Table 1: Biochemistry

Unit outlines will be available though Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCMB3002 Protein Function and Engineering Prerequisites: 6 credit points from (BCMB2X02 or BCHM2X71) and 6 credit points from (BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)

BCMB3902 Protein Function and Engineering (Advanced) Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [6 credit points from (BCMB2X02 or BCHM2X71) and 6 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)]

10/02/2020

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Biochemistry

For a major in Biochemistry, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area.
Junior units of study
BIOL1006
Life and Evolution
6    A HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February).
N BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996
Semester 1
BIOL1906
Life and Evolution (Advanced)
6    A 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent.
N BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
BIOL1996
Life and Evolution (SSP)
6    A 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent
N BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
BIOL1007
From Molecules to Ecosystems
6    A HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February).
N BIOL1907 or BIOL1997
Semester 2
BIOL1907
From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)
6    A 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent
N BIOL1007 or BIOL1997

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
BIOL1997
From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)
6    A 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent
N BIOL1007 or BIOL1907

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
Intermediate units of study
BCMB2001
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
6    P 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003
Semester 1
BCMB2901
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Advanced)
6    P A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or MEDS2003
Semester 1
BCMB2002
Proteins in Cells
6    P 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2902
Semester 2
BCMB2902
Proteins in Cells (Advanced)
6    P A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2002
Semester 2
Senior units of study
BCMB3001
Gene and Genome Regulation
6    A Intermediate biochemistry and molecular biology
P 6 credit points from (BCMB2X01 or BMED2802 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2003) and 6 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB2X02 or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2XXX or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)
N BCHM3X71 or BCMB3901
Semester 1
BCMB3901
Gene and Genome Regulation (Advanced)
6    A Intermediate Biochemistry (2000 level).
P An average mark of 75 or above in [6 credit points from (BCMB2X01 or BMED2802 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2003) and 6 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB2X02 or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2XXX or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)]
N BCHM3X71 or BCMB3001
Semester 1
BCMB3002
Protein Function and Engineering
6    A Intermediate biochemistry and molecular biology
P 6 credit points from (BCMB2X02 or BCHM2X71) and 6 credit points from (BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)
N BCHM3X81 or BCMB3902
Semester 1
BCMB3902
Protein Function and Engineering (Advanced)
6    A Intermediate Biochemistry (2000 level).
P An average mark of 75 or above in [6 credit points from (BCMB2X02 or BCHM2X71) and 6 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)]
N BCHM3X81 or BCMB3002
Semester 1
BCMB3003
Biochemistry of Human Disease
6    A Intermediate protein chemistry and biochemistry concepts
P 12 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MEDS2003 or MBLG2X01) or [6 cp (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MEDS2003 or MBLG2X01) and 6 credit points from (AMED3001 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 and BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)] or 12 credit points from (BMED2401 and BMED2405)
N BCMB3903 or (BCHM3X72 and BCHM3X82)
Semester 2
BCMB3903
Biochemistry of Human Disease (Advanced)
6    A Students should understand basic concepts in human, mammalian, plant and/or prokaryotic biology. Students should have a basic understanding of the 'genome' and of the central dogma of molecular biology (gene transcription and protein translation). Additional knowledge of basic chemistry and protein biochemistry will be helpful.
P An average mark of 75 or above in [12 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MEDS2003 or MBLG2X01) or [6 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MEDS2003 or MBLG2X01) and 6 credit points from (AMED3001 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 and BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)] or 12 credit points from (BMED2401 and BMED2405)]
N BCMB3003 or (BCHM3X72 and BCHM3X82)
Semester 2
BCMB3004
Beyond The Genome
6    A Intermediate protein chemistry and biochemistry concepts
P 12 credit points from (AMED3001 or BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)
N BCHM3X92 or BCMB3904
Semester 2
BCMB3904
Beyond The Genome (Advanced)
6    A Students should understand basic concepts in human, mammalian, plant and/or prokaryotic biology. Students should have a basic understanding of the 'genome' and of the central dogma of molecular biology (gene transcription and protein translation). Additional knowledge of basic chemistry and protein biochemistry will be helpful.
P An average mark of 75 or above in 12 credit points from (AMED3001 or BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)
N BCHM3X92 or BCMB3004
Semester 2
NUTM3001
Introductory Nutrition and Metabolism
6    A PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06
P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1

