Table B: Undergraduate elective units of study descriptions

Critical studies

CATE2007 The Art of Memory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) or 12 senior credit points of Art History and Theory Assessment: short visual analysis (20%) and small group presentation (10%) and major essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the discourse of memory through the practice of contemporary art and theory. From this perspective, it considers the relationship between memory, the politics of identity, and history through a critical exploration of different forms of remembrance, such as: storytelling and autobiography; collective memory; forgetting and the erasure of time; and trauma and embodiment.
Textbooks
James McConkey, The Anatomy of Memory: An Anthology, New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.
CATE2012 Animation: Theories and Histories

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) or BDES1001 or 12 senior credit points from Art History and Theory Assessment: storyboard (30%) and small group presentation (10%) and major essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animation as a form spans the visual arts and the entertainment industry. This unit explores theories and histories of animation that address these diverse contexts. One strand focuses on the relationship between art movements and animation practices from the early 20th century on, and the legacy of this in contemporary experimental and independent animation. A second strand focuses on animation as popular culture, including the important role of animation in the development of cinematic SFX, including CGI. The unit explores the various textual strategies used in animation, such as abstraction, self-referentiality and intertextuality, as well as analyzing the critical impulse in animation given its traditionally 'low' cultural status
Textbooks
Esther Leslie, Hollywood Flatlands: Animation, Critical Theory and the Avant-Garde. London and New York: Verso, 2002.
CATE2018 Global Art

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) or BDES1011 Assessment: short visual analysis (20%) and small group presentation (10%) and major essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Our current era of biennales and international galleries compels a wider analysis and a rethinking of basic forms and definitions of contemporary art. This unit of study focuses on how the worldwide production and dissemination of contemporary art interacts with ideas about nationalism, ethnic identity, and cosmopolitanism, and seeks to test the limits of the conceptualization of the global in art.
CATE2022 Contemporary Art and Feminism

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) or BDES1011 Assessment: short visual analysis (20%) and small group presentation (10%) and major essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Feminism scrutinizes the building blocks of culture and identity, seeking to explain how power relations - including those that naturalise gender inequality - are embedded in knowledges and practices. Feminism is thus a powerful tool for understanding our image culture and the way visual images narrativise power relations. Pioneering this critique nearly fifty years ago, feminist artists helped to forge the transition from modernist to postmodernist cultural strategies. They prioritised subject-matter, skills and design principles that had been neglected in late modernism. They criticised the idea of art as separate from society and beyond politics and power, and communicated with broader audiences through video, performance, mixed media, installation, posters and photography. They re-routed both women's traditional arts and the conventional high art media of painting and sculpture. Today these experiments remain a central platform of contemporary art, including forms of visual arts interventions in participatory and networked democracy known as 'social practice'. Many of the conceptual, material and practical dimensions of contemporary art have been derived from feminist practice, albeit in unacknowledged form. This unit considers the many ways feminist critiques inform contemporary art, contextualizing current practices in the histories of feminist art and theory
CATE2024 Professional Practice Seminar

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) Assessment: short visual analysis (20%) and small group presentation (10%) and major essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study seeks to equip visual arts students with some of the key competencies necessary to make the successful transition from art school to professional practice. The unit comprises primarily of talks by a wide spectrum of art industry professionals on issues including: the art market; the gallery circuit; artist-run spaces; entrepreneurship opportunities; public commissions. Seminars will also address issues such as: proposal-writing; funding opportunities; and up-skilling through postgraduate qualifications.
CATE2026 Art and the Uncanny

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) Assessment: team tutorial presentation (20%) and major essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
"The uncanny is a psychological sensation that occurs when the ordinariness of the everyday is ruptured. This unit of study explores the uncanny and its impact on contemporary art. The uncanny can be traced to the Romantic Movement, but is most famously associated with the impact of Sigmund Freud who wrote: `The uncanny effect is often and easily produced by effacing the distinction between imagination and reality as when something that we have hitherto regarded as imaginary appears before us in reality¿. The uncanny interferes with feelings of homeliness and certainty and instead produces disturbing sensations of being out of place and of estrangement from the familiar. This powerful concept is generated by ordinary life and also the experience of art."
CATE2013 Theorising Street Art

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) or BDES1011 or 12 senior credit points of Art History and Theory Assessment: visual intervention (30%) and small group presentation (10%) and major essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Street art has emerged as a significant cultural phenomenon in the post-globalised world of the 21st century, particularly in the major metropoles of wealthy as well as developing nations. This unit of study contextualises street art theoretically by reference to the politics of urban space, new practices and understandings of collective action, and aesthetics, and considers the institutional location of street art versus contemporary art and graffiti. The unit also contextualises street practices art historically by reference to Surrealism, conceptualism, Fluxus, Situationism, and text-based art. It covers a wide range of practices internationally, with particular emphasis on Latin America, Australia and Europe.
Textbooks
Cedar Lewisohn, Street Art: The graffiti revolution, Tate Publishing, London, 2008
CATE2014 Art and Nature

