Bachelor of Medical Science

A. Junior units of study

Candidates are required to complete:
(i) 12 credit points of Junior units of study from the Science Subject Area of Chemistry; and
(ii) 12 credit points of Junior units of study from the Science Subject Area of Mathematics; and
(iii) 12 credit points of Junior units of study from the Science Subject Area of Biology; and
(iv) 12 credit points of Junior units of study from the Science Subject Area of Physics (excluding PHYS1500); or
12 credit points of Junior units of study from the Science Subject Area of Psychology; or
6 credit points of Junior Physics (excluding PHYS1500) and 6 credit points of Junior Psychology.

B. Intermediate units of study

Candidates are required to complete 36 credit points of Intermediate core units of study.
These may all be taken in Year 2 of a standard candidature, or as BMED(2401, 2402, 2404 and 2405) in Year 2 and BMED(2403 and 2406) in Year 3, as shown in the sample enrolment tables.
BMED2401 Cellular Foundations of Medical Sciences

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Suzanne Ollerenshaw Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week; 2-3 hours of practical or tutorial classes per week Prerequisites: 30 credit points from [12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX)] Prohibitions: ANAT2008 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or ANAT2011 or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or BIOL2006 or BIOL2029 or BIOL2929 OR BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BIOL2906 or IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or NUTR2911 or NUTR2912 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2906 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam (60%), four in-semester assessments (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Faculty of Science (with the cooperation of the Faculty of Medicine), Coordinated by the Discipline of Anatomy and Histology
This unit of study provides a basis for understanding cell structure and function, and response to drugs. It begins with a discussion of the characteristics of micro-organisms (bacteria, fungi and viruses) followed by the structure and function of human cells. Basic cell structure is examined by focussing on cell specialization and tissue organization in humans. The fundamentals of metabolism are introduced, in particular, the chemical reactions that are responsible for fuel processing. The molecular basis of drug action will then be discussed. Students will be introduced to the role of enzymes in the catalysis of cellular reactions and the pharmacological strategies employed to exploit our knowledge of these mechanisms. Intracellular signalling, cell to cell signalling, and pharmacological intervention in these processes are covered. To conclude this unit of study gives an introduction into embryology and how gene expression is regulated during development. Practical classes not only complement the lecture material but also introduce students to a wide range of technical skills. In addition, the sessions are designed to provide students with generic skills such as record keeping, data collection and presentation, protocol planning and written communication.
Textbooks
Histology: Histology- a text and atlas- Ross and Pawlina, 6th Edition;
BMED2402 Nerve and Muscle

