Bachelor of Pharmacy and Management

Unit of study descriptions

First Year

BIOL1008 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Lectures; six 3-hour practical sessions; six workshops and tutorials; students encouraged to spend 1-2 hours per week accessing online resources Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Written and oral presentation, quiz, skills-based assessment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences.
Textbooks
TBA
BUSS1040 Economics for Business Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ECON1001 OR ECON1040 Assessment: written assignment (15%), on-line quizzes (10%), mid-semester exam (20%), and final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Economics underlies all business decisions, from pricing to product development, to negotiations, to understanding the general economic environment. This unit provides an introduction to economic analysis with a particular focus on concepts and applications relevant to business. This unit addresses how individual consumers and firms make decisions and how they interact in markets. It also introduces a framework for understanding and analysing the broader economic and public policy environment in which a business competes. This unit provides a rigorous platform for further study and a major in economics as well as providing valuable tools of analysis that complement a student's general business training, regardless of their area of specialisation.
CHEM1611 Chemistry A (Pharmacy)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Mathematics Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignments (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry provides the basis for understanding molecular structures and processes, essential knowledge for many later year Pharmacy units of study. Lecture topics include some fundamental concepts, atomic theory, states and properties of matter, equations and stoichiometry, general acid-base theory, atomic structure, chemical bonding, introduction to organic chemistry, nomenclature, aliphatic chemistry, aromatic chemistry, heterocyclic compounds, isomerism, stereoisomerism, reaction mechanisms, biomolecules, amino acids and peptides, carbohydrates. Practical work is designed to enhance confidence and develop skills in the handling and manipulation of chemicals and in the observation and processing of experimental results.
Special preparative studies: Students wishing to enrol in CHEM1611 who do not have the assumed chemical knowledge are advised to consult the School of Chemistry for information about a bridging course (offered in February, see http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
PHAR1811 Foundations of Pharmacy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Timothy Chen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x lectures/wk, 1 x 2hr workshop/wk, 1 x 2hr workshop/fortnight, 1 x 2-3hr community placement, 2 x 2hr theory/practical classes Assessment: Exam (50%), group projects (40%) and quiz (10%) Practical field work: One class will be held in the dispensing laboratory and 2-3 hours of fieldwork in a community pharmacy are required Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Foundations of Pharmacy is a broad introduction to the discipline of pharmacy and the roles that pharmacists play in health care as well as the ideas, issues, skills and knowledge base required of a professional pharmacist. A number of topics are introduced but not covered in depth; they will be further developed in subsequent units of study and later years of the degree. Specific skills in research, critical thinking, writing and presenting are developed in the context of activities designed to orient students to their future profession. The intent is that students begin to think and behave as future members of the profession of pharmacy, and reflect upon the attitudes and beliefs that will shape their practice.
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessment (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BUSS1030 Accounting, Business and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ACCT1001 or ACCT1002 or ACCT1003 or ACCT1004 or ACCT1005 Assessment: tutorial contribution (10%), assignment (15%), mid-semester examination (25%), final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit investigates the fundamentals of accounting and aims to provide a broad understanding of the role of accounting in the context of business and society. The format of the unit is designed to show that there are many uses of accounting data. The focus moves from accountability to decision making; both functions are explained through examples such as the 'double entry equation', and from an output (financial statements) perspective. Some more technical aspects of accounting are outlined, including the elements of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses within simple, familiar scenarios. Besides developing an understanding of the role of accounting via conventional financial reports, recent developments including the discharge of accountability by companies through the release of corporate social and environmental reports and the global financial crisis, are explored through an accounting lens.
CHEM1612 Chemistry B (Pharmacy)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Assumed knowledge: CHEM1611 Assessment: Theory examination (70%), laboratory work (15%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry provides the basis for understanding molecular structures and processes, essential knowledge for many later year Pharmacy units of study. Lecture topics include redox reactions, electrochemistry, introduction to colloids and surface chemistry, the biological periodic table, radiochemistry, chemical energetics, equilibrium theory, solution theory. Practical work is designed to enhance confidence and develop skills in the handling and manipulation of chemicals and in the observation and processing of experimental results.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
PHAR1821 Pharmacy Practice 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Parisa Aslani Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1hr lectures/wk, 1 x 2hr workshop/wk Assessment: Exam (50%), reports (30%), Reflective Ability Clinical Assessment (15%), self-directed learning (5%) Practical field work: Teamwork projects Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study consists of three integrated streams: (1) Social Pharmacy, which is designed to provide a broad perspective of health and illness, and encourages a view of the patient as a whole person. Topics include self-management and patient communication. In this stream, students will be introduced to psycho-social processes that underpin patient health behaviours. (2) Quality Use of Medicines in primary care focusing on the provision of non-prescription medicines, which introduces and develops students' knowledge of Pharmacy Only and Pharmacist Only medicines. Skills will include information gathering, clinical decision making and provision of pharmaceutical care. Core areas covered include responding to minor ailments such as pain, eye, ear, nose, fever, viral infections as well as gastrointestinal complaints. (3) Academic Writing Skills, which provides instruction and support for developing skills for academic writing and critical appraisal.
Textbooks
Rutter P and Newby D. Churchill Livingston (2016) Community Pharmacy. Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, Elsevier Publishing.

