Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The prerequisites have been removed for the following unit:

MATH1013 Mathematical Modelling

12/12/2018
2.

Prohibitions added, they now read:

ENVI1003 (Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate) Prohibitions added, they now read:
N: AGEN1002

3/9/2019

Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

Year 1

Year 1 has the following 48 credit point structure: a core (36 credit points), and electives (12 credit points) selected from the lists below.
Core Units of Study
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
or
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), project report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in a research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
or
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Practical field work: As advised and required by the project; approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, presentations, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1112 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x3-hr lecture; 1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviours, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do we develop lotions that don't burn us, how do we measure UV absorption by sunscreens, how can we measure and alter soil pH, how are sticky things made, and how do we determine the concentration of vitamin C in juice? Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1912 Chemistry 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101) or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Advanced units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B (Advanced) is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A (Advanced). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1992 Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prerequisites: 75 or above in CHEM1991 or CHEM1903 or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 Assessment: quizzes, assignment, skills-based assessment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Entry is by invitation. This unit of study is deemed to be an Advanced unit of study. Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Special Studies Program units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how food and medicines work, the properties of materials and substances. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as a demonstrated aptitude. Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is restricted to students who have gained a Distinction in Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) or by invitation. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1B and Chemistry 1B (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1B (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours per week of lectures; 2 hours per week of computer tutorials Prohibitions: ENVX1001 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or MATH1115 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 or BUSS1020 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness streams
This is an introductory data science unit for students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It provides the foundation for statistics and data science skills that are needed for a career in science and for further study in applied statistics and data science. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. It has 4 modules; exploring data, modelling data, sampling data and making decisions with data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, ENVX1002 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data.
Textbooks
Statistics, Fourth Edition, Freedman Pisani Purves
AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Cameron Clark Session: Semester 2 Classes: On average 6 hours per week (lectures and practicals); there will be several whole-day practical classes at the Camden campus Prohibitions: AGEN2006 Assumed knowledge: AGEN1004 or BIOL1XXX or AVBS1003 Assessment: Participation, written assignments, quizzes and end of semester examination Practical field work: There will be several whole day practical classes at the Camden campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the management of animals in natural and man-made environments. At the end of this unit of study, students will understand: the characteristics of the management systems of the major domestic species used for production in Australia and in a world wide context; the characteristics and principles underpinning sustainable management of native animals in natural and man-made environments; an appreciation of the dependence of living organisms upon their environment; an appreciation of indigenous land management and the husbandry practices and innovations that have been adopted by the production industries to retain their competitive advantage; a demonstrated capability in handling and husbandry of the major domestic production animal species, and an appreciation of the application of these skills to non-domestic species; a demonstrated understanding of the importance of high standards of animal welfare practice in the management of animals.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the unit content and for this reason no formal text is required. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course.
Or (for students who commenced the course in or before 2017)
AVBS1003 Animals and Us

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brandon Velie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical; one peer assisted study session per week Assessment: Assignments, presentation, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We live in a world surrounded by and dependent on animals. Australia has one of the highest rates of animal ownership in the world: dogs, cats, rabbits, birds and reptiles being common. In this unit, you explore animals in society (including companion, pocket and pet, wildlife and zoo animals). You will investigate relationships between humans and animals and normal function of animals including development, disease, aging and death. This unit will describe how human and animal health are related, outline legislation and policies on the care and use of animals, cover topical issues in animal welfare and ethics, provide opportunities for students to observe animal behaviours and discuss how cultural backgrounds influence our relationships with animals. You will visit captive and clinical animal facilities where animals are displayed for conservation, curiosity, aesthetics and research. Practicals and workshops will provide students with skills in critical thinking, communication, information/digital literacy and an evidence informed basis on which to make decisions. This unit is for students who are interested in a professional career working with animals, such as those in the AVBS stream and BVB/DVM program or who generally seek an understanding of how animals enrich our lives.
Textbooks
Animals and Us Unit of Study Guide and Practical Manual TBD
Electives
Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience (Progression Strategy) for students who commenced the course in or before 2017
ENVI1003 Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, 2-hour computer lab per week, two-day weekend field trip Assessment: 2-hour exam (50%), field trip report (15%), group work presentation (20%), GIS reports (15%) Practical field work: Computer practicals and two-day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half, using Australian case studies, we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.
AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Cameron Clark Session: Semester 2 Classes: On average 6 hours per week (lectures and practicals); there will be several whole-day practical classes at the Camden campus Prohibitions: AGEN2006 Assumed knowledge: AGEN1004 or BIOL1XXX or AVBS1003 Assessment: Participation, written assignments, quizzes and end of semester examination Practical field work: There will be several whole day practical classes at the Camden campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the management of animals in natural and man-made environments. At the end of this unit of study, students will understand: the characteristics of the management systems of the major domestic species used for production in Australia and in a world wide context; the characteristics and principles underpinning sustainable management of native animals in natural and man-made environments; an appreciation of the dependence of living organisms upon their environment; an appreciation of indigenous land management and the husbandry practices and innovations that have been adopted by the production industries to retain their competitive advantage; a demonstrated capability in handling and husbandry of the major domestic production animal species, and an appreciation of the application of these skills to non-domestic species; a demonstrated understanding of the importance of high standards of animal welfare practice in the management of animals.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the unit content and for this reason no formal text is required. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course.
Bachelor of Science (Progression Strategy) for students who commenced the course in or before 2017
GEOS1001 Earth, Environment and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Sabin Zahirovic, Dr Bree Morgan, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1901 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assessment: Exam (40%), 2000 word essay (25%), practical reports (15%), presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the gateway unit of study for Human Geography, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies and Geology. Its objective is to introduce the big questions relating to the origins and current state of the planet: climate change, environment, landscape formation, and the growth of the human population. During the semester you will be introduced to knowledge, theories and debates about how the world's physical and human systems operate. The first module investigates the evolution of the planet through geological time, with a focus on major Earth systems such as plate tectonics and mantle convection and their interaction with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and human civilisations. The second module presents Earth as an evolving and dynamic planet, investigating global environmental change, addressing climate variability and human impacts on the natural environment and the rate at which these changes occur and how they have the potential to dramatically affect the way we live. Finally, the third module, focuses on human-induced challenges to Earth's future. This part of the unit critically analyses the relationships between people and their environments, with central consideration to debates on population change, resource use and the policy contexts of climate change mitigation and adaptation.
PSYC1001 Psychology 1001

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1150 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer/
Psychology 1001 is a general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1001 covers the following areas: science and statistics in psychology; applied psychology; themes in the history of psychology; social psychology; personality theory; human development. This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/
Textbooks
Available on-line once semester commences
PHYS1001 Physics 1 (Regular)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 9 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: 3 hour exam plus laboratories, assignments and mid-semester tests (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is for students who gained 65 marks or better in HSC Physics or equivalent. The lecture series covers the topics of mechanics, thermal physics, and oscillations and waves.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1004 Physics 1 (Environmental and Life Science)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 10 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1003 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently. Assessment: 3-hour exam plus laboratories and assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended that PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 be completed before this unit
This unit of study has been designed specifically for students interested in further study in environmental and life sciences. The lecture series contains modules on the topics of properties of matter, electromagnetism, and radiation and its interactions with matter.
Textbooks
College Physics: A Strategic Approach by Knight, Jones and Field, 3rd edition. Pearsons 2014. Course lab manual.
MATH1004 Discrete Mathematics

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MATH1904 or MATH1064 or MATH2011 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or MATH1111. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
MATH1004 is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in Mathematics.
This unit provides an introduction to fundamental aspects of discrete mathematics, which deals with 'things that come in chunks that can be counted'. It focuses on the enumeration of a set of numbers, viz. Catalan numbers. Topics include sets and functions, counting principles, discrete probability, Boolean expressions, mathematical induction, linear recurrence relations, graphs and trees.
Textbooks
Introduction to Discrete Mathematics, K G Choo and D E Taylor, Addison Wesley Long-man Australia, (1998)
MATH1013 Mathematical Modelling

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1003 or MATH1903 or MATH1907 or MATH1023 or MATH1923 or MATH1933 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or a credit or higher in MATH1111. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Please note: this unit does not normally lead to a major in Mathematics or Statistics or Financial Mathematics and Statistics. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); online homework (10%); final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
MATH1013 is designed for science students who do not intend to undertake higher year mathematics and statistics.
In this unit of study students learn how to construct, interpret and solve simple differential equations and recurrence relations. Specific techniques include separation of variables, partial fractions and first and second order linear equations with constant coefficients. Students are also shown how to iteratively improve approximate numerical solutions to equations.
Textbooks
Mathematical Modelling, Leon Poladian, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sydney (2011)
MATH1014 Introduction to Linear Algebra

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MATH1012 or MATH1002 or MATH1902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or MATH1111. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Please note: this unit does not normally lead to a major in Mathematics or Statistics or Financial Mathematics and Statistics. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an introduction to Linear Algebra. Topics covered include vectors, systems of linear equations, matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Applications in life and technological sciences are emphasised.
Textbooks
A First Course in Linear Algebra (3rd edition), David Easdown, Pearson Education (2010)
Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Animal and Veterinary Bioscience) (Progression Strategy) for students commencing the course in or after 2018
AVBS1003 Animals and Us

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brandon Velie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical; one peer assisted study session per week Assessment: Assignments, presentation, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We live in a world surrounded by and dependent on animals. Australia has one of the highest rates of animal ownership in the world: dogs, cats, rabbits, birds and reptiles being common. In this unit, you explore animals in society (including companion, pocket and pet, wildlife and zoo animals). You will investigate relationships between humans and animals and normal function of animals including development, disease, aging and death. This unit will describe how human and animal health are related, outline legislation and policies on the care and use of animals, cover topical issues in animal welfare and ethics, provide opportunities for students to observe animal behaviours and discuss how cultural backgrounds influence our relationships with animals. You will visit captive and clinical animal facilities where animals are displayed for conservation, curiosity, aesthetics and research. Practicals and workshops will provide students with skills in critical thinking, communication, information/digital literacy and an evidence informed basis on which to make decisions. This unit is for students who are interested in a professional career working with animals, such as those in the AVBS stream and BVB/DVM program or who generally seek an understanding of how animals enrich our lives.
Textbooks
Animals and Us Unit of Study Guide and Practical Manual TBD
And 6 credit points of 1000-level units from any of the areas of study listed in Science Table A
Bachelor of Science (Progression Strategy) for students commencing the course in or after 2018
6 credit points of MATH1XXX units from the BSc Core units of study, and
6 credit points of 1000-level units from any of the areas of study listed in Science Table A, excluding Mathematics units of study

