Bachelor of Science in Agriculture

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The following unit has been cancelled for 2020:

AGEN3008 Indigenous Land and Food Knowledge
30/03/2020

Science in Agriculture

Year 1

Year 1 will have the following 48 credit point structure:
GEOS1001 Earth, Environment and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Sabin Zahirovic, Dr Bree Morgan, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1901 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assessment: Exam (40%), 2000 word essay (25%), practical reports (15%), presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the gateway unit of study for Human Geography, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies and Geology. Its objective is to introduce the big questions relating to the origins and current state of the planet: climate change, environment, landscape formation, and the growth of the human population. During the semester you will be introduced to knowledge, theories and debates about how the world's physical and human systems operate. The first module investigates the evolution of the planet through geological time, with a focus on major Earth systems such as plate tectonics and mantle convection and their interaction with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and human civilisations. The second module presents Earth as an evolving and dynamic planet, investigating global environmental change, addressing climate variability and human impacts on the natural environment and the rate at which these changes occur and how they have the potential to dramatically affect the way we live. Finally, the third module, focuses on human-induced challenges to Earth's future. This part of the unit critically analyses the relationships between people and their environments, with central consideration to debates on population change, resource use and the policy contexts of climate change mitigation and adaptation.
or
GEOS1901 Earth, Environment and Society Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Sabin Zahirovic, Dr Bree Morgan, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1001 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: Exam (40%), 2000 word essay (25%), practical reports (15%), presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1001, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 2 field excursions. Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 2 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
or
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 3 field excursions Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 3 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in an authentic urban biodiversity management research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
or
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, presentations, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours per week of lectures; 2 hours per week of computer tutorials Prohibitions: ENVX1001 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or MATH1115 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 or BUSS1020 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness, and Taronga Wildlife Conservation streams
This is an introductory data science unit for students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It provides the foundation for statistics and data science skills that are needed for a career in science and for further study in applied statistics and data science. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. It has 4 modules; exploring data, modelling data, sampling data and making decisions with data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, ENVX1002 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data.
Textbooks
Statistics, Fourth Edition, Freedman Pisani Purves
ENVI1003 Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, 2-hour computer lab per week, two-day weekend field trip Prohibitions: AGEN1002 Assessment: 2-hour exam (45%), field trip report (20%), group work presentation (25%), GIS reports (10%) Practical field work: Computer practicals and two-day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half, using Australian case studies, we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.
ECON1040 Principles of Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: AGEC1006 or ECON1001 or BUSS1040 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x2hr Final Exam (50%), 2x500wd Written Assignment/Task (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed for students who have an interest in economics and its application to critical issues in everyday life. Students will gain an understanding of how the economy works; how individuals, firms and governments form and shape their decisions using economic principles; and the role of public policy on outcomes including the trade-offs faced in making policy decisions. Students will develop skills to critically analyse real-world issues using the perspective of an economist, and communicate ideas and arguments about economics in a logical, coherent and evidenced based manner.
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes (15%), communication assessments (35%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: quizzes (14%), communication assessments (36%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
or
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week; online material; and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
CHEM1012 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1112 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr lecture; 1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviours, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do we develop lotions that don't burn us, how do we measure UV absorption by sunscreens, how can we measure and alter soil pH, how are sticky things made, and how do we determine the concentration of vitamin C in juice? Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1912 Chemistry 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101) or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Advanced units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B (Advanced) is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A (Advanced). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
or
CHEM1992 Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prerequisites: 75 or above in CHEM1991 or CHEM1903 or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 Assessment: quizzes, assignment, skills-based assessment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Entry is by invitation. This unit of study is deemed to be an Advanced unit of study. Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Special Studies Program units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how food and medicines work, the properties of materials and substances. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as a demonstrated aptitude. Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is restricted to students who have gained a Distinction in Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) or by invitation. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1B and Chemistry 1B (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1B (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)

Year 2

Year 2 will have the following 48 credit point structure:
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 3-hour computer practical per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 or MATH1015 or DATA1001 or DATA1901)] OR [3cp from (MATH1XX1 or MATH1906 or MATH1XX3 or MATH1907) and an additional 3cp from (MATH1XX5)] Assessment: final exam (55%), reports (2 x 10%), ten online quizzes (5% total), group work presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, Food and Agribusiness and Taronga Wildlife Conservation streams
This unit builds on introductory 1st year statistics units and is targeted towards students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It consists of two parts and presents, in an applied manner, the statistical methods that students need to know for further study and their future careers. In the first part the focus is on designed studies including both surveys and formal experimental designs. Students will learn how to analyse and interpret datasets collected from designs from more than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part the focus is on finding patterns in data. In this part the students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression, and find patterns in datasets with many variables using principal components analysis and clustering. This part provides the foundation for the analysis of big data. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the statistical software package R. A key feature of the unit is using R to develop coding skills that are become essential in science for processing and analysing datasets of ever increasing size.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are: Mead R, Curnow RN, Hasted AM (2002) 'Statistical methods in agriculture and experimental biology.' (Chapman and Hall: Boca Raton). Quinn GP, Keough MJ (2002) 'Experimental design and data analysis for biologists.' (Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK).
MICR2031 Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2931 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: written assignment (10%), group oral presentation (20%) and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the earth's trees. This unit of study will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require if you specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology or science education.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
or
MICR2931 Microbiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2031 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: two written assignments (10%, 20%), and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the Earth's trees. In this unit of study you will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Detailed aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require to specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology, or science education. As an Advanced unit, MICR2931 provides increased challenge and academic rigour to develop a greater understanding and depth of disciplinary expertise. You will actively participate in a series of small group tutorials investigating the molecular detail of microbial communication and function, which will culminate in you creating a scientific research report that communicates your understanding of recent research in microbiology.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
SOIL2005 Soil and Water: Earth's Life Support Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Balwant Singh Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures: 3 hours per week; lab: 3 hours per week for 10 weeks Prohibitions: SOIL2003 or LWSC2002 Assessment: Field excursion: attendance and creative assessment (5%), the attendance at the excursion is compulsory to get any mark for this assessment task; quiz: (10%); written assignment: modelling assessment including modelling (15%); laboratory report: group oral presentation and written assignment (20%); final exam: written exam (50%) Practical field work: Approximately eight hours working field at Cobbitty Farm Wk 0 (Friday, 22 Feb 2019) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Soil and water are the two most essential natural resources on the Earth's surface which influence all forms of terrestrial life. This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the fundamental properties and processes of soil and water that affect food security and sustain ecosystems. These properties and processes are part of the grounding principles that underpin crop and animal production, nutrient and water cycling, and environmental sustainability. You will participate in a field excursion to examine soils in a landscape to develop knowledge and understanding of soil properties, water storage, water movement and cycling of organic carbon and nutrients in relation to food production and ecosystem functioning. At the end of this unit you will be able to articulate and quantify the factors and processes that determine the composition and behaviour of soil, composition of water, soil water storage and the movement of water on the land surface. You will also be able to describe the most important properties of soil and water for food production and sustaining ecosystem functions and link this to human and climatic factors. The field excursion, report and laboratory/computer exercises have been designed to develop communication, team work and collaborative efforts.
Textbooks
Brady, N.C. and Ray R. Weil. (2007). The Nature and Properties of Soils. 14th Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey. White, R.E. (2006) Principles and Practice of Soil Science: the Soil as a Natural Resource. 4th ed., Blackwell Science, Oxford. Diana H. Wall, Richard D. Bardgett, Valerie Behan-Pelletier, Jeffrey E. Herrick, T. Hefin Jones, Karl Ritz, Johan Six, Donald R. Strong, and Wim H. van der Putten (Eds.) (2012). Soil Ecology and Ecosystem Services. Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780199575923. Kutllek, M and Nielsen, D.R. (2015). Soil: The Skin of the Planet Earth, Springer, ISBN: 978-94-017-9788-7 (Print) 978-94-017-9789-4 (Online). Gordon, N. D., McMahon, T. A., Finlayson, B. L., Gippel, C. J., and Nathan, R. J. (2004) Stream Hydrology: an Introduction for Ecologists, John Wiley and Sons Inc.
AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Cameron Clark Session: Semester 2 Classes: On average 6 hours per week (lectures and practicals); there will be several whole-day practical classes at the Camden campus Prohibitions: AGEN2006 Assumed knowledge: AGEN1004 or BIOL1XXX or AVBS1003 Assessment: Participation, written assignments, quizzes and end of semester examination Practical field work: There will be several whole day practical classes at the Camden campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the management of animals in natural and man-made environments. At the end of this unit of study, students will understand: the characteristics of the management systems of the major domestic species used for production in Australia and in a world wide context; the characteristics and principles underpinning sustainable management of native animals in natural and man-made environments; an appreciation of the dependence of living organisms upon their environment; an appreciation of indigenous land management and the husbandry practices and innovations that have been adopted by the production industries to retain their competitive advantage; a demonstrated capability in handling and husbandry of the major domestic production animal species, and an appreciation of the application of these skills to non-domestic species; a demonstrated understanding of the importance of high standards of animal welfare practice in the management of animals.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the unit content and for this reason no formal text is required. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course.
BIOL2030 Botany