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tina Hinton Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures and 2-4 hrs prac/tut per week. Prerequisites: 30 credit points from [12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX)] Prohibitions: ANAT2008 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2011 ANAT2910 or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or BIOL2006 or BIOL2016 or BIOL2906 or BIOL2916 or BMED2806 or IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2022 or MICR2921 or MICR2922 or NUTR2911 or NUTR2912 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2906 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study begins with a description and analysis of the basic anatomical organization of the musculoskeletal and nervous (central and peripheral) systems. The structure and function of excitable cells, muscle and nerve, will lead to a discussion of membrane potential, synaptic transmission and neuromuscular junction. After consideration of the mechanisms of contraction, the way in which nerve signals are integrated and coordinated are covered in more detail. The receptors involved in normal modes of communications are discussed, This is complemented by an introduction to nervous system pharmacology, focusing on the autonomic nervous system and central nervous system, with special reference to pain and analgesia. An appreciation is gained of how toxins and infections can disturb normal neuromuscular coordination and nervous system function. Thus, pharmacological and pathological considerations are studied with relevance to the anatomical, histological and physiological concepts. Special senses such as vision and hearing are also introduced. In practical classes, students perform experiments to illustrate the functioning of motor control, coordination and the senses. In addition, students extend their anatomical and histological expertise by examining prosections and prepared microscope slides. Practical classes also include the effects of analgesics on experimental pain and case studies of tetanus and botulism. Sessions are also designed to nurture experimental design, hypothesis testing and data analysis skills.
Textbooks
Human Physiology: An integrated approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013; The Anatomy Coloring Book Kapit W and Elson LM Benjamin Cummings, 4th Edition, 2015; Gray's Anatomy for Students Drake RL, Vogl W and Mitchell AWM Elsevier, 3rd Edition 2014; Prescott's Microbiology Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ McGraw-Hill, 9th Edition, 2014; Histology: A text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 7th Edition, 2015; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012; Rang and Dale's Pharmacology Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM, Flower RJ and Henderson G Churchill Livingstone, 8th Edition, 2015; Robbins Basic Pathology Kumar V, Abbass AK and Aster J Elseview/Saunders, Philadelphia, 9th Edition, 2013.
BMED2403 Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Cameron Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lec, 1 tut/prac per week Prerequisites: 30 credit points from [12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX)] Prohibitions: ANAT2008 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 or ANAT2011 or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or BIOL2006 or BIOL2016 or BIOL2906 or BIOL2916 or BMED2803 or IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or NUTR2911 or NUTR2912 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2906 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%) Practical field work: One prac per week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems and the many processes responsible for the maintenance of homeostasis in the human body. The structure and function of the cardiovascular system is discussed and cardiac output, blood pressure and blood flow are studied. This is complemented by discussion of cardiovascular pathology and pharmacological intervention. Discussion of the respiratory system includes the structure of the respiratory organs, the mechanics of breathing, control of respiration, and description of the mechanism of gas exchange. Specifically, the actions of drugs for asthma are discussed and the pathology of obstructive versus restrictive airways disease examined. The unit of study then extends the students learning to pathogenic microbes involved in infectious diseases of the respiratory system. Practical classes are designed to nurture the same generic attributes taught in BMED2401 and BMED2402, and students are additionally introduced to a further range of technical skills.
Textbooks
Human Physiology: An integrated approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013; The Anatomy Coloring Book Kapit W and Elson LM Benjamin Cummings, 4th Edition, 2015; Gray's Anatomy for Students Drake RL, Vogl W and Mitchell AWM Elsevier, 3rd Edition 2014; Histology: A text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 7th Edition, 2015; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012; Rang and Dale's Pharmacology Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM, Flower RJ and Henderson G Churchill Livingstone, 8th Edition, 2015.
BMED2404 Microbes, Infection and Immunity

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jim Manos Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one practical per week, two tutorials Prerequisites: 30 credit points from [12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX)] Prohibitions: ANAT2008 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2011 or ANAT2910 or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or BIOL2006 or BIOL2016 or BIOL2906 or BIOL2916 or BMED2807 or BMED2904 or IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2022 or MICR2921 or MICR2922 or NUTR2911 or NUTR2912 or PCOL2011 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (60%), in-semester assessments (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study begins by introducing the concepts of disease transmission, pathogenicity and virulence mechanisms of microbes. For a full understanding of the process of infection, the structure and function of pathogenic microorganisms is examined. How the body deals with injury and infection is discussed by exploring barriers to infection and host response once those barriers are breached. The body's response to such physical damage is dealt with in a series of lectures on wound healing, clotting and inflammation, and is complemented by discussion of the pharmacological basis of anti-inflammatory drugs. This is followed by a comprehensive discussion of molecular and cellular immune responses to pathogen invasion. In particular, this gives students an appreciation of the processing of antigens, the structure, production and diversity of antibodies, the operation of the complement system and mechanisms for recognition and destruction of invading microbes. The unit concludes with an overview of microbial diseases, the characteristics of causative agents, pathogenesis and symptoms as well as treatment and control and culminates with exploring current issues of antibiotic resistance, important emerging infections and vaccination strategies.

