Bachelor of Food and Agribusiness

Unit of study descriptions

All students complete an Agribusiness major and a Food Science major.

Year 1

Year 1 will have a minimum of 48 credit points comprised of:
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: practical eportfolio (10%), during semester exams (20%), communication (30%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense.Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. This unit will explore how new species, diseases and parasites continue to arise while others go extinct and discuss the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It will also explain how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes integrating Life and Evolution concepts. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems and organisms into what they are today.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: practical eportfolio (10%), during semester exams (20%), communication (30%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense.Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. This unit will explore how new species, diseases and parasites continue to arise while others go extinct and discuss the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It will also explain how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in alternative components. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Nathan Lo and A/Prof Simon Ho Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 30-36 hours of practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: practical 60% (comprised of two practical reports, laboratory note book and seminar presentation), 40% final summative exam as per biol1906 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense.Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different to BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BUSS1000 Future of Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1.5 hour lecture every week (13), 1.5 hr tutorial each week, guided learning material (e.g. videos, podcasts, contemporary case studies etc). 8x 1.5 hr workshops per week: Students who fail (or receive a low pass in) a diagnostic test on academic skills (administered during Week 1 of BUSS1000 tutorials) will be required to attend a 1.5 hour weekly workshop from Week 3 on Business Communication and Academic Writing (BCAC). Prohibitions: BUSS1001 Assessment: case study (20%), team presentation (15%), tutorial attendance and participation (15%), final exam (50%); Attendence at Business Communication workshops (if required) (0%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Note: Students who fail (or receive a low pass in) diagnostic test on academic skills (administered during Week 1 of BUSS1000 tutorials) be required to attend a 1.5 hour weekly workshop from Week 3 on Business Communication and Academic Writing (BCAC).
This compulsory first year unit is designed to provide commencing undergraduate students with insights into the study and the practice of business. Students gain foundational knowledge in relation to business stakeholders, business challenges and the ways in which business leaders might approach responding to these challenges. Key stakeholders within and external to organisations are identified and their interests are analysed. Critical business challenges such as climate change and sustainability, the future of work and workforce diversity are investigated. The way that these challenges affect different types of business, sectors and stakeholders is analysed and responses constructed to them. The unit is delivered in a blended format, with face-to-face lectures, seminars, and interactive online modules. Success in this unit is determined by strong application of critical, strategic and cross-disciplinary thinking, as well as the ability to demonstrate business knowledge and problem solving skills through effective written and oral communication.
BUSS1000 is scheduled for Semester 1
CHEM1001 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1909 or CHEM1109 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignments (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, see http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
The aim of the unit of study is to provide those students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent) with a good grounding in fundamental chemical principles together with an overview of the relevance of chemistry. There is no prerequisite or assumed knowledge for entry to this unit of study. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
or
CHEM1101 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1909 or CHEM1109 Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Mathematics. Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February). Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February, http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry 1A is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC Chemistry course. Chemistry 1A covers chemical theory and physical chemistry. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
or
CHEM1901 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour tutorial per week; one 3-hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1909 or CHEM1109 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry 1A (Advanced) is available to students with a very good HSC performance as well as a very good school record in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do Chemistry 1A (Advanced) rather than Chemistry 1A.
The theory and practical work syllabuses for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) are similar, though the level of treatment in the latter unit of study is more advanced, presupposing a very good grounding in the subject at secondary level. Chemistry 1A (Advanced) covers chemical theory and physical chemistry. Lectures: A series of about 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/wk, 1x1 hr tutorial/wk, 1x2 hr computer practical/wk Prohibitions: ENVX1001 Assessment: 1 × Exam during the Exam period (50%), 2 × Practical Tests (10% each), 2 × Assessment Tasks (10% each) and 8 Online Quizzes (1.25% each). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core first year unit for the BEnvSys, BScAgr, BFoodAgrib, BVetBiol and BAnVetBioSc degrees. It provides the foundation quantitative and statistical skills that are needed in other units in the degrees and for further study in applied statistics. In the first portion of the unit the emphasis is on the role of statistics in scientific research, describing data and its variability, and probability. In the second part the focus is on sample designs and framing scientific hypotheses; estimating a single treatment mean via a confidence interval and testing for a particular mean via a z-test or t-test; estimating or testing the difference between two treatment means. The final part of the unit is on the use of calculus for modelling biological and environmental data, for example the use of linear and non-linear functions. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the spreadsheet package Excel and the statistical package Genstat.
Textbooks
Recommended readings: -Mead R, Curnow RN, Hasted AM (2002) 'Statistical methods in agriculture and experimental biology.' (Chapman & Hall: Boca Raton). -Quinn GP, Keough MJ (2002) 'Experimental design and data analysis for biologists.' (Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK).
AGEC1006 Economic Environment of Agriculture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: AGEC1003 or AGEC1004 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: 1x2hr exam (55%) and 1x50 min mid-semester exam (25%) and workshop papers (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to give an understanding of some basic economic principles and to introduce the characteristics of the economic environment in which Australian agriculture operates. Topics to be covered include the structure, nature and history of the agricultural industries in Australia; agricultural adjustment in the world economy; introductory principles of production economics and farm management; elementary price theory and the factors affecting the demand, supply and prices of agricultural commodities.
Textbooks
HE Drummond and JW Goodwin, Agricultural Economics, 3rd edn (Prentice-Hall, 2011)
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Pauline Ross Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: practical (50%), summative final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Pauline Ross Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: summative exam (50%), practical component which may include independent or group project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Pauline Ross Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: one 2-hour exam (50%), project report (50%) which includes written report and presentation Practical field work: As advised and required by the project - approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be either a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms or organismal/ecosystems biology. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
AGEN1006 Biological Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel (Coordinator), Dr. Thomas Roberts, Dr. Feike Dijkstra, Prof. Balwant Singh, Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/wk, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk 1 x 3-hr practical/wk Prerequisites: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 Prohibitions: CHEM1002 Assessment: Three quizzes (3x5%), 1 x Problem solving exercise (10%), Laboratory-based assessment (15%), Video presentation (5%), Final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study expands on the basic chemical concepts taught in first semester (CHEM1001). The unit will cover the structure and behaviour of organic and inorganic compounds relevant to chemical reactions in biological systems. The unit will introduce students to organic molecules (hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, aromatic compounds, organic acids) and inorganic chemistry (e.g. acid-base and redox reactions, solubility, metal complexes) as well as the structures and reactions of major biological macromolecules (e.g. carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids). In weeks 1-7, lectures, tutorials and laboratory work are conducted in co-operation with the School of Chemistry, Faculty of Science. In weeks 8-13, lectures, tutorials and laboratory work will be undertaken in the Faculty of Agriculture and Environment. Lectures, tutorials and laboratory work are integrated, providing students with a theoretical and practical basis for further studies in the management of biological systems. This 6 credit point unit consists of approximately 80 hours directed learning.
Textbooks
Reference books; Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille Chemistry and SI Chemical Data (package), 2nd Edition, 2012 (John Wiley) ISBN: 9781118234228
ENVI1003 Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures per week, 2hrs tutorial/computer lab per week, 2 day weekend field trip Assessment: 1x2hr exam (60%), field trip report (20%), tutorial presentation (10%), gis reports (10%) Practical field work: Computer practicals and 2 day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half using Australian case studies we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.