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lecture/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or BIOL2930 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), anatomy project report and presentation (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to enhance biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes, and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frame works in plant identification, plant physiology, plant anatomy, and plant morphology. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by self-instructional audio-visual sessions and by small group discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. Successful completion of Botany will allow you to contribute to a range of disciplines including: ecology, bioinformatics, molecular and cell biology, genetics and biotechnology, environmental law, agriculture, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2031 Plants and Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 4-hour practical session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2931 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quiz (20%), lab assignment (15%), presentation (15%), exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants grow across a range of environments, influencing form, function and ultimately reproductive success. Being sessile, plants lack the luxury of seeking an alternative 'stress-free lifestyle' and therefore rely on genetic and physical adaptations to survive and reproduce. To understand how a plant can achieve such flexibility requires knowledge of plant structure and the influence of environmental drivers on plant growth and function. In this unit, you will examine the physiological processes controlling plant growth and reproduction linked to environmental constraints. You will understand the relationship between tissue and cellular structure and their underlying role in physiological and metabolic activities, particularly processes involving light capture, photosynthesis, water regulation, nutrient management and metabolite redistribution. Lectures and interactive practicals will together introduce you to plant processes that underpin life on earth. Experimentation and analysis of plant physiological processes will develop a skill base that will lead to a greater understanding and appreciation of common plant processes. As a component of the Plant Science minor and the Plant Production major, BIOL2031 will provide an important platform to extend your interests in plant science and plant related fields across the curriculum.
Textbooks
Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. (2010) Plant Physiology, Fifth Edition. Sinauer Associates. Sunderland, MA.
or
BIOL2931 Plants and Environment (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Brent Kaiser Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures/week; one 4-hour practical/week Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2031 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: On-line quiz (20%), lab assignment (15%), independent project (15%), exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants grow across a range of environments, which influence form, function and ultimately reproductive success. Being sessile, plants lack the luxury of seeking an alternative 'stress-free lifestyle' and therefore rely on genetic and physical adaptations to help survive and reproduce. To understand how a plant can achieve such flexibility requires an understanding of plant structure and the influence that environmental drivers have on plant growth and function. In this unit, you will examine the physiological processes controlling plant growth and reproduction linked to environmental constraints. You will understand the relationship between tissue and cellular structure and their underlying role in physiological and metabolic activities, particularly processes involving light capture, photosynthesis, water regulation, nutrient management and metabolite redistribution. Lectures and interactive practicals will together introduce you to plant processes that we commonly depend upon for food production, and plant related materials. Experimentation and analysis of plant physiological processes will develop a skill base that will lead to a greater understanding and appreciation of common plant processes that guide plant growth. As a component of the Plant Science minor, this unit will provide an important platform to extend your interests in plant science and plant-related fields, including ecology, cell biology, genetics, breeding, agriculture, molecular biology, environmental law, education and the arts. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as BIOL2031 but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in BIOL2931 participate in alternative components, which include a separate practical stream. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Resources required by the unit will be provided on the Blackboard learning management page for the unit. Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. (2010) Plant Physiology, Fifth Edition. Sinauer Associates. Sunderland, MA.
BIOL2033 Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tanya Latty Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 3-hour practical sessions a weekly basis Prohibitions: ENTO2001 Assessment: Practical test (10%), insect collection (30%), insect display (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Insects are the most abundant and diverse group of animals on earth; beetles alone account for 25% of animal life. Insects impact almost every facet of the ecosystem and our lives. Many insects play valuable and essential roles in pollinating different plant species, in predating and controlling insect pests and in recycling nutrients. Other insects are harmful and are the vectors for major diseases such as plague, malaria and recently emerged viral disease Zika. This unit will provide students with a broad introduction to entomology including insect evolution, ecology, anatomy and physiology. Students will learn applied entomological topics such as sustainable insect management in agricultural ecosystems, medical and veterinary entomology, insect-inspired technologies, and insects as a future food source for both livestock and humans. This theoretical background will be complemented by training in how to use and evaluate a range of identification tools such as lucid and traditional dichotomous keys that enable you to identify and classify major groups of insects. Practical classes will allow you to develop your identification, classification and preservation skills though examination of boxes of 'mystery insects' and through creating a museum-quality insect collection. Students will also learn procedures for caring and rearing live insects. By the end of the unit you will be well prepared to work in fields that require entomological skills.
Textbooks
Info will be made available via Canvas. Keys will be available in practical classes and in the lab Manual
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week; one 3-hour practical session per week; and one tutorial per fortnight Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics; mechanisms of evolution; molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance; and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes and presentation (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
or
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week; one 3-hour practical session per week; and one tutorial per fortnight Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and/or in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.
GEGE2X01 is intended to be taken in semester 2

Year 3

Year 3 will have the following structure: a core (24 credit points) of
FOOD3002 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Foods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Roberts Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 2x1 hr/week for 13 weeks; pre-lab 1x1 hr/week for 6 weeks; practical class 1x3 hr/week for 6 weeks Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: AGCH3025 or AFNR5102 or AGCH3024 Assumed knowledge: Equivalent to 1st-year Biology plus 2nd-year chemistry/biochemistry: -biology, chemistry, biochemistry -Carbohydrates, proteins (including enzymes), lipids -Principles of cellular metabolism Assessment: 6 x short answer assignment (30%), 3 x lab reports (15%), 2 x short answer lab exercises (10%), video presentation (5%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The molecular basis of foods is a critical aspect of food science. FOOD3002 investigates the (bio)chemical properties of food constituents, as well as the interactions between these constituents during food processing, storage, cooking and digestion. You will develop an understanding of the relationship between form and functionality of food constituents and the concept of quality in converting agricultural products into foods. You will gain an appreciation of the relationship between chemical composition and properties of macro-constituents (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids) and micro-constituents (vitamins, minerals, flavour and antinutritional chemicals) and their functions in plant- and animal-based foods. FOOD3002 will enable you to develop research and inquiry skills and an analytical approach to understand the (bio)chemistry of foods and food processing. You will gain experience in laboratory techniques used in industry and research for the analysis of a range of food products, as well as developing information literacy and communication skills, through the preparation of written and in-lab assignments, practical reports and the creation of a short video. On completing this unit, you will be able to describe the (bio)chemical properties of food constituents and demonstrate an understanding of the functionality of these constituents in food processing and nutrition.
BIOL3019 Plant Protection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Brett Whelan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/week; practical/tutorial 2 hrs/week. 2 x 4 hr field excursions. Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or AGEN2001 or AGEN2005 Prohibitions: PPAT3003 Assessment: You will be assessed though submission of a written IPM Case study 60% (20% each for weeds, insects, diseases), an oral presentation on the IPM case study (10%) and quizzes after the disease, insect and weed sections of the course (30%i.e. 3 x 10%) Practical field work: 1 x 4hr field work in crop Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants are fundamentally important to human food, fibre and energy requirements, but global productivity is reduced by an estimated 40% by pest (disease, insect and weed) pressures. The impact of these production losses is increasing as demand grows for greater food, fibre and energy production. This unit on Plant Protection focuses on the development and adoption of integrated crop management processes to control plant pathogens, insects and weeds. The advantages and disadvantages of biological, cultural, physical and chemical control methods are explored using examples from agro-ecosystems. You will develop a comparative case study of integrated pest management (IPM) for a particular crop that considers all three pest groups and present a seminar about this case study. You will learn the principles of healthy plant production, the ecology of diseases, insects and weeds and integrated approaches to manage these pests. Completing this unit of study will provide you with the skills required to identify important pest management issues and critically assess requirements for optimum intervention plans.
Textbooks
There will be a Canvas site for this unit, where resources will be supplied and reference materials suggested relevant to the course as it progresses.General textbooks for the unit are: Pedigo LP and Rice ME. 2009. Entomology and Pest Management. 6th edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, New Jersey. Schumann GL and Darcy CJ. 2010. Essential Plant Pathology (2nd ed.). APS Press, St Paul, Minn., USA. Sindel BM (Ed) (2000). Australian Weed Management Systems. R.G. and F.J. Richardson, Melbourne.
AGRI2001 Plant Management in Agroecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Brett Whelan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures two hours per week; tutorial three hours per week; three one day field trips Prohibitions: AGRO3004 Assumed knowledge: Understanding of experimental design and analysis including dependent and independent variables, random and representative sampling, t-tests a simple designs and interpretation of univariate analysis. Assessment: Quizzes, practical report, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
World population is projected to reach 9 billion within 50 years and food production needs to double in a sustainable manner in order to feed human population. This profound challenge will be met by improving our knowledge and management of agroecosystems. This unit of study is designed to provide an introductory understanding of the biology and management of plants in dryland agroecosystems, with a focus on major Australian broad acre crops. Dryland agroecosystems can be defined as ecosystems modified for the purpose of producing crops, pastures and animals in environments where water limits productivity during part of the year (and are typical in Australian agriculture). These agroecosystems are characterised by regular agricultural interventions, such as cultivation, sowing, nutrient, weed, pest and disease management, and harvest. The program will involve developing an understanding of the interactions between the environment, crops/pastures and agricultural management in dryland agroecosystems. The model for describing and analysing agroecosystems will be centred on a typical cropping cycle, with an emphasis on cereals. You will gain knowledge and skills on crop physiological, growth and development responses to the combined climatic, edaphic, biotic and management factors in the growing environment. The unit will also provide a sound understanding and analysis of the practical farming framework in which this knowledge is applied through weed, disease and pest management, approaches to managing climate variability and precision agriculture. There will be a focus on assessing the effects of climate and weather in dryland agroecosystems, especially on understanding crop-water-nutrition relationships. Successful students will be able to appreciate and analyse the most important limitations to crop production and yield in Australia and how those limitations can be minimized or overcome through science-based planning and agronomic management practices.
Textbooks
Pratley J (Ed.) (2003) Principles of Field Crop Production. 4th edition. Oxford University Press: Melbourne, Australia. Marschner P (Ed) (2012) Marschner's Mineral Nutrition of Higher Plants, 3rd edition. Elsevier, London Anderson WK, Garlinge JR (Eds) (2000) The Wheat Book. Department of Agriculture Western Australia: South Perth, Australia. Whelan, B.M., Taylor, J.A. (2013) Precision Agriculture for Grain Production Systems. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, Australia. Pearson CJ, Ison RL (1998) Agronomy of Grassland Systems. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, New York, Melbourne.
SOIL3888 Protecting the Soil Resource