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) Assessment: short visual analysis (20%) and small group presentation (10%) and major essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
"This unit of study explores the links between the natural world and human culture, and in particular how these links have been made in art practice. From the nineteenth century through to the contemporary period, natural history - the empirical study of plants and animals - has preoccupied artists seeking greater knowledge of botanical and zoological life, and enrichment through spiritual connection with the otherness of nature. This unit considers artists whose response to the natural world has been mimetic, psychological, ecological, and philosophical. It addresses the intersections of art and science including the impact of Darwin and theories of evolution on artists both historical and contemporary, the prevalence of plant and animal motifs in design and popular culture over two centuries, and the centrality of environmentalism and ecology to art today."
CATE2015 Performance Art

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) or BDES1011 Assessment: short visual analysis (20%) and small group presentation (10%) and major essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Performance Art had two births, the first during World War I with Dada, the second in the protest era of the 1960s. In both instances it was a revolt against the commodification of art and the monied classes. While it grew out of vaudeville, performance art is characterized by a strong sense of antagonism and ennui. It developed in the late 1960s into a genre of its own, although it has never been entirely discrete. The political neoconservatism at the turn of the millennium reignited interest in performance art, which was made even more popular with the accessibility of moving-image, photographic and image-sharing technologies that can render unique acts accessible to wide audiences. As opposed to other forms of theatre, performance art objectifies the object and suggests its limits, be they physical or psychological. More than a historical survey, this unit of study explores the rudiments of performance, its attributes and rules that can either be adhered to or broken. Key to the unit are the insights of Judith Butler's theory of gender as performance, which offer valuable perspectives on the way in which people perform roles in society, from the dandy to the contemporary art school bohemian.
CATE2017 Fashion, the Body and Art

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) or BDES1011 Assessment: short visual analysis (20%) and small group presentation (10%) and major essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Pop caused visible cracks in the traditional division between high and low culture, but with the advent of accessible digital moving-image media, this distinction has been all but shattered. The omnipresence of mass media has meant that for those in the developed world (and elsewhere), taste, style, desire and therefore fashion are at the epicentre of our lives. Taking a broad transdisciplinary perspective that ranges from jewellery to fashion photography to film, this unit of study examines the rich crossover between art and fashion that has been active since the emergence of couture in the mid nineteenth century. The relationship between art and fashion developed in the 1960s with audacious body styling that borrowed from science fiction movies as much as art itself: for example, it was Yves Saint Laurent's Mondrian Dress that took the modernist master into the mainstream. These cross-pollinations climax with contemporary designers such as Margiella and McQueen - whose body-as-sculpture attitude is distantly echoed in the tendency of museum architecture also to be like gigantic sculptures - and pop icons such as Lady Gaga.
CATE2021 Contemporary Realism

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) Assessment: short visual analysis (20%) and small group presentation (10%) and major essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
"This unit of study examines the various documentary practices that represent one of the most important and complex developments within art over the last two decades. Traditional documentary photography and film have been reinvented by converging with conceptual art, video, and performance. These emergent documentary forms ranging from reflexive photo essays, installations, found-footage video reportage, mockumentaries to print media, attest to an ongoing quest to find new ways of engaging with social and political phenomena. What is the function of these new documentary practices in the context of a globalised art and media world? "
CATE2025 Practising Contemporary Indigenous Art

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) or BDES1011 Assessment: essay proposal and annotated bibliography (20%) and group discussion forum (10%) and major essay (60%) and online discussion forum (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study recognizes the impact of Indigenous Australian arts on Australian contemporary art practice. It considers the development of contemporary Indigenous art, and discusses the crucial issues of appropriation, ownership, and institutional protocols, as well as contemporaneity. You will be encouraged to broaden your understanding of the complexities associated with contemporary art practices in Australia, and to actively engage in dialogues between Indigenous and non-indigenous practitioners.
CATE3001 Advanced Critical Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: minimum 120 of junior and intermediate credit points from undergraduate tables A and B (including 30 credit points from CATE units) and AAM of at least 75 Assessment: research proposal (30%) and research project (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is open only to Distinction average students in their graduating semester. Students undertake an independent research project in the context of peer and academic support offered through regular seminar sessions.
Students can also choose one of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences units of study:
ARHT2614 Pollock to Psychedelia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) Assessment: 1x1500wd Artworks review (40%), 1x3000wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit studies the interplay between high art and popular culture in America from the 1950s onwards. Pop Art, Minimalism and Performance formed alongside emerging youth cultures of political protest, drugs and rock music. We examine the interactions of high art, youth culture and mass media.
ARHT2640 Modern and Contemporary Asian Art

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) or (12 junior credit points from Asian Studies) Prohibitions: ARHT2040 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd seminar paper (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In Asia there has developed both the nationalist art of a series of modernising states and a counter-establishment art which has frequently been formally modern. Students will learn how to analyse art works and institutions in terms of critical notions of modernity which arise in these Asian contexts but which do not require projection from outside. Focus will chiefly be on China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and India since the 1850s. Other examples will be drawn from Japan, Thailand and Indonesia.
ARHT2671 Art, Travel, Empires

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Mary Roberts Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ARHT1001 and ARHT1002 Prohibitions: ARHT2071 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd visual test (30%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
In this unit of study we examine Orientalist art and the culture of travel from a post-colonial perspective. As well as the work of major artists (Delacroix, Gerome and J.F.Lewis), we will place particular emphasis upon photography, as well as international exhibitions, travel literature and film. Diverse European constructions of the exotic Orient will be examined including the distinctive contribution of women Orientalists. In this unit, the European canon of Orientalism is resituated through the introduction of counter-narratives and alternative images made by indigenous artists and patrons.

