Bachelor of Liberal Arts and Science

Liberal Arts and Science

Candidates are required to complete 36 credit points from units listed in the Liberal Studies Units Table. ATHK1001 and WRIT1001 and at least one 6 credit point unit of study from Part C Ethics must be completed. The remaining 18 credit points of Liberal Studies units may be taken from any of the six areas of the table, A-F. It is strongly recommended that ATHK1001 and WRIT1001 are taken in the first year of the degree.

A. Analytical Thinking

Core units of study
ATHK1001 Analytical Thinking

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1hr lectures and one 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: Written assignments (35%); Quizzes (10%); Tutorial participation (5%); Exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: ATHK1001 is a compulsory unit within the Bachelor of Liberal Arts and Science (BLAS) degree and will only be available to students enrolled in BLAS.
Analytical Thinking is a course covering aspects of research design, interpretation of data, analysis, logic, and thinking processes. It is comprised of three sections: Data Concepts and Analysis, Logic and Critical Reasoning, and Thinking Tools. The section on data concepts and analysis covers aspects of research design, data collection, and basic forms of hypothesis testing and statistical tests are introduced. The logic and critical reasoning section covers material ranging from valid and invalid forms of argument and errors in reasoning to critiques of arguments presented in case studies. The thinking tools section looks at the errors people make in reasoning, decision making, problem solving and learning, and how to avoid these errors. Together, the three course components teach foundational skills necessary for carrying out meaningful academic discussions, arguments, and research studies, which may be applied to any content area of scholarly enquiry.
Elective units of study
LNGS1001 Structure of Language

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 5x250wd short assignments (40%), 1x1hr mid-term exam (20%), 1x2hr final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the fundamental properties of human language, with examples from languages spoken in every part of the world. We look at the sounds of human language: how the speech organs make them, and how different they can be across languages. We gain a detailed understanding of English consonants and vowels, and we learn how to transcribe them phonetically. We investigate the ways in which sounds can convey meanings, through the formation of words and sentences in English and many other languages. We see how and why English is different from Japanese, Swahili, German, or even Irish.
PHIL1012 Introductory Logic

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 10x250wd weekly problem sets (50%), 1x2hr final examination (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
An introduction to modern logic: the investigation of the laws of truth. One essential aspect of good reasoning or argumentation is that it is valid: it cannot lead from true premises to a false conclusion. In this unit we learn how to identify and construct valid arguments, using techniques such as truth tables, models and truth trees. Apart from being a great aid to clear thinking about any subject, knowledge of logic is essential for understanding many areas not only of contemporary philosophy, but also linguistics, mathematics and computing.
PHIL2615 Logic and Proof

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: PHIL1012 Prohibitions: PHIL2215 or PHIL3215 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%) and weekly exercises (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We examine the major ways of proving things in logic: tableaux (trees), axiomatic proofs, natural deduction and sequent calculus. We learn to construct proofs of each of these kinds and then establish fundamental adequacy results (e.g. soundness and completeness) for each kind of proof system.
PHIL2642 Critical Thinking

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1xin-class test (20%) and 1x2hr exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An introduction to critical thinking and analysis of argument. By examining arguments drawn from diverse sources, including journalism, advertising, science, medicine, history, economics and politics, we will learn how to distinguish good from bad arguments, and how to construct rationally persuasive arguments of our own. Along the way we will grapple with scepticism, conspiracy theories and pseudoscience. The reasoning skills imparted by this unit make it invaluable not only for philosophy students but for every student at the University.
DATA1002 Informatics: Data and Computation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alan Fekete Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: INFO1903 OR DATA1902 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers computation and data handling, integrating sophisticated use of existing productivity software, e.g. spreadsheets, with the development of custom software using the general-purpose Python language. It will focus on skills directly applicable to data-driven decision-making. Students will see examples from many domains, and be able to write code to automate the common processes of data science, such as data ingestion, format conversion, cleaning, summarization, creation and application of a predictive model.
DATA1902 Informatics: Data and Computation (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alan Fekete Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prohibitions: INFO1903 OR DATA1002 Assumed knowledge: This unit is intended for students with ATAR at least sufficient for entry to the BSc/BAdvStudies(Advanced) stream, or for those who gained Distinction results or better, in some unit in Data Science, Mathematics, or Computer Science. Students with portfolio of high-quality relevant prior work can also be admitted. Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit covers computation and data handling, integrating sophisticated use of existing productivity software, e. g. spreadsheets, with the development of custom software using the general-purpose Python language. It will focus on skills directly applicable to data-driven decision-making. Students will see examples from many domains, and be able to write code to automate the common processes of data science, such as data ingestion, format conversion, cleaning, summarization, creation and application of a predictive model. This unit includes the content of DATA1002, along with additional topics that are more sophisticated, suited for students with high academic achievement.
Any unit of study in Mathematics or Statistics from the Faculty of Science Table A to a maximum of 12 credit points can be counted towards the Liberal Studies requirements.