Second Year

PHAR1812 Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jane Hanrahan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x lectures/wk, 1 x 2hr tutorial/wk Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and 2U Mathematics. Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February and as a distance course at other times of the year) and Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Written exam (60%), workshop reports (20%), quizzes (10%) and poster presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences provides an introduction to principles underlying pharmaceutical chemistry and pharmaceutics. This provides the foundations for a more detailed study of the chemical characteristics of drug molecules, dosage forms and pharmacokinetics in later years of the Bachelor of Pharmacy. The physicochemical properties of drugs are explored from a pharmaceutical perspective complemented by the study of chemistry. Modules provide an introduction to acid/base and solubility characteristics of drug molecules, drug discovery and development, dosage forms, and fundamental mathematics. Small group work in workshop sessions supports the learning of material introduced in lectures.
Textbooks
Basic Pharmaceutical Science Resource Book
PHAR2812 Microbiology and Infection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lifeng Kang Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x lectures/wk Prerequisites: BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 Assessment: Exam and quiz (60%), mid-term quiz (15%), and practicals including workshops (25%) Practical field work: 8 x laboratory classes, 2 x workshops (video demonstration) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides information on the biology of micro-organisms with particular reference to the importance of micro-organisms in pharmacy and the pharmaceutical sciences. The unit also involves the application of basic microbiological principles to the production of clean and sterile pharmaceutical products in both community and hospital pharmacy, and in industrial manufacture. Topics include the comparison of the structure, function and importance of the major groups of micro-organisms; pathogenicity and epidemiology of infectious diseases; infection control measures and principles underlying treatment of infectious diseases; mechanisms of action, characteristics, and types of antibiotics and chemical antimicrobial agents; antibiotic resistance; principles and methods of sterilisation, disinfection and preservation; concepts of good manufacturing practice and aseptic techniques. The practical component is illustrative of the lectures and focuses on techniques of handling microbial culture and identifying micro-organisms; factors affecting the microbial growth; transmission of diseases and host defence mechanisms; basic aseptic microbiological technique applicable to preparation of pharmaceutical products; and evaluation of different chemical antimicrobial agents.
Textbooks
Recommended: Denyer SP, Hodges NA and Gorman SP. Hugo and Russell's Pharmaceutical Microbiology. 8th edition, Blackwell, 2011; Prescott, Harley and Kelin's Microbiology, 7th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2007
PHSI2601 Physiology for Pharmacy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Meloni Muir Session: Semester 1 Classes: Four 1-hour lectures per week Prerequisites: (12cp from junior chemistry AND 24cp from junior science excluding chemistry) OR (6cp from junior chemistry AND 30cp from junior science excluding chemistry). Assessment: One 1.5 hr final exam, two in-semester tests, four practical quizzes, one written assessment (100%). Practical field work: Three 3-hour practicals and one 4-hour practical per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physiology for Pharmacy provides a broad basic knowledge of human structure and function. Topics covered include physiology of the nervous system and special senses, muscle physiology, and movement and consciousness. It also covers human endocrine system, reproduction, blood, heart and circulation, fluid regulation and electrolyte balance, the skin, sensory perception, gastro-intestinal function and respiration.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, Media Update: International Edition, 6th edition. 2012. ISBN: 9780321750075
WORK1003 Foundations of Work and Employment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online modules, 1x 1 hour lecture and 1x 1 hour tutorial hour per week Assessment: in class test (15%), essay (30%), tutorial participation (10%), tutorial leadership (15%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit draws on concepts from industrial relations and human resource management to examine the interests and strategies of workers, unions, managers, employers and the state. It explores the relationships between these parties as they seek to manage their environments and workplaces and to exercise control over each other. The unit enables students to understand how and why the organisation, regulation and management of work are changing in Australia and globally. As well as providing an introduction to all aspects of the study of the employment relationship, this is the foundation unit for a major in industrial relations and human resource management.
CLAW1001 Foundations of Business Law

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two hours of lectures and a one hour tutorial per week Prohibitions: CLAW2214 Assessment: tutorial assessment (10%), mid-semester exam (15%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The entire fabric of commerce is woven from a complex legal regime, judicial and statutory, which regulates all commercial activity. Every decision in business, and every transaction and relationship is made in the context of this legal regime. The aim of Foundations of Business Law is to introduce the students to the legal framework and regulatory systems which underlie all business activity and to expose them to the legal implications of commercial conduct. This unit of study introduces the Australian legal system and key areas of substantive business law including contracts, torts (in particular negligence and privacy), property and securities, white collar crime, intellectual property, competition and consumer law (in particular advertising, product liability and unfair contracts), business structures and operations, misleading and unconscionable conduct and dispute resolution.
PCOL2605 Pharmacology for Pharmacy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Carroll Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 lect/wk, 12 hours prac/workshop/tutorial Prerequisites: (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and (BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX8) and (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1). Corequisites: PHSI2601 Assessment: Mid-semester quiz (15%), final examination (55%), continuous assessment (lab reports or assignments) (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a basic understanding of drug actions related to physiological and pathological functions. It covers areas of pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, the autonomic nervous system, pain management, complementary medicines, adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, and the pharmacological treatment of various disease states affecting the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system and the renal system.
Textbooks
Rang and Dale's Pharmacology, 8th edition; (Elsevier, Churchill Livingstone). Baisc and Clinical Pharmacology, Katzung and Trevor, 13th edition (Lange, McGraw Hill)
PHAR1822 Physical Pharmaceutics and Formulation A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nial Wheate Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x pharmacy lectures/week, 8 x mathematics lectures, 5 x mathematics tutorials; classes will be arranged as needed Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and 2U Mathematics. Assessment: Exam (60%), Maths quiz (20%), Laboratory reports (5 x 3% = 15%), Peerwise (5%) Practical field work: 5 x laboratory sessions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to facilitate an understanding of the basic scientific concepts behind designing and using liquid or semi-solid pharmaceutical dosage forms to deliver a drug. Carrying on from PHAR1812 where different dose forms and the importance of the route of administration was introduced, this unit looks at topics such as diffusion and dissolution of drugs, drug solubilisation, crystal polymorphism, suspension and emulsion-based dosage forms. With a grounding in these concepts the unit then goes on to explore specific methods of drug delivery, including: auricular, ocular, intranasal, lung, and intravenous and intramuscular injections, including hospital practice points for pharmacists. This unit of study also includes mathematical tools required for other units of study.
Textbooks
Ansel's Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms and Drug Delivery Systems, 10th edition, Williams and Wilkins, 2014
PHAR2822 Pharmacy Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carl Schneider Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures/wk, 1.5hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: PHAR1811 and PHAR1821. Corequisites: PCOL2605. Assessment: Written exam (50%), oral assessment (30%), complementary medicines group presentation (10%) and Reflective Ability Clinical Assessment (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores the role of the pharmacist as a primary care provider for disease states and the provision of management options, including non-pharmacological recommendations. It focuses on methods of delivering patient care both at an individual level and also to the wider community. This course is fundamental to clinical pharmacy in all areas of practice. Core areas covered include responding to minor ailments such as pain, eye, ear, nose, fever, infection and infestations as well as gastrointestinal complaints. Screening in chronic disease including diabetes, respiratory and cardiovascular disease. Other areas covered are providing healthy living support including nutrition and exercise as well as the role of the pharmacist in the provision of complementary medicines.
Textbooks
Community Pharmacy. Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. (ANZ Edition) 3rd Edition, Rutter P and Newby D. Churchill Livingston Elsevier Publishing, 2016.

