Bachelor of Medical Science

Unit of study descriptions

BMED2401 Cellular Foundations of Medical Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Suzanne Ollerenshaw Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week Prerequisites: 42cp from [[12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX) and [(12cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500)) or 12cp from PSYC1XXX or (6cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500) and 6cp from PSYC1XXX) or 12cp from Engineering]] Prohibitions: MICR2921 or ANAT2008 or IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or BCHM2972 or MICR2922 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or BMED2801 or PCOL2011 or MICR2022 or BIOL2016 or PHSI2905 or BIOL2006 or PHSI2006 or NUTR2912 or BMED2802 or PHSI2005 or NUTR2911 or BIOL2916 or BCHM2072 or BIOL2906 or PHSI2906 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%) Practical field work: One prac per week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a basis for understanding cell structure and function, and response to drugs. It begins with a discussion of the structure and function of human cells. Basic cell structure is examined by focussing on cell specialization and tissue organization in humans. The fundamentals of metabolism are introduced, in particular, the chemical reactions that are responsible for fuel processing. The principles of drug action are then discussed, then characteristics of micro-organisms (bacteria, fungi and viruses) are considered. Students will be introduced to the role of enzymes in the catalysis of cellular reactions, intracellular and cell-to-cell signalling, modifications to cell and system function by drugs, and the pharmacological strategies employed to exploit our knowledge of these mechanisms., To conclude, this unit of study gives an introduction into embryology and how gene expression is regulated during development. Practical classes not only complement the lecture material but also introduce students to a wide range of technical skills, including experience handling live tissue preparations, live microbes. In addition, the sessions are designed to provide students with generic skills such as record keeping, data collection and presentation, protocol planning and written communication.
Textbooks
Textbook of Biochemistry with Clinical Correlations Devlin TM John Wiley and Sons Inc., 7th Edition, 2011; Prescott's Microbiology Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ McGraw-Hill, 9th Edition, 2014; Histology: A text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 7th Edition, 2015; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012; Rang and Dale's Pharmacology Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM, Flower RJ and Henderson G Churchill Livingstone, 8th Edition, 2015.
BMED2402 Nerve and Muscle

