Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fanfan Zhou Session: Semester 2a Classes: Lectures, workshops, and online learning activities. Assumed knowledge: 3 credit points of Calculus, 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry. Students who have not completed up to 12 credit points of prerequisite subjects are strongly advised to take the corresponding Bridging Course (offered in February, July and as a distance course at other times of the year). Assessment: Metabolism workshop assignment (20%), In-class pharmacokinetics quizzes (10%), formal quiz (10%), and final exam (60%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is intended to provide an understanding of drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenetics, and the clinical application of these concepts to support the safe and effective use of medicines. Lecture topics will include metabolic enzymes and pathways, identification of metabolites, pharmacokinetics, drug absorption and distribution, protein binding and bioavailability.
These fundamental areas of knowledge start with an understanding of the relationship between drugs interacting with target sites in the body and the effect produced (i.e. pharmacodynamic principles) and understanding the physiological and physicochemical factors that govern the effect of the body on drugs (metabolism), the movement of drugs around the body and the time course of exposure of body tissues and blood to drugs (i.e. pharmacokinetics). These principles involve developing concepts and models to explain drug activity in patients and to guide appropriate drug dosage selection. This unit will also explore reasons behind the factors affecting drug efficacy and variability in response to medicines among different individuals. The effects of disease, other drugs, demographics and the genetic basis for variable response will be introduced. Basic pharmacogenetic principles for explaining and predicting pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic variability in response will be explored.
Textbooks
Applied Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics. Shargel, Wu-Pong & Yu (2012); Pharmacokinetics Made Easy, DJ Birkett 2nd edition (2010); Pharmacogenomics: The search for Individualised Therapies, Licinio and Wong.
PHAR5716 Integrated Primary Healthcare 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bandana Saini Session: Semester 2b Classes: Lectures, workshops and online learning activities. Assumed knowledge: 3 credit points of Calculus, 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry. Students who have not completed up to 12 credit points of prerequisite subjects are strongly advised to take the corresponding Bridging Course (offered in February, July and as a distance course at other times of the year). Assessment: Participation in workshops (10%), dispensing activities (20%), oral exam (20%), and final written exam 50%. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies, with a particular focus on OTC medications. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of respiratory and gastrointestinal. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders. This units will also explore interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a multitude of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will help students to develop the language and non-verbal skills pharmacists need to communicate effectively with patients, doctors, and other health care professionals.
Textbooks
Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics. R. Walker & C. Whittlesea 5th Edition (2012); Australian Medicines Handbook (2017). eTG Complete [electronic resource]; Foye¿s Principles of Medicinal Chemistry. TL Lemke & DA Williams 7th Edition (2013). Rang and Dale¿s Pharmacology H.P. Rang, M.M. Dale, J.M. Ritter, R.J. Flower, G. Henderson 8th Edition (2016).
PHAR5717 Integrated Primary Healthcare 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Hibbs Session: Semester 2b Classes: Lectures, workshops and online learning activities. Assumed knowledge: 3 credit points of Calculus, 6 credit points of Biochemistry, 12 credit points of Chemistry. Students who have not completed up to 12 credit points of prerequisite subjects are strongly advised to take the corresponding Bridging Course (offered in February, July and as a distance course at other times of the year). Assessment: Participation in workshops (10%), dispensing activities (20%), oral exam (20%), and final written exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on medicines available over the counter (OTC), or prescribed, for therapeutic use in a number of common disorders affecting the musculoskeletal, dermatological, special senses, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems. The pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies will be covered. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of these disorders. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with these disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a multitude of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will help students to develop the language and non-verbal skills pharmacists need to communicate effectively with patients, doctors, and other health care professionals. This unit of study complements the practical experiences undertaken during experiential placements.
Textbooks
Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics. R. Walker & C. Whittlesea 5th Edition (2012); Australian Medicines Handbook (2017). eTG Complete [electronic resource]; Foye¿s Principles of Medicinal Chemistry. TL Lemke & DA Williams 7th Edition (2013). Rang and Dale¿s Pharmacology H.P. Rang, M.M. Dale, J.M. Ritter, R.J. Flower, G. Henderson 8th Edition (2016).
PHAR5718 Experiential Placement 1A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paulina Stehlik Session: Intensive July Classes: Practical experience Assessment: Preceptor Evaluation (50%), Portfolio (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this unit of study is required. Practical field work: approximately 80 hours of experiential placements. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney and as set by the Faculty prior to commencing this Unit of Study. Students who have not met verification will not be eligible to attend their placement.
Experiential Placements 1A is the first of a series of three Units of Study where students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings.
The overall objectives of the Experiential Placements Program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the Experiential Placements Program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus debriefing sessions . Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (newest edition); Australian Medicines Handbook (newest edition).
PHAR5719 Experiential Placement 1B

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paulina Stehlik Session: Intensive December Classes: Briefing sessions, practical experience and debrief session. Prerequisites: PHAR5718 Assessment: Preceptor Evaluation (50%), Portfolio (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this unit of study is required. Practical field work: approximately 160 hours of Experiential placements. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney and as set by the Faculty prior to commencing this Unit of Study. Students who have not met verification requirements will not be eligible to attend their placement.