Third Year

INFS1000 Digital Business Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr lab workshop per week Prohibitions: ISYS1003 or INFO1000 Assumed knowledge: INFO1000; INFO1003; INFO1903 Assessment: group work (10%), group project (25%), mid-semester test (25%), and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Block mode
The Digital Economy, with its focus on information as a key business resource, has changed the way Business Information Systems (BIS) are viewed in organisations. BIS are now seen as enablers of innovation in which people, supported by powerful technology, are considered to be the most important component. This is because problem-solving, innovation and critical thinking skills cannot be outsourced or easily acquired by competitors. This unit is designed to develop your understanding of how businesses operate. It shows how information systems support business operations and management through integration of people, business processes and systems. You will be provided with an introduction to state-of-the art business analysis techniques, frameworks and models to assist in understanding the nature and contribution of BIS in a range of business contexts. With its emphasis on business rather than IT, this unit does not require prior IT-related experience. In this unit you will learn about the increasingly important role of IT in business and acquire valuable business analysis and problem-solving skills.
MKTG1001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: project (20%), presentation (15%), participation (7%), mid-semester exam (28%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the relationships among marketing organisations and final consumers in terms of production-distribution channels or value chains. It focuses on consumer responses to various marketing decisions (product mixes, price levels, distribution channels, promotions, etc.) made by private and public organisations to create, develop, defend, and sometimes eliminate, product markets. Emphasis is placed on identifying new ways of satisfying the needs and wants, and creating value for consumers. While this unit is heavily based on theory, practical application of the concepts to "real world" situations is also essential. Specific topics of study include: market segmentation strategies; market planning; product decisions; new product development; branding strategies; channels of distribution; promotion and advertising; pricing strategies; and customer database management.
PHAR2811 Drug Discovery and Design A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr W. Bret Church Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x lectures/wk and tutorials scheduled as required Prerequisites: (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and PHAR1812 and (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1). Assessment: 2.5 hr exam (65%), laboratories and workshops (25%), major quiz (10%) Practical field work: 3hr workshop/wk as required Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide the background to the study of drugs and the important interactions of drugs and their targets. Learning about the molecular bases of such interactions requires consideration of the fundamental processes as replication, transcription and translation involving the macromolecules of life: proteins, DNA and RNA. The course also covers fundamental protein actions and mechanisms of the regulation of such targets, as well as fundamental molecular interactions important for understanding the action of, the detection of, and also diagnostic approaches applied to drugs and metabolites. Fuel metabolism and storage is considered, including metabolic adaptation and disorders of metabolism. Students get experience with a variety of practical techniques to assist learning in the course.
Textbooks
Patrick, GL. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry (6th ed) Oxford University Press, 2017; Nelson, DL. and Cox, MM. Lehninger: Principles of Biochemistry (7th ed), W.H. Freeman, 2017
PHAR2813 Therapeutic Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Andrew McLachlan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3-5 lectures/wk and 4 x 2hr workshops scheduled over the semester. Prerequisites: PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1822 and (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) Assessment: Maths quizzes (25%), Workshop participation (10%), Mid-semester Therapeutic Principles quiz (10%), Final examination (55%). All assessments are compulsory. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is intended to provide knowledge in a number of fundamental areas that guide and provide evidence to support the safe, effective and appropriate use of medicines. These fundamental areas of knowledge start with an understanding of the relationship between drugs interacting with target sites in the body and the effect produced (i.e. pharmacodynamic principles) and understanding the physiological and physicochemical factors that influence the movement of drugs around the body and the time course of exposure of body tissues and blood to drugs (i.e. pharmacokinetics). These principles involve developing concepts and mathematical relationships to explain drug activity in patients and to guide appropriate drug dosage regimen selection. To support this, relevant mathematical and statistical principles involving calculus are introduced during this unit of study.
This unit will also explore reasons behind variability in response to medicines among different individuals. The effects of disease, other drugs, demographics and the genetic basis for variable response will be introduced. Basic pharmacogenetic principles for explaining and predicting pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic variability in response are an important part of this unit of study.
Students are also exposed to the notion that medicines may produce adverse effects (as well as beneficial ones). The mechanisms underlying adverse reactions to drugs and how these are classified are explored as are the principles for detecting and avoiding these unwanted effects.
Ultimately, many options often exist to manage illness. While the fundamental principles described above assist in understanding how individual drugs should be used, they do not alone provide knowledge to select among alternative options. This unit will introduce students to methods that are used to provide evidence of efficacy and safety of different therapeutic options and to define the place in therapy of these options. To do this, the principles that underpin evidence based medicine (including the clinical trial and pharmacoepidemiology) and the notion of levels of evidence are introduced. Exposure to these principles is intended to develop in students a basic understanding of how to critically evaluate therapeutic options. The evaluation of therapeutic options requires an understanding of statistical methods, which are also introduced during this unit of study.
PHAR2821 Drug Discovery and Design B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Paul Groundwater Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures/wk Prerequisites: (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and PHAR1812. Corequisites: PCOL2605. Assessment: 2hr exam (50%), workshops and quizzes (50%) Practical field work: 23hrs of tutorials and workshops Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Drug Discovery and Design B goes beyond the basics to help students develop a deeper understanding of how drugs work, and how to discover and design new drugs. How drugs are transformed by metabolism is explored, with a particular focus on the factors which influence metabolism and pharmacogenetics. A problem-based learning approach will be used for the prediction of drug metabolite structures from physical, chemical, biochemical and spectroscopic data. Elements of statistics, stereochemistry, drug design, drug metabolism, and drug mechanism of action are integrated to explore the pathway from drug discovery and design to clinical application.
Textbooks
G L Patrick (2013) An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry, 5th Edition, Oxford University Press
PHAR2823 Physical Pharmaceutics and Formulation B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wojciech Chrzanowski Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures/wk Prerequisites: (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1612 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and PHAR1812 and PHAR1822. Assessment: Final exam (65%), mid-semester exam (10%) practical classes (25%) Practical field work: Laboratory work of 4hrs/week for 2 consecutive weeks Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on the material presented in Physical Pharmaceutics and Formulation A. The topics covered in this unit include: solid dose forms and particle science; dispersion dose forms including suspensions, colloidal dispersions, and emulsions; topical dose forms and semisolids; inhalation pharmaceutical aerosols; protein and peptide drugs and formulations; rectal products and novel drug delivery technologies; biomaterials; and material characterisation techniques. Aspects pertaining to the stability of dose forms are also presented in this unit. Practical activities relate to the preparation, quality control and quality assurance of a marketed solid (tablet) dosage form.
Textbooks
Aulton M.E. Pharmaceutics: The Science of Dosage Form Design, (7th edn) Churchill Livingston, A.T. Florence and D Attwood Physicochemical Principles of Pharmacy, MacMillan 1988, Pharmaceutical Press 4th Edition 2006
WORK1004 Foundations of Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prohibitions: WORK2201 Assessment: practice quiz (5%), main quiz (15%), group presentation and facilitation (15%), individual analysis and reflection (15%), tutorial participation (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a foundational unit in the Management and IRandHRM subject areas. An introductory overview of management methods and approaches is provided which forms the basis of study for an advanced specialisation in management. The unit examines management as a process of planning, organising, leading and controlling the efforts of organisational members and discusses how recent trends such as globalisation, economic change and the effects of new technology have led to profound changes in how organisations are managed. The unit explores these issues with respect to both large and small, public and private, and domestic and foreign organisations.
WORK2205 HR Strategies and Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hour lecture and 1x 1hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior units of study including (WORK1003 or WORK1002) Assessment: multiple choice exam (10%), tutorial activities (20%), research essay (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Building on the foundational coverage of Human Resource Management (HRM) issues and concepts provided in WORK1003, this unit provides a more focused understanding of key HRM concepts, processes, strategies and practices. The unit covers the way HR concepts, such as the employee psychological contract, might shape HR strategies and practices and highlights the interplay between the strategic approaches to HR and the practices of HR including talent attraction and selection; talent retention and development; managing performance and rewards; diversity and inclusion strategies, workplace health and well being to name a few. It concludes with an investigation of how the HRM system can be effectively evaluated to capture the long term sustainability of the HR processes and strategies adopted.