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4 hrs/week; some weeks 2 hrs lect, 2 hrs prac, other weeks 4 hrs prac Prerequisites: 12cp from (GEOS2X16 or SOIL2005 or ENSC2001 or BIOL2032 or BIOL2X31) Prohibitions: SOIL2004 Assessment: Status of the problem report (500-1000 words, individual work) - 10%; Consultants' report (2000-3000 words, group work) - 35%; Consultants' presentation (30 mins, group work) - 20%; Viva voce examination (20 mins per student) - 35% Practical field work: Between 2 and 5 days of soil survey/soil sampling in regional or peri-urban NSW Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The University of Sydney's new curriculum aims to provide increased experiential, collaborative and interdisciplinary learning and project-based learning is a core component of this. The SOIL3888 interdisciplinary project unit provides an opportunity for you to be part of an interdisciplinary student team that investigates a real world problem involving soil inregional or peri-urban NSW. Each student will select to work on a project related to agriculture or to the environment. Both projects will involve 2-5 days of fieldwork for soil observation and sampling. Students will work collaboratively in a series of practical sessions (before and after the fieldwork) to digitally map soil attributes, and to critically analyse all collected and mapped data. Each project group will then compile a 'consultant's report' for the landholder(s), detailing the issue or problem, the diagnosis and the recommended management strategies to optimize crop production/ecosystem services, while protecting the soil resource. For all students enrolled in SOIL3888, the fieldwork and practical sessions will be scaffolded with a series of lectures covering the high capability agricultural soils of eastern Australia and the various forms of soil degradation that must be managed for to protect our valuable soil resources. The project experience in this unit will give you the opportunity to apply your soil science skills and disciplinary knowledge (Graduate Quality 1) to an authentic problem and develop the other Graduate Qualities (2-6) that will be valuable for your future career.
And 24 credit points from Table D.

Table D - Year 3 Electives

AFNR3001 Agro-ecosystems in Developing Countries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 18 days fieldtrip before the start of semester 1, online tutorials Assessment: Participation (20%), research topic proposal (20%), oral presentation (20%), major report (40%) Practical field work: One 18 day field school Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides students with a direct contact with the agricultural reality of a developing country through a fieldtrip. Active learning in the field through contacts with farmers, public servants, cooperatives, private firms and NGOs should then motivate a critical reflection on the constraints to agricultural development in these environments.
The fieldtrip will be organized around central themes (for example, technology adoption, sustainable use of resources, access to credit, land use change) that will be introduced in a short series of seminars (held on main campus ahead of the departure and intended to provide a first introduction to some of the questions that are expected to be addressed in the field) and will constitute the focus of group work once back to main campus.
Although there are no formal prerequisites, the unit is directed to students that have completed most of the second year units in their degrees.
N.B. Department permission required for enrolment. Please note that, in practice, this unit will run prior to the start of semester 1 with all classes and the fieldtrip being scheduled during that period.
ANSC3102 Animal Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Simon de Graaf Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hours per week, tutorials 1 hour per week, practicals 3 hours per week; there will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Prerequisites: AVBS1002 and AVBS2XXX Assumed knowledge: A background in animal anatomy and physiology Assessment: Written and oral assignments (30%), mid-semester practical exam (15%), end of semester written exam (55%) Practical field work: There will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a comprehensive programme on basic and applied aspects of male and female reproductive biology, with particular emphasis on livestock and domestic animals. The fundamental topics include reproductive cycles, sexual differentiation, gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, gestation and parturition. An understanding of the applications of advanced reproductive technologies is developed through lectures, tutorials and the assignments. In addition, practical instruction is given on semen collection and processing, manipulation of the reproductive cycle, artificial insemination, and pregnancy diagnosis in sheep and pigs. Classes are held at the Camperdown Campus in Sydney and at the Camden Campus Animal Reproduction Unit and Mayfarm piggery.
Textbooks
Senger, PL 2013, Pathways to pregnancy and parturition 3rd ed., Current Conceptions Inc
AVBS2007 Animal Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter White Session: Semester 1 Classes: Most weeks students will attend 3 x 1 hour lectures and a 2 hour practical, tutorial or group session. Some 2 hour sessions will involve a mixture of tasks and may contain additional lectures. Prerequisites: 6cp from BIOL1XXX Prohibitions: ANSC3103 or ANSC3104 Assessment: This unit will include a combination of on-line (10%) quiz, individual (25%) and group (20%) assignments, intra-semester examination (15%) and final examination (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animals kept for food and companionship, are diverse and beautifully complex. In this Unit, you will develop an understanding of the structure and function of domestic animals with an emphasis on the systems relevant to animal scientists. The unit begins with the anatomy and physiology of domestic animals cell and basic tissue structure and an overview of homeostatic control systems. This is followed by a more in-depth study of the other body systems. An understanding of the normal functioning of these systems allows identification of how these systems can be influenced by animal management and the animals' environment. At the completion of this unit you will develop; a rich understanding of the relationships between body systems and structure, broad skills of critical thinking and communication, appreciating the links between structure and function and their relevance to abnormal function and animal disease that will be further developed in applied studies in animal nutrition, animal behaviour, welfare and ethics and animal reproduction. In this unit, there is a risk of exposure to zoonotic pathogens. You are encouraged to be vaccinated against tetanus and Q fever but where this is not practical you must utilize Personal Protective Equipment for specific practical classes.
Textbooks
Learning resources will be available on the Unit of Study E-Learning site. The following texts may be useful: Sherwood, L., Klandorf, H. and Yancey, P.H. (2013) Animal Physiology. From Genes to Organisms. 2nd ed. Thomson Brooks/Cole. Dyce, K.M., Sack, W.O. and Wensing, C.J.G. (2010). Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy. 4th edn. W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia.
AREC2005 Concepts in Enviro and Agricultural Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECON1001 or BUSS1040 or ECON1040 or AGEC1006) and (ECON1002 or ECON1003 or ECON1005 or ECON1006 or ECMT1010 or BUSS1020 or GEOS1001 or AGEN1001 or ENVX1002) Prohibitions: AREC2003 or RSEC2031 Assessment: 1x1hr mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr final exam (50%), 1x1500wd equiv tutorial participation and report (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on fundamental economics knowledge to develop concepts that are key to the fields of agricultural economics, environmental economics and natural resource economics. Some globally significant themes, such as food security; sustainable agricultural production; climate change; resource/environmental limits and scarcity; biotechnology and innovation; air and water pollution; environment/agriculture interactions; and sustainable development will be used to illustrate the studied concepts.
BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MEDS2003) Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the regulation, impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, and the genetic engineering of animals and plants. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.
Special Permission required for enrolment
or
BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X72 or GENE2002) and a mark of 75 or above in (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or MEDS2003) Prohibitions: BIOL3018 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Special Permission required for enrolment
ECMT2150 Intermediate Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECMT1010 or MATH1905 or MATH1005 or MATH1015 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 or ENVX1002) and (ECMT1020 or MATH1002 or MATH1902 or DATA1002 or DATA1903) or (BUSS1020) Prohibitions: ECMT2110 or ECMT2950 Assessment: 2x500wd individual assignments (15%), 1x1.5hr midsemester test (35%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the econometrics of cross-section and panel data. We start with a discussion of the assumptions underlying the simple and multiple linear regression model. We then build an understanding of the econometric methods available when these assumptions do not hold. More specifically, we cover heteroscedasticity and GLS, omitted variable bias, measurement error and instrumental variables. We finish with an introduction to using pooled cross sections and panel data for policy analysis and to estimate treatment effects. Throughout the unit, emphasis is placed on economic applications of the models and practical computer applications are incorporated.
ENVX3002 Statistics in the Natural Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Floris van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour workshop per week, one 3-hour computer practical per week Prerequisites: ENVX2001 or STAT2X12 or BIOL2X22 or DATA2X02 or QBIO2001 Assessment: One computer-based exam during the exam period (50%), assessment tasks focusing on analysing and interpreting real datasets (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the analysis of data they may face in their future careers, in particular data that are not well behaved. The data may be non-normal, there may be missing observations, they may be correlated in space and time or too numerous to analyse with standard models. The unit is presented in an applied context with an emphasis on correctly analysing authentic datasets, and interpreting the output. It begins with the analysis and design of experiments based on the general linear model. In the second part, students will learn about the generalisation of the general linear model to accommodate non-normal data with a particular emphasis on the binomial and Poisson distributions. In the third part linear mixed models will be introduced which provide the means to analyse datasets that do not meet the assumptions of independent and equal errors, for example data that is correlated in space and time. The units ends with an introduction to machine learning and predictive modelling. A key feature of the unit is using R to develop coding skills that are become essential in science for processing and analysing datasets of ever increasing size.
HORT3005 Production Horticulture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 3-hour practical/workshop per week Prerequisites: 72cp of 1000-3000 level units Assessment: One 3-hour exam (55%), three assignments (45%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study covers topics on the production of high quality food from perennial fruit crops, wine grapes, vegetables. It also covers the key aspects of the postharvest handling and quality assurance of fresh produce. At the end of this unit students are expected to have a detailed understanding of these areas of horticultural food production and be able to discuss related literature and the physiological principles underlying the commercial success of these horticultural enterprises. Students will also gain research and enquiry skills through research based practical sessions and assignments.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Louis Glowinski (2008) The complete book of fruit growing in Australia. Lothian Books, Westwood, M.N. (1993) Temperate-zone pomology. Timber Press Inc. Jackson, J.E (2003) Biology of apples and pears. Cambridge University Press. Gopinadhan Paliyath et al. (Ed.) (2008) Postharvest biology and technology of fruits, vegetables, and flowers. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Decoteau, D/. R (2000). Vegetable Crops. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall
ENSC2001 Environmental Monitoring