B. Communication

Core units of study
WRIT1001 Writing and Rhetoric: Academic Essays

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 4x500wd Written assignments (40%), 1x1000wd Oral Presentation (20%), 1x1500wd Essay (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The persuasive power of the English language emerges from its richness and variation. This unit introduces students to rhetorical theory as a resource for the creative construction of meaning. Students will learn to discover topics, arrange ideas, and analyse the delivery of arguments across a variety of contexts. We examine print, visual media, political debates and engage in virtual exchanges with universities around the world.
Elective units of study
ENGL1007 Englishes: Language, Society, Text, Time

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x500wd assignments (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x1.5-hr exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study equips students with some general tools for the close analysis of literary language. Grammatical concepts will be introduced and applied to the description of prose, poetry and drama, and students will explore the changing relations between form and meaning in English from the earliest times up to the present. A number of key strands in contemporary language study will also be presented, including semiotic theory, rhetoric and discourse studies and theorizations of the relationship between texts and subjectivity.
LNGS1002 Language and Social Context

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 5x250wd short assignments (40%), 1x1hr 1000wd equivalent mid-term exam (20%), 1x2hr 2000wd equivalent Final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the study of the interrelationship between language and society. It is concerned with phenomena of language change and how that leads to varieties in a language. How are these varieties linked to social differences? What distinguishes male speech from female speech or what are the linguistic styles of different social classes or ethnic groups? What is slang, or jargon, and what distinguishes a casual conversation from an interview?
WRIT1000 Introduction to Academic Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x900wd sentence task (20%), 1x900wd research task (20%), 1x900wd paragraph task (20%), 1x900wd review task (20%), 1x900wd revision/reflection task (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
WRIT1000 teaches the fundamentals of academic writing across disciplines. Frequent, short writing assignments are designed to help students engage with the writing process at the sentence and paragraph levels and and to make appropriate style, grammar, punctuation, and syntax choices. Students will learn to research topics, document sources in keeping with academic honesty principles, and edit and revise their own and others' writing. While WRIT1000 may be suitable for non-native English speakers, it is not a language acquisition UoS and assumes basic competence in English.
WRIT2002 Arguments that Change the World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture in flipped classroom mode/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Writing Studies Assessment: 1x1500wd close reading task (35%), 1x10min group poster presentation (20%), 1x500wd individual reflection (10%), 1x1500wd analytical report (35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What do great poets, preachers and politicians have in common? Using case studies of enduring persuasive texts from the pulpit to the courtroom to the concert hall, this unit introduces students to rhetorical hermeneutics as a method of interpretation. The unit extends their ability to interrogate and think critically about various text types and their affective qualities. It cultivates intensive and effective research and reporting practices, through which students develop discipline-based inquiry questions to effectively discover, invent, produce, and deliver their own arguments.
Any unit of study in a language subject area other than English, from the Faculty of Arts Table A to a maximum of 12 credit points in languages can be counted towards the Liberal Studies requirements.