Fourth Year

PHAR3100 Clinical Placement A

Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shweta Kumar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Practical experience Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1821 and PHAR1822 and PCOL2605 and PHAR2811 and PHAR2812 and PHAR2813 and PHAR2821 and PHAR2822 and PHAR2823 and PHSI2601 Corequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 Assessment: Preceptor Evaluation (50%), Portfolio (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this unit of study is required. Practical field work: Approximately 80 hours of clinical placements. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney and as set by the faculty prior to commencing this Unit of Study. Students who have not met verification requirements will not be eligible to attend their placement.
Clinical Placements A is the first of a series of four Units of Study where students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings.
The overall objectives of the Clinical Placements Program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the Clinical Placements Program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus debriefing sessions. Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (newest edition); Australian Medicines Handbook (newest edition).
PHAR3815 Pharmaceutical Skills and Dispensing A

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jonathan Penm, Dr George Li Session: Semester 1 Classes: Up to 10 lectures/semester Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX8) and (CHEM1611 or CHEM1102) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM1101) and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901 or BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 or BIOL1997) and PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1821 and PHAR1822 and PHAR2811 and PHAR2821 and PHAR2823 Assessment: The final mark for both PHAR3815 and PHAR3825 will be calculated at the end of semester 2 with a breakdown of Dispensing 60%, Drug Profile 30% and Herbal Workshops 10%. Practical field work: 5 x 4hr practicals for Pharmaceutical skills and 5 x 3hr practicals for Dispensing and 5 x 1hr Workshops. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pharmaceutical Skills component consists of Drug Profile Practicals. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the physicochemical properties of drugs, methods of analysing drugs and how the physicochemical properties determine the pharmacology.
The Dispensing component gives an introduction to dispensing practice and to the extemporaneous preparation of pharmaceutical formulations. Students will develop attitudes, knowledge and skills through practise in interpreting the prescription, accuracy in dispensing, methodical approaches to preparing and dispensing prescribed products including preparing, selecting or using appropriate materials, equipment, labels and containers, documentation of dispensing procedures, effect of ingredients and methods used on the quality of pharmaceutical products, quality control and quality assurance procedures including those to minimise errors in all aspects of the dispensing process to ensure patient safety.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary APF23
PHAR3816 Cardiovascular and Renal

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ingrid Gelissen Session: Semester 1a Classes: An average of 6hrs of lectures and 2hrs of tutorials/week. Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1821 and PHAR1822 and PCOL2605 and PHAR2811 and PHAR2812 and PHAR2813 and PHAR2821 and PHAR2822 and PHAR2823 and PHSI2601 Corequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3100 Assessment: Tutorial participation and presentations (10%), OSCE (20%) and final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of cardiovascular and renal disorders including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of cardiovascular and renal disorders. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with cardiovascular and renal disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a number of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will be used to develop students' communication skills for interaction between pharmacists and their clients (patients, doctors, other health professionals).
PHAR3817 Respiratory

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ingrid Gelissen Session: Semester 1a Classes: An average of 6hrs of lectures and 2hrs of tutorials/week for 6 weeks. Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1821 and PHAR1822 and PCOL2605 and PHAR2811 and PHAR2812 and PHAR2813 and PHAR2821 and PHAR2822 and PHAR2823 and PHSI2601 Corequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3100 Assessment: Tutorial participation and presentations (10%), OSCE (20%) and final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of respiratory disorders including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of respiratory disorders. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with respiratory disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a number of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will be used to develop students' communication skills for interaction between pharmacists and their clients (patients, doctors, other health professionals).
PHAR3818 Endocrine, Diabetes and Reproductive

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philip Kwok Session: Semester 1b Classes: An average of 6hrs of lectures and 2hrs of tutorials/week. Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1821 and PHAR1822 and PCOL2605 and PHAR2811 and PHAR2812 and PHAR2813 and PHAR2821 and PHAR2822 and PHAR2823 and PHSI2601 Corequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3100 Assessment: Tutorial participation and presentations (10%), OSCE (20%) and final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of endocrine, diabetes and reproductive disorders including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of endocrine, diabetes and reproductive disorders. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with endocrine, diabetes and reproductive disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a number of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will be used to develop students' communication skills for interaction between pharmacists and their clients (patients, doctors, other health professionals).
PHAR3819 Gastrointestinal

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philip Kwok Session: Semester 1b Classes: An average of 6hrs of lectures and 2hrs of tutorials/week. Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1821 and PHAR1822 and PCOL2605 and PHAR2811 and PHAR2812 and PHAR2813 and PHAR2821 and PHAR2822 and PHAR2823 and PHSI2601 Corequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3100 Assessment: Tutorial participation and presentations (10%), OSCE (20%) and final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of gastrointestinal and hepatic disorders including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of gastrointestinal and hepatic disorders. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with gastrointestinal and hepatic disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a number of computerised drug information. Role-plays will be used to develop students' communication skills for interaction between pharmacists and their clients (patients, doctors, other health professionals).
PHAR3200 Clinical Placement B

Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shweta Kumar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Practical experience Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1821 and PHAR1822 and PCOL2605 and PHAR2811 and PHAR2812 and PHAR2813 and PHAR2821 and PHAR2822 and PHAR2823 and PHSI2601 Corequisites: PHAR3100 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Assessment: Preceptor Evaluation (50%), Portfolio (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this unit of study is required. Practical field work: Approximately 80 hours of clinical placements. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney and as set by the faculty prior to commencing this Unit of Study. Students who have not met verification requirements will not be eligible to attend their placement.
Clinical Placements B is a continuation of Clinical Placement A where students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings.
The overall objectives of the Clinical Placements Program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the Clinical Placements Program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus debriefing sessions. Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (newest edition); Australian Medicines Handbook (newest edition).
PHAR3825 Pharmaceutical Skills and Dispensing B

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jonathan Penm, Dr George Li Session: Semester 2 Classes: Up to 10hrs of lectures/semester Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX8) and (CHEM1611 or CHEM1102) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM1101) and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901 or BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 or BIOL1997) and PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1821 and PHAR1822 and PHAR2811 and PHAR2821 and PHAR2823 Corequisites: PHAR3815 Assessment: The final mark for both PHAR3815 and PHAR3825 will be calculated at the end of semester 2 with a breakdown of Dispensing 60%, Drug Profile 30% and Herbal Workshops 10%. Practical field work: 5 x 3hr practicals for Dispensing, 2 x 4hr for herbal workshop Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pharmaceutical Skills component consists of Herbal Medicine workshops. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the chemical properties of herbal medicines, methods of analysing herbal medicines and how the chemical properties determine the pharmacology, efficacy and safety.
The Dispensing component gives an introduction to Dispensing practice and to the extemporaneous preparation of pharmaceutical formulations. Students will develop attitudes, knowledge and skills through practise in interpreting the prescription, accuracy in dispensing, methodical approaches to preparing and dispensing prescribed products including preparing, selecting or using appropriate materials, equipment, labels and containers, documentation of dispensing procedures, effect of ingredients and methods used on the quality of pharmaceutical products, quality control and quality assurance procedures including those to minimise errors in all aspects of the dispensing process to ensure patient safety.
Textbooks
APF23
PHAR3826 Musculoskeletal, Dermatological and Senses