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Feike Dijkstra Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour lecture per week; one 3-hour computer/laboratory practical per week; one 1-hour tutorial every three weeks; two half-day field trips Prohibitions: AGCH3033 Assumed knowledge: Understanding of scientific principles and concepts including biodiversity, human impacts on the environment, properties of substances (e.g., acidity, alkalinity, solvents) and basic knowledge of statistics. Assessment: Group presentation (10%), quiz (10%), lab reports (30%), final exam (50%) Practical field work: Two half-day field trips Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Human population growth is causing irreversible change to almost all environments on earth. The extent of human change has been so great that a new geological epoch, the anthropocene, has been defined. Global warming, the introduction of pollutants and excessive use of nutrients are stressors affecting the biodiversity and resilience of ecosystems, and pose threats to human and environmental health. These human impacts carefully need to be monitored to guide appropriate management of urban, natural and agricultural systems. In this unit you will learn about transport pathways of pollutants, bioaccumulation, environmental toxicology (e.g., LD50 values), environmental monitoring and remediation techniques. Through lectures, laboratories and group work, concepts and methods of environmental monitoring will be illustrated and discussed including findings from the latest research. You will participate in structured practical exercises and field trips where you will apply sampling techniques, use bio-indicators and diversity indices to monitor ecosystem functioning. You will interpret the results and assess what the implications are for the ecological functioning and sustainable management of the environment. These hands-on exercises will be complemented with case-studies to guide you in critically analysing and evaluating environmental monitoring data. By taking this unit, you will acquire the necessary skills and knowledge in monitoring sites impacted by human activity.
Textbooks
Artiola, Pepper, and Brusseau. 2004. Environmental Monitoring and Characterization. Elsevier Academic Press.
AVBS2004 Animal Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Alex V. Chaves Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures; 1x2h computer practical session; 1-2h online learning session on a weekly basis Prerequisites: BIOL1XX7 or AVBS1002 Prohibitions: ANSC3101 Assessment: problem-based learning report (30%), video (30%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Computer-based where students get familiarized with diet formulation software reports/outcomes and identifying limitation of the diet in each scenario. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Access afterhours to IBM-PC compatible computers that have Microsoft Windows XP or later are advisable. Most of the diet formulation software are Windows Compatible only.
One of the greatest limiting factors to the health and wellbeing of animals under our care is the nutritional value of their feed. Whether provided by nature or manufactured to meet the production and health needs of farmed animals, being able to provide suitable nutrition to animals in our care is fundamental to good animal health management. This Unit is broadly divided into three sections, namely: estimating the nutritive value of feeds; estimating the nutrient requirements of animals and diet formulation. The focus is on building up knowledge on animal nutrition by assessments of nutritional adequacy and solving of nutritional problems, with a particular emphasis on wildlife and animals used in agricultural production systems. The principles discussed in this course will be expanded in third year, in which species-specific systems will be described within the animal production major.
In this unit you will develop the skills to create diets based on sound science, to meet animal requirements for a variety of purposes and under a variety of constraints and identify deficiencies, excesses and imbalances in diets and optimising nutritional health and minimising disease risk.
Textbooks
There is no required text for the course. A number of textbooks are available on reserve at the library. Detail information is provided in this Unit of Study guide.
AREC3007 Benefit-Cost Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2 hour lecture/week; 1x1 hour tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or AREC2005 or AREC2003 Prohibitions: (AREC2004 and RSEC4131) Assessment: 1x500wd benefit-cost analysis (10%), 1x1000wd group work essay (20%), 1x1000wd report (20%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Foundational concepts in welfare economics, such as economic efficiency, criteria for assessing social welfare improvements, and economic surplus measures, are analysed in detail and applied to project evaluation and policy assessment. Procedures of conducting a benefit-cost analysis are presented, and tools of non-market valuation for public goods and environmental assets are covered in detail. These techniques include both stated and revealed preference techniques, including contingent valuation, choice modeling, hedonic pricing and travel cost methods.
AREC3006 Agricultural Production Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hour tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2005 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or AREC2003 Prohibitions: AREC2001 or AREC3001 Assessment: 1 x mid-semester test (25%), 1x 1500wd assignment (25%), 1x final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is concerned with the application of microeconomic principles to management decisions in agricultural production systems. It builds on the theoretical knowledge acquired in previous studies and introduces the methods of applied economic analysis through a range of topics including: production, cost and profit functions; methods for the measurement of productivity; optimisation in biological production systems; and production under risk. The unit introduces the linear programming technique to solve decision making problems encountered by agribusiness and natural resource firms and managers in public agencies.
ENVX3001 Environmental GIS

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Aaron Greenville Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three-day field trip, (two lectures and two practicals per week) Prerequisites: 6cp from (ENVI1003 or AGEN1002) or 6cp from GEOS1XXX or 6cp from BIOL1XXX or GEOS2X11 Assessment: 15-minute presentation (10%), 3500 word prac report (35%), 1500 word report on trip excursion (15%), 2-hour exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to impart knowledge and skills in spatial analysis and geographical information science (GISc) for decision-making in an environmental context. The lecture material will present several themes: principles of GISc, geospatial data sources and acquisition methods, processing of geospatial data and spatial statistics. Practical exercises will focus on learning geographical information systems (GIS) and how to apply them to land resource assessment, including digital terrain modelling, land-cover assessment, sub-catchment modelling, ecological applications, and soil quality assessment for decisions regarding sustainable land use and management. A three day field excursion during the mid-semester break will involve visiting Canberra to hear from various government agencies which research and maintain GIS coverages for Australia. By the end of this unit, students should be able to: differentiate between spatial data and spatial information; source geospatial data from government and private agencies; apply conceptual models of spatial phenomena for practical decision-making in an environmental context; apply critical analysis of situations to apply the concepts of spatial analysis to solving environmental and land resource problems; communicate effectively results of GIS investigations through various means- oral, written and essay formats; and use a major GIS software package such as ArcGIS.
Textbooks
Burrough, P.A. and McDonnell, R.A. 1998. Principles of Geographic Information Systems. Oxford University Press: Oxford.

Year 4^

Year 4 students will complete:
AFNR4101 Research Project A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Budiman Minasny Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: No formal classes, approximately 18 hours per week Prerequisites: 144 credit points of level 1000-3000 units of study Assessment: Research proposal presentation, critical literature review and written proposal. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop a student's ability to undertake a major research project in an area of specialization. The unit builds on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. This unit is a corequisite with AFNR4102 and each student will work with an academic supervisor in an area of specialization and develop a well-defined research project to be executed. The research project is undertaken to advance the students ability to build well-developed research skills, a strong analytical capacity, and the ability to provide high quality research results demonstrating a sound grasp of the research question. Working with an academic supervisor, students will develop their ability to define a research project including the producing of testable hypotheses, identifying existing knowledge from reviewing the literature, and the design and execution of a research strategy towards solving the research question. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem. They will enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the development of experimental programs. Students will experience presenting a project proposal. They will improve their written and planning skills by composing a research project proposal and the writing of a critical literature review.
AFNR4001 Professional Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops over four years; 40 days of professional experience, 1 week long excursion Prohibitions: AGRF4000 Assessment: One blog posting (10%), one on-line (multi-media) (30%) and one portfolio (60%) Practical field work: 40 days of professional experience, 1 week long excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is designed to allow students to critically reflect on the relationship between the rural enterprise and environment and how they can contribute to the future decisions and management affecting the rural community. It is a core unit of study in 4th year for the BScAgr which requires students to complete 40 days of professional experience with the expectation that students will examine the nature of facts from their degree in this environment. A minimum of 15 days must be completed on-farm/field. The remaining days do not have to be on-farm. The unit will be counted towards 4th year, but professional experience placements will normally be undertaken throughout the degree. In the early stages of the Professional Development program students participate in 1st year rural field tours that have been developed so they can experience a range of activities, such as research, extension, on-farm and industry both in the rural and urban environment to complement their learning within their individual degree programs. Building on this various workshops have been developed to assist students to identify a rural environment theme or issue of their interest with the specific emphasis being placed on them reflecting on how their new understandings of their theme of interest affects their personal and professional development. To complete this unit students will present a portfolio of their theme including critical reflection on the pivotal relationships between the academic degree, rural environment, professional experience, and beliefs and values if the rural community. Through developing these pivotal relationships, students will be able to use their new understandings to support and guide the future developments in the rural enterprise and environment. By developing and presenting the portfolio and engaging in other online activities the students will enhance their skills in inquiry, information literacy and communication. In particular the autonomous development of case studies reflecting the contemporary issues in agriculture and their professional placements the students will have to consider their understandings of ethical, social and professional issues and further develop the personal and intellectual autonomy.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
AFNR4102 Research Project B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Budiman Minasny Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: No formal classes, approximately 18 hours per week Prerequisites: AFNR4101 Assessment: Poster, oral presentation and research paper. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a continuation of the major research project initiated in AFNR4101 and continues to build on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. Working with their academic supervisor in the area of specialization the student will continue to pursue the defined research project towards presenting final results and conclusions. The research results will be communicated as a poster, an oral presentation, and a research paper. The research paper is to be formatted as an article of a scientific journal. Students will continue to build their research skills, develop strong analytical capacity, demonstrate a sound grasp of the topic, and an ability to interpret results in a broad framework. Working with an academic supervisor, students will develop their ability to produce results of high quality, draw reliable conclusions, and identify future areas of research. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem.The project will enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the managing the research program. Students will improve their communication skills through oral presentation of their research findings, the production of a poster detailing their research findings and the writing of a research paper.
Year 4 students will complete one specialisation comprising up to two 6cp units of study (from Table E) and up to two elective unit from Table D, E or F.
^ A student may apply to the degree coordinator for permission to enrol in up to one (6 cp) elective University of Sydney unit of study in year 3 and up to one (6 cp) University of Sydney unit of study in year 4 which is not listed in Tables D or E. The application must (1) be made prior to enrolment in the unit (2) be submitted with a written academic justification for enrolment by the student and (3) be submitted with written approval of the relevant unit of study coordinator.