Year 2

Year 2 has the following 48 credit point structure: a core (30 credit points), and electives (18 credit points) selected from the lists below.
Core Units of Study for students commencing the course in or after 2018
AVBS2001 Introductory Veterinary Pathogenesis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Damien Higgins Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week (lectures and practicals) Prerequisites: 12cp of (BIOL1XX6 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX1 or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1) Assumed knowledge: The basic structure, morphology, metabolism and behaviour of bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Fundamental histological structure and function of cells and key tissues, including blood vessels, skin, liver, lung, kidneys, intestine, and organs and cells of the immune system (lymph node, spleen, white blood cells). Assessment: Online exercises (15%), mid-semester exam (25%), practical assessment (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The overarching theme for this unit of study is the concept of the interaction between the host (or the animal), the agent of disease (genetics, physical, chemical and infectious agents) and environmental factors. In disease states, the host responds to the aetiological agent of disease and the environment through one of the basic five pathological processes that occur in tissues. These include inflammation and repair, degeneration and necrosis, circulatory disturbances, tissue deposits and pigments, and disorders of growth. A case based approach will be used whenever possible to illustrate these principles and enable the student to develop a problem solving approach and the skills of critical thinking.
Textbooks
See unit of study guide.
AVBS2004 Animal Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Alex Chaves Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures; 1x2-hr practical session; 1-2hr online learning session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: ANSC3101 Assessment: individual assignments and online quizzes Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
One of the greatest limiting factors to the health and wellbeing of animals under our care is the nutritional value of their feed. Whether provided by nature or manufactured to meet the production and health needs of farmed animals, being able to provide suitable
Textbooks
1 - Animal Nutrition by McDonald, P., Edwards, R.A., Greenhalgh, J.F.D. and Morgan, C.A. (2002) 6th ed. Pearson Education Limited, Harlow UK. Badham Library Call # 636.0852 3 E 2 - Feeds and Feeding (5th Edition) (Hardcover) by Tilden Wayne Perry, Arthur E. Cullison, Robert S. Lowrey (Authors). Publisher: Prentice Hall; 5 edition (November 19, 1998). Badham Library Call # 636.084 9 B 3 - Animal Feeds, Feeding and Nutrition, and Ration Evaluation CD-ROM (Hardcover) by David Tisch (Author). Publisher: Delmar Cengage Learning; 1 edition (October 5, 2005). Badham Library Call # 636.08557 5 4 - Animal Nutrition Science (Paperback) by G. Dryden (Author) Publisher: CABI; 1 edition (October 5, 2008). Badham Library Call # 636.0852 66 5 - Tables of Composition and Nutritional Value of Feed Materials Pigs, Poultry, Cattle, Sheep, Goats, Rabbits, Horses, Fish By Daniel Sauvant, Jean-Marc Perez, Gilles Tran Publisher: INRA (January, 2004). Badham Library Call # 636.0852 60 National Research Council (NRC) publications describing nutrient requirements of various species may also provide useful information; these publications can all be accessed online and are available on reserve at the library: ¿ Nutrient Requirements of Poultry (NRC, 1994). Badham or Camden 636.50852 4 F ¿ Nutrient Requirements of Swine (NRC, 1998). Badham or Camden 636.40852 7 G ¿ Nutrient Requirements of Dairy Cattle (NRC, 2001). Badham or Camden 636.214 17D ¿ Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle (NRC, 2000). Badham 636.213 27 G ¿ Nutrient Requirements of Horses (NRC, 2007). Badham or Camden 636.10852 5 F
AVBS2005 Animal Energetics and Homeostasis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Paul Sheehy Session: Semester 1 Classes: on average there are 4 hrs/ week of lectures and intermittent practical and tutorials of 1-2 hrs per week Prohibitions: VETS1032 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge and concepts from BIOL1XX7 Assessment: intra-semester: 1x exam (25%); end of semester: 1x2-hr written exam (55%); other: 1x cytology group learning exercise (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Effective metabolic function is critical for animal health and wellbeing. Key concepts include the comparative differences between animals and humans (eg ruminant metabolism), common disruptions in metabolism and endocrine regulation in companion animals, as well as the impact of metabolic dysfunction in animal production systems (eg bovine ketosis and ovine pregnancy toxaemia). This unit of study begins with an introduction to the metabolic processes of cells, tissues and whole animals by examining the structure ie the cytological and histological characteristics, of animal tissues in the physical context of whole animals. An integrated view is explored of the role of hormones in homeostatic control as dynamic metabolic regulators in wellbeing and the consequences of dysregulation. Students will apply knowledge of animal nutrition and animal structure and function to determine the underlying basis of metabolic disease and disorders and, how to alleviate or mitigate the dysfunction. This will be done by utilising an understanding of adaptive metabolism in animals to interpret biochemical data and identify disruptions to metabolism and homeostatic mechanisms. Clinical veterinary medicine examples of disruption to metabolism are used to emphasise normal metabolic processes. Students will develop key skills in microscopy, cytology and histology for broad application in the sciences.
Textbooks
Recommended text: Alberts et al., (2014) Essential Cell Biology 4th Edition. Garland Publishing, New York. Sjaastad, O.V, Hove, K and Sand, O. (2003) Physiology of Domestic Animals. Scandanavian Veterinary Press. Other useful textbooks include: Alberts et al., Essential Cell Biology. Garland Publishing, New York. Various Editions Stryer, L. Biochemistry, W.H. Freeman , New York. Various Editions Lehninger, A.L. Principles of Biochemistry, Worth Publishing, New York, Various Editions Campbell, M.K., Biochemistry, Harcourt Brace, Philadelphia, Various Editions Cunningham, J.G. (2002) Textbook of Veterinary Physiology. 3rd ed, Saunders, Philadelphia.
AVBS2007 Animal Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter White Session: Semester 1 Classes: Most weeks students will attend 3 x 1 hour lectures and a 2 hour practical, tutorial or group session. Some 2 hour sessions will involve a mixture of tasks and may contain additional lectures. Prerequisites: 6cp from BIOL1XXX Prohibitions: ANSC3103 or ANSC3104 Assessment: This unit will include a combination of on-line (10%) quiz, individual (25%) and group (20%) assignments, intra-semester examination (15%) and final examination (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animals kept for food and companionship, are diverse and beautifully complex. In this Unit, you will develop an understanding of the structure and function of domestic animals with an emphasis on the systems relevant to animal scientists. The unit begins with the anatomy and physiology of domestic animals cell and basic tissue structure and an overview of homeostatic control systems. This is followed by a more in-depth study of the other body systems. An understanding of the normal functioning of these systems allows identification of how these systems can be influenced by animal management and the animals' environment. At the completion of this unit you will develop; a rich understanding of the relationships between body systems and structure, broad skills of critical thinking and communication, appreciating the links between structure and function and their relevance to abnormal function and animal disease that will be further developed in applied studies in animal nutrition, animal behaviour, welfare and ethics and animal reproduction. In this unit, there is a risk of exposure to zoonotic pathogens. You are encouraged to be vaccinated against tetanus and Q fever but where this is not practical you must utilize Personal Protective Equipment for specific practical classes.
Textbooks
Learning resources will be available on the Unit of Study E-Learning site. The following texts may be useful: Sherwood, L., Klandorf, H. and Yancey, P.H. (2013) Animal Physiology. From Genes to Organisms. 2nd ed. Thomson Brooks/Cole. Dyce, K.M., Sack, W.O. and Wensing, C.J.G. (2010). Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy. 4th edn. W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia.
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes and presentation (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
or
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Sharp Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan and carry out a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.
Textbooks
TBA
Core Units of Study for students who commenced the course in or before 2017
AVBS2001 Introductory Veterinary Pathogenesis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Damien Higgins Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week (lectures and practicals) Prerequisites: 12cp of (BIOL1XX6 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX1 or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1) Assumed knowledge: The basic structure, morphology, metabolism and behaviour of bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Fundamental histological structure and function of cells and key tissues, including blood vessels, skin, liver, lung, kidneys, intestine, and organs and cells of the immune system (lymph node, spleen, white blood cells). Assessment: Online exercises (15%), mid-semester exam (25%), practical assessment (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The overarching theme for this unit of study is the concept of the interaction between the host (or the animal), the agent of disease (genetics, physical, chemical and infectious agents) and environmental factors. In disease states, the host responds to the aetiological agent of disease and the environment through one of the basic five pathological processes that occur in tissues. These include inflammation and repair, degeneration and necrosis, circulatory disturbances, tissue deposits and pigments, and disorders of growth. A case based approach will be used whenever possible to illustrate these principles and enable the student to develop a problem solving approach and the skills of critical thinking.
Textbooks
See unit of study guide.
AVBS2004 Animal Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Alex Chaves Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures; 1x2-hr practical session; 1-2hr online learning session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: ANSC3101 Assessment: individual assignments and online quizzes Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
One of the greatest limiting factors to the health and wellbeing of animals under our care is the nutritional value of their feed. Whether provided by nature or manufactured to meet the production and health needs of farmed animals, being able to provide suitable
Textbooks
1 - Animal Nutrition by McDonald, P., Edwards, R.A., Greenhalgh, J.F.D. and Morgan, C.A. (2002) 6th ed. Pearson Education Limited, Harlow UK. Badham Library Call # 636.0852 3 E 2 - Feeds and Feeding (5th Edition) (Hardcover) by Tilden Wayne Perry, Arthur E. Cullison, Robert S. Lowrey (Authors). Publisher: Prentice Hall; 5 edition (November 19, 1998). Badham Library Call # 636.084 9 B 3 - Animal Feeds, Feeding and Nutrition, and Ration Evaluation CD-ROM (Hardcover) by David Tisch (Author). Publisher: Delmar Cengage Learning; 1 edition (October 5, 2005). Badham Library Call # 636.08557 5 4 - Animal Nutrition Science (Paperback) by G. Dryden (Author) Publisher: CABI; 1 edition (October 5, 2008). Badham Library Call # 636.0852 66 5 - Tables of Composition and Nutritional Value of Feed Materials Pigs, Poultry, Cattle, Sheep, Goats, Rabbits, Horses, Fish By Daniel Sauvant, Jean-Marc Perez, Gilles Tran Publisher: INRA (January, 2004). Badham Library Call # 636.0852 60 National Research Council (NRC) publications describing nutrient requirements of various species may also provide useful information; these publications can all be accessed online and are available on reserve at the library: ¿ Nutrient Requirements of Poultry (NRC, 1994). Badham or Camden 636.50852 4 F ¿ Nutrient Requirements of Swine (NRC, 1998). Badham or Camden 636.40852 7 G ¿ Nutrient Requirements of Dairy Cattle (NRC, 2001). Badham or Camden 636.214 17D ¿ Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle (NRC, 2000). Badham 636.213 27 G ¿ Nutrient Requirements of Horses (NRC, 2007). Badham or Camden 636.10852 5 F
AVBS2007 Animal Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter White Session: Semester 1 Classes: Most weeks students will attend 3 x 1 hour lectures and a 2 hour practical, tutorial or group session. Some 2 hour sessions will involve a mixture of tasks and may contain additional lectures. Prerequisites: 6cp from BIOL1XXX Prohibitions: ANSC3103 or ANSC3104 Assessment: This unit will include a combination of on-line (10%) quiz, individual (25%) and group (20%) assignments, intra-semester examination (15%) and final examination (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animals kept for food and companionship, are diverse and beautifully complex. In this Unit, you will develop an understanding of the structure and function of domestic animals with an emphasis on the systems relevant to animal scientists. The unit begins with the anatomy and physiology of domestic animals cell and basic tissue structure and an overview of homeostatic control systems. This is followed by a more in-depth study of the other body systems. An understanding of the normal functioning of these systems allows identification of how these systems can be influenced by animal management and the animals' environment. At the completion of this unit you will develop; a rich understanding of the relationships between body systems and structure, broad skills of critical thinking and communication, appreciating the links between structure and function and their relevance to abnormal function and animal disease that will be further developed in applied studies in animal nutrition, animal behaviour, welfare and ethics and animal reproduction. In this unit, there is a risk of exposure to zoonotic pathogens. You are encouraged to be vaccinated against tetanus and Q fever but where this is not practical you must utilize Personal Protective Equipment for specific practical classes.
Textbooks
Learning resources will be available on the Unit of Study E-Learning site. The following texts may be useful: Sherwood, L., Klandorf, H. and Yancey, P.H. (2013) Animal Physiology. From Genes to Organisms. 2nd ed. Thomson Brooks/Cole. Dyce, K.M., Sack, W.O. and Wensing, C.J.G. (2010). Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy. 4th edn. W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia.
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes and presentation (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
or
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Sharp Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan and carry out a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.
Textbooks
TBA
Students who commenced the course in or before 2017 are advised to take GEGE2X01 in semester 1.
AVBS2005 Animal Energetics and Homeostasis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Paul Sheehy Session: Semester 1 Classes: on average there are 4 hrs/ week of lectures and intermittent practical and tutorials of 1-2 hrs per week Prohibitions: VETS1032 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge and concepts from BIOL1XX7 Assessment: intra-semester: 1x exam (25%); end of semester: 1x2-hr written exam (55%); other: 1x cytology group learning exercise (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Effective metabolic function is critical for animal health and wellbeing. Key concepts include the comparative differences between animals and humans (eg ruminant metabolism), common disruptions in metabolism and endocrine regulation in companion animals, as well as the impact of metabolic dysfunction in animal production systems (eg bovine ketosis and ovine pregnancy toxaemia). This unit of study begins with an introduction to the metabolic processes of cells, tissues and whole animals by examining the structure ie the cytological and histological characteristics, of animal tissues in the physical context of whole animals. An integrated view is explored of the role of hormones in homeostatic control as dynamic metabolic regulators in wellbeing and the consequences of dysregulation. Students will apply knowledge of animal nutrition and animal structure and function to determine the underlying basis of metabolic disease and disorders and, how to alleviate or mitigate the dysfunction. This will be done by utilising an understanding of adaptive metabolism in animals to interpret biochemical data and identify disruptions to metabolism and homeostatic mechanisms. Clinical veterinary medicine examples of disruption to metabolism are used to emphasise normal metabolic processes. Students will develop key skills in microscopy, cytology and histology for broad application in the sciences.
Textbooks
Recommended text: Alberts et al., (2014) Essential Cell Biology 4th Edition. Garland Publishing, New York. Sjaastad, O.V, Hove, K and Sand, O. (2003) Physiology of Domestic Animals. Scandanavian Veterinary Press. Other useful textbooks include: Alberts et al., Essential Cell Biology. Garland Publishing, New York. Various Editions Stryer, L. Biochemistry, W.H. Freeman , New York. Various Editions Lehninger, A.L. Principles of Biochemistry, Worth Publishing, New York, Various Editions Campbell, M.K., Biochemistry, Harcourt Brace, Philadelphia, Various Editions Cunningham, J.G. (2002) Textbook of Veterinary Physiology. 3rd ed, Saunders, Philadelphia.