Experiential Placements 1B is a continuation of Experiential Placement 1A where students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings.
The overall objectives of the Experiential Placements Program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the Experiential Placements Program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus briefing and debriefing sessions . Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (newest edition); Australian Medicines Handbook (newest edition).

Year 2

PHAR5507 Dispensing Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Irene Um Session: Semester 2 Classes: 12hrs of lectures/online lectures, 12 x 2hr workshops Prerequisites: PCOL5001 and PHAR5513 and PHAR5515 and PHAR5516 and PHAR5517 and PHAR5518 and PHAR5505. Assessment: Practical exams (40%), continuous practical assessment (35%), dispensing portfolio (15%), label quiz (10%), forensics exam. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this unit of study is required. Practical field work: 7 x 3hr practicals and 5 x 2hr practicals Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study gives an introduction to dispensing practice, accuracy in dispensing, legal aspects of dispensing prescriptions, procedures for dispensing prescriptions, documentation of dispensing procedures, containers and labelling of dispensed medicines, dispensing of particular formulations, effect of changing formulation variables on the physical properties and efficacy of pharmaceutical products, dispensing and therapeutics and dosage. A series of workshops and practical classes assists students to develop the skills necessary to dispense and critically assess a variety of pharmaceutical products and a range of proprietary items, as well as facilitating the development of error-detection skills. During the second half of the semester, the process of dispensing is extended to include therapeutic aspects and recommendations. The lectures cover legal aspects of the prescribing and supply of scheduled medicines.
Textbooks
Australian Medicines Handbook 2016 or 2017, Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary 23
PHAR5508 Pharmacy Practice B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Betty Chaar Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x lectures/wk and 2 x 2hr tutorials/wk Prerequisites: PCOL5001 and PHAR5513 and PHAR5515 and PHAR5516 and PHAR5517 and PHAR5518. Assessment: Tutorial participation and contribution (10%), written medication review report (10%), mid-semester exam (20%), final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is a continuation of Pharmacy Practice A and a preparatory course for PHAR5510 Pharmacy Practice C. A number of therapeutics topics will be covered in problem-based learning and workshop formats. Practice-based case-study tutorials will be supplemented with relevant therapeutics lectures and other learning resources. Students will explore the role of the pharmacist in advising on primary and self care, performing clinical interventions, conducting medication reviews, oral and written communication skills with consumers and other healthcare professionals; monitoring therapeutic outcomes and participating in therapeutic decision making within these therapeutic areas. This unit of study will facilitate students to gain in-depth knowledge about the pharmacotherapy of disease states and delivery of cognitive pharmacy services in practice through both educational lectures and self-directed learning techniques.
Themes such as evidence based practice, pharmacoepidemiology, drug information including the use of Consumer Medicine Information statements [CMI], medication safety, cognitive pharmacy services, ethics and communication skills will be incorporated throughout the unit of study. Pharmacy management, human resources and career building are also covered in this unit of study. Students will also be provided with training designed to foster development of professional communication skills with both consumers and other healthcare providers in role play methods aiming to develop students¿ competencies in communication, interviewing skills and clinical decision making.
Textbooks
Therapeutic Guidelines, Therapeutic Guidelines Ltd, North Melbourne, Vic. (latest edition) Australian Medicines Handbook, Rossi S (latest edition) Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics (latest edition), Walker R, Whittlesea C (latest edition) Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary and Handbook ISBN Number: 9780646570198
PHAR5514 Pharmaceutics 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Siew-Kee (Amanda) Low Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3-5 x lectures/wk and 2hr workshops scheduled as required Prerequisites: PCOL5001 and PHAR5513 and PHAR5515 and PHAR5516 and PHAR5517 and PHAR5518. Assessment: Quizzes (summative and formative) (30%), workshop participation (5%), PeerWise participation (5%) and final examination (summative) (60%). All assessments are compulsory. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is intended to provide knowledge in a number of fundamental areas that guide and provide evidence to support the safe, effective and ethical use of medicines. These fundamental areas of knowledge start with an understanding of the relationship between drugs interacting with target sites in the body and the effect produced (i.e. pharmacodynamic principles) and understanding the physiological and physicochemical factors that govern the movement of drugs around the body and the time course of exposure of body tissues and blood to drugs (i.e. pharmacokinetics). These principles involve developing concepts and models to explain drug activity in patients and to guide appropriate drug dosage selection.
This unit will also explore reasons behind variability in response to medicines among different individuals. The effects of disease, other drugs, demographics and the genetic basis for variable response will be introduced. Basic pharmacogenetic principles for explaining and predicting pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic variability in response will be explored.
Students are also exposed to the notion that medicines may produce adverse effects (as well as beneficial ones). The mechanisms underlying adverse reactions to drugs and how these are classified are explored as are the principles for detecting and avoiding these effects.