Table E - Year 4 Specialisations

Agricultural Chemistry

ENSC2001 Environmental Monitoring

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Feike Dijkstra Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour lecture per week; one 3-hour computer/laboratory practical per week; one 1-hour tutorial every three weeks; two half-day field trips Prohibitions: AGCH3033 Assumed knowledge: Understanding of scientific principles and concepts including biodiversity, human impacts on the environment, properties of substances (e.g., acidity, alkalinity, solvents) and basic knowledge of statistics. Assessment: Group presentation (10%), quiz (10%), lab reports (30%), final exam (50%) Practical field work: Two half-day field trips Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Human population growth is causing irreversible change to almost all environments on earth. The extent of human change has been so great that a new geological epoch, the anthropocene, has been defined. Global warming, the introduction of pollutants and excessive use of nutrients are stressors affecting the biodiversity and resilience of ecosystems, and pose threats to human and environmental health. These human impacts carefully need to be monitored to guide appropriate management of urban, natural and agricultural systems. In this unit you will learn about transport pathways of pollutants, bioaccumulation, environmental toxicology (e.g., LD50 values), environmental monitoring and remediation techniques. Through lectures, laboratories and group work, concepts and methods of environmental monitoring will be illustrated and discussed including findings from the latest research. You will participate in structured practical exercises and field trips where you will apply sampling techniques, use bio-indicators and diversity indices to monitor ecosystem functioning. You will interpret the results and assess what the implications are for the ecological functioning and sustainable management of the environment. These hands-on exercises will be complemented with case-studies to guide you in critically analysing and evaluating environmental monitoring data. By taking this unit, you will acquire the necessary skills and knowledge in monitoring sites impacted by human activity.
Textbooks
Artiola, Pepper, and Brusseau. 2004. Environmental Monitoring and Characterization. Elsevier Academic Press.

Agricultural Economics

AREC3001 Production Modelling and Management

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2001 or AGEC2103 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x2hr Final Exam (60%), 1x50min Mid-semester Test (15%), 1x1500wd Assignment (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on the principles of biological production economics and introduces optimisation methods to solve decision making problems encountered by agribusiness and natural resource firms and managers in public agencies. The principle focus is on the application of linear programming techniques, and students learn to consider solving decision making problems where the outcomes are not known with certainty, and where the timing of decisions is of essence.
AREC3002 Agricultural Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2005 or AREC2001 or AGEC2103 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1000wd equivalent problem sets (30%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x2hr final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide an understanding of the underlying forces driving agricultural markets. It addresses price analysis and efficiency, including aspects of form, time and space in agricultural marketing; information and contracts; changing consumer concerns (food safety, ethical production); futures market and other risk sharing devices. Building on the application of microeconomic theory to both production and consumption in agricultural markets, its content is analytical. The unit also investigates some of the forces which prevent the efficient operation of world agricultural markets, including impediments to trade, imperfect markets for inputs and outputs and market power along the agricultural supply chain.
AREC3006 Agricultural Production Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hour tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2005 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or AREC2003 Prohibitions: AREC2001 or AREC3001 Assessment: 1 x mid-semester test (25%), 1x 1500wd assignment (25%), 1x final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is concerned with the application of microeconomic principles to management decisions in agricultural production systems. It builds on the theoretical knowledge acquired in previous studies and introduces the methods of applied economic analysis through a range of topics including: production, cost and profit functions; methods for the measurement of productivity; optimisation in biological production systems; and production under risk. The unit introduces the linear programming technique to solve decision making problems encountered by agribusiness and natural resource firms and managers in public agencies.

Agricultural Genetics

GENE4012 Plant Breeding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard Trethowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 20 lectures plus group presentations and 10 hours of practicals/demonstrations (26 July - 30 August) Prerequisites: GENE2001 or GENE2002 or GEGE2X01 Assessment: A take home assignment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Lectures and practical work are devoted to the theory, philosophy and practice of plant breeding. The unit addresses screening techniques, conservation of genetic variability, breeding for disease resistance and integration of molecular technology in applied plant breeding, with examples from both field and horticultural crops. The unit is taught in the context [of] climate change, food security and the evolving global intellectual property environment. Classes and practicals are held at the Plant Breeding Institute at Camden and at the Biomedical Building, Australian Technology Park.
BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MEDS2003) Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the regulation, impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, and the genetic engineering of animals and plants. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.
BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X72 or GENE2002) and a mark of 75 or above in (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or MEDS2003) Prohibitions: BIOL3018 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.

Agronomy

AGRO4003 Crop and Pasture Agronomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Twelve 2-hour lectures in weeks 1-13; four 2-hour practicals in weeks 8, 11-13; field excursions: week preceding start of semester and 6 (subject to weather) Assessment: Four assessments including two data analysis projects (4x25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines agronomy as the discipline that underpins agricultural production. As a case study, the cotton industry is examined in detail to understand the end-user and social demands on agricultural production, the technical issues that challenge the farmer and the diversity of other specialist information from relevant disciplines such as entomology, pathology and soil science that must be integrated into the farming system. The unit also covers precision agriculture, legume science, rangeland science and crop protection. This unit includes a one-week excursion to cotton growing areas in northern NSW and Qld, specialist intensive instruction provided by the Cotton RDC, and a series of workshops, tutorials that provides analysis and synthesis of the major farming systems in this industry. Pasture production is also considered in the context of farming systems.
AGRO4004 Sustainable Farming Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Negotiated practicals and workshops (63 hours) Assessment: 2 assignments (2x33%), data analysis project (34%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to provide students with training in the professional skills required to practice agronomy. The unit principally builds on theoretical and applied knowledge gained in third year agronomy (AGRO3004). In this unit students will integrate their knowledge of plant physiology, soil science, experimental design, and biometry to address applied problems in agronomy, namely the issue of sustainability. Students will develop their ability to establish conclusions towards making recommendations for long term sustainability of crop and pasture systems. By implementing and managing a major field and/or glasshouse experiment(s) students will develop their research and inquiry skills. Team work is strongly encouraged in this unit and the integration and reporting of research findings will facilitate critical thinking and development of written communication skills. After completing this unit, students should be able to confidently design and manage a glasshouse/field experiment, and interpret and communicate their findings, by integrating knowledge from across disciplinary boundaries.

Animal Production

AVBS3010 Livestock Production Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Luciano Gonzalez Session: Semester 1 Classes: averaged as lecture 4hrs/week for 10 weeks, tutorials 1hr/week for 5 weeks, seminars 7 hrs/week for 1 week, practical 8 hrs/week for 1 week and 2 hrs/week for 1 week, site visit 4hrs/week for 1 week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (AVBS2XXX or ANSC3101 or BIOL2XXX or FOOD2000 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2001 or GENE2002 or ITLS2000) Prohibitions: AGRO4005 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with data analysis and animal handling. Assessment: 4 x practical reports (5%, 20% total), group-based farm system enterprise report (20%), group-based oral presentation (20%), final exam (40% ) Practical field work: 2 days of farm practical classes Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit requires three days of practicals at the Camden campus and field trip to commercial farms .
Livestock production systems are changing rapidly as a result of pressures to increase productivity, sustainability and profitability. These changes are further augmented by the rapid growth in new knowledge and emergence of new technologies, and changes in the diet of world populations. In this unit you will be exposed to contemporary livestock production systems through a whole-system approach integrating animals, pastures, environment, management and economics. The unit starts with a section describing the holistic approach to livestock production systems, then examines each component of the production system, and how these interact and affect each other. You will integrate concepts from animal biology and ecology, genetics, nutrition, reproduction, health and welfare, agronomy and economics. You will analyse farming systems and develop solutions to optimise production, sustainability and social goals. You will learn the use of simulation models and decision support systems, new technologies and holistic farm business analysis and planning. Computer-based and field classes will allow you to gain direct, practical experience in key areas required to work with the livestock industries in leading roles as consultants, advisors, managers or scientists in sustainable livestock enterprises
AGRO4006 New and Emerging Tech in Animal Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Luciano Gonzalez Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 3-hour lecture followed by one 3-hour practical per week at Camden Campus (practicals include demonstration and hands-on with remote sensing, GIS and ICT technologies) Prerequisites: 6cp from BIOL1XXX Assessment: Final Assignment presentation (10%) and document (40%), video proposal for major assignment (10%) and practical reports (computer labs and field classes, 40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of new and emerging livestock technologies in Australia and overseas. Examples of these technologies include (1) next-generation infrared and laser scanning to determine physiological status and whole body composition, (2) diet formulation to enhance the nutritional and eating quality of livestock food products, (3) new vaccines and other therapeutics to regulate fertility, growth and behaviour whilst enhancing welfare and wellbeing, (4) microRNA technology to influence cellular, endocrine and physiological processes, (5) new genomics and laboratory-based reproductive technologies for advanced livestock breeding, (6) technologies to monitor and control animal behaviour, (7) unmanned ground and aerial vehicles to monitor livestock and the environment, (8) sensors and advanced image-capture technology to record the attributes of soil, air and the feedbase, (9) data-fusion science to integrate, analyse and interpret collected data, and (10) modelling of livestock systems. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through on-line discussion postings, laboratory reports and presentations, and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups. At successful completion of the unit students will have a sound knowledge of new and emerging technologies that will shape the livestock industries in Australia and overseas. This will provide valuable grounding for students preparing for postgraduate study and other learning and career paths.
Textbooks
No prescribed text but referral to references listed from library