Biochemistry

For a major in Biochemistry, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area.
Junior units of study
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 2 field excursions. Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 2 field excursions Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1,Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 3 field excursions Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 3 field excursions Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in an authentic urban biodiversity management research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes (15%), communication assessments (35%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: quizzes (14%), communication assessments (36%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week; online material; and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
Intermediate units of study
BCMB2001 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1,Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quizzes, exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. Our practicals, along with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to widely applied and cutting edge tools that are essential for modern biochemistry and molecular biology. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the life and medical sciences.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
BCMB2901 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1,Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, quiz, skills-based assessment, exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. The advanced laboratory component will provide students with an authentic research laboratory experience while in the theory component, current research topics will be presented in a problem-based format through dedicated advanced tutorial sessions. This material will be assessed by creative student-centered activities supported by eLearning platforms.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
BCMB2002 Proteins in Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2902 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quiz, final exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. Our practicals, other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for protein biochemistry ranging from protein visualization, quantification, purification and enzymatic activity, to in silico studies and cellular targeting experiments. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the cellular and molecular biosciences.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
BCMB2902 Proteins in Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2002 Assessment: Assignment, skills-based assessment, quiz, exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. There will be a research-focused approach to the advanced practical component, including real and virtual extensions to key experiments. This approach will continue in the lecture series with several unique advanced lectures covering current research topics. You will further investigate a selected area of interest from these topics using original source material and present your findings through an oral presentation in dedicated advanced tutorials.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
Senior units of study
BCMB3001 Gene and Genome Regulation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Christie Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2h/week, lab 6h/fortnight for 12 weeks Prerequisites: 6 credit points from (BCMB2X01 or BMED2802 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2003) and 6 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB2X02 or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2XXX or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001) Prohibitions: BCHM3X71 or BCMB3901 Assumed knowledge: Intermediate biochemistry and molecular biology Assessment: 3 x laboratory reports (6% each), online quiz (2%), 1000-wd formal report (10%), presentation (5%), 6 x in-semester quizzes (2% each), final exam (53%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Virtually every cell in your body contains the same DNA, but each one of your cell types uses a distinct subset of genes to define its function throughout its lifetime at every step along its developmental pathway. This unit of study will lead you to appreciate the mechanisms by which cells switch on or switch off genes at different times, in different places and in response to different signals. You will discover how our cells walk the fine line between repairing genetic damage and generating genetic diversity. You will also explore how manipulation of the genome through natural or targeted mutation can contribute to, prevent or treat disease. Our practicals, together with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for modern molecular biology, ranging from laboratory-based experiments to bioinformatics, in silico and virtual reality studies. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with senior level skills and knowledge to support your studies and careers in the cellular and molecular biosciences.