Year 2

Year 2 will have a minimum of 48 credit points comprised of:
AGEC2102 Agribusiness Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AGEC1006 or AGEC1102 or RSEC1031 Assessment: Group presentation (15%), 1x2000wd case study (25%), and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide an introductory understanding of agribusiness marketing in a modern context. The unit will provide students in the Sciences degrees with an understanding of how the economic theory taught in first year in AGEC1006 can be treated in an applied context. For BAgrEc students, it is an intermediate level unit in the Agribusiness major.
Students will study the theory relating to the firm-level marketing mix and marketing strategy. The emphasis will be on the organisation and trends of agribusiness marketing including value-adding and market power in the supply chain, market efficiency and international marketing by agribusiness firms.
The unit content is analytical, and draws on applied microeconomics to demonstrate how marketing decisions are made along the marketing chain. At the end of this unit students will be able to use marketing theory to analyse the steps in the marketing chain and be aware of the forces for change within that chain.
By completing this unit, students should have improved their ability to master key theories, identify and frame problems, organise knowledge, carry out individual and group research, and synthesise information. They should also have improved their information literacy skills, and communication skills through group presentations and individual research.
or
MKTG1001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: MKTG2001 Assessment: project (20%), presentation (15%), participation (7%), mid-semester exam (28%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the relationships among marketing organisations and final consumers in terms of production-distribution channels or value chains. It focuses on consumer responses to various marketing decisions (product mixes, price levels, distribution channels, promotions, etc.) made by private and public organisations to create, develop, defend, and sometimes eliminate, product markets. Emphasis is placed on identifying new ways of satisfying the needs and wants, and creating value for consumers. While this unit is heavily based on theory, practical application of the concepts to "real world" situations is also essential. Specific topics of study include: market segmentation strategies; market planning; product decisions; new product development; branding strategies; channels of distribution; promotion and advertising; pricing strategies; and customer database management.
AGEN2001 Plant Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tina Bell (Coordinator), Dr Thomas Roberts Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures, 1x 3-hr practical per week Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XX1, BIOL1XX6) and 12cp from (CHEM1XX1, CHEM1XX2, AGEN1006) Assessment: 1 x 1 hr mid-semester exam (25%), 1 x 1 hr final exam (25%), 1 x 1000w essay (10%), Four practical reports (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to develop an understanding of the structural and molecular principles that underlie the function of plants and how these principles relate to the use of plants by humans as sources of food, fibre and fuel.
The unit is a core unit for BScAgr students and an elective for BSc and other degree programs. It recognizes the specialized nature of plant anatomy and biochemistry and is a platform for students who wish to gain a sound knowledge of plant growth and development.
This unit covers the structure of plant cells and the anatomy of the major tissues and organs of plants. It also covers the biochemistry of the main carbohydrate, lipid, protein and nucleic acid constituents of plants, as well as the metabolic pathways that regulate plant growth and development.
At the completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of the structure and function of plants. Students will also be able to demonstrate abilities in the practice of laboratory methods used to analyse plants and the effective communication of experimental findings.

Students enrolled in this unit will gain research and enquiry skills through attendance at lectures and participation in laboratory classes and tutorials; information literacy and communication skills through the synthesis of information used to prepare practical reports; social and professional understanding by participation in group-work and assessments that seek to demonstrate the role of agriculture in the broader community.
Textbooks
Taiz L, Zeiger E (2010) Plant Physiology 5th ed.
AGEN2002 Fresh Produce Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lecture per week Prerequisites: 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, AGEN1004) and 12cp from (CHEM1XX1, CHEM1XX2, AGEN1006) Assumed knowledge: HSC level Mathematics and Biology Assessment: 4 x Prac Reports (15% each), 1 x End of Semester Exam (40%) Practical field work: 6 x excursions/ practical sessions per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study, students will critically examine the science underpinning the management and handling of fresh food products in Australia and internationally. The unit primarily addresses the challenges facing fresh produce by looking at the main specialized product categories and related practices and technologies to optimise and maintain fresh food product qualities. Students will develop the core skills required to determine and ensure that essential qualities are maintained during the handling, storage and marketing of perishable plant and animal foods. Students will be able to integrate knowledge of the physiology, technological and economic aspects of fresh produce management to determine the optimal storage and handling conditions for safety and the maximization of the consumer experience. Case study examples will be drawn from fruits and vegetables, dairy, meat and seafood products. Students will study food handling processes in order to be able to critically evaluate their performance. Industry quality assurance schemes and government regulations will be examined, with particular reference to food safety. The students will gain research, inquiry and communication skills through research-based group projects, laboratory reports and an oral presentation. Personal and intellectual autonomy will be developed through group and individual work.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbooks
BUSS1030 Accounting, Business and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Semester 1: Abdul Razeed; Semester 2: Paul Blayney Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ACCT1001 or ACCT1002 or ACCT1003 or ACCT1004 or ACCT1005 Assessment: tutorial contribution (10%), assignment (15%), mid-semester examination (25%), final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is a compulsory part of the Bachelor of Commerce and combined Bachelor of Commerce degrees.
This unit investigates the fundamentals of accounting and aims to provide a broad understanding of the role of accounting in the context of business and society. The format of the unit is designed to show that there are many uses of accounting data. The focus moves from accountability to decision making; both functions are explained through examples such as the 'double entry equation', and from an output (financial statements) perspective. Some more technical aspects of accounting are outlined, including the elements of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses within simple, familiar scenarios. Besides developing an understanding of the role of accounting via conventional financial reports, recent developments including the discharge of accountability by companies through the release of corporate social and environmental reports and the global financial crisis, are explored through an accounting lens.
BUSS1030 is scheduled for Semester 1
ITLS2000 Managing Food and Beverage Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x 3hrs of classes per fortnight comprising a combinatiion of seminars and tutorials (Monday and Tuesday mornings) Prohibitions: AGEN2003 or AGEN1005 Assessment: tutorial quiz (10%), individual assignement (35%), group project report (15%), group project presentation (10%), final 2hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The food and beverage sector is one of the key economic activities in virtually all countries in the world today. When it comes to logistics and supply chain management within this sector, there is a level of complexity, not frequently found in other industries. This includes the need to consider products bulkiness, perishability and seasonality, coupled with potential additional infrastructure requirements in respect of temperature?controlled storage and transport. As a consequence, there is a higher imperative to have a well?designed end?to?end supply chain. Equally, it is important to understand issues from the perspectives of the various actors in food and beverage supply chains including farms, processing units, wholesalers / distributors, and retailers. Overarching the structuring of any food and beverage supply chain will be consideration of issues such as perishability, quality and risk. Further, for a supply chain to be effective and efficient consideration also needs to be given to the support functions of information management, use of technology, and financial reporting. In today's world, companies compete on supply chains. Those who have the ability to establish a distinctive supply chain and create it as a strategic asset will therefore emerge as industry leaders.
Textbooks
Christopher, M., 2011, Logistics and Supply Chain Management: Creating Value Adding Networks, 4th edition. Pearson Prentice Hall Financial Times
AGEN2006 Animal Production and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael D'Occhio, Associate Professor Luciano Gonzalez Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures per week Prerequisites: 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, AGEN1004) and 12cp from (CHEM1XX1, CHEM1XX2, AGEN1006) Prohibitions: AVBS1002 Assumed knowledge: HSC level Mathematics and Biology Assessment: 1 x mid-term exam (20%), 1 x 2 hr final exam (30%), 2 x Assignments (2 x 25% each) Practical field work: 10 x excursions/ practical sessions per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to develop the student's ability to critically examine and evaluate the production and management of animals used for food and fibre in Australia and internationally. The unit will focus on new and emerging issues in animal production, including productivity, welfare, remote monitoring and management, animals in the environment, and meeting specifications in an ever-evolving marketplace. The identification, selection and breeding of animals that are optimally suited to production systems is a focus. New thinking and innovations that are being used to address scientific, industry and social expectation challenges will be a feature of the unit and case studies will be used throughout to examine interactions between these factors and their impact on management practices. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through online discussion postings, laboratory reports and presentations, and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups. At the successful completion of the unit, students will have the core knowledge and skills to enable them to lead developments in production animal industries in Australia and overseas.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbooks
MICR2024 Microbes in the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec, 3h prac/wk Prerequisites: 12cp from (AGEN1004, MBLG1XXX, BIOL1XXX) Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2022 or MICR2921 or MICR2922 Assessment: 1 x 2hr exam (60%), 4 x quizzes (15%), lab skills assessment (5%) and 1 x lab project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the diversity of microbes found in soil, water, air, plants and animal environments. Through an examination of their physiology and genetics it explores their interactions with plants, animals and each other, and their roles as decomposers and recyclers in the environment. The soil is a rich microbial environment, and the concept of soil health and its relationship to plant growth is discussed. Practical classes introduce techniques and skills in isolating, quantifying and culturing microbes, designing and interpreting experiments to study microbial growth, and in preparing and presenting data.
Textbooks
Willey et al. Prescott's Microbiology. 9th edition. McGraw-Hill. 2013.
And one elective unit from Table FA1.
Students who commenced the Bachelor of Food and Agribusiness prior to 2017 may follow the Course Rules that applied when they were admitted to the Degree, simply by choosing AGEC2102 (Year 2, semester 1) and FINC2011 (Year 2, semester 2) instead of the alternate units that are now being offered.