Entomology

BIOL3033 Applied Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tanya Latty Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2hr/week, practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2XXX or ENTO2001 or MEDS200X or ANAT2XXX or PHSI2XXX or BMED240X or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2101 Prohibitions: ENTO4003 Assessment: Assessments will include a consultant report (15%), a research proposal (15%), a final group presentation (25%), an arthropod identification test (15%) and a final exam (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Insects effect almost every facet of our lives from vectoring major diseases like the plague, malaria and Zika virus to the billions of dollars of free ecosystems services they provide by consuming pest insects, pollinating agricultural crops and removing waste. This unit takes an applied approach to entomology by covering topics such as medical entomology, sustainable pest management, pollination ecology, insects as human/livestock foods and insect conservation. You will learn how to identify a variety of economically and medically important arthropods and how to sample insects in a variety of settings. You will also learn how insects are managed in agricultural, urban and natural environments as well as how we can use insects to solve some of humanities most pressing problems. You will learn about the many important ecosystems services that insects provide, as well as how practitioners can help encourage and support populations of beneficial insects. Field trips to Westmead hospital's medical entomology unit and the Biosecurity unit at Botany Bay will show you how practicing entomologists use their knowledge of insects to solve important problems. You will build your skills in research and inquiry through group research projects that you design and run. This unit will give you the basic skills needed to pursue careers in a variety of entomology-related fields.
Textbooks
Sindel BM (Ed) (2000). Australian Weed Management Systems. R.G. and F.J. Richardson, Melbourne.

Environmetrics

ENVX3002 Statistics in the Natural Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Floris van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour workshop per week, one 3-hour computer practical per week Prerequisites: ENVX2001 or STAT2X12 or BIOL2X22 or DATA2X02 or QBIO2001 Assessment: One computer-based exam during the exam period (50%), assessment tasks focusing on analysing and interpreting real datasets (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the analysis of data they may face in their future careers, in particular data that are not well behaved. The data may be non-normal, there may be missing observations, they may be correlated in space and time or too numerous to analyse with standard models. The unit is presented in an applied context with an emphasis on correctly analysing authentic datasets, and interpreting the output. It begins with the analysis and design of experiments based on the general linear model. In the second part, students will learn about the generalisation of the general linear model to accommodate non-normal data with a particular emphasis on the binomial and Poisson distributions. In the third part linear mixed models will be introduced which provide the means to analyse datasets that do not meet the assumptions of independent and equal errors, for example data that is correlated in space and time. The units ends with an introduction to machine learning and predictive modelling. A key feature of the unit is using R to develop coding skills that are become essential in science for processing and analysing datasets of ever increasing size.
ENVX3001 Environmental GIS

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Aaron Greenville Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three-day field trip, (two lectures and two practicals per week) Prerequisites: 6cp from (ENVI1003 or AGEN1002) or 6cp from GEOS1XXX or 6cp from BIOL1XXX or GEOS2X11 Assessment: 15-minute presentation (10%), 3500 word prac report (35%), 1500 word report on trip excursion (15%), 2-hour exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to impart knowledge and skills in spatial analysis and geographical information science (GISc) for decision-making in an environmental context. The lecture material will present several themes: principles of GISc, geospatial data sources and acquisition methods, processing of geospatial data and spatial statistics. Practical exercises will focus on learning geographical information systems (GIS) and how to apply them to land resource assessment, including digital terrain modelling, land-cover assessment, sub-catchment modelling, ecological applications, and soil quality assessment for decisions regarding sustainable land use and management. A three day field excursion during the mid-semester break will involve visiting Canberra to hear from various government agencies which research and maintain GIS coverages for Australia. By the end of this unit, students should be able to: differentiate between spatial data and spatial information; source geospatial data from government and private agencies; apply conceptual models of spatial phenomena for practical decision-making in an environmental context; apply critical analysis of situations to apply the concepts of spatial analysis to solving environmental and land resource problems; communicate effectively results of GIS investigations through various means- oral, written and essay formats; and use a major GIS software package such as ArcGIS.
Textbooks
Burrough, P.A. and McDonnell, R.A. 1998. Principles of Geographic Information Systems. Oxford University Press: Oxford.

Food Science

FOOD3001 Food Processing and Value Adding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week; practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: AGEN3004 Assumed knowledge: 6cp of (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of CHEM1XXX Assessment: Structure and food quality lab report (10%), QC investigation lab report (20%), Processingcase study report (20%), Processing case study presentation (10%), Final exam(40%) Practical field work: A few optional site visits Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit needs to be available as a non-award course so that students seeking admission to the MND have an option to fulfil the 6 cp Food Science prerequisite, if their previous study does not fulfil this requirement already.
All of the food that we produce and consume is processed in some way. The manufacture of composite food products, which have distinct properties to their constituent ingredients, requires a complex series of processing operations. However, even ready-to-eat fresh foods undergo processing to facilitate distribution to consumers, maximise shelf-life, and ensure food safety. This unit will examine the biochemical and physicochemical transformations that occur in food materials during processing and how processing parameters affect the fulfilment of food quality, shelf-life, and safety objectives. The unit is divided into modules on (1) processing to modify food structure; (2) processing for preservation; and value-adding, focused on (3) healthier food and (4) fermentation as interesting case studies in food processing. You will learn methods of food analysis and apply a scientific approach to investigating the relationships between food composition, functionality, processing conditions, and end-product properties. By doing this unit, you will develop a sound understanding of the scientific principles underpinning food processing decisions and outcomes. This is well-regarded in the food industry, particularly FMCG and manufacturing, as the ability to systematically characterise, analyse, and troubleshoot processes can be applied to a wide range of industrial situations.

Forest Science

BIOL3020 Applied Plant Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Warren Session: Semester 1 Classes: You are required to attend 2 x lectures, 1 x 4-hour practical session on a weekly basis. On-line Learning Requirements. Please check for updates regularly. Prerequisites: BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or AGEN2001 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09 Prohibitions: BIOL3043, BIOL3943, AGEN2005, PLNT3001, PLNT3901, PLNT3002, PLNT3902, ENSY3001 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assessment in BIOL3020 is based on a written laboratory report (30%), laboratory notebook (15%), group presentation (15%) and a 2-hour exam at the end of semester (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants are truly amazing. Plants lift water to heights that defy physics. Plants take sunlight and simple inorganic ingredients to create a bewildering diversity of organic compounds. What's even more amazing is that we are only just beginning to understand how plants achieve these amazing feats. This unit explores how plants function and illustrates how this knowledge can be applied to real-World problems. Major topics include how plants function as integrated systems, resource partitioning and the dilemmas faced by plants, interaction of plants with the world around them. Emphasis will be placed on integration of plant responses from molecular through to whole plant scales, and how this knowledge can be practically applied to maximise plant growth, optimise use of water and nutrients, and understand how plants affect (and are affected by) their environment. Lectures are augmented by experimental work that leads to practical hands-on experience with research tools and techniques that can be applied across the sciences, and bespoke instruments used in the world's leading plant science research laboratories. This unit of study complements other senior units of study in the Plant Science minor and is essential for those seeking a career in plant biology and plant-related fields, including ecology, cell biology, genetics, breeding, agriculture, molecular biology, environmental law, education and the arts.
BIOL3004 Terrestrial Plant Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tina Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: The general weekly schedule comprises 2 x 1 hour lectures and 1 x 3 hour practical session. A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or AGEN2001 or GEOS2X21 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09 Prohibitions: ENSY3003 or ENSY3002 Assumed knowledge: Students should have a basic understanding of plant biology, plant ecology and/or plant physiology. Some background knowledge in mathematics and chemistry would be beneficial. Assessment: Assessment tasks include two in-class quizzes (10% each); field report (20%); 2000w group-based land management plan (35%); 500w individual component to the land management plan (15%); group-based oral presentation (10%). Practical field work: A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australian native vegetation is a unique resource for diversity, ecosystem services and public use. The objective of this unit is to provide a broad understanding of three major plant terrestrial ecosystems that are found across Australia: forests, heathlands and grasslands and how they are managed. While the focus will be on native plant systems in an Australian setting, their importance at a global level will also be discussed. You will develop an understanding of the characteristics of key plant ecosystems, including where they are found and their main ecophysiology features. Each of the ecosystems described has the potential to be affected (positively or negatively) by a range of natural and anthropogenic disturbances. They include fire, climate change (drought and temperature), changes in nutrient flows and more broadly human-induced disturbances such as logging, mining, urban development and agricultural management. The impact of these disturbances along with mitigation via conservation and associated management changes will also be covered. Finally, government policy around conservation/management of these ecosystems will be examined. At the completion of this unit you will have developed an understanding of the environmental and economic importance of forests, heathlands and grasslands, their vulnerability to a range of external factors and the extent that these can be mitigated.