C. Ethics

HPSC1000 Bioethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Dominic Murphy Session: Intensive January,Intensive June,Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week Prohibitions: HPSC1900 Assessment: 3 x 1,250 word papers and tutorial work Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This Junior unit of study is highly recommended to Intermediate and Senior Life Sciences students.
Science has given us nearly infinite possibilities for controlling life. Scientists probe the origins of life through research with stem cells and embryos. To unlock the secrets of disease, biomedicine conducts cruel experiments on animals. GM crops are presented as the answer to hunger. Organ transplantation is almost routine. The international traffic in human body parts and tissues is thriving. The concept of brain death makes harvesting organs ethically more acceptable. It may also result in fundamental changes in our ideas about life. Science has provided new ways of controlling and manipulating life and death. As a consequence, difficult ethical questions are raised in increasingly complex cultural and social environments. This course will discuss major issues in the ethics of biology and medicine, from gene modification to Dolly the sheep. This unit will be introductory, but a small number of topical issues will be studied in depth. No scientific background beyond Year 10 level will be assumed.
Textbooks
Weekly readings
HPSC1900 Bioethics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Dominic Murphy Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: HPSC1000 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: 3 x 1,250 word papers and tutorial work Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The topics covered by HPSC1000 - Bioethics will be treated in more depth, in a special tutorial set aside for Advanced students.
Textbooks
Weekly readings
HPSC3107 Science, Ethics and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniela Helbig Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 X 1 hour lecture PLUS 1 X 1 hour tutorial per week and an online component. Prerequisites: (HPSC2100 or HPSC2900) and (HPSC2101 or HPSC2901) Prohibitions: HPSC3022 or HPSC3024 or HPSC2011 Assessment: short essay (15%), final essay (30%), presentation (15%), quizzes (20%), classroom and online tutorial participation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
(This unit will not be available from 2021) Science and technology are powerful modern institutions, and they are social endeavours, undertaken and often contested by different groups of people in different historical, cultural, political, and geographical contexts. These social underpinnings are the subject of this course. What does it mean to say scientific knowledge is socially constructed? How does science relate to social and political values? Can scientific facts simply be independent of these values? Should they be independent? Scientific knowledge is often difficult to understand without years of training, and yet this knowledge is crucial to social welfare and to political and environmental futures. So how should publics relate to scientific knowledge? We investigate sociological and ethical issues related to modern science, technology, and medicine, and we develop different approaches to thinking critically about what it means to live in a society so profoundly bound up with the methods and results of the long historical process of scientific knowledge-making. Topics include scientific expertise in public policy and law; fact/value distinctions; industrial science; human/non-human animals and recent biomedical challenges to human self-understandings; scientific and legal constructions of human difference; and recent global challenges that are both social and scientific in nature, in particular environmental change.
PHIL1011 Reality, Ethics and Beauty

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: PHIL1003 or PHIL1004 or PHIL1006 or PHIL1008 Assessment: 1x500wd essay outline (10%), 1x1750wd essay (30%), 250wd equiv online quizzes (10%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an introduction to central issues in metaphysics, ethics and aesthetics. It opens with general questions about reality, God, personal identity and free will. The middle section of the unit will consider questions about values, goodness and responsibility. The final part is concerned with the question "what is art", the nature of aesthetic judgment and the role of art in our lives.
PHIL2617 Practical Ethics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level Prohibitions: PHIL2517 or PHIL3617 Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (40%), Tutorial participation (10%), Tutorial presentation (10%) and 1x2000wd Take-home exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit draws on contemporary moral philosophy to shed light on some of the most pressing practical, ethical questions of our time, including euthanasia, abortion, surrogacy, censorship, animal rights, genetic testing and cloning and environmental ethics. By the end of the unit, students should have a good understanding of these practical ethical issues; and, more crucially, be equipped with the conceptual resources to think through new ethical questions and dilemmas as they arise in their personal and professional lives.
PHIL2623 Moral Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL2513 or PHIL3513 Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (50%) and 1x2000wd Take-home exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We go beyond the question of which actions are morally right to consider the following: How should we evaluate motives and emotions? Is anyone actually virtuous, or are we all weak-willed, self-deceived confabulators? Are any actions or persons evil? When should we feel guilty or ashamed? Should forgiveness be unconditional? Is morality the product of Darwinian natural selection, or of culture and learning? Is there any objective truth in morality, or are moral claims merely subjective or culturally relative?