Year 3

Year 3 will have a minimum of 48 credit points comprised of:
AGCH3025 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Foods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Roberts (Coordinator), Prof Les Copeland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x4-hr practical fortnightly Prohibitions: AFNR5102 or AGCH3017 or AGCH3024 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Intermediate Biochemistry or Chemistry Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%) and 6 x lab reports (6x10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to give students an understanding of the properties of food constituents, and the interactions between these constituents during food processing, storage and digestion. The unit will develop an understanding of the relationship between form and functionality of constituents and the concept of fitness-for-purpose (i.e., quality) in converting agricultural products into foods. Students will gain an appreciation of the relationship between chemical composition and properties of macroconstituents (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids) and microconstituents (vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, flavour and anti-nutritional chemicals) and their functions in plant- and animal-based foods. The material presented in lectures and practical classes will enable students to develop research and inquiry skills and an analytical approach in understanding the biochemistry of foods, food processing and storage. On completing this unit, students will be able to describe the chemical and biochemical properties of major food constituents, and demonstrate an understanding of the functionality of these constituents in food processing and nutrition. Students will have gained experience in laboratory techniques used in industry for the analysis of some food products, and information literacy and communication skills from the preparation of practical reports.
Textbooks
Lecture and laboratory notes will be made available through Blackboard. There is no recommended textbook.
AGEN3004 Food Processing and Value Adding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien (Coordinator), Dr John Kavanagh, Dr Brian Jones, Dr Thomas Roberts, Prof Les Copeland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lecture, 1 x 3 hr practical per week Prerequisites: 36cp Junior/Intermediate units including 12cp from (CHEM1XX1, CHEM1XX2, AGEN1006) Assumed knowledge: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX Assessment: Lab book (5% + 15%); 1 x Viva voce (10%); 1 x Industry or Product Report (30%); 1 x 2hr Final Exam (40%) Practical field work: 6 x excursions/practical sessions over 4 weeks (weeks 1 - 4) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From the grinding of grains to the drying of meats, humans have been processing their food since the dawn of civilisation. Over the decades, many traditional processing methods have become industrialised, while new processing technologies have emerged, quietly revolutionising our food systems, diets and cultures. In this unit, students will study the biochemical transformations that take place during food processing operations and the key engineering principles underlying industrial food manufacture. Lectures and practical classes will cover applications in diverse food categories to link the theoretical content to an industrial context. After completion of this unit, students will be able to: (1) recognise common food processing operations of importance to food industry; (2) explain the underlying biochemical and physicochemical changes that occur during processing and relate these to end-product qualities; (3) demonstrate current techniques for measuring key biochemical and physicochemical transformations, monitoring processes, and evaluating end-product qualities; (4) appreciate fundamental engineering principles relevant to industrial food processing; and (5) apply an understanding of processing principles to design a processing solution that adds value to a basic food or beverage. The unit will include lectures, laboratory sessions, group work and visits to food processing facilities.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbooks
And two elective units from Table FA1.
AGEN3001 Food Product Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien (Coordinator), A/Prof Robyn McConchie, Dr Brian Jones, Dr Thomas Roberts, Prof Les Copeland Session: Intensive August Classes: Intensive Unit - 12 x 4 hr workshops over 4 weeks Prerequisites: 6cp from AGEN3004 Assumed knowledge: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX Assessment: 1 x Project Report (70%), 1 x Presentation (30%) Practical field work: 6 x excursions/practical sessions per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study, students will gain a theoretical and practical understanding of the development of novel food products using traditional and novel food ingredients. Students will examine processes in market trend analysis, product innovation, prototype development, product testing and the formal presentation of a new product. They will develop practical skills in product research and development through a group design project that will require application of product development principles and integration of knowledge regarding product specifications, ingredient interactions and food processing. Product quality, functionality, shelf-life, safety, nutritional and health implications are key considerations in the design process. This is an intensive unit taught as a series of workshops over the first four weeks of semester. It is designed to be taken as one of the final core units in the food science major of the BFoodAgrib as it integrates learnings from across the program and offers a great platform for exploration of product development ideas, that could potentially be expanded in 4th year research projects.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbooks
AGEN3003 Global Food and Nutrition Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brian Jones (Coordinator), Academics from a range of Schools and Faculties will present material in this unit. Session: Intensive August Classes: Intensive Unit - Weeks 1-4, 15 contact hours/week (lectures, workshops and tutorial sessions). Prerequisites: AGEN2002 and AGEN2003 and AGEN2006 Assumed knowledge: 48 Credit Points of Junior and Intermediate units. Assessment: 1 x Group Presentation (60%), 1 x Individual Assignment (30%); 1 Viva voce (10%). Practical field work: 6 x excursions/practical sessions over 4 weeks (weeks 1 - 4) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Humanity has made great progress towards a food secure world over the past several decades. Continuing this progress in a world where environmental constraints are becoming increasingly obvious is the next great challenge. The shortfalls in global food security are manifested in particular by the triple burden of malnutrition/undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies, and obesity. In this unit, students will explore state-of-the-art research, analysis, and global visions for a food secure planet from a wide range of perspectives, including technological, biophysical, behavioural, economic, institutional, political, and social. The course ranges across disciplines and spatiotemporal scales to examine the synergies and trade-offs between human health, social, environmental, and economic objectives and outcomes. Case studies will be used throughout the unit. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through a major research-based project. At the successful completion of the unit, students will have the core knowledge and skills to enable them to critically analyse policy, development and research goals and settings and their impact on global and regional food security.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbooks
The units of study AGEN3001 Food Product Development and AGEN3003 Global Food and Nutrition Security will be delivered in intensive mode at the beginning of second semester prior to AGEN3002 Industry Internship.
AGEN3002 Industry Internship

