Table 1: Medicinal Chemistry

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Medicinal Chemistry

For a major in Medicinal Chemistry, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points comprising:
(i) (PCOL3011/3911 or MCHM3001/3901) and PCOL3012/3912; and
(ii) CHEM3110/3910 and CHEM3115/3915.
Note that there are intermediate prerequisites for the core senior units of study. Junior and intermediate units of study should be selected to permit progression to the required senior units of study.
PCOL3011
Toxicology
6    P (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405)
N PCOL3911
Semester 1
PCOL3911
Toxicology (Advanced)
6    P a mark of 70 or above in [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405)]
N PCOL3011
Semester 1
PCOL3012
Drug Design and Development
6    P (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405)] or 12cp from BCMB2XXX
N PCOL3912
Semester 1
PCOL3912
Drug Design and Development (Advanced)
6    P a mark of 70 or above in {(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405)] or 12cp from BCMB2XXX}
N PCOL3012
Semester 1
CHEM3110
Biomolecules: Properties and Reactions
6    P [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)
N CHEM3910
Semester 1
CHEM3910
Biomolecules: Properties and Reactions Adv
6    P [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991))
N CHEM3110
Semester 1
CHEM3115
Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry
6    P [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)
N CHEM3915
Semester 2
CHEM3915
Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry (Adv)
6    P [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991))
N CHEM3115
Semester 2
MCHM3001
From Molecules to Therapeutics
6    P [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405)] or (12cp from BCMB2XXX) and [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2521 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)]
N MCHM3901
Semester 1
MCHM3901
From Molecules to Therapeutics (Advanced)
6    P A mark of 70 or above in each of [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405) or in each unit of (12cp from BCMB2XXX)] AND a mark of 70 or above in [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2521 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)]
N MCHM3001
Semester 1

Medicinal Chemistry

For a major in Medicinal Chemistry, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points comprising:
(i) (PCOL3011/3911 or MCHM3001/3901) and PCOL3012/3912; and
(ii) CHEM3110/3910 and CHEM3115/3915.
Note that there are intermediate prerequisites for the core senior units of study. Junior and intermediate units of study should be selected to permit progression to the required senior units of study.
PCOL3011 Toxicology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Slade Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week and one 3 hour tutorial/practical every 2 weeks and two practical sessions each 3 hours in length. Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405) Prohibitions: PCOL3911 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, tutorial presentations, assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students with a basic understanding of pharmacology to the discipline of toxicology. The study of toxicology is central to the assessment of drug safety in drug development and in the explanation of toxicology associated with registered drugs (adverse drug reactions) and drug-drug interactions. These issues as well as the pharmacogenetic basis of adverse reactions will be considered. Environmental toxicology, particularly toxic reactions to environmental agents such as asbestos and pesticides, and target organ toxicology (lung, liver, CNS) are also covered. The diverse world of plants and animal toxins will also be explored. As a final consequence of exposure to many toxicants, the biology and causes of cancer are discussed. As part of the unit students are introduced to basic ideas about the collection and analysis of data from human and animal populations, both in the structured situation of clinical trials, forensic problems and in analysis of epidemiological data.
Textbooks
Klaasen, Curtis D. Casarett and Doull's Essentials of Toxicology 2 ed. McGraw Hill. 2010, or, by the same authors: Toxicology: The Basic Science of Poisons. 7 ed. McGraw Hill. 2008.
PCOL3911 Toxicology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Slade Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week and one 3 hour tutorial/practical every second week. and two practical sessions each 3 hours in length Prerequisites: a mark of 70 or above in [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405)] Prohibitions: PCOL3011 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, tutorial presentations, assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will consist of the lecture and practical components of PCOL3011. Students will be set special advanced assignments and additional practical data management activities related to the material covered in lectures and practical work. These may also involve advanced practical work or detailed investigation of a theoretical problem.
Textbooks
Klaasen, Curtis D. Casarett and Doull's Essentials of Toxicology 3rd ed. McGraw Hill. 2015.. or, by the same authors: Toxicology: The Basic Science of Poisons. 8th ed. McGraw Hill. 2013.
PCOL3012 Drug Design and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Rachel Codd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per week. Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405)] or 12cp from BCMB2XXX Prohibitions: PCOL3912 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, class and online quizzes, assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students with a basic understanding of pharmacology to the field of medicinal chemistry associated with drug design and development. The course covers the fundamental aspects of drug discovery and development with reference to the essentials of chemistry and illustrates drug development with examples that include neuraminidase inhibitors and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The role of computers in drug design is emphasised by classwork and assignments on molecular modelling and structure-activity relationships. The course also extends to a section on the design of diverse pharmacological agents which include compounds for imaging by positron emission tomography (PET), and kinase inhibitors.
Textbooks
Patrick, Graham L. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry. 5th edition. Oxford University Press. 2013.
PCOL3912 Drug Design and Development (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Rachel Codd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per week. Prerequisites: a mark of 70 or above in {(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405)] or 12cp from BCMB2XXX} Prohibitions: PCOL3012 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, in class and online quizzes, assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will consist of the lecture and practical components of PCOL3012. Students will be set special advanced assignments related to the material covered in core areas. These may also involve advanced practical work or detailed investigation of a theoretical problem.
Textbooks
Patrick, Graham L. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry. 5th edition. Oxford University Press. 2013.
CHEM3110 Biomolecules: Properties and Reactions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3910 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
DNA, proteins and carbohydrates represent three classes of essential biomolecules present in all biological systems. This unit will cover the structure, reactivity and properties of biomolecules and the building blocks from which these molecules are assembled. Interactions between biomolecules and metalions, small molecules and other biomolecules will be covered and the chemical tools for studying biomolecules highlighted. The design and synthesis of small molecules which mimic the functions of biomolecules will also be illustrated.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3910 Biomolecules: Properties and Reactions Adv