Electives

Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience (Progression Strategy) for students who commenced the course in or before 2017
BIOL2032 Australian Wildlife Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Herbert Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures; one 2-hour tutorial or practical session each week Prohibitions: ANSC2005 Assessment: Quizzes, presentation assignment, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australia is home to a broad diversity of vertebrate wildlife species, many of which are unique to the Australian environment, having evolved in isolation from other large land-masses for millions of years. This unit examines the diversity of Australian reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals (including all three mammalian lineages; monotremes, marsupials and eutherian mammals). We focus on the unique anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have enabled our wildlife to survive and thrive within varied Australian ecosystems. We also examine how the uniqueness of our wildlife is also one of its greatest challenges, being naive to the new threats that are present in our rapidly changing environments. At the end of this unit you should have an appreciation of the diversity and uniqueness of Australian wildlife; be able to determine the links between form and function in wildlife and understand the significance of these functional adaptations in relation to ecological challenges. You will also have an understanding of the interactions between humans and wildlife, and how the unique characteristics of our wildlife also make them vulnerable to threats within the rapidly changing Australian environment. Students will also develop enhanced scientific literacy and communication skills through tutorial activities and assessment tasks.
Textbooks
No text book requirements. Recommended reading throughout semester provided by each lecture relevant to their class content. Relevant scientific papers will be uploaded to LMS
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 3-hour computer practical per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 or MATH1015 or DATA1001 or DATA1901)] OR [3cp from (MATH1XX1 or MATH1906 or MATH1XX3 or MATH1907) and an additional 3cp from (MATH1XX5)] Assessment: One exam during the exam period (50%),three reports (10% each), ten online quizzes (2% each) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness streams
This unit builds on introductory 1st year statistics units and is targeted towards students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It consists of two parts and presents, in an applied manner, the statistical methods that students need to know for further study and their future careers. In the first part the focus is on designed studies including both surveys and formal experimental designs. Students will learn how to analyse and interpret datasets collected from designs from more than than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part the focus is on finding patterns in data. In this part the students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression, and find patterns in datasets with many variables using principal components analysis and clustering. This part provides the foundation for the analysis of big data. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the statistical software package R. A key feature of the unit is using R to develop coding skills that are become essential in science for processing and analysing datasets of ever increasing size.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
Bachelor of Science (Progression Strategy) - subject to approval for students who commenced the course in or before 2017
BCMB2001 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quizzes, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. Our practicals, along with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to widely applied and cutting edge tools that are essential for modern biochemistry and molecular biology. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the life and medical sciences.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
BCMB2901 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, quiz, skills-based assessment, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. The advanced laboratory component will provide students with an authentic research laboratory experience while in the theory component, current research topics will be presented in a problem-based format through dedicated advanced tutorial sessions. This material will be assessed by creative student-centered activities supported by eLearning platforms.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
BCMB2002 Proteins in Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2902 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quiz, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. Our practicals, other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for protein biochemistry ranging from protein visualization, quantification, purification and enzymatic activity, to in silico studies and cellular targeting experiments. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the cellular and molecular biosciences.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
BCMB2902 Proteins in Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2002 Assessment: Assignment, skills-based assessment, quiz, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. There will be a research-focused approach to the advanced practical component, including real and virtual extensions to key experiments. This approach will continue in the lecture series with several unique advanced lectures covering current research topics. You will further investigate a selected area of interest from these topics using original source material and present your findings through an oral presentation in dedicated advanced tutorials.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
BIOL2021 Zoology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mathew Crowther Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL2921 or BIOL2011 or BIOL2911 or BIOL2012 or BIOL2912 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (60%), Lab book (20%), Oral presentation (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an overview of the functional and phylogenetic diversity of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. The material is presented within the conceptual framework of evolution, the foundation of biology. Lectures explore the diversity of major functional systems and behaviour in the context of environmental challenges and the ecological roles of different animal groups. Laboratory classes include dissections and demonstrations of the functional anatomy of invertebrates and vertebrates, as well as experiments. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Hickman CP, Roberts LS, Larson A, l'Anson H 2004. Integrated Principles of Zoology, 12th ed. McGraw Hill, NY. Withers, P. 1992 Comparative Animal Physiology. Saunders, New York
BIOL2022 Biology Experimental Design and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1XX5) Prohibitions: BIOL2922 or BIOL3006 or BIOL3906 or ENVX2001 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides foundational skills essential for doing research in biology and for critically judging the research of others. We consider how biology is practiced as a quantitative, experimental and theoretical science. We focus on the underlying principles and practical skills you need to explore questions and test hypotheses, particularly where background variation (error) is inherently high. In so doing, the unit provides you with an understanding of how biological research is designed, analysed and interpreted using statistics. Lectures focus on sound experimental and statistical principles, using examples in ecology and other fields of biology to demonstrate concepts. In the practical sessions, you will design and perform, analyse (using appropriate statistical tools) and interpret your own experiments to answer research questions in topics relevant to your particular interest. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2016. Experimental design for the life sciences. 4th Ed. Oxford University Press
CHEM2401 Molecular Reactivity and Spectroscopy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, seven 1-hour tutorials per semester, eight 4-hour practicals per semester Prerequisites: (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) and (CHEM1XX2 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: CHEM2001 or CHEM2101 or CHEM2301 or CHEM2311 or CHEM2502 or CHEM2901 or CHEM2903 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a required chemistry unit of study for students intending to major in chemistry.
This is one of the two core units of study for students considering majoring in chemistry, and for students of other disciplines who wish to acquire a good general background in chemistry. The unit considers fundamental questions of molecular structure, chemical reactivity, and molecular spectroscopy: What are chemical reactions and what makes them happen? How can we follow and understand them? How can we exploit them to make useful molecules? This course includes the organic and medicinal chemistry of aromatic and carbonyl compounds, organic reaction mechanisms, molecular spectroscopy, quantum chemistry, and molecular orbital theory.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
CHEM2402 Chemical Structure and Stability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, seven 1-hour tutorials per semester, eight 4-hour practicals per semester Prerequisites: (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) and (CHEM1XX2 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: CHEM2202 or CHEM2302 or CHEM2902 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a required chemistry unit of study for students intending to major in chemistry.
This is the second core unit of study for students considering majoring in chemistry, and for students seeking a good general background in chemistry. The unit continues the consideration of molecular structure and chemical reactivity. Topics include the structure and bonding of inorganic compounds, the properties of metal complexes, materials chemistry and nanotechnology, thermodynamics and kinetics.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Animal and Veterinary Bioscience) (Progression Strategy) for students commencing the course in or after 2018
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 3-hour computer practical per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 or MATH1015 or DATA1001 or DATA1901)] OR [3cp from (MATH1XX1 or MATH1906 or MATH1XX3 or MATH1907) and an additional 3cp from (MATH1XX5)] Assessment: One exam during the exam period (50%),three reports (10% each), ten online quizzes (2% each) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness streams
This unit builds on introductory 1st year statistics units and is targeted towards students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It consists of two parts and presents, in an applied manner, the statistical methods that students need to know for further study and their future careers. In the first part the focus is on designed studies including both surveys and formal experimental designs. Students will learn how to analyse and interpret datasets collected from designs from more than than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part the focus is on finding patterns in data. In this part the students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression, and find patterns in datasets with many variables using principal components analysis and clustering. This part provides the foundation for the analysis of big data. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the statistical software package R. A key feature of the unit is using R to develop coding skills that are become essential in science for processing and analysing datasets of ever increasing size.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
And 12 credit points of 2000-level units from Science Table A that enables the completion of a second major.
Bachelor of Science (Progression Strategy) for students commencing the course in or after 2018
18 credit points of 2000-level units from Science Table A