Ultimately, many options often exist to manage illness. While the fundamental principles described above assist in understanding how individual drugs should be used, they do not alone provide knowledge to select among alternative options. This unit will introduce students to methods that are used to provide evidence of efficacy and safety of different therapeutic options and to define the place in therapy of these options. To do this, the principles that underpin evidence based medicine (including the clinical trial and pharmacoepidemiology) and the notion of levels of evidence are introduced. Exposure to these principles is intended to develop in students a basic understanding of how to critically evaluate therapeutic options.
PHAR5506 Pharmaceutical Chemistry 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rebecca Roubin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures/wk and 7 x 3hr workshops as well as self-directed learning Prerequisites: PCOL5001 and PHAR5513 and PHAR5515 and PHAR5516 and PHAR5517 and PHAR5518. Assessment: Final Exam (35%), Midsemester Exam (30%), Antibiotics resistance workshop (15%), Emerging therapeutics workshop (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to explore recent advances in drug technology and to illustrate how basic research underpins clinical practice and pharmaceutical care. Students will be exposed to the newly developed and "up-and-coming" biotechnologies such as gene therapy, immunotherapies and prodrugs in the context of neurological disorders, inflammatory diseases, cancer and AIDS. Students will also obtain molecular insights into the actions of natural products. On successful completion of this unit of study, students will: be aware of the latest advances in drug technology; understand how basic research underpins clinical practice and pharmaceutical care; have developed advanced literature searching skills and be able to comprehend the work in original research articles and extract the relevant information from those articles; have improved their writing and oral communication skills; and comprehend the role chemistry plays in determining the molecular basis of drug action. This unit of study will hone the student's critical thinking, literature searching and scientific presentation skills; thus equipping the students with the essential skills for life-long learning.
Textbooks
Foye's Principles of Medicinal Chemistry; Thomas L Lemke, David A Williams, Victoria F Roche & S. William Zito, LWW, 6th Ed, 2008. Immunology for Pharmacy; Flaherty, Elsevier, 2012.
PHAR5509 Integrated Pharmaceutics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fanfan Zhou Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1hr lectures/wk and 1 x 3hr workshop/wk Prerequisites: PCOL5001 and PHAR5513 and PHAR5515 and PHAR5516 and PHAR5517 and PHAR5518 and PHAR5505. Assessment: Exam (60%) and workshop presentations/assignments/reports (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to expose students to several themes associated with new drug development. As an integrated pharmaceutics course, this unit covers the topics of preclinical screening, ADME and animal testing, pre-formulation, formulation, bioinformatics in drug development and finally product marketing and post marketing responsibilities. Themes will be introduced in the form of lectures presented by the faculty as well as invited scientific professionals.
PHAR5510 Pharmacy Practice C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Andrew Bartlett Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3hrs of lectures/week, 8 x case-based learning workshops ( 2 x 2hr sessions/week), 12 hours of additional workshops. Prerequisites: PCOL5001 and PHAR5513 and PHAR5515 and PHAR5516 and PHAR5517 and PHAR5518 and PHAR5505. Assessment: final examination MCQ (30%), 4 x Self-Directed Learning modules (10%), Health Care Collaboration (HCC) (10%), Group medication review submission (10%), OSCE (40%), Case Conference (S/U), IPL Peer assessment (S/U) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is a continuation of Pharmacy Practice A and B. A number of therapeutics topics will be covered in a problem-based learning format. Practice-based tutorials will be supplemented with relevant therapeutics lectures and other learning resources. Students will explore the role of the pharmacist in advising on primary and self care, performing clinical interventions, conducting medication reviews, monitoring therapeutic outcomes, participating in therapeutic decision making and involvement in health promotion and public health within these therapeutic areas. Themes such as evidence based practice, pharmacoepidemiology, drug information, medication safety, ethics and communication skills will be incorporated throughout the unit of study.
Textbooks
Therapeutic Guidelines. Therapeutic Guidelines Ltd, North Melbourne, VIC. Latest editions.
PHAR5512 Clinical Residency 2

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jo-anne Brien Session: Intensive July Classes: Clinical experience Prerequisites: PCOL5001 and PHAR5513 and PHAR5515 and PHAR5516 and PHAR5517 and PHAR5518 and PHAR5505. Assessment: For each block: Preceptor Evaluation (50%), Portfolio, Case/Project and Reflective Diary (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this unit of study is required. Practical field work: 4 weeks clinical placement ~35hrs per week in July. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney prior to commencing this Unit of Study. Students who have not met verification requirements will not be eligible to attend their placement.
This is an experiential unit of study. Off-campus placements will provide students with opportunities to enhance their knowledge and skill-base within clinical and professional settings. The sites may include primary and tertiary health care settings (community and hospital), general and specialist practice in rural and metropolitan areas, professional organisations and Quality Use of Medicines settings. The overall objectives of the Clinical Placements Program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio during their placement experiences. The portfolio materials for students at a clinical site/s will also include a Case Report prepared by the student. The Case Report may be submitted for formative feedback, and the Case Report will be submitted as part of the Portfolio for summative assessment. Students at a non-clinical placement site may submit a Project Report as part of their Portfolio. Students are prompted to be reflective in their learning through the experiential learning program and will write a reflective diary to be included in the Portfolio. Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement. Students will attend on-campus debriefing sessions.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (newest edition); Australian Medicines Handbook (newest edition).