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tina Hinton Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures and 2-4 hrs prac/tut per week. Prerequisites: 42cp from [[12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX) and [(12cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500)) or 12cp from PSYC1XXX or (6cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500) and 6cp from PSYC1XXX) or 12cp from Engineering]] Prohibitions: BIOL2906 or BIOL2016 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2905 or PCOL2011 or MICR2922 or ANAT2008 or BIOL2916 or MICR2021 or BCHM2072 or MICR2921 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or MICR2022 or BIOL2006 or PHSI2006 or NUTR2912 or BMED2806 or PHSI2005 or NUTR2911 or IMMU2101 or BCHM2972 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study begins with a description and analysis of the basic anatomical organization of the musculoskeletal and nervous (central and peripheral) systems. The structure and function of excitable cells, muscle and nerve, will lead to a discussion of membrane potential, synaptic transmission and neuromuscular junction. After consideration of the mechanisms of contraction, the way in which nerve signals are integrated and coordinated are covered in more detail. The receptors involved in normal modes of communications are discussed, This is complemented by an introduction to nervous system pharmacology, focusing on the autonomic nervous system and central nervous system, with special reference to pain and analgesia. An appreciation is gained of how toxins and infections can disturb normal neuromuscular coordination and nervous system function. Thus, pharmacological and pathological considerations are studied with relevance to the anatomical, histological and physiological concepts. Special senses such as vision and hearing are also introduced. In practical classes, students perform experiments to illustrate the functioning of motor control, coordination and the senses. In addition, students extend their anatomical and histological expertise by examining prosections and prepared microscope slides. Practical classes also include the effects of analgesics on experimental pain and case studies of tetanus and botulism. Sessions are also designed to nurture experimental design, hypothesis testing and data analysis skills.
Textbooks
Human Physiology: An integrated approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013; The Anatomy Coloring Book Kapit W and Elson LM Benjamin Cummings, 4th Edition, 2015; Gray's Anatomy for Students Drake RL, Vogl W and Mitchell AWM Elsevier, 3rd Edition 2014; Prescott's Microbiology Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ McGraw-Hill, 9th Edition, 2014; Histology: A text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 7th Edition, 2015; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012; Rang and Dale's Pharmacology Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM, Flower RJ and Henderson G Churchill Livingstone, 8th Edition, 2015; Robbins Basic Pathology Kumar V, Abbass AK and Aster J Elseview/Saunders, Philadelphia, 9th Edition, 2013.
BMED2403 Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sharon Herkes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lec, 1 tut/prac per week Prerequisites: 42cp from [[12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX) and [(12cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500)) or 12cp from PSYC1XXX or (6cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500) and 6cp from PSYC1XXX) or 12cp from Engineering]] Prohibitions: NUTR2912 or BMED2803 or PHSI2005 or PCOL2011 or NUTR2911 or MICR2922 or BIOL2906 or BIOL2006 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2006 or IMMU2101 or BCHM2972 or BIOL2916 or BCHM2072 or MICR2921 or ANAT2008 or MICR2021 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or MICR2022 or BIOL2016 or PHSI2905 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%) Practical field work: One prac per week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems and the many processes responsible for the maintenance of homeostasis in the human body. The structure and function of the cardiovascular system is discussed and cardiac output, blood pressure and blood flow are studied. This is complemented by discussion of cardiovascular pathology and pharmacological intervention. Discussion of the respiratory system includes the structure of the respiratory organs, the mechanics of breathing, control of respiration, and description of the mechanism of gas exchange. Specifically, the actions of drugs for asthma are discussed and the pathology of obstructive versus restrictive airways disease examined. The unit of study then extends the students learning to pathogenic microbes involved in infectious diseases of the respiratory system. Practical classes are designed to nurture the same generic attributes taught in BMED2401 and BMED2402, and students are additionally introduced to a further range of technical skills.
Textbooks
Human Physiology: An integrated approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013; The Anatomy Coloring Book Kapit W and Elson LM Benjamin Cummings, 4th Edition, 2015; Gray's Anatomy for Students Drake RL, Vogl W and Mitchell AWM Elsevier, 3rd Edition 2014; Histology: A text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 7th Edition, 2015; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012; Rang and Dale's Pharmacology Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM, Flower RJ and Henderson G Churchill Livingstone, 8th Edition, 2015.
BMED2404 Microbes, Infection and Immunity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jim Manos Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec & 1 prac/wk, 2 tut Prerequisites: 42cp from [[12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX) and [(12cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500)) or 12cp from PSYC1XXX or (6cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500) and 6cp from PSYC1XXX) or 12cp from Engineering]] Prohibitions: PHSI2005 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or ANAT2008 or MICR2022 or MICR2021 or BMED2807 or BIOL2016 or PHSI2905 or BIOL2006 or PHSI2006 or NUTR2912 or NUTR2911 or IMMU2101 or BCHM2972 or BIOL2906 or PHSI2906 or MICR2921 or BIOL2916 or BCHM2072 or PCOL2011 or MICR2922 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), in-semester assessments (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study begins by introducing the concepts of disease transmission, pathogenicity and virulence mechanisms of microbes. For a full understanding of the process of infection, the structure and function of pathogenic microorganisms is examined. How the body deals with injury and infection is discussed by exploring barriers to infection and host response once those barriers are breached. The body's response to such physical damage is dealt with in a series of lectures on wound healing, clotting and inflammation, and is complemented by discussion of the pharmacological basis of anti-inflammatory drugs. This is followed by a comprehensive discussion of molecular and cellular immune responses to pathogen invasion. In particular, this gives students an appreciation of the processing of antigens, the structure, production and diversity of antibodies, the operation of the complement system and mechanisms for recognition and destruction of invading microbes. The unit concludes with an overview of microbial diseases, the characteristics of causative agents, pathogenesis and symptoms as well as treatment and control and culminates with exploring current issues of antibiotic resistance, important emerging infections and vaccination strategies.