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Prof Robyn McConchie (Coordinator), Dr Brian Jones, Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien, Ms Tamara Kirby (Internship Placement Coordinator) Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 12-week industry internship Prerequisites: A minimum of 78 credit points of Year 1 and Year 2 Units of Study, or on Faculty Approval. Assessment: Participation in Blackboard discussion (10%); One industry report: Industry context and business overview (20%); One final report including: Reflective diary (20%) and Analytical Report (20%); One 15 min individual seminar (30%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Costs: students to cover internship related costs (e.g. travel, accommodation) where required
This unit of study is designed as a Work-Integrated Learning industry placement in the agri-food sector where students will consolidate and contextualise the knowledge and skills in applied science and business they have gained in Years 1-3 of the degree. Businesses and organisations that have agreed to host interns include small-medium enterprises (SMEs), large national and multinational companies; and government and non-government organisations with roles in the production, processing, distribution, marketing, research and development, policy-making or regulation of agri-food products. Students will further their learning through application of scientific and business concepts in an authentic practical setting, which will be selected where possible to align with their interests and career aspirations. Internships are established by the Faculty Internship Coordinator in consultation with students and host organisations to ensure that the aspirations and expectations of both are accommodated. Student learning outcomes will be achieved in several ways. First, pre-placement workshops on 'soft skills' including inter-personal, communication and self-management skills will improve work-readiness and build student confidence. Throughout the industry placement, students will be offered mentoring by an assigned academic mentor through regular communication and a site visit during the 3rd week of placement. Finally, the assessment tasks have been designed to ensure that the internship is accompanied by continued development of research skills, reflective practice, critical thinking, analytical perspectives, reporting and presentation skills.
Textbooks
No prescribe textbooks for unit, however students are expected to undertake reading of relevant industry and academic literature for background information.

Year 4

Year 4 will have a minimum of 48 credit points comprised of:
AFNR4101 Research Project A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 1 Classes: No formal classes, approx. 18h per week Prerequisites: 144 credit points of level 1000-3000 units of study Assessment: Research proposal, literature review. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop a student's ability to undertake a major research project in an area of specialization. The unit builds on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. This unit is a corequisite with AFNR4102 and each student will work with an academic supervisor in an area of specialization and develop a well defined research project to be executed. The research project is undertaken to advance the students ability to build well-developed research skills, a strong analytical capacity, and the ability to provide high quality research results demonstrating a sound grasp of the research question. Working with an academic supervisor students will develop their ability to define a research project including the producing of testable hypotheses, identifying existing knowledge from reviewing the literature and the design and execution of a research strategy towards solving the research question. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem and enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the development of experimental programs. Students will improve their written and planning skills by composing a research project proposal and the writing of a comprehensive literature review.
and 12 credit points of electives from Table FA1 and FA2.
AFNR4102 Research Project B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: No formal classes, approx. 18h per week Prerequisites: AFNR4101 Assessment: Oral presentation, research paper, poster. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a continuation of the major research project initiated in AFNR4101 and continues to build on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. Working with their academic supervisor in the area of specialization the student will continue to pursue the defined research project towards presenting final results and conclusions. The research results are presented in a format of a research paper as submitted to a research journal. The research paper and corrected literature review is combined and presented together as a thesis. Students will continue to build their research skills, develop strong analytical capacity, demonstrate a sound grasp of the topic, and an ability to interpret results in a broad framework. Working with an academic supervisor students will develop their ability to produce results of high quality, draw reliable conclusions and identify future areas avenues of research. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem and enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the managing the research program. Students will improve their communication skills through oral presentation of their research findings, the production of a poster detailing their research findings and the writing of a research paper.
and 12 credit points of electives from Table FA1 and FA2.

Elective unit of study descriptions

Table FA1

Students may only select one 1000 level unit of study from Table FA1 to fulfil part of the requirements for Year 3. Students may only select two 2000 level units of study from Tables FA1 and FA2 to fulfil part of the requirement for Year 4. A maximum 60 credit points of 1000 level units of study may be included to satisfy the requirements of the degree.
School of Economics units
AREC2001 Econ of Biological Production Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON1001 or AGEC1006 or AGEC1102 Assessment: 2x1000wd Assignment (40%), 1x2hr Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is concerned with the application of microeconomic principles to management decisions in agricultural, forest, and fisheries systems. The unit builds on the theoretical knowledge acquired in previous studies and introduces the methods of applied economic analysis through a range of topics including: production functions (single and multi-output), cost and profit functions; methods for the measurement of productivity; optimisation in biological production systems; and production under risk.
AREC2002 Commodity Market and Price Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON1001 or AGEC1006 or AGEC1102 Assessment: 1x50min Mid-semester Test (20%), 1xGroup Assignment (1000wd equiv) (20%), 1x2hr Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on the nature of agricultural and resource commodity markets, market demand relationships, market supply relationships, price determination under alternative market structures, marketing margin relationships, derived demand for inputs, spatially and temporally related markets, market dynamics, price expectations, commodity futures markets and other pertinent topics. Applied examples from the agricultural and resource industries and the overall economy will be used throughout the semester as illustrations of the principles involved.
AREC3001 Production Modelling and Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2001 or AGEC2103 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x2hr Final Exam (60%), 1x50min Mid-semester Test (15%), 1x1500wd Assignment (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on the principles of biological production economics and introduces optimisation methods to solve decision making problems encountered by agribusiness and natural resource firms and managers in public agencies. The principle focus is on the application of linear programming techniques, and students learn to consider solving decision making problems where the outcomes are not known with certainty, and where the timing of decisions is of essence.
AREC3002 Agricultural Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2001 or AGEC2103 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1000wd equivalent problem sets (30%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2hr final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide an understanding of the underlying forces driving agricultural markets. It addresses price analysis and efficiency, including aspects of form, time and space in agricultural marketing; information and contracts; changing consumer concerns (food safety, ethical production); futures market and other risk sharing devices. Building on the application of microeconomic theory to both production and consumption in agricultural markets, its content is analytical. The unit also investigates some of the forces which prevent the efficient operation of world agricultural markets, including impediments to trade, imperfect markets for inputs and outputs and market power along the agricultural supply chain.
AREC3005 Agricultural Finance and Risk

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2001 or AGEC2103 or AREC2002 or AGEC2101 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x2hr Final Exam (70%), 2x1500wd Assignments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Agricultural production is typically risky, adding complexity to decision analysis and increasing need of risk consideration in agricultural policy design. This unit explores this theme, and has two related components: risk and risk management in agriculture, and issues of agricultural producer finance. These two components cover a broad range of topics that incorporate production risk and other sources of risk in agriculture.
See Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (Undergraduate) Handbook
Business School units
Students may take units of study from the following subject areas in the Business School: Accounting; Business Analytics; Banking; Business Information Systems; Commercial Law; Finance; Industrial Relations and Human Resources Management; International Business; Management; Marketing
Notes: Prerequisites and/or co-requisites apply for most units. See the Business School (Undergraduate) Handbook