D. Culture, Society and Global Citizenship

AMST1001 Global America

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x1000wd essays (2x30%), tutorial participation (10%) and 1x1.5 hr exam (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Why does America have so much influence globally? What is the nature of this influence? And what are the consequences of this influence? What are the nature and consequences of the influence of the rest of the world on America? Why given America's global influence, and globalisation in general, does America remain such an insular society? This unit takes an interdisciplinary approach to these questions with a focus primarily on the United States in the 21st century.
ANTH1001 Introduction to Anthropology

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ANTH1003 Assessment: 1x300wd In-class quiz (5%), 1x900wd Observation exercise (15%), 1x1500wd Take-home midterm (30%), 1x1800wd Essay (40%), x Participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Anthropologists want to know what makes us human. This unit introduces you to the unique perspective on human experience in cultural anthropology. Anthropologists argue that each individual is incomplete without the input of the shared patterns acquired from one's community. In this class you will learn how anthropologists define the concept of culture, how they use cultural relativism, and how they conduct research through cultural immersion and participatory fieldwork. You will examine several cases that demonstrate the human capacity for cultural diversity, and will understand several of the core topics that anthropologists investigate to capture a society's worldview and way of life.
ANTH1002 Anthropology in the World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ANTH1004 Assessment: 1x300wd In-class quiz (5%), 1x900wd Observation exercise (15%), 1x1500wd Take-home midterm (30%), 1x1800wd Essay (40%), x Participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
As humans, culture completes us, but we also create culture through our words and deeds. Social and cultural anthropologists are engaged in both cultural description and cultural criticism: their work contributes to understanding the world and changing it. Anthropologists challenge many dominant beliefs about how the world works. In this class, you will be introduced to the unique perspective of cultural anthropology on human experience through a study of how anthropologists have contributed to debates on contemporary issues of global importance. You will learn how anthropological understandings of culture and society help us to rethink the way we live and the world we inhabit.
ANTH2625 Culture and Development

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Anthropology Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (40%), 1x1400wd Take-home exercise (35%), 1x1-hr multiple-choice exam (15%), 12xweekly 50wd reading notes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The 1949 speech by US president, Harry Truman, declared his country's commitment to the 'development' of the Third World, and began what many consider to be development as an institutional approach to non-Western societies. Anthropology, well established in its study of non-Western societies, was able to offer a rich ethnographic insight into the developing world. Combining ethnographic detail with social science concepts, this unit covers topics such as food crisis, land, environment, cities, fair trade, migration, nation-state, NGOs, poverty and informal economy.
ARHT1002 Shock of the Now: Global Art since 1900

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr Lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Visual Test (30%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1500wd Exhibition/Artwork Review Blog (20%), 1x Tutorial participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Art shapes our cities, streets, galleries, phones and minds. It is now made with every conceivable material, and sometimes none at all. It shocks, challenges, soothes, entertains, engrosses and overwhelms us. This unit charts the history of Modern and Contemporary Art across the world, as it is shaped by and shapes society, politics and environment. It shows current concerns in art , with materials, landscape, self-image, politics, and the body are grounded in a century of global experiment
GEOS1001 Earth, Environment and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Sabin Zahirovic, Dr Bree Morgan, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1901 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assessment: Exam (40%), 2000 word essay (25%), practical reports (15%), presentation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the gateway unit of study for Human Geography, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies and Geology. Its objective is to introduce the big questions relating to the origins and current state of the planet: climate change, environment, landscape formation, and the growth of the human population. During the semester you will be introduced to knowledge, theories and debates about how the world's physical and human systems operate. The first module investigates the evolution of the planet through geological time, with a focus on major Earth systems such as plate tectonics and mantle convection and their interaction with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and human civilisations. The second module presents Earth as an evolving and dynamic planet, investigating global environmental change, addressing climate variability and human impacts on the natural environment and the rate at which these changes occur and how they have the potential to dramatically affect the way we live. Finally, the third module, focuses on human-induced challenges to Earth's future. This part of the unit critically analyses the relationships between people and their environments, with central consideration to debates on population change, resource use and the policy contexts of climate change mitigation and adaptation.
GEOS1901 Earth, Environment and Society Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Sabin Zahirovic, Dr Bree Morgan, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1001 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: Exam (40%), 2000 word essay (25%), practical reports (15%), presentation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1001, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
GEOS1002 Introductory Geography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hour lecture per week and eight 2 hour practicals during semester. Prohibitions: GEOS1902 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word essay, two online quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a geographical perspective on the ways in which people interact with each other and the physical world, focussing on the processes that generate spatial variation and difference. Students will consider the development and characteristics of natural environments across the globe, and will explore how these environments both constrain, and are influenced by, humans. In the process, they will learn about the biophysical, political, economic, cultural and urban geographies that shape contemporary global society. Each of these themes will be discussed with reference to key examples, in order to understand the ways in which the various processes (both physical and human) interact. The unit of study is designed to attract and interest students who wish to pursue geography as a major within their undergraduate degree, but also has relevance to students who wish to learn how to think geographically about the contemporary world.
GEOS1902 Introductory Geography (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hour lecture per week and 8 2 hour practicals per semester, plus independent group work. Prohibitions: GEOS1002 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 1000 word essay, two online quizzes, one practical report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1002, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
GOVT1621 Introduction to International Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x 1000wd Essay (20%), 1x 1500wd Essay (30%), 1x 2hr (2000 wd equivalent) Exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with a foundational understanding in two key areas of international relations. First students will gain an understanding of the history of the international political and economic system, and the forces, events, and processes that have shaped the contemporary international system. Second, students will be introduced to the main theories of international relations and explore how these help explain the forces that shape international relations.
INDG1001 Introduction to Indigenous Cultures

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent seminar presentation (10%), 1x1000wd presentation paper (20%), 1x1000wd equivalent online contribution (30%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to Indigenous Australia in a stimulating, in-depth study of traditional and contemporary forms of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural expression. Ranging from the Dreaming and ancient knowledges, ceremony and lore, to the lives and societies of Indigenous peoples today, students learn in areas such Aboriginal kinship, language, story and art, Indigenous agriculture, aquaculture and astronomy, and contemporary Indigenous cultures and cultural currents.

E. Scientific Enquiry

ANTH2627 Medical Anthropology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Anthropology or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Gender Studies Prohibitions: ANTH2027 Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay (30%), 1x3000wd Take-home exercise (60%), Tutorial participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Medical anthropology is a comparative and ethnographic response to the global influence of biomedicine within diverse cultural worlds. This unit will examine major theoretical approaches, their respective critiques, and the methods that underpin them. Concepts such as 'health/illness', 'disease', 'well-being', 'life-death', and 'body/mind' will be located in a variety of cultural contexts and their implications for different approaches to diagnosis and treatment considered. The unit will include culturally located case studies of major contemporary health concerns, such as AIDS.
HPSC2101 What Is This Thing Called Science?

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Godfrey-Smith Session: Intensive January,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr online study; and 1x1-hr advanced tutorial per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior units of study Prohibitions: HPSC2901 or HPSC1001 or HPSC1901 Assessment: 1000-word essay (20%), 2x 2000-word essays (each worth 30%), 10x online exercises (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
(This unit will not be available from 2021) What distinguishes creationism from evolutionary theory, or astrology from astronomy? Can we have good reason to believe that our current scientific theories represent the world "as it really is"? This course critically examines the most important attempts to describe the scientific method, to draw a line dividing science from non-science, and to justify the high status generally accorded to scientific knowledge. Views studied include Karl Popper's idea that scientific theories are falsifiable in principle, Thomas Kuhn's proposal that science consists of a series of paradigms separated by abrupt scientific revolutions, and various claims that science cannot really be distinguished from other approaches to knoweldge. This unit of study also explores contemporary theories of evidence and explanation, the role of values in science, sociological approaches to understanding science, feminist perspectives on science, and the nature of scientific consensus.
Textbooks
Godfrey-Smith, P (2003). Theory and Reality. The University of Chicago Press. USA/ Curd, Cover and Pincock (2013). Philosophy of Science: The Central Issues (2nd edition). W. W. Norton and Company.
HPSC2901 What Is This Thing Called Science? (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Godfrey-Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr online study; and 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior study with a Distinction average Prohibitions: HPSC2101 or HPSC1001 or HPSC1901 Assessment: 1000-word essay (20%), 2x 2000-word essays (each worth 30%), 10x online exercises (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The topics covered in 'What is This Thing Called Science?' will be covered in more depth, in a special tutorial set aside for advanced students.
Textbooks
Godfrey-Smith, P (2003). Theory and Reality. The University of Chicago Press. USA/ Curd, Cover and Pincock (2013). Philosophy of Science: The Central Issues (2nd edition). W. W. Norton and Company.
HPSC2100 The Birth of Modern Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Ofer Gal Session: Intensive January,Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture, 1 X 1 hour tutorial, 1 x 1 hour independent online work. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior units of study Prohibitions: HPSC2900 Assessment: 10x short quizzes (24%), 10x 100wd questions (26%), 3x essays (250wd; 500 wd; 750 wd ¿ together 30%), 10x online activities (10%), class participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Modern culture is a culture of science and modern science is the outcome of a historical process of 2,500 years. In this course we investigate how traditional knowledge gradually acquired the characteristics of 'science': the social structure, contents, values and procedures we are familiar with. We will look at some primary chapters of this process, from antiquity to the end of the seventeenth century, and try to understand their implications to understanding contemporary science in its culture.