Years 3 to 6

Candidates who successfully complete the progression requirements enrol in the units of study for the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree.
The requirements for the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree are set out in the Science Postgraduate Handbook.

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

Year 1 has the following 48 credit point structure:

VETS6101 The Veterinary Professional 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sanaa Zaki Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 week intensive at start of semester 1, then tutorials, lectures, presentations and independent study throughout the semester. Assumed knowledge: One semester of study in each of: general chemistry (physical and inorganic), organic chemistry, biology and biochemistry. Assessment: Presentation with peer feedback, self and peer assessment of leadership and teamwork competencies; written exam. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study introduces you to foundational knowledge, skills and attitudes for being an effective veterinary professional. Key themes include lifelong learning, professionalism, one health, communication, teamwork, ethics, the human-animal bond and anthrozoology, cultural competence, emotional intelligence and leadership. The course also orientates you to studying with the Faculty and University as you attain your veterinary degree. Specifically, this Unit of Study will prepare you for: contributing to society as a professional veterinarian; making the most of your veterinary degree; conducting effective veterinary consultations; working successfully in veterinary workplace environments and teams; fostering positive practices in relation to professional wellbeing and self-care; maintaining clear professional records; upholding professional standards and ethics; effectively approaching situations in different cultural settings; managing your finances and career; and consistently improving your professional practice. Developing your knowledge and skills in these areas will help you develop veterinary graduate attributes essential for long term effectiveness and success in your veterinary career.
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6102 Professional Skills 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Christina Dart Session: Semester 1 Classes: Introductory lecture, practical classes and demonstrations, tutorials, field trips, workplace training in veterinary teaching hospitals, independent study Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice; empathy for and confidence in interactions with animals, One semester of study in each of general chemistry (physical and inorganic), organic chemistry, biology and biochemistry. Assessment: Practical examinations, oral presentations/examinations, written assignments/reflective statements, clinical supervisor feedback, Objective Structured Clinical Examination, formative self and peer assessment Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study students will be introduced to, and begin to develop confidence and competency in, fundamental professional skills relevant to veterinary practice. The skills will include basic animal handling, basic clinical skills, personal and professional attributes, basic laboratory skills and clinical experience in veterinary teaching hospitals. Successful completion of this unit of study requires students to: (1) Attend and actively participate in all compulsory classes, (2) Achieve at least a pass grade in all compulsory assessment tasks, and (3) Submit all compulsory documents (veterinary teaching hospital site contracts and skills logs, feedback forms etc.).
Textbooks
There is no prescribed textbook for this unit. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6103 Research and Enquiry 1A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Navneet Dhand Session: Semester 1 Classes: Large group classes, small group tutorials/ discussion groups, computer laboratory tutorials, research seminars, online resources and independent study. Assessment: Writing an abstract; Quiz; Assignment. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Research and enquiry is implicit in every aspect of every career path in veterinary science. This unit will equip students with skills in generating research evidence as well as in searching and critically evaluating available evidence. The candidate will develop the skills necessary to formulate relevant questions and to collate, evaluate and synthesise evidence to answer these questions. The candidate will gain knowledge and develop fundamental skills in designing and conducting field experiments, including clinical trials, and evaluating journal articles about such experiments. Skills will be developed in using spreadsheets and conducting statistical analyses for data collected during simple experiments. Guidelines for publishing clinical trials will be discussed to enable candidates to critically evaluate methods (design, conduct and analysis) of clinical trials presented in journal articles and marketing brochures.
Textbooks
There is no prescribed textbook for this unit. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6104 Foundations of Veterinary Science A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter White Session: Semester 1 Classes: Activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures Assumed knowledge: One semester of study in each of general chemistry (physical and inorganic), organic chemistry, biology and biochemistry. Assessment: Intra-semester exam; an intrasemester assignment; end of semester theory and practical exams. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, the basic gross anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy) and physiology of the integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive, cardiovascular and respiratory systems of domestic mammals are considered. The dog is used as the main anatomical exemplar, although some comparative anatomical detail, particularly for the digestive system, is included. Clinical material is used both to illustrate normal structure and function, and to provide the anatomical, histological and physiological knowledge that underpins the clinical examination and investigative techniques of these systems, such as auscultation, palpation and haematology. The material in this unit will underpin the acquisition of relevant skills in the unit of study Professional Skills 1A. Examples of disease in animals created by structural abnormalities and dysfunction are used to illustrate the application of this knowledge. This unit will provide a thorough basis for more advanced applied, regional and comparative anatomical and physiological learning in later years of the DVM in paraclinical and clinical disciplines. The body systems studied in this unit provide a framework of the mammalian body that will be further developed in Foundations of Veterinary Science B.
Textbooks
Required: Dyce, KM, Sack, WO and Wensing, CJG (2010). Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy. 4th Edition. Elsevier, St Louis. Evans, HE and de LaHunta, A (2013). Miller's Anatomy of the Dog. 4th Edition. Elsevier, St Louis. Sjaastad V, Sand, O and Hove, K (2010). Physiology of Domestic Animals. 2nd Edition. Scandinavian Veterinary Press, Oslo.
VETS6105 Animal Management Systems 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A.Prof Imke Tammen Session: Semester 2 Classes: Large group classes and lectures, Small group tutorials/ discussion groups, On farm practicals, Independent study Prerequisites: VETS6102 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice, one semester of study in each of general chemistry (physical and inorganic), organic chemistry, biology and biochemistry Assessment: Theory exam, Group assignment with oral presentation and written component, Reflective statement, Formative online quizzes Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animal Management Systems 1 will introduce students to the husbandry, housing, feeding and management of the major production, performance and companion animals, as well as key economic influences on livestock production. It will establish animal welfare standards and concepts of biosecurity, ethics and breeding programs. Students will be equipped with the necessary knowledge to understand farming and animal management systems when attending placements. This unit of study will also provide a foundation on which to build an understanding of animals' disease.
Textbooks
There is no required text for the course. A number of recommended textbooks, journal references and online resources that may prove useful in understanding lecture material or in the preparation of assessment tasks are listed in the handbook.
VETS6106 Professional Skills 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/P Christina Dart Session: Semester 2 Classes: Introductory lecture, practical classes and demonstrations, tutorials, field trips, workplace training in veterinary teaching hospitals, independent study Prerequisites: VETS6102 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice; empathy for and confidence in interactions with animals, one semester of study in each of general chemistry (physical and inorganic), organic chemistry, biology and biochemistry Assessment: Practical examinations, oral presentations/ examinations, written assignments/ reflective statements, clinical supervisor feedback, Objective Structured Clinical Examination, formative self and peer assessment Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this Unit of study students will continue to develop confidence and competency in fundamental professional skills relevant to veterinary practice, building on their experiences in Professional Skills 1A. The skills will include basic animal handling and husbandry, basic clinical skills, personal and professional attributes, basic laboratory skills and clinical experience in veterinary teaching hospitals. Successful completion of this unit of study requires students to: (1) Attend and actively participate in all compulsory classes, (2) Achieve at least a pass grade in all compulsory assessment tasks, and (3) Submit all compulsory documents (veterinary teaching hospital site contracts and skills logs, feedback forms etc.).
Textbooks
There is no prescribed textbook for this unit. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required
VETS6107 Research and Enquiry 1B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Large group classes, small group tutorials/ discussion groups, computer laboratory tutorials, online resources and independent study. Prerequisites: VETS6103 Assessment: Study design assignment; participation; end-of-semester exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will contribute to graduates being able to create new knowledge and understanding through the process of research and enquiry. Within Research and Enquiry 1B students will continue to develop the skills necessary to synthesise evidence. This will be based within the context of using and interpreting diagnostic tests (module 1), and designing observational studies (module 2) to answer animal health and production questions relevant to veterinary science and allied professions. Scenarios that include client-owned individual animals within a clinical setting; herds, flocks and other groups of animals; and national control programs will be used to explain principles and purpose of sensitivity and specificity of diagnostics tests, and the principles of study design (such as target populations, case definition, sampling and measurement). Research and Enquiry 1B will focus on research in observational studies, building on Research and Enquiry 1A skills and knowledge in clinical trials. Students will critically incorporate available evidence (including peer-reviewed and non-peer reviewed literature) and practice communication skills. Additionally students will become familiar with basic statistical methods to evaluate evidence, a framework for animal ethics in research and cultural competence as it relates to conducting research (module 3).
Textbooks
Thrusfield, M.V. Veterinary Epidemiology. 2013, 3rd ed., ISBN 1118713419
VETS6108 Foundations of Veterinary Science B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hamutal Mazrier Session: Semester 2 Classes: Activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures. Prerequisites: VETS6104 Assumed knowledge: 2 semesters of chemistry, 1 semester of biology, 1 semester of biochemistry Assessment: Quizzes, individual and group assignment, end of semester theory exam, end of semester practical exam. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Understanding normal structure and function of the animal body is critical to understanding disease and dysfunction and as such, principles of preventative and therapeutic intervention. The overarching purpose of this unit of study is to provide an advanced understanding of the normal structure and function of the major co-ordinating Systems of the mammalian body and preliminary contextual understanding of the important concepts of pathophysiology and general pathology. The unit of study is underpinned by an understanding of basic concepts and the frameworks of structure and function achieved in the Foundations of Veterinary Science A. This Unit of Study will provide the foundation for advanced learning in DVM year 2 of systemic pathology, pathophysiology and aetiopathogenesis in the setting of the major organ systems in the context of clinical scenarios of companion and production animals.
Textbooks
Dyce, KM, Sack, WO and Wensing, CJG (2010). Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy. 4th Edition. Elsevier, St Louis.; Evans, HE and de LaHunta, A (2013). Miller's Anatomy of the Dog. 4th Edition. Elsevier, St Louis.; Samuelson, DA (2007). Textbook of Veterinary Histology. Elsevier, St Louis.; Sjaastad V, Sand, O and Hove, K (2010). Physiology of Domestic Animals. 2nd Edition. Scandinavian Veterinary Press, Oslo.; Zachary, JF and McGavin, MD (2012). Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 5th edition. Mosby, Elsevier.