Table FA2

Students may only select two 2000 level units of study from Tables FA1 and FA2 to fulfil part of the requirements for Year 4.
AFNR3001 Agro-ecosystems in Developing Countries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x18 days fieldtrip before start of semester 1, online tutorials Assessment: Participation (20%), Research Topic Proposal (20%), Oral Presentation (20%), Major report (40%) Practical field work: 1 x 18 day Field School Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
AFNR5107 Principles of Biochemical Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalind Deaker (Coordinator), Prof Les Copeland, Dr Thomas Roberts, A/Prof Michael Kertesz, Dr Feike Dijkstra, Dr Claudia Keitel, Dr Neil Wilson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 18 hrs of lectures and 36 hrs of laboratory during the semester Prohibitions: AGCH4007 Assessment: Assessment includes attendance and participation in lectures and practical classes. Each module will comprise 25% of the final assessment mark and satisfactory progress in all modules is required for the successful completion of this unit. (4x25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
AGEN3005 Flavour and Sensory Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Malcolm Possell (Coordinator), Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x 1 hour lectures, and 1x 3 hour practical per week Prerequisites: 12cp from (CHEM1XX1, CHEM1XX2, AGEN1006) Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of statistics from, or equivalent to that in, the 1st year Units of Study in the degrees in which this Unit is available. Assessment: One 2hr final exam (40%), One literature review (10%), Three lab reports (2 x 15% + 1 x 20% = 50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Textbooks
No prescribed textbook but recommended reading includes:
AGEN3008 Indigenous Land and Food Knowledge

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Ampt (Coordinator), A/Prof Tina Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Application process; Pre-trip orientation - 1 day; Field trip ¿ 10 days + travel time = 70 hours; Post-trip Workshop - 1 day. (Student financial contribution $2000-$2500) Assessment: Assessment during field trip: Field trip activities recorded in booklet (20%); Journal - personal/reflective (20%); participation peer and self-assessment (10%); Assessment post-field trip: 1 x 3000w Feasibility study, funding application and essay due week 7 Semester 2 (50%); Out of class prescribed student workload: Application process - Kinship module 1 hr, written application 2 hrs. Prepare report - 5 hrs/week for 7 weeks Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Students must attend pre-trip briefing session (1 day in S1 exam period); field trip (approximately 2 weeks in mid-year break) and post-trip workshop (1 day in S2).
Textbooks
No prescribed textbook but recommended reading includes: Gammage B (2011) The Biggest Estate on Earth: How Aborigines made Australia, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, Sydney, Australia; Svieby K, Skuthorpe T (2006) Treading Lightly: The Hidden Wisdom of the World's Oldest People, Allen and Unwin, Crows nest, Sydney, Australia; Bird Rose D (2000) Dingo Makes us Human: Life and Land in an Australian Aboriginal Culture, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK
AGEN5001 Agricultural and Environmental Extension

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Ampt Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 lec/wk (2hr), 1 tut/wk (2 hr), 1 field (3 day) Assessment: 1500w essay (20%), Tutorial/workshop participation (30%), 3000w problem based learning project (30%), Field trip report (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Textbooks
Recommended reading, Jennings, J., Packham R. and Woodside, D.(eds) (2001) Shaping Change APEN; Hay, I (2012) Communicating in Geography and the Environmental Sciences, Oxford
AVBS4002 Dairy Production and Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: UoS Coordinator: Professor Sergio (Yani) Garcia; Participating Lecturers: A/Prof. Kendra Kerrisk, Dr Cameron Clark, Dr Nicolas Lyons, Dr Luke Ingenhoff, Dr Jennie Mohler, Juan Molfino, Dr Mark Hazelton Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures up to 3 hrs/wk, practicals 3 hrs/wk Assumed knowledge: Enrolled students are expected to have some understanding of key components of the dairy production system, including basic knowledge of animal physiology and nutrition. Assessment: Assignment (report or lit review) (30%), Pracs assessments, (30%), 1 hr exam (40%) Practical field work: At least 2 half day field trips and 1 or 2 full day trips/excursions including commercial farms and a milk processing plant Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Textbooks
Students are advised to consult lecturers for recommended text, scientific and professional articles, technotes for advisors and industry-generated information for farmers
AVBS4004 Food Safety Assessment and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gary Muscatello Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 3 hrs/wk, tutorial/practicals 2 hrs/wk Prerequisites: AVBS3001 and AVBS4001 Assessment: 1000wd individual report (20%), 1000wd group assignment (20%), 2hr exam (50%), MCQ (10%) Practical field work: 2 field trips (compulsory) 16 hrs total Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Textbooks
Torrence ME & Isaacson RE (eds) 2003, Microbial food safety in animal agriculture current topics, Iowa State Press, Ames, Iowa
AVBS4008 Intensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hrs/wk Prerequisites: (Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3) OR (Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3) Assessment: Written exam (50%) (Poultry and Pigs 50:50), in course evaluations and case study - Pigs (25%), Broiler growth study report and in course evaluations - Poultry (25%) Practical field work: Visits to an intensive pig/poultry farm, feed mill and poultry production and processing units when biosecurity restrictions allow Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the Australian pig industry and for this reason no formal text is required. There are many sites (industry, academic institutions and government departments) on the Web which provide excellent information. Links to these will be provided. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course. Often poultry specific text books are obsolete very quickly, it would be important to use trade information. The library subscribes to breeder management guides and general poultry production journals as well as specific poultry scientific journals.
AVBS4012 Extensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Russell Bush Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3hrs/wk, practicals 3hrs/wk Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 Assessment: case study (10%), practical report (15%), meat grading (15%), excursion report (20%) and written exam (40%) Practical field work: 5 day study tour to the Riverina Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop (Coordinator), A/Prof Willem Vervoort, A/Prof Peter Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/wk, 1x1 hr tutorial/wk, 1x2 hr computer practical/wk Prerequisites: ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 or MATH1015 Assessment: 1 × Exam during the Exam period (50%), 2 × Practical Tests (2x10%), 2 × Assessment Tasks (2x10%) and 8 Online Quizzes (8x1.25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
HORT3005 Production Horticulture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Robyn McConchie Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lec; 1x3hr prac/workshop/wk Prerequisites: (AGEN2001 and AGEN2005) or BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2002 Assessment: 1x 3 hr exam (55%), three assignments (45%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Textbooks
Recommended reading:
HORT4005 Research and Practice in Horticulture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brian Jones (Coordinator), Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thein Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2h tut/wk; one 1-week excursion Prerequisites: HORT3005 Assessment: Industry reports (2x20%); Field trip industry report (10%); 2 x Practical reports (2x10%); End of semester exam 30%. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
PHYS5031 Ecological Econ and Sustainable Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arunima Malik Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1.5-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week, and 1 hour seminar per week. Assessment: Essay, presentation and comprehensive diary/notes from lectures (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
PHYS5033 Environmental Footprints and IO Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arunima Malik and Prof Manfred Lenzen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Comprehensive diary/notes from lectures, including a quantitative example (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
PHYS5034 Life Cycle Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arunima Malik Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2.5-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Essay, presentation and comprehensive diary/notes from lectures (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
All students complete an Agribusiness Major and a Food Science Major