Textbooks
Weekly readings
HPSC2900 The Birth of Modern Science (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Ofer Gal Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture, 1 X 1 hour tutorial, 1 x 1 hour independent online work. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior study with a Distinction average Prohibitions: HPSC2100 Assessment: 10x short quizzes (24%), 10x 100wd questions (26%), 3x essays (250wd; 500 wd; 750 wd ¿ together 30%), 10x online activities (10%), class participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The topics covered in 'The Birth of Modern Science' will be covered in more depth, in a special tutorial set aside for advanced students.
Textbooks
Weekly readings

F. Technological Literacy

ARIN2610 Internet Transformations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Media Studies or 18 credit points at 1000-level in any of Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Philosophy, Psychology or Sociology Prohibitions: ARIN2100 Assessment: 3x500wd analytic journal entries (25%), 1x1000wd equiv research presentation (30%), 1x2000wd critical analysis or web feature (45%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Internet is at the heart of major digital transformations in industry, society and culture. This unit introduces key skills in analysis and critique of the technologies involved in networked change, exploring internet imaginaries, histories and emerging phenomena.
ARIN2620 Everyday Digital Media

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Media Studies or 18 credit points at 1000-level in any of Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Philosophy, Psychology or Sociology Prohibitions: ARIN2200 Assessment: 1x1250wd take-home exercise 1 (25%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1250wd take-home exercise 2 (25%), participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How we eat, sleep, talk, love, shop, work, play, learn and die are all shaped by digital media. Everyday digital media focuses on the transformation of self and society through the digital mediation of everyday practices. How do we organise our social lives and engage creatively in online realms? What are the opportunities and risks of sharing and self-presentation in networked publics? How are communities reconfigured in a digital context? This unit introduces theories of digital culture and identity and applies them to our everyday experiences and interactions with social media, participatory culture, locative media, computer games, virtual reality, smart homes and connected cities.
INFO1110 Introduction to Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Stavrakakis Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories, seminars Prohibitions: INFO1910 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an essential starting point for software developers, IT consultants, and computer scientists to build their understanding of principle computer operation. Students will obtain knowledge and skills with procedural programming. Crucial concepts include defining data types, control flow, iteration, functions, recursion, the model of addressable memory. Students will be able to reinterpret a general problem into a computer problem, and use their understanding of the computer model to develop source code. This unit trains students with software development process, including skills of testing and debugging. It is a prerequisite for more advanced programming languages, systems programming, computer security and high performance computing.
MECO1002 Digital Media and Communications Landscapes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd create CV and online profile (10%), 1x800wd design landscape infographic (20%), 1x1200wd online lit review quiz (30%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available to BA/B Advanced Studies (Media and Communications), BA/BLaw and Digital Cultures major students only
Digital media and communications landscapes teaches students to map and analyse media policy, industry change, and user engagement. Within this framework, it explores concepts of labour and practical responses to workplace dynamics. Students will review their digital media footprint and develop professional branding strategies.