Disciplinary electives

Sydney College of the Arts

CAEL2039 Screen Arts: an Introduction

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: CASF1001 or 18 junior credit points from undergraduate table A for Arts and Social Sciences students including ENGL1011 Assessment: small group presentation (10%) and project proposal (20%) and major self-directed project (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces you to the conceptual frameworks and technologies that shape the making of screen-based media and contemporary art practices. Through a series of lectures, seminars, tutorials and screenings you will explore the evolution of experimental film, video art and independent filmmaking from the 1960s to the present. You will engage in the production of a self-directed digital film that may be realized in any style or genre. The unit is supported by a technical program that provides you with the applied skills and competencies needed for the use of studio facilities and equipment.
CAEL2040 Drawing: The Medium of Translation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: major visual project (70%) and online discussion forum (10%) and short research task (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Drawing is re-emerging as an important field of artistic activity and research. In this unit of study, you will explore drawing as a primary research activity. Working with drawing as a research instrument and creative discipline will enable critical engagement with traditional practices and contemporary trends. You will participate in peer-evaluation and undertake theoretical research in addition to studio based activities and production.
CAEL2041 The Art of Sound and Noise

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: directed project (40 %) and major self-directed project (60 %) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study approaches sound in the broadest sense as it crosses barriers through physical and cultural space, and exists as a force in the world. In this unit, you will undertake a studio-based approach to the production of sound art works, including sound objects, instruments, sonic sculpture, sound installation, performance and new ways of working with sound. The unit begins with the physicality of sound and music physics. You will listen to sonic phenomena, materials, forms and existing sound works. This unit will be conducted in an open studio framework including a variety of workshops, sound studios and digital labs.
CAEL2042 Photography and the Darkroom

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: technique task (20%) and concept task (30%) and self-directed major project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces the principles of black and white photography via the 35mm camera and the darkroom. You explore alternative documentary photography strategies by challenging the role of the camera to simply observe and capture. You experiment with the genres of reportage, street photography and conventional documentary practices, and are encouraged to take an interventionist approach to the urban environment. You are introduced to the 35 mm manual SLR camera, black and white film processing, dark room printing, film exposure and photographic print enlargement.
CAEL2043 Image/Object in Photomedia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: studio task: stack (20%) and studio task: projection (30%) and major project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores how photography can interact with the world beyond a two-dimensional image, and how the relationship between objects and photography can stretch the function of the image. You consider what a photograph may be materially when it extends into a three-dimensional object form, and how the image might be situated to encompass a sculptural and interactive dimension. You develop image-based practices that combine digital photography, analogue photography, projection, print, objects and installation to encourage a multidisciplinary approach to photographic practice.
CAEL2044 Radical Rock Video

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: proposal, documentation or journal (20%) and introductory assignment (20%) and major project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores the intersection between contemporary visual art practice and contemporary music and sound. Is it possible to make innovative connections between sound and image that embrace experimental music, sound arts and screen based experimental work, without reverting to the moribund conventions of commercial music video? In an age where everything seems to have already been done, are there new formations of art and music to be discovered, even by people who have no traditional skills in these areas? This unit operates within an open studio framework that encompasses all skill levels from beginner, to intermediate, to advanced. You will make creative and practical responses based on your interest in art and sound through guided and self-directed individual and collaborative projects.
CAEL2047 Animation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project proposal (30%) and major self-directed project (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces you to the fundamental concepts and skills associated with 2D animation production. The unit provides both a conceptual and technical framework for you to explore the possibilities of animation in relation to your existing practice or as a completely new endeavour. Working in the digital domain, you will explore a range of approaches including frame-by-frame animation and stop motion animation. The technical component of this course provides you with the necessary skills to realise a self-directed project while encouraging exploration and experimentation. Class discussions, seminars and individual tutorials support screenings of historical and contemporary animated works to allow you to situate your own projects within a contemporary context.
CAEL2048 Investigating Clay

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: experimental process folio (20%) and proposal for final work (20%) and final work (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a studio-based approach to the production of creative work in ceramics. You will be introduced to concepts, methodologies and technologies integral to contemporary ceramics. You will also be introduced to historical and contemporary frameworks that underpin the processes and paradigms of ceramics today and provide the foundations of a 3D vocabulary. Thematic approaches accompany technical introductions to handbuilding, wheelwork, surface treatments and kiln firing to encourage exploration with ceramics methodologies. The unit develops and enhances critical skills through group and individual tutorials and critiques. This unit is suitable for those who have no or limited experience with the ceramic material and its technologies.
CAEL2049 Vessel as Concept: Hot Glass Intro

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: research presentation (20%) and themed project 1 (40%) and themed project 2 (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the glass vessel in everyday life and its application as a conceptual agent in contemporary art. By nature, the glassblowing process creates a vessel or container from a mass of molten glass. Through research projects you will investigate the psychology of the glass vessel through its function and physical properties. You will develop fundamental hand skills and glassblowing techniques through structured weekly workshops, and combine practical skills with contextual knowledge in the development of conceptually themed projects. You may work exclusively with glass or in conjunction with other media and processes.
CAEL2051 Posters to Paste-ups