Year 2 has the following 48 credit point structure:

VETS6201 The Veterinary Professional 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sanaa Zaki Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 week intensive at start of semester 1, then tutorials, lectures, presentations and independent study throughout the semester Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 Assessment: Completion of independent learning project and associated forms, Presentation with peer feedback, self and peer assessment of leadership and teamwork competencies; written exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study introduces the student to intermediate professional skills for approaching disease investigation and engaging with presenting signs. It also builds on and extends their knowledge of professional competencies introduced in Year 1 and required as an effective veterinary professional. Key themes include clinical communication and professional reasoning, introduction to physical examination and disease investigation, lifelong learning, risk management and self-care, professionalism, legislation and ethics, cultural competence, emotional intelligence, practice management and leadership. Developing and extending their knowledge and skills in these areas will help students attain veterinary graduate attributes essential for long term effectiveness and success in their veterinary career. An integral part of this unit of study is an opportunity to extend their professional capabilities in an area of personal interest through the Independent Learning Project, allowing them to extend and differentiate their abilities from others in future employment applications.
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6202 Professional Skills 2A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg Session: Semester 1 Classes: Introductory lecture, Practical classes and demonstrations, Tutorials, Workshops; Independent study Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 Assessment: Practical examinations, Oral presentations/examinations, Written assignments/reflective statements, Clinical supervisor feedback, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), Formative self and peer assessment Practical field work: Field trips, Workplace training in Veterinary Teaching Hospitals Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is assumed that student have a basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice; empathy for and confidence in interactions with animals
In this unit of study students will continue in the development of their confidence and competency in, fundamental professional skills relevant to veterinary practice. These will include animal handling, clinical and laboratory skills, as well as the development of relevant personal and professional attributes, and clinical experience in veterinary teaching hospitals. Successful completion of this unit of study requires students to: (1) Attend and actively participate in all compulsory classes, (2) Achieve at least a pass grade in all compulsory assessment tasks, and (3) Submit all compulsory documents (veterinary teaching hospital site contracts and skills logs, feedback forms etc.).
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6203 Research and Enquiry 2A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Merran Govendir Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures and tutorials Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 Assessment: Synthesis of an animal ethics proposal (40%), Synthesis of a visual communication task (30%), Online quiz (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will continue to build on previous Research and Enquiry 1A and 1B units of study. This unit will continue to expand students' appreciation of the contribution of research to the veterinary sciences and develop their skills in the synthesis and communication of new and existing knowledge. Where possible this unit will integrate with the UoS Principles of Animal Disease A VETS6204 by utilising content and examples from the relevant module/s as triggers to explore this unit`s themes. The themes for this unit are to i) synthesise an animal ethics proposal that complies with the Australian code for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes with an emphasis on the '3Rs' (reduction, replacement and refinement) of animal use; ii) elaborate on principles introduced in Research and Enquiry 1B to explore diagnostic test validation in a laboratory and field settings using pathogen susceptibility testing to anti-infective drugs as an exemplar and how the results are interpreted with reference to population data from both the animals and pathogens (with this theme culminating in consideration of the 'prudent use' of anti-infectives; iii) appreciate and utilise effective practices in the generation of visual communication tools and verbal presentation techniques and iv) explore the skills and tools applied to investigate a disease outbreak or herd problem involving one premise or event
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6204 Principles of Animal Disease A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Derek Spielman Session: Semester 1 Classes: Activities will vary weekly, but will be a mix of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures. Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 Assessment: Intrasemester (35%); end of semester written examinations and practical exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A fundamental understanding of disease and dysfunction is critical to applying principles of preventative and therapeutic interventions in veterinary practice. This unit of study provides a thorough grounding in knowledge and skills for a wide range of veterinary disciplines including veterinary pathology, veterinary clinical pathology, immunology, veterinary microbiology, veterinary parasitology, animal behaviour, veterinary pharmacology and veterinary diagnostic imaging. An integrated multi-disciplinary approach will highlight the underlying pathophysiology and aetiopathogenesis of clinical and subclinical disease affecting several major body systems. This unit will emphasise a pathobiological approach to investigations providing a logical diagnostic framework to facilitate students' understanding of disease and disease investigation. This unit of study will utilise scenarios from companion animals, production animals and wildlife to contextualise problems involving haematology, disorders of growth, dermatopathology, reproductive system pathology, gastrointestinal pathology, as well as behavioural manifestations during disease and the investigation of sudden (unexpected) deaths. The use of case-based scenarios will motivate and direct students to develop the concepts and principles underscoring therapeutics and disease control and management programs. The unit provides the foundation for integrated parasite/pest management (IPM) strategies. In addition, vector-, water- and food- borne diseases and transboundary diseases will be included enabling students to understand their relevance to the human-animal bond, public health, trade and biosecurity. Reinforcing the development and maintenance of normal structure and function will highlight abnormalities associated with specific clinical presentations and disease entities. This unit of study integrates with the concepts and skills taught within VETS6203 (Research and Enquiry 2A) and VETS6202 (Professional skills 2A) to prepare students for the clinical units of study in DVM 3.
Textbooks
Beveridge I and Emery D (2015) Australasian Animal Parasites Inside and Out. Australian Society for Parasitology. http://parasite.org.au/publications/australian-animal-parasites-inside-and-out/, Zachary and McGavin (2012) Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 5th Ed. Mosby. Refer to specific module outlines for relevant recommended texts.
VETS6205 Animal Management Systems 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Paul McGreevy Session: Semester 2 Classes: Classes will be a mixture of lectures, practical and tutorials Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 and VETS6201 and VETS6202 and VETS6203 and VETS6204 Assessment: Practical/oral assessment, Written Assignment, Online quizzes: formative and summative Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is assumed that students have a basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice, biology and biochemistry
Animal management Systems 2 will build on and extend student knowledge gained in Animal Management Systems 1 including the husbandry, housing, feeding and management of the major production, performance and companion animals, as well as key economic influences on livestock production. Using an animal welfare focus, students will build their knowledge of the concepts of biosecurity, nutrition, and breeding. Students will be equipped with further knowledge to help them understand farming and animal management systems and provide a foundation on which to develop an appreciation of disease management that will be taught in subsequent years.
Textbooks
Handbooks and online resources. Lucas and Southgate, Aquaculture: farming aquatic animals and plants (2nd edition, 2012). Huntington, Peter, Jane Myers, and Elizabeth Owens. Horse Sense: the guide to horse care in Australia and New Zealand. Landlinks Press, 2004. Cottle DJ ed. International Sheep and Wool Handbook. NPU, 2010. P. McDonald, R.A. Edwards, J.F.D. Greenhalgh, C.A. Morgan, L.A. Sinclair and R.G. Wilkinson. Animal Nutrition (7th edition published in 2011) (Prentice Hall).
VETS6206 Professional Skills 2B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg Session: Semester 2 Classes: Introductory lecture, Practical classes and demonstrations, Tutorials, Workshops; Independent study Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 and VETS6201 and VETS6202 and VETS6203 and VETS6204 Assessment: Practical examinations, Oral presentations/examinations, Written assignments/reflective statements, Clinical supervisor feedback, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), Formative self and peer assessment Practical field work: Field trips, Workplace training in Veterinary Teaching Hospitals Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is assumed that student have a basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice; empathy for and confidence in interactions with animals
In this unit of study students will continue in the development of their confidence and competency in, fundamental professional skills relevant to veterinary practice. These will include animal handling, clinical and laboratory skills, as well as the development of relevant personal and professional attributes, and clinical experience in veterinary teaching hospitals. Successful completion of this unit of study requires students to: (1) Attend and actively participate in all compulsory classes, (2) Achieve at least a pass grade in all compulsory assessment tasks, and (3) Submit all compulsory documents (veterinary teaching hospital site contracts and skills logs, feedback forms etc.)
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6207 Research and Enquiry 2B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Jenny-Ann Toribio Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures and tutorials Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 and VETS6201 and VETS6202 and VETS6203 and VETS6204 Assessment: Proposal for research 25%, Communication tool 25%, Outbreak investigation assignment 50% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will build on previous Research and Enquiry units in Year 1 and 2 of the DVM. It will consolidate and extend student skills relevant to the planning and conduct of research, and to applications of enquiry and investigation encountered across units in Year 3 and rotation placements in Year 4. Skills in evidence based practice will be extended to the evaluation and conduct of systematic reviews relevant to a clinical question; consideration of the investigation of outbreaks involving multiple premises and the application of surveillance to inform evaluation of disease risk; and in communication to identification of communication tools appropriate for conveying research outcomes to specific target audiences. Awareness of ethical issues in research will be extended to research that involves sourcing data from people and the requirements for a human ethics application. Each student will prepare a project brief for research in an area of the veterinary science of interest to the student and receive feedback on the proposed work. Where appropriate, this unit will integrate with VETS6208 Principles of Animal Disease B by utilizing content and examples across aligned modules.
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6208 Principles of Animal Disease B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rachael Gray Session: Semester 2 Classes: Activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures. Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 and VETS6201 and VETS6202 and VETS6203 and VETS6204 Assessment: Intrasemester (40%); end of semester written examinations and practical exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A fundamental understanding of disease and dysfunction is critical to the application of principles of preventative and therapeutic intervention in the veterinary clinical setting. This unit of study will provide a thorough grounding in knowledge and skills for a wide range of veterinary disciplines including veterinary pathology, veterinary clinical pathology, immunology, veterinary microbiology, veterinary parasitology, animal behaviour, veterinary pharmacology and veterinary diagnostic imaging. An integrated multi-disciplinary approach will be used to highlight the underlying pathophysiology and aetiopathogenesis of clinical and subclinical disease within the setting of several major body systems. This unit will emphasise a pathobiological approach to the investigative process providing a logical framework for diagnostics to facilitate students' understanding of disease and disease investigation. This unit of study will utilise scenarios from companion animals, production animals and wildlife to contextualise problems of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, urinary system, musculoskeletal system, nervous system, endocrine system, as well as behavioural problems and the investigation of sudden (unexpected) death. The unit provides the foundation for integrated parasite/pest management (IPM) strategies. In addition, vector-, water- and food- borne diseases and transboundary diseases will be included enabling students to understand their relevance to the human-animal bond, public health, trade and biosecurity. Reinforcement of the development and maintenance of normal structure and function will be employed to highlight abnormalities associated with specific clinical presentations and disease entities. The unit of study is underpinned by the knowledge and understanding of animal disease and the investigative approach achieved in Principles of Animal Disease A in DVM 2 semester 1, and integrates with the concepts and skills taught within VETS6207 (Research and Enquiry 2B) and VETS6206 (Professional skills 2B) to prepare students for the clinical units of study in DVM 3.
Textbooks
Beveridge I and Emery D (2015) Australasian Animal Parasites Inside and Out. Australian Society for Parasitology. http://parasite.org.au/publications/australian-animal-parasites-inside-and-out/. Zachary and McGavin (2012) Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 5th Ed. Mosby. Discipline specific texts and readings will be provided within each module.