Horticulture

HORT3005 Production Horticulture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 3-hour practical/workshop per week Prerequisites: 72cp of 1000-3000 level units Assessment: One 3-hour exam (55%), three assignments (45%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study covers topics on the production of high quality food from perennial fruit crops, wine grapes, vegetables. It also covers the key aspects of the postharvest handling and quality assurance of fresh produce. At the end of this unit students are expected to have a detailed understanding of these areas of horticultural food production and be able to discuss related literature and the physiological principles underlying the commercial success of these horticultural enterprises. Students will also gain research and enquiry skills through research based practical sessions and assignments.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Louis Glowinski (2008) The complete book of fruit growing in Australia. Lothian Books, Westwood, M.N. (1993) Temperate-zone pomology. Timber Press Inc. Jackson, J.E (2003) Biology of apples and pears. Cambridge University Press. Gopinadhan Paliyath et al. (Ed.) (2008) Postharvest biology and technology of fruits, vegetables, and flowers. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Decoteau, D/. R (2000). Vegetable Crops. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall

Hydrology

ENVX3003 Hydrological Monitoring and Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2hrs/week, computer practical 3hrs/wk Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: LWSC3007 Assumed knowledge: SOIL2005 or GEOS2116 or ENVI1003 or GEOS1001 or ENSC2001 Assessment: Three individual assignments (25%), group based field report (25%), 2 hr final exam (50%). Practical field work: 3 days fieldwork near Cootamundra Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Globally, and in Australia in particular, water quantity and quality problems are growing due to increasing human use and a changing climate. In this unit, you will engage with field-based and quantitative problems related to water quantity and quality. This includes a multi-day field trip to regional NSW to collect samples and engage with field-based activities. During these activities, you will develop field-based skills for collection of hydrological data. The data will be used later in the unit to analyse and map the water quantity and quality issues in the catchment, relating this to landscape, management and climate. The second part of the unit focusses on developing an insight into model building, model calibration, validation and sensitivity analysis. It links back to the field experience by using long-term data collected by previous student cohorts and focussing on the identified landscape issues. This part of the study will allow you to directly engage with numerical approaches in prediction and forecasting in landscape hydrological models. The unit of study is specifically designed to extend your field hydrological knowledge and to strengthen your analytical and numerical skills in this area.
ENVX3001 Environmental GIS

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Aaron Greenville Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three-day field trip, (two lectures and two practicals per week) Prerequisites: 6cp from (ENVI1003 or AGEN1002) or 6cp from GEOS1XXX or 6cp from BIOL1XXX or GEOS2X11 Assessment: 15-minute presentation (10%), 3500 word prac report (35%), 1500 word report on trip excursion (15%), 2-hour exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to impart knowledge and skills in spatial analysis and geographical information science (GISc) for decision-making in an environmental context. The lecture material will present several themes: principles of GISc, geospatial data sources and acquisition methods, processing of geospatial data and spatial statistics. Practical exercises will focus on learning geographical information systems (GIS) and how to apply them to land resource assessment, including digital terrain modelling, land-cover assessment, sub-catchment modelling, ecological applications, and soil quality assessment for decisions regarding sustainable land use and management. A three day field excursion during the mid-semester break will involve visiting Canberra to hear from various government agencies which research and maintain GIS coverages for Australia. By the end of this unit, students should be able to: differentiate between spatial data and spatial information; source geospatial data from government and private agencies; apply conceptual models of spatial phenomena for practical decision-making in an environmental context; apply critical analysis of situations to apply the concepts of spatial analysis to solving environmental and land resource problems; communicate effectively results of GIS investigations through various means- oral, written and essay formats; and use a major GIS software package such as ArcGIS.
Textbooks
Burrough, P.A. and McDonnell, R.A. 1998. Principles of Geographic Information Systems. Oxford University Press: Oxford.

Soil Science

SOIL3009 Contemporary Field and Lab Soil Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Budiman Minasny (Coordinator), Prof Balwant Singh, A/Prof. Stephen Cattle, Prof Alex McBratney Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and two practicals, or one lecture and three practicals per week, 6-day field excursion north-western NSW commencing 15 days prior to beginning of Semester 1 Prerequisites: SOIL2003 or SOIL2004 or SOIL2005 Assessment: one viva voce exam (35%), field trip written assessments (30%), soil judging (15%), laboratory reports (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a theoretical and empirical unit providing specialised training in three important areas of contemporary soil science, namely pedology, soil chemistry, and soil physics. The key concepts of these sub-disciplines will be outlined and strengthened by hands-on training in contemporary field and laboratory techniques. All of this is synthesized by placing it in the context of soil distribution and use in North-Western New South Wales. The unit is motivated by the teaching team's research in this locale. It builds on students, existing soil science knowledge gained in SOIL2003. After completion of the unit, students should be able to articulate the advantages and disadvantages of current field and laboratory techniques for gathering necessary soil information, and simultaneously recognise key concepts and principles that guide contemporary thought in soil science. Students will be able to synthesise soil information from a multiplicity of sources and have an appreciation of the cutting edge areas of soil management and research. By investigating the contemporary nature of key concepts, students will develop their skills in research and inquiry. Students will develop their communication skills through report writing and will also articulate an openness to new ways of thinking which augments intellectual autonomy. Teamwork and collaborative efforts are encouraged in this unit.
Textbooks
Textbooks: D. Hillel, 2004. Introduction to Environmental Soil Physics. Elsevier Science, San Diego, CA, USA.
SOIL3010 The Soil at Work

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Budiman Minasny (Coordinator), Prof Balwant Singh, Prof Alex McBratney, A/Prof. Stephen Cattle, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 2 Classes: Problem-based unit: each student completes one problem as part of a team, involving multiple team meetings Prerequisites: SOIL2003 or SOIL2004 or SOIL2005 Assessment: Introduction to the problem group presentation (10%); status of the problem group report (10%); how to tackle the problem seminar (15%) - team seminars, before fieldwork, analyses done; results seminar (25%) - team seminars; final group report (30%); activities diary (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a problem-based applied soil science unit addressing the physical, chemical and biological components of soil function. It is designed to allow students to identify soil-related problems in the real-world and by working in a group and with an end-user, to suggest short and long-term solutions to problems such as fertility, resilience, carbon management, structural decline, acidification, salinisation and contamination. By designing and administering strategies to tackle real-world soil issues, students will develop their research and inquiry skills and enhance their intellectual autonomy. By producing reports and seminars that enables understanding by an end-user, students will improve the breadth of their communication skills. This is a core unit for students majoring or specialising in soil science and an elective unit for those wishing to gain an understanding of environmental problem-solving. It utilises and reinforces soil-science knowledge gained in SOIL2003 and SOIL2004, as well as generic problem-solving skills gained during the degree program.
Textbooks
Reference book: I.W.Heathcote 1997. Environmental Problem Solving: A Case Study Approach. McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, USA.