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: experimental poster (20%) and major self-directed work (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Artworks made for public spaces have been an integral part of modern art. This unit of study looks at the role print has played in this history, briefly surveying Situationist graphics and psychedelic and punk posters before moving on to explore the potential contemporary print as a medium for urban intervention. Focusing on poster design and screen printing, the unit introduces you to techniques associated with the US band poster revival and other recent manifestations of print based public art such as stenciling and wheat pasting. The hands-on production of screen printed posters will be linked to an introduction to the digital publishing skills needed for commercial poster production.
CAEL2052 Introduction to Digital Publishing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: digital booklet (20%) and draft layout (20%) and digital magazine (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores the boundary between artwork, publication and portfolio. The unit acquaints you with the basics of InDesign, a software program that has become industry standard for designing digital and paper publications. Focusing on experimental magazines and other small scale artist's publications the unit explores the visual language of contemporary publishing from an artist's perspective. You learn about the complex interplay of text, image and sequence involved in producing multipage documents/artworks through the practical experience of creating your own InDesign publication.
CAEL2053 Screen Printing: an Introduction

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project proposal (20%) and major work (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces you to screen printing and its broad application across media. The unit explores the technical basics of this process through various projects. It provides for the development and enhancement of critical skills through group and individual tutorials and critiques and the acquisition of technical knowledge required to independently access and use the Printmedia studio facilities.
CAEL2054 Silversmithing: Exoskeleton Extension

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: technical samples (15%) and research presentation (20%) and major work (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From the symbolically charged through to the functionally utilized, the hammer formed metallic object builds upon the dynamic landscape of the body. In this unit of study you investigate the potential for an object to expand the metaphysical self. The malleable and ductile qualities of metal will be examined as a creative catalyst enabling material characteristics to form a transformative element of a work that is made for the body by the body. You will explore silversmithing processes, in alignment with your individual research interests, as a technical and conceptual starting point to negotiate ideas of metamorphosis and growth. The appropriate forming processes, including sinking, raising, hot forging and planishing, will be introduced alongside an examination of the historic foundations and key principles of contemporary metalsmithing, as a means to generate your own individual project.
CAEL2056 Critical Bodies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: preliminary project (20%) and research presentations (20%) and final project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Critical Bodies explores and extends visual art practice - including painting, sculpture, photography, performance and moving image - that places the body at the centre of investigation.
From drawing space to virtual space, the body has been a vehicle for experimentation into all realms of human experience, including emotion, violent action, religious expression, political engagement, gender questions, and medical intervention. This unit of study provides you with a rich source of potential approaches in your investigation of the body within your practice with a focus on an open studio interdisciplinary approach that can investigate hybrid forms. You will work on self-directed projects developed through lectures, tutorials, group critique and excursions.
CAEL2057 Biomimicry in Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: observation drawing (10%) and experimental model (20%) and found object presentation (20%) and final artwork (40%) and online forum (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines how artists are inspired by elements in nature to develop more sustainable approaches to their practice. Biomimicry looks to nature's innovative and efficient solutions to solve human problems. By exploring materials and processes relevant to your own practice, you will develop artworks using new understandings of sustainable art practice using principles of biomimicry and sustainability. These include formal concepts of lightness derived from Haiku poetry, a type of creative minimalist realism that strives to use the least amount of materials and energy to communicate ideas. Through active engagement in studio and research classes, field trips and online discussion, you will develop a series of individual studio projects, combining your current skills with experiments in new materials and processes, towards the realisation of a final work.
CAEL2058 Synthetic Landscape

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: proposal, documentation or journal (20%) and introductory assignment (20%) and major self-directed project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study allows you to explore the theme of imaginary landscapes within an expanded field that includes digital and analogue, technology-based and more traditional art making approaches. From painting to fractal based generative software, the unit opens up new frontiers on how artists construct visionary scapes that might be as gracious as a bonsai garden or as ambitious as the digital construction of a synthetic tree in a real time environment. This unit of study embraces the model in all of its forms, from diorama to maquette, from digital simulation to food as sculpture, from time based forms such as projection and sound, to the work of art as `wunderkammer¿.
CAEL2059 Curatorial Strategies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: short essay (30%) and major essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on key aspects of curating and exhibiting in relation to contemporary art theories and practices. You will examine the curatorial function in a variety of contemporary exhibition models and contexts, including state and commercial galleries, residency centres, contemporary art spaces and ARIs (artist run spaces), and landmark shows. You will develop an understanding of curating from the perspectives of contemporary artistic practice, including your own practice and research. The unit provides you with the skills and knowledge that will enable you to comprehensively evaluate the curatorial strategies and objectives of contemporary art projects, as well as the structures of contemporary art spaces and institutions.
CAEL2060 Experimental Writing Studio

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: directed project (40%) and major self-directed project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Text now is found in a multiplicity of art forms. This open studio interdisciplinary unit investigates text and language in art, from street art to high culture, via self-directed projects that are unbounded by medium and yet use writing as the genesis or as primary material for the production of a work of art. Final works could range from a screenplay or work of fiction, to a body of paintings or sculptures, to artists' books, zines, net art and editions, from video, to sound, and performance art. You will work by way of a self-directed project and on one short in class project. This unit of study is taught by way of tutorials, group critique, workshops, lectures and guest lectures.
CAEL2065 Abject Architecture: Open Form