Practical classes illustrate and underpin the lecture content. Students will investigate normal flora, host defences and medically important microbes and will obtain experience in, and an understanding of, a range of techniques in bacteriology. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes.
Textbooks
Prescott's Microbiology Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ McGraw-Hill, 10th Edition, 2016
BMED2405 Gut and Nutrient Metabolism

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Collyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one tutorial or one practical session per week Prerequisites: 30 credit points from [12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX)] Prohibitions: ANAT2008 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2011 or ANAT2910 or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or BIOL2006 or BIOL2016 or BIOL2906 or BIOL2916 or BMED2807 or BMED2904 or IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2022 or MICR2921 or MICR2922 or NUTR2911 or NUTR2912 or PCOL2011 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (60%), five in-semester assignments/assessments (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines in detail the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract, from the oral cavity to anal canal, and includes the liver, gallbladder and pancreas. This is complemented by description of the specialised cells in the gastrointestinal tract, followed by discussion of the transport mechanisms employed to absorb nutrients, and consideration of control systems used to regulate activity of the digestive process. The role of intestinal microflora in the gastrointestinal tract, contributing to both beneficial digestion and absorption of nutrients, as well as to pathogenic disruption, is also discussed. The fate of the macronutrients (carbohydrate, fat and protein) is then considered in terms of their uptake, disposal and reassembly into storage fuels and cellular structures. The biochemical pathways involved in the extraction of energy from the macronutrient fuels are then covered. Examples of these metabolic processes are provided by considering fuel selection during starvation and in diabetes. Finally, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics are explored, with discussion of the metabolism and absorption of drugs including detoxification and excretion of xenobiotic compounds. Practical classes give students extensive experience with inspection of the gastrointestinal system at both the cellular and gross anatomical levels, and in theassay of biochemicals such as glucose. These sessions are designed to nurture observation, data analysis, record keeping and report writing skills.
Textbooks
Human Physiology: An integrated approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013
BMED2406 Hormones, Kidney and Reproduction