Year 3 has the following 48 credit point structure:

VETS6301 Veterinary Public Practice

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jenny- Ann Toribio Session: Semester 1 Classes: Intensive at start of semester, then lectures throughout the semester Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Assessment: group theory-based assignment (30%), theory-based quiz (25%), written examination (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Veterinarians make vital contributions - at local, regional and global levels - to some of the most pressing challenges facing modern society, including emerging infectious diseases, food safety and food security, and antimicrobial resistance. This unit introduces you to the knowledge and technical skills that underpin the roles of veterinary professionals in serving the public good. Specifically, this Unit of Study will prepare you to: contribute to Emergency Animal Disease (EAD) response; oversee animal welfare and food safety in abattoirs; and advise clients, community members and policy developers on risks associated with zoonotic diseases and how to minimise them. During the intensive, you will participate in lectures, interactive tutorials and practicals designed to integrate prior learning on epidemiology, animal welfare, pathology, microbiology, and parasitology within the context of EAD response and food safety. You will also be introduced to the global frameworks that support animal health at an international level. During the semester, you will participate in tutorials focussed on risk management and risk communication in practice settings in relation to a number of common zoonotic disease scenarios in Australia. Legislation relevant to the above areas will be introduced throughout the unit.
VETS6302 Clinical Foundations

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Christina Dart Session: Semester 1 Classes: introductory lectures, independent study, tutorials, practical classes and demonstrations Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Assessment: online quiz (30%) to be undertaken in the early part of the semester, written theory assignment (70%) to be undertaken at the end of the semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will facilitate foundational clinical knowledge and skills in disciplines including anaesthesia, surgery, medicine, imaging, therapeutics and infection control. This foundational unit of study will sit at the beginning of semester 1. The student will study fundamental concepts for practicing safe and humane sedation administration (chemical restraint), general anaesthesia, and pain relief in animal species. Foundational surgical concepts will include principles of wound healing, surgical suture materials and their use, haemostasis principles, and aseptic techniques as part of foundational principle of infection control in practice. Foundational knowledge and skills in diagnostic imaging will encompass radiography and ultrasonography principles, radiological safety, and principles of image interpretation. The students will be introduced to concepts of prescribing therapeutics in clinical and non-clinical veterinary practice, including rationalisation of use based on disease priority, safety, efficacy, patient response, disease prevalence, and by considering owner and regulatory constraints. Students will advance understandings of diagnostic frameworks and case management in veterinary medicine through clinical reasoning, utilising an evidence based approach, and remaining cognisant and sensitive to clients' needs and constraints.
VETS6303 Small Animal Practice A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof David Phalen Session: Semester 1 Classes: activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials and lectures Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Corequisites: VETS6302 Assessment: intra-semester theory-based examination (20%) delivered mid-semester, intra-semester theory-based written assessment (15%) delivered at the end of semester, end-of-semester theory-based examination (65%) delivered at the end of semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Mastering essential clinical competencies and the application of the problem-oriented approach is essential for the transition into clinical practice. This unit of study will consolidate the skills and knowledge from DVM1 and DVM2 in a case-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of common clinical syndromes in small animals. An integrated multi-disciplinary approach will be used to highlight the importance and interrelatedness of all aspects of clinical practice (medicine, surgery, anaesthesia, behaviour, pharmacology and diagnostic imaging) in case management. Consideration of the responsibilities of small animal clinicians with regard to infection control, zoonoses and public health in the context of clinical practice will form part of this unit. The unit will provide grounding in the basic principles of diagnosis and treatment of urogenital, neurological, ophthalmological, cardiorespiratory, endocrinological, musculoskeletal, behavioural, alimentary, dermatological, haematological and oncological conditions. It focuses on developing the students' day one skills and professional attitude required for their clinical placements. Practical classes and small group learning will be included in the teaching of this unit to allow students to develop clinical thinking, practical skills and communication proficiencies.
Textbooks
Students will be directed by teaching staff to required texts
VETS6304 Livestock Practice A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennie Mohler Session: Semester 1 Classes: activities will vary weekly, but will be a mix of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Corequisites: VETS6302 Assessment: intra-semester theory exam (40%), end-of-semester theory and practical exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Livestock Practice A combines the teaching of ruminant (primarily bovine) and porcine medicine and surgery in a practical setting where student's progress from the fundamental clinical and surgical problems as would be encountered in a rural mixed practice. Much of the lecture course utilises problem-based learning using a case-based approach. This approach is designed to augment skills developed in other disciplines including animal husbandry, anatomy, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, veterinary medicine and veterinary surgery. The course is designed to assist the student in learning effective problem solving skills, determination of differential diagnoses and the judicious use of appropriate diagnostic aids when attempting to reach a diagnosis. Options and approaches to commonly used therapeutic measures are included. The learning is integrated across species and deals with the major body systems, such as cardiac, respiratory, neuromuscular, ocular, skin, alimentary and renal disorders, and also includes an introduction to herd and flock diseases in livestock. The practical classes are designed to augment and expand the student's experiences in large animal clinical skills.
VETS6305 Equine Practice A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg Session: Semester 1 Classes: tutorials and case discussions, independent study Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Corequisites: VETS6302 Assessment: mid-semester scenario-based essay (20%), mid-semester oral presentation of written assignment (pass/fail), end-of-semester practical examination (pass/fail), end-of-semester case-based theory written examination (80%) Practical field work: Practical classes and demonstrations, Workplace training at the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden (UVTHC) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Equine Practice A and B will assist students in developing the knowledge, skills and attitudes relevant to equids required of a 'day-one' graduate in rural mixed practice. These units of study will provide the foundations for equine and mixed practice clinical placements in DVM Year 4. Equine Practice A will build on the content of DVM Years 1 and 2, and VETS6302 Clinical Foundations, and will expose students to a wide range of aspects of equine practice using a case-based pedagogic approach.
Textbooks
Equine Clinical Medicine, Surgery and Reproduction, Munroe, G and Weese, S (eds), Manson, 2011.
VETS6306 Exotic and Wildlife Practice