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: drawing/model (20%) and project 1 (20%) and project 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores ideas of structure/ antistructure / unstructure, shelter, space, memory, building / unbuilding, the body, matter, void, the object, sexuality, parasitic, anti and impossible architectures. Practical experiments and architectural theory will combine in projects centred around memory, the home, inhabiting both space and knowledge. The project begins with a collaborative drawing exercise addressing selective memory through building a drawing on forgotten spaces. The results from the drawing exercise will be developed further into 3D models. Following the models, you will extend your ideas into larger interconnecting structures. The psychology of space will be investigated through a process of play. Emphasis will be on working with mistakes, accidents and the forgotten in order to create new and open forms. Group critiques and excursions will be regular events during the project.
CAEL2066 Flung Ink Painting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: 3 x directed task (3x20%) and major self-directed project (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
'Flung Ink' is a traditional form of Chinese painting. The goal of this practice is the unity of mind, body and field embodied in gestural mark. Flung ink is regarded as a form of calligraphy and its influence still persists in recent and contemporary art practices including the Japanese Gutai movement. You will explore the relationship between action, energy, mark and residue through the use of both traditional and non-traditional painting materials. Meditation as a method of investigating states of non-duality will be key to the structure of the course.
CAEL2068 Painting: Plus or Minus

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project stage 1 (20%) and project presentation (20%) and project stage 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores the interfaces between painting and other media such as photography, screenprinting, sculpture, performance and video. In considering these hybrid forms as additions or subtractions to painting, you confront questions around what do and don¿t constitute the borders and limits of any given medium. You will encounter potential new material combinations in which a photo becomes a painting surface or a painting becomes a live action, object or digital interface. You will work on self-directed projects developed through lectures, tutorials, group critique and excursions.
CAEL2069 Screenwriting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: participation in seminars (30%) and script (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces you to the art and craft of writing for the screen. Through a series of lectures, seminars, tutorials and film screenings you will explore a range of approaches to screenwriting. These include looking at the structure of dialogue and character driven scripts, then moving to an analysis of more experimental approaches to script writing that rely less on character or dialogue and more on mood, situation and atmosphere. You will write an original script for a digital film that can be realized in any style or genre.
CAEL2072 Voids and Apertures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: experimental process folio (20%) and written research report (20%) and final studio work (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores notions of the void and the aperture through the development of hollow formed objects created by hand or the potter¿s wheel. You will be introduced to the creation of various common forming techniques on the potter¿s wheel and will be encouraged to use these to create new techniques and develop modular and sculptural assemblages. This unit also examines the philosophical underpinnings associated with the traditional and contemporary practice of this genre of ceramics through group discussion and individual research.
CAEL2076 Upcycled Glass: Introducing Warm Glass

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: research proposal and presentation (20%) and themed project 1 (40%) and themed project 2 (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines conceptual and practical applications of up-cycled and found glass through contemporary art and design. The unit develops your understanding of the ubiquity of glass and its reuse in various guises through small research projects and student presentations. Using found and recycled glass, students will explore a variety of processes, including: diamond cutting, polishing, lathe-working, engraving and joining. You will select from a range of sustainably themed projects that combine critical and practical skills to develop and realise creative works. You may work exclusively with glass or in conjunction with other media and processes.
CAEL2077 Glass as Skin: Advanced Warm Glass

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: research presentation (20%) and self-directed project (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores the use of glass as a conceptual and practical skin in contemporary art and everyday life. The primary focus of the unit is the manipulation of the glass skin and its conceptual properties to build metaphor specific to the intent of your artistic practice. Short research projects decode the metaphysics of glass and its use as a social and commercial material. You gain skills in kiln fusing, slumping of sheet glass, as well as knowledge in the chemistry of glass and proficiency in the creation firing schedules. You may work exclusively with glass or in conjunction with other media and processes.
CAEL2078 Glass in Time: Advanced Hot Glass

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: research project and presentation (20%) and themed project (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study you consider the scientific, cultural and artistic impact of Venetian glassblowing from the Renaissance to present day through research projects. Structured weekly workshops traverse contemporary use of a range of Venetian glassblowing techniques and methods. You will apply learned theoretical knowledge and developed practical skills to a self-directed work that reinterprets the Venetian glassmaking tradition. You may work exclusively with glass or in conjunction with other media and processes.
CAEL2080 Etching: Expanded Workshops

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: preliminary small project (20%) and research proposal (20%) and major work (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces and enhances skills in etching. You will follow a project-based curriculum in a broad range of technically based workshops intrinsic to the medium of etching. You will be encouraged to engage in a sustained self-directed project addressing concepts and methodologies central to your creative ideas. This project will be supported by more specialised workshops that expand on conventional etched plate techniques. You will learn innovative methods that enable digital processes to be integrated with traditional print media and offer a greater flexibility in output and presentation. The unit promotes investigation and exploration across media to develop your creative practice.
CAEL2081 Fusion: Jewellery and Ceramics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: research proposal and moulds (50%) and final work (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Fusion refers to the merging or melting of different materials into one. Working across jewellery and ceramics, in this unit of study you consider this concept also in relationship to the construction of an object from multiple parts. In this sense the artist becomes alchemist, scientist, or musician, mixing, constructing and blending to create a new object. By experimenting with processes of moulding, you explore notions of multiplicity, the original, the copy and the archetype. This unit addresses the development of conceptual, formal and aesthetic approaches in making.
CAEL2082 On Location: Jewellery-Street & Gallery