Practical classes illustrate and underpin the lecture content. Students will investigate normal flora, host defences and medically important microbes and will obtain experience in, and an understanding of, a range of techniques in bacteriology. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes.
Textbooks
Prescott's Microbiology Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ McGraw-Hill, 9th Edition, 2014
BMED2405 Gut and Nutrient Metabolism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Collyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures plus 1 tutorial or 1 practical session/wk Prerequisites: 42cp from [[12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX) and [(12cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500)) or 12cp from PSYC1XXX or (6cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500) and 6cp from PSYC1XXX) or 12cp from Engineering]] Prohibitions: BIOL2916 or BIOL2906 or PHSI2906 or BCHM2072 or PCOL2011 or MICR2922 or MICR2921 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or MICR2022 or BIOL2016 or PHSI2905 or BMED2807 or BMED2904 or PHSI2005 or IMMU2101 or NUTR2911 or BCHM2972 or BIOL2006 or PHSI2006 or NUTR2912 or ANAT2008 or MICR2021 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), five in-semester assignments/assessments (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines in detail the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract, from the oral cavity to anal canal, and includes the liver, gallbladder and pancreas. This is complemented by description of the specialised cells in the gastrointestinal tract, followed by discussion of the transport mechanisms employed to absorb nutrients, and consideration of control systems used to regulate activity of the digestive process. The role of intestinal microflora in the gastrointestinal tract, contributing to both beneficial digestion and absorption of nutrients, as well as to pathogenic disruption, is also discussed. The fate of the macronutrients (carbohydrate, fat and protein) is then considered in terms of their uptake, disposal and reassembly into storage fuels and cellular structures. The biochemical pathways involved in the extraction of energy from the macronutrient fuels are then covered. Examples of these metabolic processes are provided by considering fuel selection during starvation and in diabetes. Finally, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics are explored, with discussion of the metabolism and absorption of drugs including detoxification and excretion of xenobiotic compounds. Practical classes give students extensive experience with inspection of the gastrointestinal system at both the cellular and gross anatomical levels, and in theassay of biochemicals such as glucose. These sessions are designed to nurture observation, data analysis, record keeping and report writing skills.
Textbooks
Human Physiology: An integrated approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013
BMED2406 Hormones, Kidney and Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Cameron Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec, 1 tut Prerequisites: 42cp from [[12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX) and [(12cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500)) or 12cp from PSYC1XXX or (6cp from PHYS1XXX (except PHYS1500) and 6cp from PSYC1XXX) or 12cp from Engineering]] Prohibitions: BIOL2006 or PHSI2006 or NUTR2912 or BMED2805 or ANAT2008 or MICR2021 or IMMU2101 or BCHM2972 or BIOL2916 or BCHM2072 or PCOL2011 or MICR2922 or PHSI2005 or NUTR2911 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or BIOL2016 or MICR2022 or PHSI2905 or MICR2921 or BIOL2906 or PHSI2906 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%) Practical field work: One prac per week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines hormonal regulation of human body functions, including metabolism, growth and development, tissue function, and mood. Specifically, students will investigate the structure and function of endocrine glands, such as the pituitary, adrenal, thyroid and pancreas, at the cellular and gross anatomical level. The fundamentals of the feedback systems which are mediated via the hypothalamus and pituitary gland are discussed, in particular, the adrenal, gonadal and thyroid axes. Students will then cover the structure and function of the renal system at both the cellular and gross anatomical level. The fundamental homeostatic processes of the kidney, such as electrolyte, water and acid-base regulation of extracellular fluid, are explored. This unit of study also gives an introduction to the reproductive system, at both the anatomical and histological levels. The hormones involved in reproduction, contraception, fertilization and pregnancy are discussed, leading on to an overview of pharmacological interventions in contraception. In the practical classes, students will investigate the structure and function of the endocrine glands, will perform a glucose tolerance test to investigate how glucose levels are regulated, and will undertake investigation of the effects of diuretics. In addition, sessions are designed to nurture oral presentation skills, hypothesis testing and data analysis.
Textbooks
Textbook of Biochemistry with Clinical Correlations Devlin TM John Wiley and Sons Inc., 7th Edition, 2011; The Anatomy Coloring Book Kapit W and Elson LM Benjamin Cummings, 4th Edition, 2015; Gray's Anatomy for Students Drake RL, Vogl W and Mitchell AWM Elsevier, 3rd Edition 2014; Histology: A text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 7th Edition, 2015; Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012; Rang and Dale's Pharmacology Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM, Flower RJ and Henderson G Churchill Livingstone, 8th Edition, 2015.
INFD3012 Infectious Diseases

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jamie Triccas Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 4 hour practical class per week. Prerequisites: 18 credit points of BMED including (BMED2401 and BMED2404) Assessment: Formal examination (60%): one 2 hour exam. Progressive assessment (40%): includes tutorial case presentation, mid-semester quiz and practical assessment. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Infectious diseases occur as a result of interactions between a host and a microbial parasite. This unit of study will explain how infectious agents interact with human hosts at the molecular, cellular, individual patient and community levels to cause diseases and how the hosts attempt to combat these infections. The unit will be taught by the discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology of the Department of Medicine within the Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine with involvement of associated clinical and research experts who will contribute lectures and theme sessions on their own special interests. The unit will integrate lectures with clinical case studies and hands-on practical sessions to provide students with current knowledge of infectious diseases.
Textbooks
Infectious Diseases: Pathogenesis, Prevention and Case Studies. Edited by Shetty et al. Wiley-Blackwell 2009. ISBN 9781405135436.