BCMB3901 Gene and Genome Regulation (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Christie Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2h/week, lab 6h/fortnight for 12 weeks Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [6 credit points from (BCMB2X01 or BMED2802 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2003) and 6 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB2X02 or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2XXX or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)] Prohibitions: BCHM3X71 or BCMB3001 Assumed knowledge: Intermediate Biochemistry (2000 level). Assessment: 3 x laboratory reports (6% each), online quiz (2%), 1000-wd formal report (10%), presentation (5%), 6 x in-semester quizzes (2% each), final exam (53%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Virtually every cell in your body contains the same DNA, but each one of your cell types uses a distinct subset of genes to define its function throughout its lifetime at every step along its developmental pathway. This unit of study will lead you to appreciate the mechanisms by which cells switch on or switch off genes at different times, in different places and in response to different signals. You will discover how our cells walk the fine line between repairing genetic damage and generating genetic diversity. You will also explore how manipulation of the genome through natural or targeted mutation can contribute to, prevent or treat disease. Our practicals, together with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for modern molecular biology, ranging from laboratory-based experiments to bioinformatics, in silico and virtual reality studies. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with senior level skills and knowledge to support your studies and careers in the cellular and molecular biosciences. Gene and Genome Regulation (Advanced) has the same overall structure and lecture content as BCMB3001 but the material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BCMB3901 participate in a partially varied practical and tutorial program that focuses on developing skills in experimental design, critical thinking, data analysis and communication.
BCMB3002 Protein Function and Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 h/week, lab 6 h/fortnight for 12 weeks Prerequisites: 6 credit points from (BCMB2X02 or BCHM2X71) and 6 credit points from (BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001) Prohibitions: BCHM3X81 or BCMB3902 Assumed knowledge: Intermediate biochemistry and molecular biology Assessment: 1000-wd lab report (10%), 2 x in-semester quizzes (theory; 5% each), skills-based task (theory of practical component; 10%), 4 x 400-wd short lab report (10%), group presentation and individual report (10%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Proteins are the major doing molecules in biology. Their molecular make-up gives them a much more diverse set of properties than any other biological or synthetic polymer, leading to a vast array of different structures and functions. In this unit of study, you will learn about the structure, dynamics and interactions of proteins, and how those properties influence their myriad roles in nature. You will discover how these complex molecules are thought to have evolved, how they are made and dismantled, how they fold, and drive key processes inside and outside cells. You will also explore how the properties of proteins can be modulated by other molecules, or engineered to develop proteins with new functions or properties for use in biotechnology, medicine, bioremediation and industry. Our practicals, other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for protein biochemistry ranging from protein visualization, quantification, purification and enzymatic activity, to in silico and virtual reality studies. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with senior level skills and knowledge to support your studies and careers in the cellular and molecular biosciences.
BCMB3902 Protein Function and Engineering (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 h/week, lab 6 h/fortnight for 12 weeks, 2-4 additional tutorial/online discussion groups throughout the semester Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [6 credit points from (BCMB2X02 or BCHM2X71) and 6 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)] Prohibitions: BCHM3X81 or BCMB3002 Assumed knowledge: Intermediate Biochemistry (2000 level). Assessment: 1000-wd lab report (10%), 2 x in-semester quizzes (theory; 5% each), skills-based task (theory of practical component; 10%), 4 x 400-wd short lab report (10%), group presentation and individual report (10%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Proteins are the major doing molecules in biology. Their molecular make-up gives them a much more diverse set of properties than any other biological or synthetic polymer, leading to a vast array of different structures and functions. In this unit of study, you will learn about the structure, dynamics and interactions of proteins, and how those properties influence their myriad roles in nature. You will discover how these complex molecules are thought to have evolved, how they are made and dismantled, how they fold, and drive key processes inside and outside cells. You will also explore how the properties of proteins can be modulated by other molecules, or engineered to develop proteins with new functions or properties for use in biotechnology, medicine, bioremediation and industry. Our practicals, other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for protein biochemistry ranging from protein visualization, quantification, purification and enzymatic activity, to in silico and virtual reality studies. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with senior level skills and knowledge to support your studies and careers in the cellular and molecular biosciences. Protein Function and Engineering (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BCMB3002 but the material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BCMB3902 participate in a partially varied practical and tutorial program that focuses on developing skills in experimental design, critical thinking, data analysis and communication.