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)) Prohibitions: CHEM3110 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
DNA, proteins and carbohydrates represent three classes of essential biomolecules present in all biological systems. This unit will cover the structure, reactivity and properties of biomolecules and the building blocks from which these molecules are assembled. Interactions between biomolecules and metal ions, small molecules and other biomolecules will be covered and the chemical tools for studying biomolecules highlighted. The design and synthesis of small molecules which mimic the functions of biomolecules will also be illustrated. CHEM3910 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3110 students but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3115 Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3915 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The development of new pharmaceuticals fundamentally relies on the ability to design and synthesize new compounds. Synthesis is an enabling discipline for medicinal chemistry - without it, the development of new drugs cannot progress from design to implementation, and ultimately to a cure. This unit will tackle important factors in drug design, and will highlight the current arsenal of methods used in the discovery of new drugs, including rational drug design, high throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry. We will develop a logical approach to planning a synthesis of a particular target structure. The synthesis and chemistry of heterocycles, which comprise some 40% of all known organic compounds and are particularly common in pharmaceuticals, will be outlined. Examples will include important ring systems present in biological systems, such as pyrimidines and purines (DNA and RNA), imidazole and thiazole (amino acids and vitamins) and porphyrins (natural colouring substances and oxygen carrying component of blood). Throughout the course, the utility of synthesis in medicinal chemistry will be illustrated with case studies such as anti-influenza (Relenza), anaesthetic (benzocaine), anti-inflammatory (Vioxx), antihypertensive (pinacidil) and cholesterol-lowering (Lovastatin) drugs.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3915 Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)) Prohibitions: CHEM3115 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The development of new pharmaceuticals fundamentally relies on the ability to design and synthesize new compounds. Synthesis is an enabling discipline for medicinal chemistry - without it, the development of new drugs cannot progress from design to implementation, and ultimately to a cure. This unit will tackle important factors in drug design, and will highlight the current arsenal of methods used in the discovery of new drugs, including rational drug design, high throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry. We will develop a logical approach to planning a synthesis of a particular target structure. The synthesis and chemistry of heterocycles, which comprise some 40% of all known organic compounds and are particularly common in pharmaceuticals, will be outlined. Examples will include important ring systems present in biological systems, such as pyrimidines and purines (DNA and RNA), imidazole and thiazole (amino acids and vitamins) and porphyrins (natural colouring substances and oxygen carrying component of blood). Throughout the course, the utility of synthesis in medicinal chemistry will be illustrated with case studies such as anti-influenza (Relenza), anaesthetic (benzocaine), anti-inflammatory (Vioxx), antihypertensive (pinacidil) and cholesterol-lowering (Lovastatin) drugs. CHEM3915 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3115 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
MCHM3001 From Molecules to Therapeutics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Margaret Sunde Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week Prerequisites: [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405)] or (12cp from BCMB2XXX) and [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2521 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)] Prohibitions: MCHM3901 Assessment: 2 x in-class test (10%), oral presentation (10%), 2 x group workshop (20%), lab report (20%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Workshops and labs up to 4hr/week for 12 wks Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Major changes to the way we discover and develop new medicines have taken place in recent years. Sequencing of the human genome has revolutionised drug target identification and therapeutic design. Approaches that combine molecular biology and intensive data analysis are key to the development of effective personalised and precision therapies. New methods in organic synthesis have accelerated how we explore chemical space and parallel developments in nanotechnology are driving innovative drug delivery methods. Improvements in cell, tissue and animal models of human disease are changing how drugs are identified and tested. In this unit, you will explore how these new ideas and technologies are transforming medicinal chemistry. You will learn and apply such techniques to the molecular-level understanding of diseases and the design of effective therapeutics. You will learn the procedures leading to drug registration and regulation. You will participate in enquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts of the unit and develop your skills in cutting-edge methods used in modern medicinal chemistry. By studying this unit you will build knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in creating therapeutics that will impact lives.
MCHM3901 From Molecules to Therapeutics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Margaret Sunde Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/week. Students in the Advanced unit of study will work in smaller groups and tackle alternative higher-level tasks in workshops and labs that broaden and extend their knowledge and expertise. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in each of [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405) or in each unit of (12cp from BCMB2XXX)] AND a mark of 70 or above in [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2521 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)] Prohibitions: MCHM3001 Assessment: 2 x in-class test (10%), oral presentation (10%), 2 x group workshop (20%), lab report (20%), final exam (40%). Practical field work: workshops and labs up to 4hr/week for 12 wks. Students in the Advanced unit of study will work in smaller groups and tackle alternative higher-level tasks in workshops and labs that broaden and extend their knowledge and expertise. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Major changes to the way we discover and develop new medicines have taken place in recent years. Sequencing of the human genome has revolutionised drug target identification and therapeutic design. Genomics approaches that combine molecular biology and intensive data analysis are key to the development of personalised and precision therapies. New methods in organic synthesis have accelerated how we explore chemical space, developments in nanotechnology are driving innovative drug delivery methods. In this unit you will explore how these new ideas and technologies transforming medicinal chemistry. You will learn and apply such techniques to the molecular-level understanding of diseases and the design of effective therapeutics. You will learn the procedures leading to drug registration and regulation. You will participate in enquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts of the unit and develop your skills in cutting-edge methods used in modern medicinal chemistry. By studying this unit you will build knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in creating therapeutics that will impact lives. You will learn and apply such techniques to the molecular-level understanding of diseases and the design of effective therapeutics. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but the material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components, which may vary from year to year.