Table F - Other Year 4 electives

AVBS3009 Aquaculture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joy Becker Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week, tutorial 1 hr/week, practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: 6 credit points from (AVBS1002 or BIOL1XXX or GEOS1XXX or MBLG1XXX) and 6 credit points from (AVBS2XXX or BIOL2XXX) Prohibitions: AVBS4009 Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of animal husbandry and management; aquatic animal biology. Assessment: oral presentation (25%), annotated bibliography (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Aquaculture is a rapidly developing area of food production as the world faces a critical point in not being able to meet global demand for seafood. This unit of study explores in detail the husbandry of aquaculture broodstock and larval and juvenile culture techniques of finfish, molluscs and crustaceans. The biological principles of aquaculture including aquatic animal physiology, species selection, hatchery breeding and rearing and grow-out practices, aquaculture farming systems, animal health, welfare and disease and environmental impact are addressed. In this unit of study, you will attain practical skills relevant to aquaculture production and management of aquatic animals, such as animal handling, growth measures, fluid collection, health assessments and necropsy. The unit aims to inspire and motivate you through research-informed teaching and application of the principles of scientific thinking. By the end of this unit, you will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles of: the context of aquaculture in global food production; animal management and welfare of aquaculture species; comparative aspects of farming systems used in aquaculture; health and disease relevant to aquaculture; nutrition of aquaculture species; water quality and the environmental impact of aquaculture.
AVBS4012 Extensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Russell Bush Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 3 hours per week, practicals 3 hours per week, five-day study tour to the Riverina Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 or {144 credit points of units of study including a minimum of 12 credit points from [ANSC3106 and (ANSC3888 or AVBS3888 or SCPU3001)]} Assumed knowledge: Senior tertiary level knowledge inanimalproduction management andbehaviour and welfare of production animals Assessment: Case study (10%), practical report (20%), meat grading (15%), excursion report (15%) and written exam (40%) Practical field work: Five-day study tour to the Riverina Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the concepts of sheep (wool and meat) and beef cattle production in the Australian environment within the context of world food and fibre consumption and production. The key products as well as domestic and export markets for these are presented. The course provides a historical perspective of the basis for each of these industries and describes each of the production systems designed to meet the demand for these products.
Production in both the tropical and temperate regions of Australia will be covered and include the key elements of extensive grazing and intensive feedlot systems. Major issues will include breeds and breeding systems, basic nutrition and production practices and animal welfare issues as they affect the quality and quantity of product marketed.
The concepts of first stage processing of both meat and fibre products in abattoirs and top-making plants respectively will be presented. The major factors that influence the quality of product and therefore grading and market demand will be presented.
Lecture material will be supported with appropriate practical classes, a 2 day trip to the University's 'Arthursleigh' farm and a 5 day study tour to the Riverina to evaluate different commercial production systems. Students will also have an opportunity to compete in the annual Inter Collegiate Meat Judging (ICMJ) competition as a member of the University of Sydney team. This competition involves teams from numerous universities throughout Australia as well as Japan and the USA.
VIRO3001 Virology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tim Newsome Session: Semester 1 Classes: 26 1-hour lectures, seven 4-hour practical classes, one 2-hour tutorial Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from (BCHM2XXX or BCMB2X01 or BIOL2XXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MICR2XXX or MIMI2X02 or PCOL2X0X or PHSI2X0X)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404] Prohibitions: VIRO3901 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems Assessment: preparation assessment for practical classes: (5 x 1%), practical assessment for practical classes: (5 x 2%), presentation on virology-themed research literature: (10%), theory of practical exam: (15%) (30 minutes), theory exam: (60%) (120 minutes) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students are strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902.
Viruses are some of the simplest biological machinery known yet they are also the etiological agents for some of the most important human diseases. New technologies that have revolutionised the discovery of viruses are also revealing a hitherto unappreciated abundance and diversity in the ecosphere, and a wider role in human health and disease. Developing new gene technologies have enabled the use of viruses as therapeutic agents, in novel vaccine approaches, gene delivery and in the treatment of cancer. This unit of study is designed to introduce students who have a basic understanding of molecular biology to the rapidly evolving field of virology. Viral infection in plant and animal cells and bacteria is covered by an examination of virus structure, genomes, gene expression and replication. Building upon these foundations, this unit progresses to examine host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, cell injury, the immune response and the prevention and control of infection and outbreaks. The structure and replication of sub-viral agents: viroids and prions, and their role in disease are also covered. The practical component provides hands-on experience in current diagnostic and research techniques such as molecular biology, cell culture, serological techniques, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses and is designed to enhance the students' practical skills and complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Tutorials cover a range of topical issues and provide a forum for students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills. The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Microbiology within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences with the involvement of the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
AGEN3008 Indigenous Land and Food Knowledge

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Ampt (Coordinator), A/Prof Tina Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Application process, pre-trip orientation - 1 day, field trip - 10 days + travel time = 70 hours, post-trip workshop - 1 day. (Student financial contribution $2000-$2500) Assessment: Assessment during field trip: field trip activities recorded,in booklet (20%), journal - personal/reflective (20%), participation peer and self-assessment (10%); assessment post-field trip: one 3000wd feasibility study, funding application and essay due week 7 Semester 2 (50%); Out of class prescribed student workload: application process - Kinship module 1-hour, written application 2-hours. Prepare report - five hours for seven weeks Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must attend pre-trip briefing session (one day in S1 exam period), field trip (approximately two weeks in mid-year break) and post-trip workshop (one day in S2).
This unit of study aims to promote understanding of Indigenous knowledge of land and food both past and present, and develop skills in identifying and developing opportunities for Indigenous engagement in land management and food production. It is an elective unit of study for undergraduate degree students in Science, Business and Arts; and for Honours and Masters degree students in Science and Arts.
This unit of study will explore the importance of the Indigenous estate (the 20-25% of Australia which is under some form of Indigenous land tenure) and will examine Indigenous knowledge to engage with contemporary realities of land management and food production for the sustainability of communities living on country. Emphasis will be on identifying opportunities for economic activities based on land and food management for the communities visited on the field trip.
Students will describe traditional land and food knowledge and understand the complex situation around living on country and the long term trends that are impacting on Indigenous communities. They will participate in activities with community members to identify opportunities for the development of enterprises based on land and food knowledge, then design and develop a plan for an activity that could contribute to the sustainability of the community.
Students will develop cultural competency through engagement with indigenous communities and recognition of the influence of their personal and cultural background through self-reflection. They will develop social research skills in collection and interpretation of qualitative data and the ability to describe a complex social/cultural ecological system and design interventions to improve problem situations. It will also provide students with skills and ideas for future research projects that will engage Indigenous communities and improve partnerships and dialogue.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbook but recommended reading includes: Gammage B (2011) The Biggest Estate on Earth: How Aborigines made Australia, Allen and Unwin, Crows Nest, Sydney, Australia; Svieby K, Skuthorpe T (2006) Treading Lightly: The Hidden Wisdom of the World's Oldest People, Allen and Unwin, Crows nest, Sydney, Australia; Bird Rose D (2000) Dingo Makes us Human: Life and Land in an Australian Aboriginal Culture, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK
GEGE3004 Applied Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Claire Wade Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 4 hours per week during standard semester. Prerequisites: 6cp of (GEGE2X01 or QBIO2XXX or DATA2X01 or GENE2XXX or MBLG2X72 or ENVX2001 or DATA2X02) Prohibitions: ANSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Genetics at 2000 level, Biology at 1000 level, algebra Assessment: The assessment will consist of one intra-semester examination (20%), group work assignment (30%)[ including assessment both of a project report (20%) and the team process (10%)], individual assignment (10%) and final examination (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit must be taken by all students in the Genetics and Genomics major.
The average mammalian genome is 3 billion nucleotides long and some other organisms have genomes that are even larger. Working with DNA at the nucleotide level on an organismal scale is impossible without the assistance of high performance computing. This unit will investigate strategies to manipulate genomic data on a whole organism scale. You will learn how scientists use high performance computing and web-based resources to compare and assemble genomes, map genes that cause specific phenotypes, and uncover mutations that cause phenotypic changes in organisms that influence health, external characteristics, production and disease. By doing this unit you will develop skills in the analysis of big data, you will gain familiarity with high performance computing worktop environments and learn to use bioinformatics tools that are commonly applied in research.
AVBS4002 Dairy Production and Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Sergio (Yani) Garcia Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures up to 3 hours per week, practicals 3 hours per week, at least two half day field trips and one or two full day trips/excursions including commercial farms and a milk processing plant Prerequisites: 48cp of 2000-level or 3000-level units Assumed knowledge: Enrolled students are expected to have some understanding of key components of the dairy production system, including basic knowledge of animal physiology and nutrition. Assessment: Assignment (report or lit review) (40%), pracs assessments, (30%), 1-hour exam (30%) Practical field work: At least two half day field trips and one or two full day trips/excursions including commercial farms and a milk processing plant Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Dairy science is arguably the most multidisciplinary of all animal production areas. Topics such as animal physiology, nutrition, reproduction, genetics need to be understood in the context of more distant disciplines like pasture and forage crops, milk harvesting and robotics, farm economics; and the integration of all these into the whole system. In this UoS, we combine face-to-face lectures, interactive group discussions, guided field exercises and activities, and visits to commercial farms (ranging from small pasture-based to large-herd indoor systems milking >2000 cows) to gain understanding of key components of dairy system and of the system of production as a whole. This unit connects basic knowledge with practical application and contributes to develop students' ability to integrate knowledge. Completing this course successfully will give students the tools and confidence required to assist commercial farmers to improve practice change on farm and increase profitability. In line with the research expertise of the dairy science team, emphasis is placed on automatic/robotic systems and the use and application of technology in dairying.
Textbooks
Students are advised to consult lecturers for recommended text, scientific and professional articles, technotes for advisors and industry-generated information for farmers
AVBS3008 Intensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sonia Liu Session: Semester 2 Classes: approximately 6 hrs/week: lecture 2-3 hrs/week, tutorial or MCQ 2hr/fortnight Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (ANSC3101 or AVBS2XXX or BIOL2XXX or FOOD2000 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2001 or GENE2002 or ITLS2000) Prohibitions: AVBS4008 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with data analysis and animal handling. Assessment: in-class MCQs x 4 (20%), efficacy and welfare written report (20%), group assignment virtual piggery (10%), final exam (50%) Practical field work: Approximately 6 afternoons at Mayfarm Piggery and Poultry Unit. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Poultry and pig farmers are faced with ever increasing challenges, from the increasing demand for affordable meat and eggs to the ever-present issues related to welfare and wellbeing of these traditionally intensively managed animals. This unit will investigate poultry and pig production with an emphasis towards giving you an understanding of the pig meat, poultry meat and whole egg industries under Australian conditions. You will examine and evaluate various aspects of the poultry and pig production systems important in maintaining efficiency and profitability. Current challenges in pig and poultry productions and hot topics in research will be discussed in lectures. Through examining aspects such as breeding, nutrition, housing, growth, performance, health and welfare you will develop practical skills that can be applied to aid local and international poultry and pig farmers as they strive to produce food of the highest quality in a sustainable and ethical fashion.