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof David Phalen Session: Semester 1 Classes: large group classes, independent study Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Corequisites: VETS6302 Assessment: case-based written theory examination (50%) delivered mid-semester, case-based written theory examination (50%) delivered at the end of semester Practical field work: Practical classes and demonstrations, Workplace training at the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden (UVTHC) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will cover the basic husbandry of commonly kept exotic pets and wildlife species presented to veterinarians. Applied anatomy of these species will be taught so that students will be able to safely handle these animals, complete physical examinations of them, collect diagnostic samples from them, interpret radiographs and other images of them, treat them, and undertake common surgical procedures on them. Common disease processes and their manifestations, treatments, and prevention will be discussed. Upon completion of this unit of study, students will be comfortable seeing these species in their practice for routine appointments, and will be aware when referral to a specialist is indicated.
VETS6307 Research and Enquiry 3A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jan Slapeta, Prof Michael Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: individual and group consultation with advisor and advisors, respectively. independent study on professionally focused project Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Assessment: progress report on professionally focused projectapproved by advisor and assessor (pass/fail) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit forms a first part of a capstone experience in which the student formulates a question based on systematic investigation of a topic related to a discipline in veterinary medicine or an allied health science, under the guidance of a research advisor and peers under independent review. The investigation can include lab/bench, field/clinic research or secondary data analysis. The investigation must demonstrate independent data collection, critical analysis and reflection on existing dimension of knowledge. Literature reviews are not acceptable.
VETS6308 Veterinary Practice Management

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ingrid van Gelderen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 week intensive (lectures and tutorials) at start of semester, presentations and independent study throughout the semester Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Assessment: groupwork assessment (60%) during intensive block, multiple-choice question (mcq) theory examination (40%) scheduled for the end of semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit extends students' foundational knowledge and skills for working effectively as a veterinary professional, by introducing key concepts in Practice Management. The unit also builds on and extends students' application of professional competencies introduced in VETS6101 The Veterinary Professional 1 and VETS6201 The Veterinary Professional 2 including communication, teamwork, cultural competence, professional reasoning and leadership. It utilises a case-based approach to aid understanding of financial, legal and ethical perspectives in the management of problems encountered in Veterinary Practice. Students are given opportunities to review, critically evaluate and present their findings on case studies that reflect real life veterinary challenges. This is supplemented with keynote presentations from professional experts in business, finance and law. Specifically this will facilitate students' preparedness for clinical placements in DVM4 and Clinical Practice beyond graduation.
VETS6309 Small Animal Practice B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Kenneth Johnson Session: Semester 2 Classes: activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials and lectures Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6303 Assessment: intra-semester theory-based examination (20%) delivered mid-semester, intra-semester written assessment (15%) delivered at the end of semester, theory-based written examination (65%) delivered at the end of semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Mastering essential clinical competencies and the application of the problem-oriented approach is essential for the transition into clinical practice. This unit of study will consolidate the skills and knowledge from DVM1 and DVM2 in a case-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of common clinical syndromes in small animals (cats, dogs, ferrets, rabbits, and rodents. An integrated multi-disciplinary approach will be used to highlight the importance and interrelatedness of all aspects of clinical practice (medicine, surgery, anaesthesia, behaviour, pharmacology and diagnostic imaging) in case management. Consideration of the responsibilities of small animal clinicians with regard to infection control, zoonoses and public health in the context of clinical practice will form part of this unit. The unit will provide grounding in the basic principles of diagnosis and treatment of urogenital, neurological, ophthalmological, cardiorespiratory, endocrinological, musculoskeletal, behavioural, alimentary, dermatological, haematological and oncological conditions. It focuses on developing the students' day one skills and professional attitude required for their clinical placements. Practical classes and small group learning will be included in the teaching of this unit to allow students to develop clinical thinking, practical skills and communication proficiencies.
Textbooks
Students will be directed by teaching staff to required texts
VETS6310 Livestock Practice B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof John House Session: Semester 2 Classes: activities will vary weekly, but will be a mix of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6304 Assessment: intra-semester theory exam (40%), end-of-semester theory and practical exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Livestock Practice will develop deep learning approaches to solving problems of ruminant (mainly bovine, but also ovine and caprine) production, and reproduction. In addition to lectures and practical classes, it uses a case-based approach to deliver group case studies on-line for student presentations, known as TILHAP's (teaching innovations in livestock health and production). These cases require integration of pathological and epidemiological investigative skills to provide evidence based solutions in the management of disease and productivity problems in a 'whole farm' setting. The course is designed to advance student learning in preparation for the intramural and extramural clinical placements encountered in final year. The practical classes will continue to build the confidence of students in handling large animals in rural mixed and public practice settings.
VETS6311 Equine Practice B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg Session: Semester 2 Classes: tutorials and case discussions, independent study Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6305 Assessment: mid-semester scenario-based essay (20%), mid-semester oral presentation of written assignment (pass/fail), end-of-semester practical examination (pass/fail), end-of-semester case-based theory written examination (80%) Practical field work: Practical classes and demonstrations, Workplace training at the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden (UVTHC) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Equine Practice A and B will assist students in developing the knowledge, skills and attitudes relevant to equids required of a 'day-one' graduate in rural mixed practice. These units of study will provide the foundations for equine and mixed practice clinical placements in DVM Year 4. Equine Practice B will build on the content of DVM Years 1 and 2, VETS6302 Clinical Foundations, and VETS6305 Equine Practice A, and will expose students to a wide range of aspects of equine practice using a case-based pedagogic approach.
Textbooks
Equine Clinical Medicine, Surgery and Reproduction, Munroe, G and Weese, S (eds), Manson, 2011.
VETS6312 Intensive Animal Practice

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Hick Session: Semester 2 Classes: activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6302 Assessment: mid-semester theory-based case studies (30%), mid-semester practical class evaluations (15%) (5% each for aquaculture, pigs, and poultry), end-of-semester written theory examination (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will provide students with an understanding of the major factors driving the profitability and sustainability of fish, poultry and pig industries. The emphasis is on epidemiology, management and preventive medicine, with Page 6 consideration given to welfare aspects of intensively housed animals.which are essential knowledge and skills required for a sound approach to identifying and solving health problems and improving production and welfare. Students will be equipped with the approaches required to practice veterinary medicine across the entire range of contexts in intensive animal industries. The focus will be on disease and health management in the context of Australian production systems with an awareness of exotic diseases and different diseases in these industries at an international level. The general principles of health and disease of the relevant species learnt previously will be developed into a sound approach to clinical practice. Clinical skills and diagnostic modalities including pathology specific to the intensive animal will be developed. The course will expand beyond individual animal medicine to integrated health and production management and regulatory roles for health professionals for diseases of significance to regulation, human health and trade.
VETS6313 Research and Enquiry 3B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Michael Ward, A/Prof Jan Slapeta Session: Semester 2 Classes: individual and group consultation with advisor and advisors, respectively; independent study on professionally focused project Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Assessment: manuscript on professionally focused project evaluated by advisor and reviewed by assessor (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit forms the second and final part of a capstone experience in which the student will systematically investigate a topic to test a hypothesis under the guidance of a research advisor and peers under independent review. The unit is a logical progression from VETS6307. The cap-stone experience project will culminate in preparation of a manuscript in the style of an appropriate scientific journal and present the results of the investigation in either an oral or poster presentation to peers and faculty. Literature reviews are not acceptable.

Year 4 has the following 48 credit point structure:

VETS6401 Small Animal Clinics A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Gina Davis Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week clinical rotation specifically in the fields of primary accession and emergency medicine at the UVTHS Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form, activity log, skills log, communication task, individual summative examination Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: The majority of the unit of study will involve practical work in the form of clinical practice, facilitated in a rotational format. Students will be involved in the handling, examination, diagnostic procedures and treatment of various small animal species.
This unit of study will provide students with essential experience and training in the management of emergency cases and the care of hospitalised patients at the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Sydney (UVTHS). Students will have the opportunity to practice clinically-relevant techniques such as history taking, physical examination, diagnostic sample collection, interpretation of radiographs and ultrasound, medical record keeping, critical analysis of case-related information, development and implementation of treatment plans and evaluation of outcomes. The focus will be on triage and care of cases presenting in an emergency situation. In addition, students will intergrate various learning activities to effectively diagnose and treat patients and develop skills to enhance the client-veterinarian and veterinarian-patient relationship and form effective collegial teams.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6402 Small Animal Clinics B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laurencie Brunel Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week practicum; tutorials; self-directed learning activities Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form, activity log, skills log, communication task, individual summative examination Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: This unit of study involved four weeks of practical clinical experience at the UVTHS, focusing on developing clinical knowledge and skills in the area of veterinary anaesthesia.
This unit of study is designed to provide student interns with essential exposure to and experience in small anaesthesia and surgery. This study forms a placement which is part of an integrated approach to the delivery of small animal practice related content over the four years of the DVM programme, the over-arching aim of which is to prepare DVM graduates with the day-one knowledge, skills and attitudes required to succeed in the small animal clinical environment. It will be comprised of two weeks of practical clinical experience in each small animal surgery and anaesthesia. Student interns are involved in the management of a wide variety of cases requiring surgery and /or anaesthesia, from the time of admission until discharge from the hospital. They will be integrated into the daily activities of the anaesthesia and surgery unit. Emphasis will be placed on problem oriented approach to making medical and therapeutic decisions and which integrate judgments based on previous material and evidence-based disease management approaches in the various clinical veterinary science disciplines, as well as laboratory diagnostics.
Textbooks
Tranquilli WJ, Thurmon JC and Grimm KA (2007) Lumb and Jones' Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, 4th Edition, Wiley-Blackwell Hall WL, Clarke KW and Trim CM (2013) Veterinary Anaesthesia, 11th Edition, Harcourt Publishers Ltd. King LG and Boag A (2007) BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Emergency and Critical care, 2nd Edition, BSAVA
VETS6403 Small Animal Clinics C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Julia Beatty Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: a one-week clinical rotation through the AREPH; a one-week clinical rotation with the diagnostic imaging team at the UVTHS; and a two-week clinical rotation with the medicine tram at the UVTHS Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: individual assessment of clinical capabilities through client communication and interactions, presentations at rounds, and patient care outcomes, assessed daily during the one-week AREPH rotation Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: The majority of the unit of study will involve practical work in the form of clinical practice, facilitated in a rotational format. Students will be involved in the handling, examination, diagnostic procedures and treatment of dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, exotic pets and wildlife.
This unit of study consolidates the theory of avian, reptile, exotic pet and wildlife medicine and surgery, as well as of canine and feline internal medicine and diagnostic imaging, and applies this theory to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in patients presenting to the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Sydney (UVTHS) and the Avian Reptile and Exotic Pet Hospital (AREPH). Case material will be used to develop student's use of the problem-orientated approach in patient assessment. During placements, acquiring appropriate skills in history-taking, physical examination, interpretation of diagnostic imaging modalities and clinicopathological test results, routine clinical procedures and implementation of treatments will be emphasised. Cases will form the basis of interactive collegiate discussions on patient-specific identification and assessment of problems. Student interns will participate in clinical activities, including client communication, collection of samples for diagnostic tests, acquisition of diagnostic images, developing treatment and nutrition plans, routine health management, disease management, management of patients in hospital, and medical record-keeping.
Textbooks
Ettinger SJ and Feldman EC (ed) (2010) Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine: Diseases of the Dog and the Cat 7th Ed. Elsevier Saunders, St Louis. (ISBN: 9781416065937) Additional reference books and online resources will be available during the rotations.
VETS6404 Small Animal Clinics D