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karin Findeis Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3-week field trip in Europe and 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: travelogue (20%) and critical reviews (20%) and project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
On Location: Jewellery in the Street and the Gallery focuses on material and significance in the processes of the conception and making of jewellery and how these appear in both contemporary and historical work. Within this you will engage with a range of contexts where jewellery appears including the street, the museum and the gallery. Accordingly, you will be introduced to the most contemporary work as well as historical pieces; will experience a range of means of presentation from formal museum to low-tech and ephemeral exhibitions; will see work by emerging artists and the most respected and established makers. This unit takes an intensive approach to learning where students go into the field in Europe at the beginning of the semester and follow up with tutorial meetings with the lecturer while a final body of work is produced. Learning contexts include artist talks, gallery visits and seminars. Studio outcomes will be based on experience and research developed in the field. You will maintain a record of your experiences, impressions and ideas in the form of a Travelogue which will become the key resource for developing a piece of work (or small series) on your return, culminating in an exhibition. Throughout the duration of the journey you will contribute to a daily blog, including exhibitions reviews, gallery profiles and critical responses.
CAEL2083 Virtual Objects 2D

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: directed project (40%) and major self-directed project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a studio based approach to translating design drawings from analogue and digital sources into componentry through industrialised machine processes found in the technology of laser cutting, vinyl cutting, plasma cutting etc. These digitally mediated processes open up possibilities for reproducing or translating graphic ideas and drawings in a variety of different ways and would be applicable to all artists interested in working with the digital and the new forms of modular fabrication technology. In this unit you will work through the processes necessary for making graphic artwork ready to work with these technologies that allow for mechanical reproduction of, for example, a large quantity of smaller elements that make up a large scale work, the cutting of intricate patterns, working with materials that are difficult to cut, or using the process to distort shape or manipulate the scale of the final work. Our focus will be on translating digital drawing into materials. The software we will be using will be a combination of commercial and open source software and we will be outsourcing the actual cutting process and working with the relevant companies that provide this service.
CAPP2003 Professional Placement for Artists

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Assessment: visual diary (30%) and final report (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study provides you with direct experience of working closely with nationally and internationally acclaimed professional artists in the context of key art events including the Sydney Biennale and ISEA , as well as in leading museums and contemporary art spaces and significant artists' studios.
You will have access to discussions and interactions between artists and national and international curators, as well participate in the exhibition production process, including production management, technical and preparatory methodologies, publicity and promotion. In addition, you can choose to undertake an internship with the organisation itself, to develop your understanding of the expectations and responsibilities of professional practice, including insights into: the creation and presentation of contemporary art, marketing and promotion, curatorial decision making, administration, funding structures, audience development, publication, and working relationships with artist, writers and conference speakers.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

ARHT2655 Modern Cinema: Modes of Viewing

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) or (18 Junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: ARHT2055 Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (50%), 1x2000wd tutorial paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will give an introduction to how film studies has analysed the meaning of a film in relation to how the film incorporates or addresses the spectator (what is known as theories of spectatorship). Commencing with debates around classical Hollywood cinema and the functioning of the point of view shot, the unit will examine how theories of spectatorship have understood the significance of different genres.
ARHT2656 Film Genres and National Cinemas

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) or (18 Junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: ARHT2056 Assessment: 1x1000wd classification exercise (20%), 1x1000wd discussion paper (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Nations are like movies: they are the result of complex imaginings. To what extent have nations been imagined through movies, and have movies been affected by national imaginings? This unit of study takes Hollywood as a starting point to examine the evolving relation of national cinemas and film genres. A national case study - for instance, Australian cinema - will be studied to identify and analyse some of the complexities of the relation of film genres and national audiences.
ENGL1011 Introduction to Film Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Winter Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How do form and style structure our experience of film? This unit provides a critical introduction to elements of film making and viewing, moving through an exploration of formal components of film to consider film aesthetics in relation to the history of film scholarship. We will consider films in a variety of cultural and historical contexts, from early cinema to youtube, and introduce a series of "case studies" to explore historical, cultural and material contexts of film production and consumption.
ENGL2627 Screening Sexuality

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Kate Lilley Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ((12 junior credit points from English) or (6 junior credit points from English and AMST1001)) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1076 or HSTY1023))) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) or (12 junior credit points from GCST, SCLG, ANTH, ENGL1008, ENGL1026, PHIL1011 or PHIL1013) Prohibitions: ENGL2027 Assessment: 1x1500wd word essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the relationship between cinema and sexuality in classic films through detailed, historicised readings. Questions to be investigated include the erotics of cinematic genre and form; the sexual politics of representation and spectatorship; stardom, scandal and cult appreciation; cinema and sexuality as technologies of modernity; cinema, sexuality and pedagogy.
FILM2601 Cinema Today: Traffic in Moving Images

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) or (12 senior credit points from Digital Cultures) Assessment: 1x500wd descriptive exercise (10%), 1x1500wd critical analysis (30%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The twentieth century was known as the cinematic century. How best should we understand film today? Once confined to the physical space of the movie theatre, the cinematic image is now mobile, part of our everyday mediascapes. This unit considers the broad history of film from the perspective of the contemporary moment, while also providing the conceptual tools for analyzing the future of film in a media-convergent world.

Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning

DAAE2002 Architecture, Place and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Akin Sevinc Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prohibitions: DESA2211 Assessment: Graphic and Written Pressentation on Research (40%); Final Research Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to investigate the relationship between architecture, place and society and to explore the meaning of cultural and social sustainability in architectural design. The unit assumes that designers will increasingly work in places where cultures are unfamiliar at home or in a global context, and that an ability to understand, and interpret, diverse cultures, and the way design occurs in diverse locations, is an important area of knowledge for designers. A key aspect of social sustainability is the practice of social responsibility, and the unit explores how this may occur, including involving people in the design process. On completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate: an ability to better understand the connections between architecture place and society, and the social, cultural, political and economic factors affecting sustainable environments; skills and knowledge in participatory processes necessary for effective communication about environmental design issues; increased critical awareness about social responsibility in relation to the practice of architecture and the design of the built environment, and an ability to exercise this awareness. This unit will provide architecture students with knowledge of the relationship between culture and architecture, as well as practical knowledge of the social aspects of design practice. It is intended that students from other disciplines will develop a critical awareness of the built environment as a form of cultural production, and the possibilities for their participation in its production.
DESA1004 Designing with Surfaces and Light

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Davis Session: Semester 2,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: Online Prohibitions: DESA2612 Assessment: Assignment (40%), Assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: Online
Objects only become visible when light reflects off of them. This unit explores the ways in which light interacts with surfaces, objects, and the human visual system. Architectural design decisions regarding the lighting, as well as exterior and interior surfaces of a building, alter the perceptual experience of users and should be done thoughtfully.
This unit introduces students to the way humans perceive and experience the built environment. It covers some of the fundamental properties of light, mechanisms of human perception, and the ways that light interacts with surfaces. The application of these topics to design decisions is also discussed. Students demonstrate their understanding of the presented material and apply their knowledge to critically analyze their own environments.
DECO1006 Design Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, Workshop 2 hrs/wk Prohibitions: IDEA9106 Assessment: Design assignments (90%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an overview of a human (or user) centred approach to the design of interactive technologies. It introduces students to design thinking and how it can be productively applied to different design situations. The theoretical concepts, methods and tools for the key stages of interaction design are covered including user research, ideation, prototyping and user evaluation. The cognitive processes of individual designers are also explored. Students learn to persuasively communicate and pitch design concepts with an emphasis on the user experience through visual storytelling and the use of video. It provides students with the principles, processes and tools for working on user-centred design in studio projects. Students will acquire the following outcomes: An appreciation of the role of design thinking in traditional and cross-disciplinary contexts, theoretical and practical understanding and application of human-centred design methodologies, methods and tools, demonstration of ideation and concept development, informed by user and background research, to innovate interactive technology solutions to complex problems, awareness of design processes and cognition in collaborative, inter-disciplinary teams, demonstration of persuasive oral/visual communication techniques. This unit is core in the Bachelor of Design Computing, Bachelor of Architecture and Environments and can be taken as elective by students enrolled in other programs.
DECO1012 Design Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rob Saunders Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1hr/wk, tutorial 2hrs/wk Prohibitions: SOFT1001, DECO2011 Assessment: Tutorials and participation (10%); three programming assignments (90%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Enrolment limited by teaching resources. Permission required unless enrolled in the Bachelor of Design Computing. Other students may apply directly to the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Student Administration Centre (SAC) for a place.
This unit aims to teach students an understanding of the stages involved in the development of software for design; skills in the design and implementation of software for design tasks and in the development of software as design tools. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have demonstrated: skills in using software tools to build interactive, visual design applications through individual programming assignments; knowledge of object-oriented programming concepts through individual programming assignments; implementation techniques such as editing, using assets, and runtime environments through individual programming assignments; knowledge of the Processing programming language including: classes, methods, object creation, instance and local variables, primitive and object types, simple I/O, and control flow through individual programming assignments; knowledge of software design and development processes including analysis of requirements, design of data-structures, functions and classes, debugging, and managing software projects. This unit is a core unit in the Bachelor of Design Computing program.
DECO2103 3D Modelling and Fabrication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rob Saunders Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1hr/wk; tutorial 2 hrs/wk Prohibitions: DECO1008, DECO1003, DECO2001 Assessment: Tutorials: (10%); Geometric Modeling (20%); Lighting and Texture (30%); Fully Rendered Model (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Places in this unit are limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Student Administration Centre (SAC). Bachelor of Design in Architecture students will receive preference. Not available in the Bachelor of Design Computing. Design Computing students should enrol in DECO1008 instead.
The unit further introduces students to rapid prototyping fabrication techniques, such as 3D printing and laser cutting with the aim to understand how to prepare a digital representation for physical fabrication. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have: demonstrated an understanding of how physical objects are represented in 3D digital models by modelling various 3D geometric entities; demonstrated critical judgment, be capable of rigorous and independent thinking and use appropriate information technology techniques to communicate their knowledge through the production of efficient design presentations and documentation; an understanding of boundary representations, solid and parametric modelling, texture mapping, light sources, camera locations and projections, and model constraints through model development and presentation; acquire skills in using a 3D modelling system for 2D and 3D objects, in preparing digital representations for physical fabrication, and in creating photorealistic images that accurately and efficiently describe intent, structure, geometric and surface variations of 3D models. These skills will be assessed through the tutorial exercises and the submission of 3D models. This unit is core in the Bachelor of Design Computing.

Sydney Conservatorium of Music

MUSC1506 Music in Western Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Anne Boyd Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1 hr tut/wk Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: The ability to follow a musical score while listening to the music and some prior knowledge of elementary music theory. Prohibitions: MUSC1001, MUSC1502, MUSC1000 Assumed knowledge: The ability to follow a musical score while listening to the music and some prior knowledge of elementary music theory. Assessment: Tutorial work including a Listening Journal (40%), 2000 word essay (30%), 60 minute listening exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will study a range of today's popular classics with a view to understanding how musical meaning is constructed in relation to the development of tonality and other European stylistic conventions from the Ancient Greeks to the present day. It will consider questions about how the Western art music tradition has been constructed through history. What are the social factors at work? How does music reflect the minds of its creators and create meaning? How does music reflect the minds of its creators and create meaning?
MUSC1507 Sounds, Screens, Speakers: Music & Media

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1 tut/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1001, MUSC1502, MUSC1000 Assessment: Article summary, 1000 words (25%); Critical analysis, 1000 words (25%); Tutorial test, 500 words (10%); Final Project, 2,000 words(30%), attendance and participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Music has been dramatically shaped and reshaped by every major change in communications technology in the 20th century from vinyl discs to MP3s. In this unit of study we will analyse such issues as the ways in which the early recording industry transformed jazz, the blues and country music, how the presentation of music on radio and television changed the ways the music industry created new musical celebrities, and the challenges the music industry faces as digital technology transforms the creation, distribution and consumption of music.
MUSC2667 Shakespeare as Opera

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Halliwell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points. Assessment: 1500 word mid-semester assignment (25%), 4,500 word essay (75%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will study the literary and musical strategies employed by composers and librettists in the adaption of the plays of Shakespeare into opera. Operas to be examined are taken from nearly 400 years of operatic repertoire including the classical, romantic, modernist and postmodernist periods. Recent CD and DVD recordings of both the plays and operas will be used, and current adaption theory as applicable to opera will be investigated.
MUSC2670 Music Festivals & Arts Events Management

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Matthew Hindson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour seminar + 1 hr tut/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Prohibitions: MUSC2070 Assessment: Participation and involvement including small written tasks as appropriate (e.g. preparation of a sample budget) (50%) equivalent to 3000 words of assessment. 1500 word groupwork written submission (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study includes a practical component in which participants will be actively involved in the administration and management of music and arts events. They will learn the procedures and protocols necessary for a smooth behind-the-scenes operation of music event presentation through their own involvement as well as examination of best practice event management nationally and internationally.
MUSC3699 Understanding Music: Modes of Hearing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Wierzbicki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lecture, 1 hr tut/wk Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points Assessment: Analyses eq. 1,500 words (30%), final paper 3,000 words (50%), tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study deals with the different ways in which we comprehend music and with the different ways in which that comprehension might be explained. It deals with modes of hearing and musical analysis for the purpose of leading students towards a deeper knowledge of how music in various genres (ranging from the classical mainstream to the twentieth-century avant-garde, from Tin Pan Alley songs to punk rock and hip-hop) is understood. A good working knowledge of musical terminology and vocabulary is required. This is the required unit of study for a music major in an Arts degree.

Business School

BUSS2220 Small Business Structures and Taxation

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Brett Bondfield Session: Semester 2 Classes: Wks 2 and 10: Saturday and Sunday 9am-1pm workshops and online modules on Blackboard Prerequisites: 48 credit points in junior and senior units Prohibitions: ACCT3014, CLAW2207, ACCT3013, CLAW2205, CLAW3206, CLAW3207, ACCT3099, CLAW2211, ACCT2012, CLAW2202, CLAW3201, ACCT3032, CLAW2209, ACCT3011, CLAW2203, CLAW3202, ACCT3098, CLAW2210, ACCT3012, CLAW2204, CLAW3204, ACCT3031, CLAW2208, ACCT2011, CLAW2201, CLAW2212 Assessment: taxation portfolio (50%), presentation (20%), and exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Many graduates will be faced with the opportunity of running a business in their chosen field and will need to have the business acumen and skills to make informed business decisions. Choosing the right business structure, and understanding and meeting taxation and superannuation obligations, are important components of operating a successful and effective business. This unit of study aims to provide prospective business operators with the tools, knowledge and information that will help them decide which legal structure best suits their needs and to meet their taxation and superannuation obligations throughout the lifecycle of their business.
The subject begins with an introduction to the Australian legal and taxation systems. It is followed by the various issues that need to be considered when starting a business such as selecting the right business structure that suits the individual's needs and focuses on key registration requirements. Tax topics include income tax and deductions; the goods and services tax; special rules and concessions that apply to small business; employer obligations; record keeping; completing activity statements and common tips and traps of which those business operators should be aware.