BCMB3003 Biochemistry of Human Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 2 hrs/week, practical 3 hrs/fortnight (up to 7 practicals in total per student) Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MEDS2003 or MBLG2X01) or [6 cp (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MEDS2003 or MBLG2X01) and 6 credit points from (AMED3001 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 and BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)] or 12 credit points from (BMED2401 and BMED2405) Prohibitions: BCMB3903 or (BCHM3X72 and BCHM3X82) Assumed knowledge: Intermediate protein chemistry and biochemistry concepts Assessment: 2 x 200-wd lab book report (5% each), scientific paper (15%), in-class quiz (20%), final exam (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Diseases are ultimately the result of an imbalance of cellular function. Causes for such dysfunction are diverse and include mutations of our DNA, altered gene expression and external stimuli such as infection. This unit will investigate how defects in key cell functions including gene expression, signalling, biomolecular interactions and metabolic processes lead to diseases. The molecular causes and biochemical processes that underlie cancer, aging and neurodegeneration will be used to illustrate the relationships between these processes and how our understanding of these commonalities is allowing us to solve complex health problems. Associations to other diseases will be integrated into the course to give a broader understanding of how key biochemical processes are linked to a wide range of disorders. In the practicals you will use experimental approaches to study cell proliferation and death, protein misfolding, the hallmarks of cancer and some neurodegenerative diseases. By the end of this unit you will have gained foundational skills and knowledge that will support further studies and careers in the life and medical sciences.
BCMB3903 Biochemistry of Human Disease (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 2 hrs/week, practical 3 hours per fortnight (up to 7 practicals in total per student) , four one-hour seminars, one poster session to present poster Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MEDS2003 or MBLG2X01) or [6 credit points from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MEDS2003 or MBLG2X01) and 6 credit points from (AMED3001 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 and BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MEDS2002 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001)] or 12 credit points from (BMED2401 and BMED2405)] Prohibitions: BCMB3003 or (BCHM3X72 and BCHM3X82) Assumed knowledge: Students should understand basic concepts in human, mammalian, plant and/or prokaryotic biology. Students should have a basic understanding of the 'genome' and of the central dogma of molecular biology (gene transcription and protein translation). Additional knowledge of basic chemistry and protein biochemistry will be helpful. Assessment: 2 x 200-wd lab book report (3% each), poster design and presentation (7%), 400-wd written report (6%), 400-wd short essay (6%), in class quiz (20%), final exam (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Diseases are ultimately the result of an imbalance of cellular function. Causes for such dysfunction are diverse and include mutations of our DNA, altered gene expression and external stimuli such as infection. This unit will investigate how defects in key cell functions including gene expression, signalling, biomolecular interactions and metabolic processes lead to diseases. The molecular causes and biochemical processes that underlie cancer, aging and neurodegeneration will be used to illustrate the relationships between these processes and how our understanding of these commonalities is allowing us to solve complex health problems. Associations to other diseases will be integrated into the course to give a broader understanding of how key biochemical processes are linked to a wide range of disorders. In the practicals you will use experimental approaches to study cell proliferation and death, protein misfolding, the hallmarks of cancer and some neurodegenerative diseases. By the end of this unit you will have gained foundational skills and knowledge that will support further studies and careers in the life and medical sciences. The lecture component of this advanced unit will be the same as for the mainstream unit BCMB3003. In the practicals you will investigate similar concepts, however, the experiments are designed to cover a wider range of techniques, and you will analyse the results in more depth. You will present scientific findings in a poster session to academics from the School of Life and Environmental Sciences (SOLES). In addition, to relate the course content to current research and application, you will attend a series of four research seminars relating to the lecture content that will be given by experts in their field.
BCMB3004 Beyond The Genome

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 2 hrs/week, practicals 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (AMED3001 or BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001) Prohibitions: BCHM3X92 or BCMB3904 Assumed knowledge: Intermediate protein chemistry and biochemistry concepts Assessment: 4 x in-practical reports (10%), take-home computational practical (5%), 1000-1500wd scientific report (10%), mid-semester quiz (10%), 1500-2000wd data analysis and interpretation scientific report (15%) final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The sequencing of the human genome was a landmark achievement in science and medicine, marking the 'Age of Genomics'. Now we can access the blueprints for life, but need to uncover how those blueprints work, allowing organisms to respond to internal and external environmental changes, and how we can utilise this plethora of DNA sequence information to improve human and planetary health. This unit will investigate the function of the genome by examining the proteome, metabolome and beyond. You will investigate links between the central dogma of molecular biology and the complexities of living genomes - from modifications that massively increase diversity to the dynamic metabolome. You will explore fundamental cellular processes and discover how they are shaped by the proteome via gene expression, post-translational modification and protein complex formation. These processes will be examined in the context of human health and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders (e. g. type 2 diabetes) to demonstrate how global approaches can define, diagnose and help develop treatments for disease. You will practice methods employed in the post-genome era, including the 'Multi-omics' approaches that provide a global view of living systems, and discover how they are applied to solve problems in biology, biomedicine and agriculture. By the end of the unit students will understand why global 'omics approaches are needed in the post-genome era and know how best to apply such tools to given biological and biomedical problems.
BCMB3904 Beyond The Genome (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 2 hrs/week, practicals 3 hrs/week, 4 x 1 hr advanced tutorials, 8 x 1 hr advanced practicals Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in 12 credit points from (AMED3001 or BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCHM3XXX or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or BCMB3XXX or BIOL2X29 or BMED2401 or BMED2405 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X01 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or PCOL2X21 or QBIO2001) Prohibitions: BCHM3X92 or BCMB3004 Assumed knowledge: Students should understand basic concepts in human, mammalian, plant and/or prokaryotic biology. Students should have a basic understanding of the 'genome' and of the central dogma of molecular biology (gene transcription and protein translation). Additional knowledge of basic chemistry and protein biochemistry will be helpful. Assessment: 4 x in-practical reports (10%), take-home computational practical (5%), 1000-1500wd scientific report (10%), mid-semester quiz (10%), 1500-2000wd data analysis and interpretation scientific report (15%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The sequencing of the human genome was a landmark achievement in science and medicine, marking the 'Age of Genomics'. Now we can access the blueprints for life, but need to uncover how those blueprints work, allowing organisms to respond to internal and external environmental changes, and how we can utilise this plethora of DNA sequence information to improve human and planetary health. This unit will investigate the function of the genome by examining the proteome, metabolome and beyond. You will investigate links between the central dogma of molecular biology and the complexities of living genomes - from modifications that massively increase diversity to the dynamic metabolome. You will explore fundamental cellular processes and discover how they are shaped by the proteome via gene expression, post-translational modification and protein complex formation. These processes will be examined in the context of human health and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders (e. g. type 2 diabetes) to demonstrate how global approaches can define, diagnose and help develop treatments for disease. You will practice methods employed in the post-genome era, including the 'Multi-omics' approaches that provide a global view of living systems, and discover how they are applied to solve problems in biology, biomedicine and agriculture. Beyond the Genome (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BCMB3004 but focuses on a more advanced level of practical work, data analysis and interpretation, using cutting-edge technologies. By the end of the unit students will understand why global 'omics approaches are needed in the post-genome era and know how best to apply such tools to given biological and biomedical problems.
NUTM3001 Introductory Nutrition and Metabolism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Wendy Stuart-Smith Session: Semester 1,Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures, one tutorial per week, 1-5hour laboratory/presentation class most weeks Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Assumed knowledge: PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06 Assessment: In semester reports, presentations and quizzes (40%) one 2.5-hour exam (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Nutrition is a multidisciplinary science that covers the role of food in health and disease. Advances in biomolecular science have increased the focus of nutrition on the metabolic pathways that transform nutrients. This unit of study aims to explore fundamentals in nutritional science to develop an understanding of the core concepts in human nutrition through exploring the role of macro- and micro-nutrients and their interaction across the lifespan, mostly in the healthy individual. The focus will be the biochemical reactions that take place in cells, how these are influenced by different nutrients and what are the implications for the whole body. This unit of study will consider the structure and chemical characteristics of nutrients, their metabolism, and their roles in health and disease. This unit of study will explore how animal models, cell culture techniques and human trials have contributed to advancing nutritional science. Examples from current research will be used to illustrate how nutrients are metabolised, mostly in health, and the expanding scope of research in human nutrition.
Textbooks
Essentials of Human Nutrition 4th Edition, 2012. Edited by Jim Mann and A. Stewart Truswell. Oxford University Press. ISBN: 9780199566341*