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alan Boddy Session: Semester 2a Classes: An average of 6 hrs of lectures and 2 hrs of tutorials/week. Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1821 and PHAR1822 and PCOL2605 and PHAR2811 and PHAR2812 and PHAR2813 and PHAR2821 and PHAR2822 and PHAR2823 and PHSI2601 Corequisites: PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3200 Assessment: Tutorial participation and presentations (10%), OSCE (20%) and final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of musculoskeletal, dermatological and special senses including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin the pharmacological therapies. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of musculoskeletal, dermatological and special senses disorders. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapy of patients with musculoskeletal, dermatological and special senses disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a number of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will be used to develop students' communication skills for interactions between pharmacists and their clients (patients, consumers, public, carers) and health care professionals (physicians, dentists, allied health professionals).
Textbooks
References: Therapeutic Guidelines, AMH, MIMS, Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, recommended resources and reading material from lectures and tutorials.
PHAR3827 Oncology and Anti-Infective Agents

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alan Boddy Session: Semester 2a Classes: An average of 6 hrs of lectures and 2 hrs of tutorials/week. Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1821 and PHAR1822 and PCOL2605 and PHAR2811 and PHAR2812 and PHAR2813 and PHAR2821 and PHAR2822 and PHAR2823 and PHSI2601 Corequisites: PHAR3826 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3200 Assessment: Tutorial participation and presentations (10%), OSCE (20%) and final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of oncology and immunology including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of oncology and immunology disorders. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with oncology and immunology disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a number of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will be used to develop students' communication skills for interaction between pharmacists and their clients (patients, doctors, other health professionals).
Textbooks
Australian Medicines Handbook, Pharmaceutical Society of Australia, 2016
PHAR3820 Neurology and Mental Health

Credit points: 10 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mary Collins Session: Semester 2b Classes: an average of 6hrs of lectures and 2hrs of tutorials/week. Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX8) and (CHEM1611 or CHEM11X2 or CHEM19X2 or CHEM1904) and (CHEM1612 or CHEM11X1 or CHEM19X1 or CHEM1903) and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901 or BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 or BIOL1997) and PHAR1811 and PHAR1812 and PHAR1821 and PHAR1822 and PCOL2605 and PHAR2811 and PHAR2812 and PHAR2813 and PHAR2821 and PHAR2822 and PHAR2823 and PHSI2601 Corequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3100 and PHAR3200 Assessment: tutorial participation and presentations (10%), osce (20%) and final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will cover the therapeutics of neurological and mental health disorders including the pharmaceutical sciences that underpin such drug therapies. This unit will also include the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of neurological disorders. Through the use of case-based learning, students will participate in the interpretation, application and dissemination of pharmaceutical and pharmacotherapeutic concepts and knowledge. On completion of this unit of study students will be able to apply an understanding of the pharmaceutical sciences to optimising the drug and non-drug therapy of patients with neurological disorders. Interprofessional communication and the application of specialist knowledge to implementing pharmacist cognitive services such as clinical interventions and/or medication management review will also be explored. Students will become familiar with drug information software and a number of computerised drug information databases. Role-plays will be used to develop students' communication skills for interaction between pharmacists and their clients (patients, doctors, other health professionals).

Fifth Year

PHAR4100 Clinical Placement C

Teacher/Coordinator: Tina Xu Session: Semester 1 Classes: Practical experience Prerequisites: PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and or PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 Assessment: Preceptor Evaluation (50%), Portfolio (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this Unit of Study is required. Practical field work: Approximately 80 hours of clinical placements. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney and as set by the faculty prior to commencing this Unit of Study. Students who have not met verification requirements will not be eligible to attend placements or participate in this Unit of Study.
Clinical Placement C is a continuation of Clinical Placements A and B, where students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings.
The overall objectives of the Clinical Placements Program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the Clinical Placements Program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus debriefing sessions. Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (newest edition); Australian Medicines Handbook (newest edition).
PHAR4811 Pharmacotherapeutics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Janet Cheung Session: Semester 1 Classes: 32 x 1hr lectures, 8 x 3hr small group learning and up to 18hrs of self directed learning Prerequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: PHAR4812 and (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100 Assessment: Final exam (40%), quiz (10%), group portfolios (15%), workshop participation (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on developing students' understanding of the use of medicines and related appropriate health measures in special patient populations (paediatrics, geriatrics, pregnancy, disability and others). The unit of study will draw upon concepts in clinical pharmacy, pharmacokinetics and clinical practice.
Through a series of workshops, students will undertake activities including case-study analysis, role-plays, problem solving and case presentations. These activities will help students explore information sources for drug use and integrate knowledge of clinical indices, laboratory data, medication use history and demographic information to optimise drug therapy in response to the needs of individual patients. Students will gain 'hands-on' practice in the provision of patient-specific medicine use education and explore key issues concerning the maintenance of vigilance for medicines use specific to certain population groups.
Textbooks
Standard Reference Texts for Medications (AMH, APF, eMIMS). In addition, current research articles provided via workshop outlines will inform the reference base for this Unit of Study.
PHAR4812 Integrated Dispensing Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Carter Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr lec/wk (total approx 8hrs); 1 x 2hr workshop/wk and (total approx 16hrs/sem), approx 16hrs on-line activities Prerequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: PHAR4811 and (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100 Assessment: Students must prove competency in each component of this unit of study (practical exams, continuous weekly assessments, pharmaceutical calculations assignment, portfolio presentation). This unit of study is Pass/Fail. Practical field work: 1 x 2hr laboratory class /wk (total approx 16hrs/sem) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Integrated Dispensing Practice links together the skills and knowledge that students have developed in dispensing and pharmacy practice. The emphasis is on clinical practice and develops the theme that dispensing is not a single event but a process which draws on skills and knowledge from a variety of areas of pharmacy practice, including communication with the patient and prescriber. This is achieved using a simulated practice environment in which students learn to integrate the skills they have developed in dose form preparation with their clinical skills, forensic and administrative requirements (including the use of computer-based dispensing programs), as well as the professional aspects of pharmacy in delivering a patient-centred care. This unit of study emphasises the importance of patient safety and quality use of medicines.
Textbooks
Australian Medicines Handbook (2016 or later) and Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (Ed 23).
PHAR4823 Pharmacy Services and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Barbara Mintzes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 34 x 1hr lectures, 10 x 3hr workshops and up to 25hrs of self directed learning Prerequisites: PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4100 Assessment: Final exam (50%), group assignment/presentation (40%), workshop participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on developing students' understanding of the Australian Health Care System, health policy and regulation affecting health in Australia and internationally and the role of pharmacy in public health/ health promotion. We will develop students' skills in identifying, accessing and interpreting relevant policy, regulation and literature. Topics which underpin understanding of public health including, epidemiology/pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacoeconomics will also be addressed. Through workshops and assignments, students will be given the opportunity to integrate their learning and apply this knowledge to address population health care problems with a special emphasis on achieving the quality, safety and judicious use of medicines in health care.
Textbooks
Population Health: concepts and method
WORK3202 Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prohibitions: WORK2222 Assessment: group assessment (30%), reflective essays (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Leadership is increasingly seen to be a key factor affecting the performance of contemporary organisations and is an important area of study in the fields of management and organisational behaviour. While leadership principles are often associated with the work of senior management, they also have potential application to all members of organisations. This unit explores conventional and alternative perspectives on leadership and also examines the practice of leadership in diverse organisational contexts. Practitioner perspectives, experiences and case studies of business leaders are also presented.
PHAR4813 Novel Therapeutics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Grewal Session: Semester 2 Classes: Up to 6 hours of lectures, eight 3 hour workshops and up to 60 hours of self-directed learning and group work. Prerequisites: PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: PHAR4821 and PHAR4822. Assessment: Workshops (20%), written assignment (40%), and final exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study expands on second and third year pharmaceutical science (Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmaceutics, Pharmacology, Biology and Biochemistry) by exposing students to drug development and developing biotechnologies, new drug targets and therapies as well as clinical trials. Students will be introduced to emerging biotechnologies and biological devices including drug delivery systems, new drug targets and therapies in order to be aware of ¿up and coming¿ biotechnologies and how they will impact on pharmaceutical care. Such knowledge will help students to decide their future career direction and give more understanding of practical problems encountered in design and use of biotechnology derived drugs. In addition, this unit of study promotes integration and application of prior knowledge in pharmaceutical science to solving problems in tasks encountered in research and development. This unit will help to understand pharmaceutical drug development as a possible career path and prepares students for professional accreditation. Students will develop knowledge related to biotechnology derived drugs and develop skills in obtaining and critically assessing peer-reviewed publications, as well as people skills from group work, conflict management and written and oral communication skills.
Textbooks
Foye W.O et. al. Principles of Medicinal Chemistry (5th Ed), Williams and Wilkins (2002) Shargel L and Yu ABC Applied Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics (1999) Burton, Evans.
PHAR4821 Professional Practice