Table 1A - Agribusiness Major

Year 1
BUSS1000 Future of Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1.5 hour lecture every week (13), 1.5 hr tutorial each week, guided learning material (e.g. videos, podcasts, contemporary case studies etc). 8x 1.5 hr workshops per week: Students who fail (or receive a low pass in) a diagnostic test on academic skills (administered during Week 1 of BUSS1000 tutorials) will be required to attend a 1.5 hour weekly workshop from Week 3 on Business Communication and Academic Writing (BCAC). Prohibitions: BUSS1001 Assessment: case study (20%), team presentation (15%), tutorial attendance and participation (15%), final exam (50%); Attendence at Business Communication workshops (if required) (0%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Note: Students who fail (or receive a low pass in) diagnostic test on academic skills (administered during Week 1 of BUSS1000 tutorials) be required to attend a 1.5 hour weekly workshop from Week 3 on Business Communication and Academic Writing (BCAC).
This compulsory first year unit is designed to provide commencing undergraduate students with insights into the study and the practice of business. Students gain foundational knowledge in relation to business stakeholders, business challenges and the ways in which business leaders might approach responding to these challenges. Key stakeholders within and external to organisations are identified and their interests are analysed. Critical business challenges such as climate change and sustainability, the future of work and workforce diversity are investigated. The way that these challenges affect different types of business, sectors and stakeholders is analysed and responses constructed to them. The unit is delivered in a blended format, with face-to-face lectures, seminars, and interactive online modules. Success in this unit is determined by strong application of critical, strategic and cross-disciplinary thinking, as well as the ability to demonstrate business knowledge and problem solving skills through effective written and oral communication.
ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/wk, 1x1 hr tutorial/wk, 1x2 hr computer practical/wk Prohibitions: ENVX1001 Assessment: 1 × Exam during the Exam period (50%), 2 × Practical Tests (10% each), 2 × Assessment Tasks (10% each) and 8 Online Quizzes (1.25% each). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core first year unit for the BEnvSys, BScAgr, BFoodAgrib, BVetBiol and BAnVetBioSc degrees. It provides the foundation quantitative and statistical skills that are needed in other units in the degrees and for further study in applied statistics. In the first portion of the unit the emphasis is on the role of statistics in scientific research, describing data and its variability, and probability. In the second part the focus is on sample designs and framing scientific hypotheses; estimating a single treatment mean via a confidence interval and testing for a particular mean via a z-test or t-test; estimating or testing the difference between two treatment means. The final part of the unit is on the use of calculus for modelling biological and environmental data, for example the use of linear and non-linear functions. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the spreadsheet package Excel and the statistical package Genstat.
Textbooks
Recommended readings: -Mead R, Curnow RN, Hasted AM (2002) 'Statistical methods in agriculture and experimental biology.' (Chapman & Hall: Boca Raton). -Quinn GP, Keough MJ (2002) 'Experimental design and data analysis for biologists.' (Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK).
AGEC1006 Economic Environment of Agriculture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: AGEC1003 or AGEC1004 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: 1x2hr exam (55%) and 1x50 min mid-semester exam (25%) and workshop papers (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to give an understanding of some basic economic principles and to introduce the characteristics of the economic environment in which Australian agriculture operates. Topics to be covered include the structure, nature and history of the agricultural industries in Australia; agricultural adjustment in the world economy; introductory principles of production economics and farm management; elementary price theory and the factors affecting the demand, supply and prices of agricultural commodities.
Textbooks
HE Drummond and JW Goodwin, Agricultural Economics, 3rd edn (Prentice-Hall, 2011)
ENVI1003 Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures per week, 2hrs tutorial/computer lab per week, 2 day weekend field trip Assessment: 1x2hr exam (60%), field trip report (20%), tutorial presentation (10%), gis reports (10%) Practical field work: Computer practicals and 2 day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half using Australian case studies we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.
Year 2 and 3 Units
BUSS1030 Accounting, Business and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Semester 1: Abdul Razeed; Semester 2: Paul Blayney Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ACCT1001 or ACCT1002 or ACCT1003 or ACCT1004 or ACCT1005 Assessment: tutorial contribution (10%), assignment (15%), mid-semester examination (25%), final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is a compulsory part of the Bachelor of Commerce and combined Bachelor of Commerce degrees.
This unit investigates the fundamentals of accounting and aims to provide a broad understanding of the role of accounting in the context of business and society. The format of the unit is designed to show that there are many uses of accounting data. The focus moves from accountability to decision making; both functions are explained through examples such as the 'double entry equation', and from an output (financial statements) perspective. Some more technical aspects of accounting are outlined, including the elements of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses within simple, familiar scenarios. Besides developing an understanding of the role of accounting via conventional financial reports, recent developments including the discharge of accountability by companies through the release of corporate social and environmental reports and the global financial crisis, are explored through an accounting lens.
AGEC2102 Agribusiness Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AGEC1006 or AGEC1102 or RSEC1031 Assessment: Group presentation (15%), 1x2000wd case study (25%), and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide an introductory understanding of agribusiness marketing in a modern context. The unit will provide students in the Sciences degrees with an understanding of how the economic theory taught in first year in AGEC1006 can be treated in an applied context. For BAgrEc students, it is an intermediate level unit in the Agribusiness major.
Students will study the theory relating to the firm-level marketing mix and marketing strategy. The emphasis will be on the organisation and trends of agribusiness marketing including value-adding and market power in the supply chain, market efficiency and international marketing by agribusiness firms.
The unit content is analytical, and draws on applied microeconomics to demonstrate how marketing decisions are made along the marketing chain. At the end of this unit students will be able to use marketing theory to analyse the steps in the marketing chain and be aware of the forces for change within that chain.
By completing this unit, students should have improved their ability to master key theories, identify and frame problems, organise knowledge, carry out individual and group research, and synthesise information. They should also have improved their information literacy skills, and communication skills through group presentations and individual research.
or
MKTG1001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: MKTG2001 Assessment: project (20%), presentation (15%), participation (7%), mid-semester exam (28%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the relationships among marketing organisations and final consumers in terms of production-distribution channels or value chains. It focuses on consumer responses to various marketing decisions (product mixes, price levels, distribution channels, promotions, etc.) made by private and public organisations to create, develop, defend, and sometimes eliminate, product markets. Emphasis is placed on identifying new ways of satisfying the needs and wants, and creating value for consumers. While this unit is heavily based on theory, practical application of the concepts to "real world" situations is also essential. Specific topics of study include: market segmentation strategies; market planning; product decisions; new product development; branding strategies; channels of distribution; promotion and advertising; pricing strategies; and customer database management.
ITLS2000 Managing Food and Beverage Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x 3hrs of classes per fortnight comprising a combinatiion of seminars and tutorials (Monday and Tuesday mornings) Prohibitions: AGEN2003 or AGEN1005 Assessment: tutorial quiz (10%), individual assignement (35%), group project report (15%), group project presentation (10%), final 2hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The food and beverage sector is one of the key economic activities in virtually all countries in the world today. When it comes to logistics and supply chain management within this sector, there is a level of complexity, not frequently found in other industries. This includes the need to consider products bulkiness, perishability and seasonality, coupled with potential additional infrastructure requirements in respect of temperature?controlled storage and transport. As a consequence, there is a higher imperative to have a well?designed end?to?end supply chain. Equally, it is important to understand issues from the perspectives of the various actors in food and beverage supply chains including farms, processing units, wholesalers / distributors, and retailers. Overarching the structuring of any food and beverage supply chain will be consideration of issues such as perishability, quality and risk. Further, for a supply chain to be effective and efficient consideration also needs to be given to the support functions of information management, use of technology, and financial reporting. In today's world, companies compete on supply chains. Those who have the ability to establish a distinctive supply chain and create it as a strategic asset will therefore emerge as industry leaders.
Textbooks
Christopher, M., 2011, Logistics and Supply Chain Management: Creating Value Adding Networks, 4th edition. Pearson Prentice Hall Financial Times
AGEN3003 Global Food and Nutrition Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brian Jones (Coordinator), Academics from a range of Schools and Faculties will present material in this unit. Session: Intensive August Classes: Intensive Unit - Weeks 1-4, 15 contact hours/week (lectures, workshops and tutorial sessions). Prerequisites: AGEN2002 and AGEN2003 and AGEN2006 Assumed knowledge: 48 Credit Points of Junior and Intermediate units. Assessment: 1 x Group Presentation (60%), 1 x Individual Assignment (30%); 1 Viva voce (10%). Practical field work: 6 x excursions/practical sessions over 4 weeks (weeks 1 - 4) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Humanity has made great progress towards a food secure world over the past several decades. Continuing this progress in a world where environmental constraints are becoming increasingly obvious is the next great challenge. The shortfalls in global food security are manifested in particular by the triple burden of malnutrition/undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies, and obesity. In this unit, students will explore state-of-the-art research, analysis, and global visions for a food secure planet from a wide range of perspectives, including technological, biophysical, behavioural, economic, institutional, political, and social. The course ranges across disciplines and spatiotemporal scales to examine the synergies and trade-offs between human health, social, environmental, and economic objectives and outcomes. Case studies will be used throughout the unit. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through a major research-based project. At the successful completion of the unit, students will have the core knowledge and skills to enable them to critically analyse policy, development and research goals and settings and their impact on global and regional food security.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbooks
Students are also required to complete 18 credit points of elective units from Table FA1 for the Agribusiness Major.