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Green Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two-week practical experience Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form, activity/case log, skills log, communication task, individual summative examination Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: The majority of the unit of study will involve practical work in the form of general clinical practice. Students will be involved in the handling, examination, diagnostic procedures and treatment, and wellness management of animals commonly presented in small animals practice.
This unit of study comprises two weeks of blended practical clinical experience. Student interns will be involved in the management of a wide variety of cases such as they are presented to general practice in a non-metropolitan setting. They will apply consultations skills, clinical reasoning, and consolidate knowledge of abnormal and normal presentions to determine animal health. They conduct wellness and preventative health consultation and perform immunisation, and formulate and conduct diagnostic and treatment plans withing the context of general practice. They recognise life threatening and serious conditions and initiate appropriate treatment. Student interns will formulate a rational approach to further investigation or patient referral taking into account owner preferences and financial constraints and they prepare documentation for referring patients. During this placement student interns will solidify knowledge and skills in anaesthesia and surgery by undertaking routine neutring procedures in dogs and cats. Emphasis will be placed on problem oriented approach and on making evidence based medical and therapeutic decisions, which integrate judgments based on previous foundational material including principles and approach to health and disease management.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6405 Large Animal Clinics A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Gaby van Galen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week practical experience, including routine clinical activities, rounds, tutorials, and practical classes Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form, clinical anatomy quiz, attendance and performance at clinical rounds, treatment facilitations, and tutorials, communication task, skills log, activity log, individual summative examination Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Four weeks of practical experience in clinical environments focusing on multiple disciplinary areas required to facilitate effective equine clinical assessment and care.
This unit of study incorporates multiple aspects of equine practice, including anaesthesia, diagnostic imaging, medicine, reproduction and surgery, with a strong focus on the primary care aspects of equine practice. The placement experience includes a range of routine clinical activities, rounds, tutorials and practical classes, designed to provide a balance between clinical and didactic learning opportunities. This placement is part of an integrated approach to the delivery of equine practice related content over the four years of the DVM programme, the over-arching aim of which is to prepare DVM graduates with the day-one knowledge, skills and attitudes required to succeed in the equine clinical environment.
Textbooks
Equine Clinical Medicine, Surgery and Reproduction, Munroe, G and Weese, S (eds), Manson, 2011.
VETS6406 Large Animal Clinics B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Michael Reynolds Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two-week practical experience Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form, attendance and performnance during clinical rounds and tutorials, overnight field trip, communication task, skills log, activity log, individual summative examination Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Two weeks of clinical practical experience in working with livestock, ruminant, and herd populations via the University Livestock Veterinary Service at Camden campus.
The University Livestock Veterinary Service provides routine herd health and medicine services to dairy clients, and a 24-hour amulatory service to local livestock owners. This unit of study will be facilitated within this service through a two-week, livestock and ruminant health focused practical experience. Veterinary student interns will be expected to participate in all facets of the clinic activities. Practical experiences in this unit of study will encompass the further development of problemsolving skills, clinical knowledge and acumen, and technical and commuication skills relevant to conditions found in ruminant species, as wellas laboratory diagnostic and pathophysiological considerations. Practical work will also provide students with important knowledge and experience in dairy production and animal welfare, and in the relationship between ruminant health and food quality and safety relevant to human populations.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6407 Lab Investigations of Clinical Disease

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mark B. Krockenberger Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two intensive weeks of teaching (one based at Camden, one at Camperdown) comprising morning and afternoon laboratory sessions Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: group case report due at the end of each week of the rotation (20%), individual take-home written examination due by the end of the rotation (20%), individual communication task due at the end of each week of the rotation (10%), individual examination to take place at the end of the year (50%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: The unit of study is entirely practical, utilising diagnostic accessions to perform and interpret laboratory testing.
This unit of study provides the capstone experience for the paraclinical disciplines of pathobiology. It focuses on the implementation of a diagnostic approach, utilising the strengths of the disciplines of diagnostic pathology (anatomical and clinical), microbiology, and parasitology, to further develop students' understanding of the utility and limitations of laboratory-based diagnostic tools in clinical practice. The learning context will foster: (1) a scientific, discipline-based systematic approach to apply an understanding of normal function, homeostasis, pathophysiology, mechanisms of health/disease, and the natural history and manifestations of important animal diseases during diagnosis; (2) an understanding of the principles and hands-on experiences in physical and laboratory diagnostic methods and interpretation (including diagnostic pathology, clinical pathology, microbiology, parasitology and necropsy); and (3) an emphasis on problem solving that results in making and applying medical judgments based on sound evidence provided by laboratory-based testing.
Textbooks
No required texts.
VETS6408 Public, Industry, or Community Placement

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jenny-Ann Toribio Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week practical experience rotation, 3-day placement Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form (to be graded either proficient, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory), activity log, skills log, communication task Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Four weeks of practical experience of professional practice as required within a public, industry, or community-based body that serves the public good and/or underprivileged communities that lack regular access to veterinary services directly involved in servicing the livestock industries and/or public health. Students will also undertake a 3-day placement at an export abattoir.
This unit of study enables student interns to identify the importance of veterinarians outside of conventional clinical practice in contributing to animal and human health and wellbeing. The unit involves a four-week rotation with a public or private organisation that serves the public good and/or underprivileged communities that lack regular access to veterinary services. In addition, students will undertake a 3-day placement at an export abattoir. Organisations that may be suitable for this placement include (but are not limited) to those involved with: Animal ethics and animal welfare; Veterinary legislation and animal policy; Veterinary product development; Population health and conservation; Diagnostic services; Zoonoses and food safety; Laboratory and epidemiological research; Outbreak investigation, disease surveillance and response; Animal disease control programs; Community-based animal programs.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6409 Extramural Placement 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Bennett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week period of practical experience in an approved rural or remote practice/placement Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105,VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form (to be graded either proficient, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory), activity log, skills log, communication task Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This unit of study involves placement at a Faculty-approved external rural or remote location linked to the veterinary student intern's career interest area. Suitability of placements will be negotiated between the veterinary intern and the unit of study coordinator. Interns will be under the supervision of an extramural supervisor who will liaise with Faculty, review the aims of the rotation with the intern, and assess the performance of the intern via a standard report form. Interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the placement, typically taking on the role and schedule of a fulltime, supervised veterinary associate. The requirements of this rotation include the completion of the following documents: an introductory letter to the placement at least four weeks prior to the rotation; a site contract; learning agreement form; skills report form; and rotation feedback form. During the rotation interns are expected to participate in three meetings with the extramural supervisor and complete a communication task.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6410 Extramural Placement 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Bennett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week period of practical experience in an approved rural or remote practice/placement Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105,VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form (to be graded either proficient, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory), activity log, skills log, communication task Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This unit of study involves placement at a Faculty-approved external location linked to the veterinary student intern's career interest area. Suitability of placements will be negotiated between the veterinary intern and the unit of study coordinator. Interns will be under the supervision of an extramural supervisor who will liaise with Faculty, review the aims of the rotation with the intern, and assess the performance of the intern via a standard report form. Interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the placement, typically taking on the role and schedule of a full-time, supervised veterinary associate. The requirements of this rotation include the completion of the following documents: an introductory letter to the placement at least four weeks prior to the rotation; a site contract; learning agreement form; skills report form; and rotation feedback form. During the rotation interns are expected to participate in three meetings with the extramural supervisor and complete a communication task.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6411 Extramural Placement 3

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Bennett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week period of practical experience in an approved rural or remote practice/placement Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105,VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form (to be graded either proficient, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory), activity log, skills log, communication task Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This unit of study involves placement at a Faculty-approved external location linked to the veterinary student intern's career interest area. Suitability of placements will be negotiated between the veterinary intern and the unit of study coordinator. Interns will be under the supervision of an extramural supervisor who will liaise with Faculty, review the aims of the rotation with the intern, and assess the performance of the intern via a standard report form. Interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the placement, typically taking on the role and schedule of a full-time, supervised veterinary associate. The requirements of this rotation include the completion of the following documents: an introductory letter to the placement at least four weeks prior to the rotation; a site contract; learning agreement form; skills report form; and rotation feedback form. During the rotation interns are expected to participate in three meetings with the extramural supervisor and complete a communication task.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6412 Extramural Placement 4

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Bennett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week period of practical experience in an approved rural or remote practice/placement Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105,VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form (to be graded either proficient, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory), activity log, skills log, communication task Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This unit of study involves placement at a Faculty-approved external location linked to the veterinary student intern's career interest area. Suitability of placements will be negotiated between the veterinary intern and the unit of study coordinator. Interns will be under the supervision of an extramural supervisor who will liaise with Faculty, review the aims of the rotation with the intern, and assess the performance of the intern via a standard report form. Interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the placement, typically taking on the role and schedule of a full-time, supervised veterinary associate. The requirements of this rotation include the completion of the following documents: an introductory letter to the placement at least four weeks prior to the rotation; a site contract; learning agreement form; skills report form; and rotation feedback form. During the rotation interns are expected to participate in three meetings with the extramural supervisor and complete a communication task.
Textbooks
No texts required.