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rebekah Moles Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24hrs of lectures, 20hrs of workshops, 55hrs of simulated learning tutorials and up to 40hrs of self-directed learning. Prerequisites: PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: PHAR4813 and PHAR4822. Assessment: Tutorial marks and communication (40%), MCQ exam (20%), Medication review (30%), Health Care Collaboration (10%) and satisfactory performance in the forensic exam. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study consolidates previous units from year one to semester 1 of year four of the curriculum, through the presentation and solving of clinical and ethical problems. It has a focus on knowledge application in a simulated pharmacy workplace and includes professional services including disease state management. The unit consists of lectures, on-line learning and simulated case-based competency assessment and learning.
Textbooks
Pharmacy and Poisons legislation is required but is made available in a specific format for the unit. Therapeutic Guidelines, AMH and texts from previous practice units will be utilised.
PHAR4822 Clinical Placement D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jo-anne Brien Session: Semester 2 Classes: Practical experience Prerequisites: PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and or PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 and PHAR4100. Corequisites: PHAR4813. Assessment: Preceptor assessment (50%), Portfolio (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this unit of study is required. Practical field work: Up to 80hrs of clinical placement. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney prior to commencing this Unit of Study. Students who have not met verification requirements before the commencement of Semester 2 will not be eligible to attend their placement.
Clinical Placement D is the final Clinical Placements Unit of Study and is a continuation of Clinical Placements A, B, and C. Students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings.
The overall objectives of the Clinical Placements program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the Clinical Placements program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus debriefing sessions. Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (newest edition); Australian Medicines Handbook (newest edition).

Fifth Year Honours

PHAR4100 Clinical Placement C

Teacher/Coordinator: Tina Xu Session: Semester 1 Classes: Practical experience Prerequisites: PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and or PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 Assessment: Preceptor Evaluation (50%), Portfolio (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this Unit of Study is required. Practical field work: Approximately 80 hours of clinical placements. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney and as set by the faculty prior to commencing this Unit of Study. Students who have not met verification requirements will not be eligible to attend placements or participate in this Unit of Study.
Clinical Placement C is a continuation of Clinical Placements A and B, where students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings.
The overall objectives of the Clinical Placements Program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the Clinical Placements Program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus debriefing sessions. Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (newest edition); Australian Medicines Handbook (newest edition).
PHAR4811 Pharmacotherapeutics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Janet Cheung Session: Semester 1 Classes: 32 x 1hr lectures, 8 x 3hr small group learning and up to 18hrs of self directed learning Prerequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: PHAR4812 and (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100 Assessment: Final exam (40%), quiz (10%), group portfolios (15%), workshop participation (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on developing students' understanding of the use of medicines and related appropriate health measures in special patient populations (paediatrics, geriatrics, pregnancy, disability and others). The unit of study will draw upon concepts in clinical pharmacy, pharmacokinetics and clinical practice.
Through a series of workshops, students will undertake activities including case-study analysis, role-plays, problem solving and case presentations. These activities will help students explore information sources for drug use and integrate knowledge of clinical indices, laboratory data, medication use history and demographic information to optimise drug therapy in response to the needs of individual patients. Students will gain 'hands-on' practice in the provision of patient-specific medicine use education and explore key issues concerning the maintenance of vigilance for medicines use specific to certain population groups.
Textbooks
Standard Reference Texts for Medications (AMH, APF, eMIMS). In addition, current research articles provided via workshop outlines will inform the reference base for this Unit of Study.
PHAR4812 Integrated Dispensing Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Carter Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr lec/wk (total approx 8hrs); 1 x 2hr workshop/wk and (total approx 16hrs/sem), approx 16hrs on-line activities Prerequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: PHAR4811 and (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100 Assessment: Students must prove competency in each component of this unit of study (practical exams, continuous weekly assessments, pharmaceutical calculations assignment, portfolio presentation). This unit of study is Pass/Fail. Practical field work: 1 x 2hr laboratory class /wk (total approx 16hrs/sem) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Integrated Dispensing Practice links together the skills and knowledge that students have developed in dispensing and pharmacy practice. The emphasis is on clinical practice and develops the theme that dispensing is not a single event but a process which draws on skills and knowledge from a variety of areas of pharmacy practice, including communication with the patient and prescriber. This is achieved using a simulated practice environment in which students learn to integrate the skills they have developed in dose form preparation with their clinical skills, forensic and administrative requirements (including the use of computer-based dispensing programs), as well as the professional aspects of pharmacy in delivering a patient-centred care. This unit of study emphasises the importance of patient safety and quality use of medicines.
Textbooks
Australian Medicines Handbook (2016 or later) and Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (Ed 23).
PHAR4815 Research Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lisa Bero Session: Semester 1 Classes: Data management (approx 16hrs); literature searching and appraisal, and scientific presentations (approx 9hrs); research methods (approx 40hrs); journal club and seminars (approx 16hrs) and research project. Prerequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: PHAR4811 and PHAR4812 and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100. Assessment: Data management assignment (10%), literature review search strategy and outline (5%), oral scientific presentation (5%), seminar report (5%), literature review manuscript (55%), and literature review presentation (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Research Methods is a component of the Honours elective, and is designed to extend students' knowledge and skills in research methods and problem solving, as well as oral and written scientific communication. The workshop and seminar series in the unit will equip students with the advanced research skills needed for their research projects. Research projects will commence in Semester 1 and will be completed in Semester 2 under the direct supervision of an academic staff member or supervisory team.
Textbooks
Those recommended by individual lecturers and research project supervisors.
PHAR4823 Pharmacy Services and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Barbara Mintzes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 34 x 1hr lectures, 10 x 3hr workshops and up to 25hrs of self directed learning Prerequisites: PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4100 Assessment: Final exam (50%), group assignment/presentation (40%), workshop participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on developing students' understanding of the Australian Health Care System, health policy and regulation affecting health in Australia and internationally and the role of pharmacy in public health/ health promotion. We will develop students' skills in identifying, accessing and interpreting relevant policy, regulation and literature. Topics which underpin understanding of public health including, epidemiology/pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacoeconomics will also be addressed. Through workshops and assignments, students will be given the opportunity to integrate their learning and apply this knowledge to address population health care problems with a special emphasis on achieving the quality, safety and judicious use of medicines in health care.
Textbooks
Population Health: concepts and method
PHAR4830 Honours

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Danijela Gnjidic Session: Semester 2 Classes: Journal club and seminars (approx 15 hours in total) and research project (approx 35-40 hours per week) and monthly meeting (approx 3hrs). In addition, students are required to attend several sessions of the Faculty Postgraduate conference. Forensic: 8hrs Prerequisites: PHAR4811 and PHAR4812 and PHAR4815 and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100 Assessment: Research paper manuscript (55%), oral presentation of research project (25%) and supervisor mark for overall research performance (20%). Satisfactory performance is required in the forensics examination. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to extend the Pharmacy undergraduate's knowledge and skills in research practice and problem solving, and written and oral scientific communication acquired in PHAR4815. Honours provides an important basis for those who may wish to branch into specialised areas and will be particularly useful for those seeking employment in industry, government, hospital laboratories, research institutions and also for those considering continuation to postgraduate studies. The journal club/seminar/postgraduate conference component of the course will assist in the development of advanced research and presentation skills and will complement the research project. A final research presentation and report describing research results and conclusions is to be conducted at the end of the semester.
Textbooks
Those recommended by individual lecturers and research project supervisors. Pharmacy and Poisons legislation is required but is made available in a specific format for the unit.

Fifth Year International Major

PHAR4100 Clinical Placement C

Teacher/Coordinator: Tina Xu Session: Semester 1 Classes: Practical experience Prerequisites: PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and or PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 Assessment: Preceptor Evaluation (50%), Portfolio (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this Unit of Study is required. Practical field work: Approximately 80 hours of clinical placements. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney and as set by the faculty prior to commencing this Unit of Study. Students who have not met verification requirements will not be eligible to attend placements or participate in this Unit of Study.
Clinical Placement C is a continuation of Clinical Placements A and B, where students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings.
The overall objectives of the Clinical Placements Program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the Clinical Placements Program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus debriefing sessions. Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (newest edition); Australian Medicines Handbook (newest edition).
PHAR4811 Pharmacotherapeutics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Janet Cheung Session: Semester 1 Classes: 32 x 1hr lectures, 8 x 3hr small group learning and up to 18hrs of self directed learning Prerequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: PHAR4812 and (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100 Assessment: Final exam (40%), quiz (10%), group portfolios (15%), workshop participation (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on developing students' understanding of the use of medicines and related appropriate health measures in special patient populations (paediatrics, geriatrics, pregnancy, disability and others). The unit of study will draw upon concepts in clinical pharmacy, pharmacokinetics and clinical practice.
Through a series of workshops, students will undertake activities including case-study analysis, role-plays, problem solving and case presentations. These activities will help students explore information sources for drug use and integrate knowledge of clinical indices, laboratory data, medication use history and demographic information to optimise drug therapy in response to the needs of individual patients. Students will gain 'hands-on' practice in the provision of patient-specific medicine use education and explore key issues concerning the maintenance of vigilance for medicines use specific to certain population groups.
Textbooks
Standard Reference Texts for Medications (AMH, APF, eMIMS). In addition, current research articles provided via workshop outlines will inform the reference base for this Unit of Study.
PHAR4812 Integrated Dispensing Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Carter Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr lec/wk (total approx 8hrs); 1 x 2hr workshop/wk and (total approx 16hrs/sem), approx 16hrs on-line activities Prerequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: PHAR4811 and (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100 Assessment: Students must prove competency in each component of this unit of study (practical exams, continuous weekly assessments, pharmaceutical calculations assignment, portfolio presentation). This unit of study is Pass/Fail. Practical field work: 1 x 2hr laboratory class /wk (total approx 16hrs/sem) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Integrated Dispensing Practice links together the skills and knowledge that students have developed in dispensing and pharmacy practice. The emphasis is on clinical practice and develops the theme that dispensing is not a single event but a process which draws on skills and knowledge from a variety of areas of pharmacy practice, including communication with the patient and prescriber. This is achieved using a simulated practice environment in which students learn to integrate the skills they have developed in dose form preparation with their clinical skills, forensic and administrative requirements (including the use of computer-based dispensing programs), as well as the professional aspects of pharmacy in delivering a patient-centred care. This unit of study emphasises the importance of patient safety and quality use of medicines.
Textbooks
Australian Medicines Handbook (2016 or later) and Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (Ed 23).
PHAR4823 Pharmacy Services and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Barbara Mintzes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 34 x 1hr lectures, 10 x 3hr workshops and up to 25hrs of self directed learning Prerequisites: PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4100 Assessment: Final exam (50%), group assignment/presentation (40%), workshop participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on developing students' understanding of the Australian Health Care System, health policy and regulation affecting health in Australia and internationally and the role of pharmacy in public health/ health promotion. We will develop students' skills in identifying, accessing and interpreting relevant policy, regulation and literature. Topics which underpin understanding of public health including, epidemiology/pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacoeconomics will also be addressed. Through workshops and assignments, students will be given the opportunity to integrate their learning and apply this knowledge to address population health care problems with a special emphasis on achieving the quality, safety and judicious use of medicines in health care.
Textbooks
Population Health: concepts and method
WORK3202 Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prohibitions: WORK2222 Assessment: group assessment (30%), reflective essays (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Leadership is increasingly seen to be a key factor affecting the performance of contemporary organisations and is an important area of study in the fields of management and organisational behaviour. While leadership principles are often associated with the work of senior management, they also have potential application to all members of organisations. This unit explores conventional and alternative perspectives on leadership and also examines the practice of leadership in diverse organisational contexts. Practitioner perspectives, experiences and case studies of business leaders are also presented.
PHAR4832 Pharmacy International Exchange

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hien Duong Session: Semester 2 Classes: The numbers of practical classes, tutorials/workshops and lectures in each of the units of study taken will be the same as for the full-time students at the host institution. Forensic: Lectures 8hrs, Workshop 3hrs by distance learning. Prerequisites: PHAR4811 and PHAR4812 and (PHAR4814 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100 Assessment: The students will be assessed in the coursework and examination components agreed by the Faculty and the international host institution in the same weighting as the full-time students at the host institution. This unit of study is Pass/Fail. Satisfactory performance in the forensic examination. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will provide students with the opportunity to experience other healthcare systems through undertaking coursework at international universities. The students will attend all classes in prescribed units of study offered by the host institution. These units of study will be agreed by the Faculty and the host institution and will be selected for level, content, and exposure of our students to the different healthcare system and roles of a pharmacist in the host country. The overall assessment and workload will be agreed between the two institutions and will be commensurate with 24 credit points.
Textbooks
Those recommended by the units of study at the host institution. Pharmacy and Poisons legislation is required but is made available in a specific format for the unit.