Table 1B - Food Science Major

BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: practical eportfolio (10%), during semester exams (20%), communication (30%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense.Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. This unit will explore how new species, diseases and parasites continue to arise while others go extinct and discuss the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It will also explain how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes integrating Life and Evolution concepts. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems and organisms into what they are today.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: practical eportfolio (10%), during semester exams (20%), communication (30%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense.Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. This unit will explore how new species, diseases and parasites continue to arise while others go extinct and discuss the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It will also explain how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in alternative components. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Nathan Lo and A/Prof Simon Ho Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 30-36 hours of practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: practical 60% (comprised of two practical reports, laboratory note book and seminar presentation), 40% final summative exam as per biol1906 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense.Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different to BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
CHEM1001 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1909 or CHEM1109 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignments (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, see http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
The aim of the unit of study is to provide those students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent) with a good grounding in fundamental chemical principles together with an overview of the relevance of chemistry. There is no prerequisite or assumed knowledge for entry to this unit of study. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
or
CHEM1101 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1909 or CHEM1109 Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Mathematics. Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February). Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February, http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry 1A is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC Chemistry course. Chemistry 1A covers chemical theory and physical chemistry. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
or
CHEM1901 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour tutorial per week; one 3-hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1909 or CHEM1109 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry 1A (Advanced) is available to students with a very good HSC performance as well as a very good school record in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do Chemistry 1A (Advanced) rather than Chemistry 1A.
The theory and practical work syllabuses for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) are similar, though the level of treatment in the latter unit of study is more advanced, presupposing a very good grounding in the subject at secondary level. Chemistry 1A (Advanced) covers chemical theory and physical chemistry. Lectures: A series of about 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Pauline Ross Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: practical (50%), summative final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Pauline Ross Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material and 12x3hr practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: summative exam (50%), practical component which may include independent or group project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Pauline Ross Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: one 2-hour exam (50%), project report (50%) which includes written report and presentation Practical field work: As advised and required by the project - approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be either a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms or organismal/ecosystems biology. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
AGEN1006 Biological Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel (Coordinator), Dr. Thomas Roberts, Dr. Feike Dijkstra, Prof. Balwant Singh, Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/wk, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk 1 x 3-hr practical/wk Prerequisites: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 Prohibitions: CHEM1002 Assessment: Three quizzes (3x5%), 1 x Problem solving exercise (10%), Laboratory-based assessment (15%), Video presentation (5%), Final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study expands on the basic chemical concepts taught in first semester (CHEM1001). The unit will cover the structure and behaviour of organic and inorganic compounds relevant to chemical reactions in biological systems. The unit will introduce students to organic molecules (hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones, aromatic compounds, organic acids) and inorganic chemistry (e.g. acid-base and redox reactions, solubility, metal complexes) as well as the structures and reactions of major biological macromolecules (e.g. carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids). In weeks 1-7, lectures, tutorials and laboratory work are conducted in co-operation with the School of Chemistry, Faculty of Science. In weeks 8-13, lectures, tutorials and laboratory work will be undertaken in the Faculty of Agriculture and Environment. Lectures, tutorials and laboratory work are integrated, providing students with a theoretical and practical basis for further studies in the management of biological systems. This 6 credit point unit consists of approximately 80 hours directed learning.
Textbooks
Reference books; Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille Chemistry and SI Chemical Data (package), 2nd Edition, 2012 (John Wiley) ISBN: 9781118234228
Year 2 and 3 units
AGEN2001 Plant Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tina Bell (Coordinator), Dr Thomas Roberts Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures, 1x 3-hr practical per week Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XX1, BIOL1XX6) and 12cp from (CHEM1XX1, CHEM1XX2, AGEN1006) Assessment: 1 x 1 hr mid-semester exam (25%), 1 x 1 hr final exam (25%), 1 x 1000w essay (10%), Four practical reports (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to develop an understanding of the structural and molecular principles that underlie the function of plants and how these principles relate to the use of plants by humans as sources of food, fibre and fuel.
The unit is a core unit for BScAgr students and an elective for BSc and other degree programs. It recognizes the specialized nature of plant anatomy and biochemistry and is a platform for students who wish to gain a sound knowledge of plant growth and development.
This unit covers the structure of plant cells and the anatomy of the major tissues and organs of plants. It also covers the biochemistry of the main carbohydrate, lipid, protein and nucleic acid constituents of plants, as well as the metabolic pathways that regulate plant growth and development.
At the completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate theoretical knowledge of the structure and function of plants. Students will also be able to demonstrate abilities in the practice of laboratory methods used to analyse plants and the effective communication of experimental findings.