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec, 1 tut Prerequisites: 30 credit points from [12cp from CHEM1XXX and 12cp from MATH1XXX and 12cp from (BIOL1XXX, MBLG1XXX)] Prohibitions: ANAT2008 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2011 or ANAT2910 or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or BIOL2006 or BIOL2016 or BIOL2906 or BIOL2916 or BMED2805 or IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2022 or MICR2921 or MICR2922 or NUTR2912 or NUTR2911 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2906 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%) Practical field work: One prac per week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines hormonal regulation of human body functions, including metabolism, growth and development, tissue function, and mood. Specifically, students will investigate the structure and function of endocrine glands, such as the pituitary, adrenal, thyroid and pancreas, at the cellular and gross anatomical level. The fundamentals of the feedback systems which are mediated via the hypothalamus and pituitary gland are discussed, in particular, the adrenal, gonadal and thyroid axes. Students will then cover the structure and function of the renal system at both the cellular and gross anatomical level. The fundamental homeostatic processes of the kidney, such as electrolyte, water and acid-base regulation of extracellular fluid, are explored. This unit of study also gives an introduction to the reproductive system, at both the anatomical and histological levels. The hormones involved in reproduction, contraception, fertilization and pregnancy are discussed, leading on to an overview of pharmacological interventions in contraception. In the practical classes, students will investigate the structure and function of the endocrine glands, will perform a glucose tolerance test to investigate how glucose levels are regulated, and will undertake investigation of the effects of diuretics. In addition, sessions are designed to nurture oral presentation skills, hypothesis testing and data analysis.
Textbooks
Textbook of Biochemistry with Clinical Correlations Devlin TM John Wiley and Sons Inc., 7th Edition, 2011; The Anatomy Coloring Book Kapit W and Elson LM Benjamin Cummings, 4th Edition, 2015; Gray's Anatomy for Students Drake RL, Vogl W and Mitchell AWM Elsevier, 3rd Edition 2014; Histology: A text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 7th Edition, 2015; Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012; Rang and Dale's Pharmacology Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM, Flower RJ and Henderson G Churchill Livingstone, 8th Edition, 2015.
In addition, candidates may take Intermediate units of study from Table I for which they have satisfied the prerequisites.
However, candidates are prohibited from taking the following units of study due to substantive overlap in content with the Intermediate core units of study:
(i) intermediate units of study offered by the School of Medical Sciences (exceptions listed below); and
(ii) IMMU2101; and
(iii) BIOL2016/2916; BIOL2029/2929; MICR2021/2921; MICR2022/2922; MICR2024; BCHM2072/2972
Exceptions - The following intermediate units offered by the School of Life and Environmental Sciences and the School of Medical Sciences are permissible:
ANAT2009 Comparative Primate Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Coordinator: Dr Denise Donlon Associate Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures Prerequisites: 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX OR MEDS1X01 OR PSYC1XXX OR ARCA1XXX Assessment: Two quizzes (10%), theory exam (60%), practical exam (30%). Practical field work: One 2-hour practical per week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of student covers the musculo-skeletal anatomy of the human body with particular emphasis on human evolution and comparisons with apes and fossil hominids. The topics covered include the versatility of the human hand, in manipulation and locomotion, bipedalism, climbing and brachiation in apes, and the change in pelvic anatomy associated with bipedalism and obstetric consequences.
Textbooks
Kapit, W and Elson, LM 2014 The Anatomy Coloring Book. Addison-Wesley. 4th edition
BCMB2002 Proteins in Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2902 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quiz, final exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. Our practicals, other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for protein biochemistry ranging from protein visualization, quantification, purification and enzymatic activity, to in silico studies and cellular targeting experiments. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the cellular and molecular biosciences.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
BCMB2902 Proteins in Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2002 Assessment: Assignment, skills-based assessment, quiz, exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. There will be a research-focused approach to the advanced practical component, including real and virtual extensions to key experiments. This approach will continue in the lecture series with several unique advanced lectures covering current research topics. You will further investigate a selected area of interest from these topics using original source material and present your findings through an oral presentation in dedicated advanced tutorials.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes and presentation (50%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Sharp Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, final exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan and carry out a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.
Textbooks
TBA
PCOL2012 Pharmacology: Drugs and People

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hilary Lloyd Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures (2x1 hr per week); wet and dry labs (5 x 4 hrs), data analysis tutorials (2 x 2 hrs); workshops (6 x 2 hrs) Prerequisites: 6cp from CHEM1XXX Prohibitions: PCOL2555 Assumed knowledge: (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XX1) and PCOL2011 Assessment: In-semester (40%), which consists of 4 x on-line quizzes, 2 x lab reports, 3 x research topics, 1 x oral presentation, end-of-semester examination (60%), which consists of multiple choice and short answer questions Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines four important areas of Pharmacology: (1) Principles of drug action in the nervous system; (2) Drug abuse, addiction and analgesia; (3) Drug treatment of allergies and GI disorders; (4) Introduction to drug discovery and development. The delivery of material involves lectures, practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. Practical classes provide students with the opportunity of acquiring technical experience and teamwork skills. Problem-based workshops are based on real-life scenarios of drug use in the community. These workshops require students to apply information obtained in lectures and readings in order to 'solve' the problems. Workshop activities will include oral presentations.
Textbooks
Rang and Dale's Pharmacology, 8th Edition. H. P. Rang, J. M. Ritter, R. J. Flower, and G. Henderson, (Elsevier 2015 ). Medical Pharmacology at a Glance, 7th edn M.J. Neal: (Blackwell Scientific Publications, 2012).

C. Senior units of study

Candidates are required to take a minimum of 12 credit points of Senior units of study from the subject areas of: Anatomy, Applied Medical Science, Biology (Genetics) (i.e. BIOL3018/3918, BIOL3026/3926), Biochemistry, Cell Pathology, Histology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, Neuroscience, Nutrition and Metabolism, Pharmacology, Physiology, Virology.
Note: INFD3012 is only available to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Medical Science degree and does not contribute to a major listed in Table I.
INFD3012 Infectious Diseases

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jamie Triccas Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 4 hour practical class per week. Prerequisites: BMED2404 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11 Assessment: Formal examination (60%): one 2 hour exam. Progressive assessment (40%): includes tutorial case presentation, mid-semester quiz and practical assessment. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Infectious diseases occur as a result of interactions between a host and a microbial parasite. This unit of study will explain how infectious agents interact with human hosts at the molecular, cellular, individual patient and community levels to cause diseases and how the hosts attempt to combat these infections. The unit will be taught by the discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology of the Department of Medicine within the Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine with involvement of associated clinical and research experts who will contribute lectures and theme sessions on their own special interests. The unit will integrate lectures with clinical case studies and hands-on practical sessions to provide students with current knowledge of infectious diseases.
Textbooks
Infectious Diseases: Pathogenesis, Prevention and Case Studies. Edited by Shetty et al. Wiley-Blackwell 2009. ISBN 9781405135436.

D. Majors

A complete list of available majors is set out in Table I. Of these, the majors available in medical science discipline areas are: Anatomy and Histology*, Applied Medical Science (Transitional Provision), Biochemistry*, Cell Pathology, Immunobiology*, Microbiology*, Molecular Biology and Genetics*, Neuroscience*, Nutrition and Metabolism, Pharmacology* and Physiology*.
* indicates a major in this area is also available at the advanced level

E. Study in other faculties

A total of 12 credit points of units of study from non-science discipline areas may be counted towards the Bachelor of Medical Science degree. Students should consult the handbooks from other faculties to determine any prerequisites, corequisites or other requirements relating to enrolment in units of study offered by departments in these faculties.
Note: Students may not enrol in BUSS1020, ECMT1010, ENVX1001, STAT1021, or any other unit of study deemed mutually exclusive with units of study listed in Table I.

F. Honours units of study

The units of study required to undertake Honours in the Bachelor of Medical Science degree are provided in Table I.
Note: Honours in the subject area of Infectious Diseases is only available to students enrolled in the the Bachelor of Medical Science degree. Its units are listed below. These Honours units of study designated as A, B, C, D should be taken in that order, whether a student enrols full-time, part-time or mid-year.
Infectious Diseases
INFD4011 Infectious Diseases Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Carl Feng Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, tutorials, seminars and practicals. Prohibitions: BMED4021 Assessment: Research project, examinations and classwork. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students enrolled in the Honours program study various advanced aspects of Infectious Diseases. The program may include lectures, tutorials, seminars and practicals. They will undertake a research project. Assessment will include the project and may include examinations and classwork.
INFD4012 Infectious Diseases Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Carl Feng Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, tutorials, seminars and practicals. Corequisites: INFD4011 Prohibitions: BMED4022 Assessment: Research project, examinations and classwork. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students enrolled in the Honours programs study various advanced aspects of Infectious Diseases. The program may include lectures, tutorials, seminars and practicals. They will undertake a research project. Assessment will include the project and may include examinations and classwork.
INFD4013 Infectious Diseases Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Carl Feng Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, tutorials, seminars and practicals. Corequisites: INFD4012 Prohibitions: BMED4023 Assessment: Research project, examinations and classwork. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students enrolled in the Honours programs study various advanced aspects of Infectious Diseases. The program may include lectures, tutorials, seminars and practicals. They will undertake a research project. Assessment will include the project and may include examinations and classwork.
INFD4014 Infectious Diseases Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Carl Feng Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, tutorials, seminars and practicals. Corequisites: INFD4013 Prohibitions: BMED4024 Assessment: Research project, examinations and classwork. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students enrolled in the Honours programs study various advanced aspects of Infectious Diseases. The program may include lectures, tutorials, seminars and practicals. They will undertake a research project. Assessment will include the project and may include examinations and classwork.