Fifth Year Industrial Major

PHAR4100 Clinical Placement C

Teacher/Coordinator: Tina Xu Session: Semester 1 Classes: Practical experience Prerequisites: PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and or PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 Assessment: Preceptor Evaluation (50%), Portfolio (50%). All assessment tasks must be completed. Satisfactory performance in all areas of this Unit of Study is required. Practical field work: Approximately 80 hours of clinical placements. Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must meet all checks and clearances as required and verified by the Office of Clinical Education at The University of Sydney and as set by the faculty prior to commencing this Unit of Study. Students who have not met verification requirements will not be eligible to attend placements or participate in this Unit of Study.
Clinical Placement C is a continuation of Clinical Placements A and B, where students are provided opportunities to observe and participate in real-life application of theory and skills learned during on-campus course work. Students will have the opportunity to gain experience in practice and knowledge of a variety of professional settings.
The overall objectives of the Clinical Placements Program are to familiarise students with their future professional roles and working environments, and to develop professional skills and behaviours.
Students will be required to maintain an e-portfolio across the Clinical Placements Program of their placement experiences, and attend on-campus debriefing sessions. Students will also be evaluated by their preceptors on their professional performance during placement.
Textbooks
Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (newest edition); Australian Medicines Handbook (newest edition).
PHAR4811 Pharmacotherapeutics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Janet Cheung Session: Semester 1 Classes: 32 x 1hr lectures, 8 x 3hr small group learning and up to 18hrs of self directed learning Prerequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: PHAR4812 and (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100 Assessment: Final exam (40%), quiz (10%), group portfolios (15%), workshop participation (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on developing students' understanding of the use of medicines and related appropriate health measures in special patient populations (paediatrics, geriatrics, pregnancy, disability and others). The unit of study will draw upon concepts in clinical pharmacy, pharmacokinetics and clinical practice.
Through a series of workshops, students will undertake activities including case-study analysis, role-plays, problem solving and case presentations. These activities will help students explore information sources for drug use and integrate knowledge of clinical indices, laboratory data, medication use history and demographic information to optimise drug therapy in response to the needs of individual patients. Students will gain 'hands-on' practice in the provision of patient-specific medicine use education and explore key issues concerning the maintenance of vigilance for medicines use specific to certain population groups.
Textbooks
Standard Reference Texts for Medications (AMH, APF, eMIMS). In addition, current research articles provided via workshop outlines will inform the reference base for this Unit of Study.
PHAR4812 Integrated Dispensing Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Carter Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr lec/wk (total approx 8hrs); 1 x 2hr workshop/wk and (total approx 16hrs/sem), approx 16hrs on-line activities Prerequisites: PHAR3815 and PHAR3825 and PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: PHAR4811 and (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100 Assessment: Students must prove competency in each component of this unit of study (practical exams, continuous weekly assessments, pharmaceutical calculations assignment, portfolio presentation). This unit of study is Pass/Fail. Practical field work: 1 x 2hr laboratory class /wk (total approx 16hrs/sem) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Integrated Dispensing Practice links together the skills and knowledge that students have developed in dispensing and pharmacy practice. The emphasis is on clinical practice and develops the theme that dispensing is not a single event but a process which draws on skills and knowledge from a variety of areas of pharmacy practice, including communication with the patient and prescriber. This is achieved using a simulated practice environment in which students learn to integrate the skills they have developed in dose form preparation with their clinical skills, forensic and administrative requirements (including the use of computer-based dispensing programs), as well as the professional aspects of pharmacy in delivering a patient-centred care. This unit of study emphasises the importance of patient safety and quality use of medicines.
Textbooks
Australian Medicines Handbook (2016 or later) and Australian Pharmaceutical Formulary (Ed 23).
PHAR4823 Pharmacy Services and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Barbara Mintzes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 34 x 1hr lectures, 10 x 3hr workshops and up to 25hrs of self directed learning Prerequisites: PHAR3816 and PHAR3817 and PHAR3818 and PHAR3819 and PHAR3826 and PHAR3827 and PHAR3828 and PHAR3829 Corequisites: (PHAR4814 or PHAR4815 or WORK3202) and PHAR4100 Assessment: Final exam (50%), group assignment/presentation (40%), workshop participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on developing students' understanding of the Australian Health Care System, health policy and regulation affecting health in Australia and internationally and the role of pharmacy in public health/ health promotion. We will develop students' skills in identifying, accessing and interpreting relevant policy, regulation and literature. Topics which underpin understanding of public health including, epidemiology/pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacoeconomics will also be addressed. Through workshops and assignments, students will be given the opportunity to integrate their learning and apply this knowledge to address population health care problems with a special emphasis on achieving the quality, safety and judicious use of medicines in health care.
Textbooks
Population Health: concepts and method
WORK3202 Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prohibitions: WORK2222 Assessment: group assessment (30%), reflective essays (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Leadership is increasingly seen to be a key factor affecting the performance of contemporary organisations and is an important area of study in the fields of management and organisational behaviour. While leadership principles are often associated with the work of senior management, they also have potential application to all members of organisations. This unit explores conventional and alternative perspectives on leadership and also examines the practice of leadership in diverse organisational contexts. Practitioner perspectives, experiences and case studies of business leaders are also presented.
PHAR4831 Pharmacy Industrial Placement

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Hak-Kim Chan and Dr Wojciech Chrzanowski Session: Semester 2 Classes: Students will be allocated a full-time workload in the host organization. Forensic: 8hrs of lectures and 3hrs of workshops. Prerequisites: PHAR4811 and PHAR4812 and (PHAR4814 or WORK3202) and PHAR4823 and PHAR4100 Assessment: Students will be assessed through the submission of two reports, detailing their activities and the activities they have contributed to. The initial report will provide a background about the industrial host (including information about the company and department(s) in which you have been based), their area of pharmaceutical activity, and an introduction to the activities to be performed on the placement. The final report will give a detailed description of the work performed, its relevance and how the work translates to health practitioners, patients, policy makers, the host organisation or other stakeholders. The industrial host will also be asked to provide a brief assessment of the student's performance on their placement and will be assessed as Pass/Fail. Satisfactory performance is required in the forensic examination. Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This unit of study will provide students with the opportunity to experience the practice of pharmacy in one of a range of industrial settings. Students will contribute to the activities of the host organisation, e.g. helping to develop and prepare consumer-relevant information sheets on managing medicines. The overall workload (full-time for 13 weeks) will be agreed individually in consultation with the host and will be commensurate with 24 credit points.
Textbooks
Those recommended by the host institution. Pharmacy and Poisons legislation is required but is made available in a specific format for the unit.