Students enrolled in this unit will gain research and enquiry skills through attendance at lectures and participation in laboratory classes and tutorials; information literacy and communication skills through the synthesis of information used to prepare practical reports; social and professional understanding by participation in group-work and assessments that seek to demonstrate the role of agriculture in the broader community.
Textbooks
Taiz L, Zeiger E (2010) Plant Physiology 5th ed.
AGEN2002 Fresh Produce Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lecture per week Prerequisites: 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, AGEN1004) and 12cp from (CHEM1XX1, CHEM1XX2, AGEN1006) Assumed knowledge: HSC level Mathematics and Biology Assessment: 4 x Prac Reports (15% each), 1 x End of Semester Exam (40%) Practical field work: 6 x excursions/ practical sessions per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study, students will critically examine the science underpinning the management and handling of fresh food products in Australia and internationally. The unit primarily addresses the challenges facing fresh produce by looking at the main specialized product categories and related practices and technologies to optimise and maintain fresh food product qualities. Students will develop the core skills required to determine and ensure that essential qualities are maintained during the handling, storage and marketing of perishable plant and animal foods. Students will be able to integrate knowledge of the physiology, technological and economic aspects of fresh produce management to determine the optimal storage and handling conditions for safety and the maximization of the consumer experience. Case study examples will be drawn from fruits and vegetables, dairy, meat and seafood products. Students will study food handling processes in order to be able to critically evaluate their performance. Industry quality assurance schemes and government regulations will be examined, with particular reference to food safety. The students will gain research, inquiry and communication skills through research-based group projects, laboratory reports and an oral presentation. Personal and intellectual autonomy will be developed through group and individual work.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbooks
AGEN2006 Animal Production and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael D'Occhio, Associate Professor Luciano Gonzalez Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures per week Prerequisites: 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, AGEN1004) and 12cp from (CHEM1XX1, CHEM1XX2, AGEN1006) Prohibitions: AVBS1002 Assumed knowledge: HSC level Mathematics and Biology Assessment: 1 x mid-term exam (20%), 1 x 2 hr final exam (30%), 2 x Assignments (2 x 25% each) Practical field work: 10 x excursions/ practical sessions per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to develop the student's ability to critically examine and evaluate the production and management of animals used for food and fibre in Australia and internationally. The unit will focus on new and emerging issues in animal production, including productivity, welfare, remote monitoring and management, animals in the environment, and meeting specifications in an ever-evolving marketplace. The identification, selection and breeding of animals that are optimally suited to production systems is a focus. New thinking and innovations that are being used to address scientific, industry and social expectation challenges will be a feature of the unit and case studies will be used throughout to examine interactions between these factors and their impact on management practices. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through online discussion postings, laboratory reports and presentations, and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups. At the successful completion of the unit, students will have the core knowledge and skills to enable them to lead developments in production animal industries in Australia and overseas.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbooks
MICR2024 Microbes in the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec, 3h prac/wk Prerequisites: 12cp from (AGEN1004, MBLG1XXX, BIOL1XXX) Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2022 or MICR2921 or MICR2922 Assessment: 1 x 2hr exam (60%), 4 x quizzes (15%), lab skills assessment (5%) and 1 x lab project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the diversity of microbes found in soil, water, air, plants and animal environments. Through an examination of their physiology and genetics it explores their interactions with plants, animals and each other, and their roles as decomposers and recyclers in the environment. The soil is a rich microbial environment, and the concept of soil health and its relationship to plant growth is discussed. Practical classes introduce techniques and skills in isolating, quantifying and culturing microbes, designing and interpreting experiments to study microbial growth, and in preparing and presenting data.
Textbooks
Willey et al. Prescott's Microbiology. 9th edition. McGraw-Hill. 2013.
AGCH3025 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Foods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Roberts (Coordinator), Prof Les Copeland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x4-hr practical fortnightly Prohibitions: AFNR5102 or AGCH3017 or AGCH3024 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Intermediate Biochemistry or Chemistry Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%) and 6 x lab reports (6x10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to give students an understanding of the properties of food constituents, and the interactions between these constituents during food processing, storage and digestion. The unit will develop an understanding of the relationship between form and functionality of constituents and the concept of fitness-for-purpose (i.e., quality) in converting agricultural products into foods. Students will gain an appreciation of the relationship between chemical composition and properties of macroconstituents (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids) and microconstituents (vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, flavour and anti-nutritional chemicals) and their functions in plant- and animal-based foods. The material presented in lectures and practical classes will enable students to develop research and inquiry skills and an analytical approach in understanding the biochemistry of foods, food processing and storage. On completing this unit, students will be able to describe the chemical and biochemical properties of major food constituents, and demonstrate an understanding of the functionality of these constituents in food processing and nutrition. Students will have gained experience in laboratory techniques used in industry for the analysis of some food products, and information literacy and communication skills from the preparation of practical reports.
Textbooks
Lecture and laboratory notes will be made available through Blackboard. There is no recommended textbook.
AGEN3001 Food Product Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien (Coordinator), A/Prof Robyn McConchie, Dr Brian Jones, Dr Thomas Roberts, Prof Les Copeland Session: Intensive August Classes: Intensive Unit - 12 x 4 hr workshops over 4 weeks Prerequisites: 6cp from AGEN3004 Assumed knowledge: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX Assessment: 1 x Project Report (70%), 1 x Presentation (30%) Practical field work: 6 x excursions/practical sessions per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study, students will gain a theoretical and practical understanding of the development of novel food products using traditional and novel food ingredients. Students will examine processes in market trend analysis, product innovation, prototype development, product testing and the formal presentation of a new product. They will develop practical skills in product research and development through a group design project that will require application of product development principles and integration of knowledge regarding product specifications, ingredient interactions and food processing. Product quality, functionality, shelf-life, safety, nutritional and health implications are key considerations in the design process. This is an intensive unit taught as a series of workshops over the first four weeks of semester. It is designed to be taken as one of the final core units in the food science major of the BFoodAgrib as it integrates learnings from across the program and offers a great platform for exploration of product development ideas, that could potentially be expanded in 4th year research projects.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbooks
AGEN3004 Food Processing and Value Adding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien (Coordinator), Dr John Kavanagh, Dr Brian Jones, Dr Thomas Roberts, Prof Les Copeland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lecture, 1 x 3 hr practical per week Prerequisites: 36cp Junior/Intermediate units including 12cp from (CHEM1XX1, CHEM1XX2, AGEN1006) Assumed knowledge: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX) and 6cp from CHEM1XXX Assessment: Lab book (5% + 15%); 1 x Viva voce (10%); 1 x Industry or Product Report (30%); 1 x 2hr Final Exam (40%) Practical field work: 6 x excursions/practical sessions over 4 weeks (weeks 1 - 4) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From the grinding of grains to the drying of meats, humans have been processing their food since the dawn of civilisation. Over the decades, many traditional processing methods have become industrialised, while new processing technologies have emerged, quietly revolutionising our food systems, diets and cultures. In this unit, students will study the biochemical transformations that take place during food processing operations and the key engineering principles underlying industrial food manufacture. Lectures and practical classes will cover applications in diverse food categories to link the theoretical content to an industrial context. After completion of this unit, students will be able to: (1) recognise common food processing operations of importance to food industry; (2) explain the underlying biochemical and physicochemical changes that occur during processing and relate these to end-product qualities; (3) demonstrate current techniques for measuring key biochemical and physicochemical transformations, monitoring processes, and evaluating end-product qualities; (4) appreciate fundamental engineering principles relevant to industrial food processing; and (5) apply an understanding of processing principles to design a processing solution that adds value to a basic food or beverage. The unit will include lectures, laboratory sessions, group work and visits to food processing facilities.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbooks