Table 1: Neuroscience

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Neuroscience

For a major in Neuroscience, students are required to complete at least 24 credit points of senior units of study from PCOL3022/3922, NEUR3005/3905, NEUR3006/3906, NEUR3003/3903, NEUR3004/3904, PSYC3011, PSYC3012, PSYC3013, PSYC3014/3914.
At least two subject areas must be chosen from the three subject areas NEUR, PSYC and PCOL.
Intermediate units of study
ANAT2010
Concepts of Neuroanatomy
6    P 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903
N ANAT2910 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808
Semester 2
ANAT2910
Concepts in Neuroanatomy Adv
6    P A mark of 70 or above in BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903
N ANAT2010 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
BCMB2001
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
6    P 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003
Semester 1
BCMB2901
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Advanced)
6    P A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or MEDS2003
Semester 1
GEGE2001
Genetics and Genomics
6    A Mendelian genetics; mechanisms of evolution; molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance; and gene regulation and expression.
N GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072
Semester 1
Semester 2
GEGE2901
Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)
6    A Mendelian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression.
P Annual average mark of at least 70
N GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972
Semester 1
Semester 2
PCOL2011
Pharmacology Fundamentals

This unit of study is not available in 2020

6    A BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XX1
P 6cp from CHEM1XXX
N PCOL2555 orBMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808
Semester 1
PCOL2012
Pharmacology: Drugs and People

This unit of study is not available in 2020

6    A (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XX1) and PCOL2011
P 6cp from CHEM1XXX
N PCOL2555
Semester 2
PCOL2021
Key Concepts in Pharmacology
6    A [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3)
P CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903
N PCOL2555 or PCOL2011 or MEDS2002 or BMED2401 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2002
Semester 1
PCOL2022
Drugs in Contemporary Society
6    A PCOL2021
P [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N PCOL2555 or PCOL2012
Semester 2
PHSI2005
Integrated Physiology A

This unit of study is not available in 2020

6    P 6cp from CHEM1XXX or 6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1)
N PHSI2905 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
Semester 1
PHSI2905
Integrated Physiology A (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2020

6    P A mark of 75 or above in CHEM1XXX or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1)
N PHSI2005 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
Semester 1
PHSI2006
Integrated Physiology B

This unit of study is not available in 2020

6    P 6cp from CHEM1XXX or 6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1)
N PHSI2906 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. It is recommended that PHSI2005 is completed before enrolling in PHSI2006.
Semester 2
PHSI2906
Integrated Physiology B (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2020

6    P A mark of 75 or above in CHEM1XXX or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1)
N PHSI2006 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
Semester 2
PHSI2007
Key Concepts in Physiology
6    A Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01)
P 6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]
N PHSI2907 or MEDS2001
Semester 1
PHSI2907
Key Concepts in Physiology (Advanced)
6    A Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01)
P A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]}
N PHSI2007 or MEDS2001

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
PHSI2008
Integrated Physiology
6    A Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)]
P [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]}
N PHSI2908
Semester 2
PHSI2908
Integrated Physiology (Advanced)
6    A Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)]
P A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]}
N PHSI2008

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
PSYC2010
Brain and Behaviour

This unit of study is not available in 2020

6    P PSYC1002
N PSYC2015 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017 or PSYC2910

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
PSYC2910
Brain and Behaviour (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2020

6    P A mark of at least 75 in PSYC1002
N PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
PSYC2013
Cognitive and Social Psychology

This unit of study is not available in 2020

6    P PSYC1001 and PSYC1002
N PSYC2015 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
PSYC2015
Brain and Behavioural Psychology
6    P PSYC1002
N PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2915
Semester 1
PSYC2915
Brain and Behavioural Psychology (Advanced)
6    P A mark of 75 or greater in PSYC1002
N PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2015
Semester 1
PSYC2016
Perception, Cognition, and Intelligence
6    P PSYC1002
N PSYC2013 or PSYC2014
Semester 2
PSYC2017
Personality and Social Psychology
6    P PSYC1001 and PSYC1002
N PSYC2013 or PSYC2014
Semester 2
Senior units of study
For a major in Neuroscience, 24 credit points must be chosen from any of the following units: PCOL3022/3922, NEUR3005/3905, NEUR3006/3906, NEUR3003/3903, NEUR3004/3904, PSYC3011/3911, PSYC3012, PSYC3013/3913, PSYC3014/3914. *Legacy units: NEUR3001/3901, NEUR3002/3902.
At least two subject areas must be chosen from the three subject areas NEUR, PSYC and PCOL.
NEUR3003
Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience
6    A Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain".
P ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07
N NEUR3903
Semester 2
NEUR3903
Cellular and Developmental Neurosci. (Adv)
6    A Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain".
P ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year
N NEUR3003

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
NEUR3004
Integrative Neuroscience
6    A Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain".
P ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07
N NEUR3904
Semester 2
NEUR3904
Integrative Neuroscience (Advanced)
6    A Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain".
P ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year
N NEUR3004

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
NEUR3005
Functional Neuroanatomy
6    A Fundamental knowledge of human anatomy and neuroanatomy (ANAT2X10 or MEDS2005 or BMED2402)
N NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3905
Semester 1
NEUR3905
Functional Neuroanatomy (Advanced)
6    A Fundamental knowledge of human anatomy and neuroanatomy (ANAT2X10 or MEDS2005 or BMED2402)
P Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year
N NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3005
Semester 1
NEUR3006
Neural Information Processing
6    A (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402
P 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units
N NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3906
Semester 1
NEUR3906
Neural Information Processing (Advanced)
6    A (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402
P 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year
N NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3006
Semester 1
PCOL3022
Neuropharmacology
6    P (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015)
N PCOL3922
Semester 2
PCOL3922
Neuropharmacology (Advanced)
6    P A mark of 70 or above in [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015)]
N PCOL3022
Semester 2
PSYC3011
Learning and Behaviour
6    P (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and PSYC2012
N PSYC3911
Semester 1
PSYC3911
Learning and Behaviour (Advanced)
6    P (A mark of 75 or above in PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and PSYC2012
N PSYC3011
Semester 1
PSYC3012
Cognitive Psychology
6    P PSYC2012 and (PSYC2013 or PSYC2016)
Semester 1
PSYC3013
Perceptual Systems
6    P (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2016) and PSYC2012
N PSYC3913
Semester 2
PSYC3913
Perceptual Systems (Advanced)
6    P (A mark of 75 or above in PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2016) and PSYC2012
N PSYC3013
Semester 2
PSYC3014
Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience
6    P [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910)]
N PSYC3914
Semester 2
PSYC3914
Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience Adv
6    P [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910)]
N PSYC3014
Semester 2

Neuroscience

For a major in Neuroscience, students are required to complete at least 24 credit points of senior units of study from PCOL3022/3922, NEUR3005/3905, NEUR3006/3906, NEUR3003/3903, NEUR3004/3904, PSYC3011, PSYC3012, PSYC3013, PSYC3014/3914.
At least two subject areas must be chosen from the three subject areas NEUR, PSYC and PCOL.
Intermediate units of study
ANAT2010 Concepts of Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2910 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments, one written assignment Practical field work: Tutorials: One 2-hour practical tutorial in 5 sessions during semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study, in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.
ANAT2910 Concepts in Neuroanatomy Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2010 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one 1200 word critical scientific review article, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments Practical field work: 1 x 1 hr practical Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study and in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Required text: Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.
BCMB2001 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quizzes, exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. Our practicals, along with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to widely applied and cutting edge tools that are essential for modern biochemistry and molecular biology. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the life and medical sciences.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
BCMB2901 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, quiz, skills-based assessment, exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. The advanced laboratory component will provide students with an authentic research laboratory experience while in the theory component, current research topics will be presented in a problem-based format through dedicated advanced tutorial sessions. This material will be assessed by creative student-centered activities supported by eLearning platforms.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week; one 3-hour practical session per week; and one tutorial per fortnight Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics; mechanisms of evolution; molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance; and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes and presentation (50%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week; one 3-hour practical session per week; and one tutorial per fortnight Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, final exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and/or in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.
PCOL2011 Pharmacology Fundamentals

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hilary Lloyd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures (2 x1 hr per week); wet and dry labs (5 x4 hrs), data anaylsis tutorials (2 x 2 hrs); workshops (6 x 2 hrs) Prerequisites: 6cp from CHEM1XXX Prohibitions: PCOL2555 orBMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XX1 Assessment: In-semester (40%), which consists of 4 x on-line quizzes, 2 x lab reports, 3 x research topics, 1 x oral presentation, end-of-semester examination (60%), which consists of multiple choice and short answer questions Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides the fundamental grounding in four basic areas in Pharmacology: (1) principles of drug action (2) pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism (3) experimental design and autonomic pharmacology, and (4) drug design. The delivery of material involves lectures, practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. Practical classes provide students with the opportunity of acquiring technical experience and teamwork skills. Problem-based workshops are based on real-life scenarios of drug use in the community. These workshops require students to integrate information obtained in lectures in order to provide solutions to the problems. Online quizzes accompany each module and are to encourage continued learning throughout the semester.
Textbooks
Rang and Dale's Pharmacology, 8th Edition. H. P. Rang, J. M. Ritter, R. J. Flower, and G. Henderson, (Elsevier 2016 ). Medical Pharmacology at a Glance, 7th edn M.J. Neal: (Blackwell Scientific Publications, 2012).
PCOL2012 Pharmacology: Drugs and People

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hilary Lloyd Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures (2x1 hr per week); wet and dry labs (5 x 4 hrs), data analysis tutorials (2 x 2 hrs); workshops (6 x 2 hrs) Prerequisites: 6cp from CHEM1XXX Prohibitions: PCOL2555 Assumed knowledge: (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XX1) and PCOL2011 Assessment: In-semester (40%), which consists of 4 x on-line quizzes, 2 x lab reports, 3 x research topics, 1 x oral presentation, end-of-semester examination (60%), which consists of multiple choice and short answer questions Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines four important areas of Pharmacology: (1) Principles of drug action in the nervous system; (2) Drug abuse, addiction and analgesia; (3) Drug treatment of allergies and GI disorders; (4) Introduction to drug discovery and development. The delivery of material involves lectures, practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. Practical classes provide students with the opportunity of acquiring technical experience and teamwork skills. Problem-based workshops are based on real-life scenarios of drug use in the community. These workshops require students to apply information obtained in lectures and readings in order to 'solve' the problems. Workshop activities will include oral presentations.
Textbooks
Rang and Dale's Pharmacology, 8th Edition. H. P. Rang, J. M. Ritter, R. J. Flower, and G. Henderson, (Elsevier 2015 ). Medical Pharmacology at a Glance, 7th edn M.J. Neal: (Blackwell Scientific Publications, 2012).
PCOL2021 Key Concepts in Pharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brent McParland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: PCOL2555 or PCOL2011 or MEDS2002 or BMED2401 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2002 Assumed knowledge: [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) Assessment: Cognitive, problem-based examination (40%), poster presentation (10%), practical exercises (20%), written research topics (10%), online quizzes (10%), and contribution to online discussion (10%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Pharmacology is the study of the properties and biological actions of drugs and chemicals and the keys role they play in the prevention and treatment of human diseases. In this unit of study you will be introduced to the fundamental concepts in pharmacology: a) principles of drug action, b) pharmacokinetics and precision medicine, c) drug design, and d) drug development and regulation. Additionally, you will learn the tools pharmacologists use in their investigations and develop skills in laboratory and problem-based enquiry. In both face-to-face and online learning environments you will learn the core concepts underpinning pharmacology and will have the opportunity to explore and apply these concepts through practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. By undertaking this unit you will not only learn to view health and disease through the lens of a pharmacologist, you will further develop valuable skills in critical thinking and problem solving, communication, digital literacy, teamwork and interdisciplinary effectiveness. This unit will help you to develop a coherent and connected knowledge of the medical sciences and their broad applications, while also giving you the foundations for increasing your disciplinary expertise in pharmacology.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site. Links to other learning technologies will be available via Canvas LMS. Textbooks will be available for purchase from Co-op bookshop, in hard copy and online via the library.
PCOL2022 Drugs in Contemporary Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hilary Lloyd Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: PCOL2555 or PCOL2012 Assumed knowledge: PCOL2021 Assessment: Online quizzes (10%), oral presentation (10%), practical exercises (20%), written research topics (10%), online discussion posts (10%), Final Exam (problem-based) (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The prevention, control and treatment of many diseases and conditions remain major challenges within contemporary society. These challenges provide unique opportunities for pharmacologists to discover novel molecular targets for drug action. In this unit of study you will examine six major conditions that affect a range of body systems where improvements in treatment using pharmacotherapies are needed. In learning about unresolved issues, you will also evaluate the complexities of pharmacological treatment, including: ethical considerations, strength of evidence of drug efficacy, as well as safety and tolerability aspects of drug use. Using the tools of pharmacological enquiry you will further your practical and cognitive skills through laboratory- and problem-based enquiry. In both face-to-face and online learning environments you will explore a range of pharmacotherapeutic options currently available and will have the opportunity to research and apply your knowledge and understanding to unresolved health-related problems. By undertaking this unit you will develop your disciplinary expertise in pharmacology and further your skills in critical thinking, problem solving, communication, digital literacy, teamwork and interdisciplinary effectiveness.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site. Links to other learning technologies will be available via Canvas LMS. Textbooks will be available for purchase from Co-op bookshop, in hard copy and online via the library.
PHSI2005 Integrated Physiology A

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Morris Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures per week. Prerequisites: 6cp from CHEM1XXX or 6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) Prohibitions: PHSI2905 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: One written exam; individual written assessments, and quizzes (100%) Practical field work: One 3 hour practical or one 3 hour tutorial per week. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
This unit of study offers an introduction to the basic concepts underpinning physiology, excitable cell (nerve and muscle) physiology, as well as the functions of the nervous system (central processing, and sensory and motor systems). It also incorporates cardiovascular and exercise physiology. The practical component involves experiments on humans and isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Tutorial sessions develop critical thinking, the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th edition. 2015. ISBN-10: 0321981227; ISBN-13: 978-0321981226 (International Edition)
PHSI2905 Integrated Physiology A (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Atomu Sawatari Session: Semester 1 Classes: Five 1 hour lectures, one 3 hour practical and one 3 hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students will be required to attend the designated Advanced Practical and Tutorial sessions. Students will also be exempt from all Inquiry-based learning tutorials. Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in CHEM1XXX or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) Prohibitions: PHSI2005 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: One written exam; individual and group oral presentations, 2 practical reports (reports will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
This unit of study is an extension of PHSI2005 for talented students with an interest in Physiology and Physiological research. The lecture component of the course is run in conjunction with PHSI2005. This unit of study offers a basic introduction to the functions of the nervous system, excitable cell (nerve and muscle) physiology, sensory and motor systems, and central processing. It also incorporates haematology and cardiovascular physiology. The practical component involves experiments on humans and isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Inquiry-based learning sessions develop critical thinking and generic skills while demonstrating the integrative nature of physiology. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized, as well as group learning and team work. The course will provide an opportunity for students to apply and extend their understanding of physiological concepts by designing and conducting actual experiments. Small class sizes will provide a chance for students to interact directly with faculty members mentoring the practical sessions. Assessment for this stream will be based on oral group presentations and two practical reports. These items will replace some other assessable activities from the regular course.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2010. ISBN 10:0-321-1750071; ISBN 13:978-0-321-750075 (International Edition).
PHSI2006 Integrated Physiology B

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bronwyn McAllan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures per week, and one 3 hour practical or one 3 hour tutorial per week. There will be one 4 hour practical session. Prerequisites: 6cp from CHEM1XXX or 6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) Prohibitions: PHSI2906 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: Two written exams; group and individual written and oral presentations (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology. It is recommended that PHSI2005 is completed before enrolling in PHSI2006.
This unit of study offers a basic introduction to the functions of the remaining body systems: gastrointestinal, respiratory, haematology, endocrine, reproductive and renal. The practical component involves experiments on humans and computer simulations, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. The tutorial sessions develop critical thinking and graduate attributes while demonstrating the integrative nature of physiology. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized, as well as group learning and team work.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2012. ISBN-10: 0321750071. ISBN-13: 978-0321750075.
PHSI2906 Integrated Physiology B (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Atomu Sawatari Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures per week, and one 3 hour practical and/or one 3 hour tutorial per fortnight. Advanced students will be required to attend the designated Advanced Practical and Tutorial sessions. Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in CHEM1XXX or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) Prohibitions: PHSI2006 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: One written exam; individual and group oral presentations, 2 practical reports (reports will replace some other assessment items from regular course) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended for progression to Senior Physiology.
This unit of study is an extension of PHSI2006 for talented students with an interest in Physiology and Physiological research. The lecture component of the course is run in conjunction with PHSI2006. This unit of study gives a basic introduction to the remaining of the body systems: gastrointestinal, respiratory, endocrine, reproductive and renal. The practical component involves simple experiments on humans, isolated tissues, and computer simulations, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. Both oral and written communication skills are emphasised, as well as group learning. The course will provide an opportunity for students to apply and extend their understanding of physiological concepts by designing and conducting actual experiments. Small class sizes will provide a chance for students to interact directly with faculty members mentoring the practical sessions. Assessment for this stream will be based on oral group presentations and two practical reports. These items will replace some other assessable activities from the regular course.
Textbooks
Dee Unglaub Silverthorn. Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 6th edition. 2012. ISBN 10:0-321-750071; ISBN 13:978-0-321-750075 (International Edition).
PHSI2007 Key Concepts in Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hour lectures/week, 1 x 3 hours practical or tutorial/week Prerequisites: 6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903] Prohibitions: PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) Assessment: exam (40%), integrated task (10%), practical report (15%), quizzes (15%), mid-semester exam (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating from the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organ systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning, you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
Textbooks
Silverthorn D.U, Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Ed (Pearson, 2016)
PHSI2907 Key Concepts in Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hour lectures/week, 1 x 3 hours practical or tutorial/week Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2007 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) Assessment: exam (40%), project (25%), quizzes (15%), mid-semester exam (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will explore these concepts in four modules: compartmentalisation, cell specialisation, communication between cells and responding to the environment. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organs systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Furthermore, specialised activities in physiological research will allow small group learning and interaction with staff. Workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
Textbooks
Silverthorn D.U, Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Ed (Pearson, 2016)
PHSI2008 Integrated Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bronwyn McAllan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week, 1 x 3 hours practical or tutorial/week Prerequisites: [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2908 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)] Assessment: exam (40%), integrated task (10%), practical report and abstract (20%), individual report (10%), mid-semester exam (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The study of physiology is in essence the understanding of the integration of function and homeostasis. In this unit you will extend your learning in MEDS2001/PHSI2X07, applying your understanding of basic physiology to systems-based scenarios in three modules: sensory, metabolism and integrated physiology. This will consolidate your conceptual understanding of physiology and the homeostatic mechanisms that can change in disease. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, your understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the complex systems that regulate the human body and provide the platform for undertaking a major in Physiology in third year.
Textbooks
Silverthorn D.U, Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Ed (Pearson, 2016)
PHSI2908 Integrated Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bronwyn McAllan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week, 1 x 3 hours practical or tutorial/week Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2008 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)] Assessment: exam (40%), integrated task (10%), project (20%), individual report (10%), mid-semester exam (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The study of physiology is in essence the understanding of the integration of function and homeostasis. In this unit you will extend your learning in MEDS2001/PHSI2X07, applying your understanding of basic physiology to systems-based scenarios in three modules: sensory, metabolism and integrated physiology. This will consolidate your conceptual understanding of physiology and how the homeostatic mechanisms that can change in disease. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, your understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the complex systems that regulate the human body and provide the platform for undertaking a major in Physiology in third year.
PSYC2010 Brain and Behaviour

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures and 1x1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2015 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017 or PSYC2910 Assessment: 1x2hr examination, 1x1500 word report, 1 x quiz, 1 x oral presentation/debate (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This Unit of Study examines a range of phenomena and principles in behaviour, learning and perception, abnormal psychology and their relations to underlying neural substrates. The emphasis in learning is on instrumental conditioning and the principle of reinforcement, ranging from applications of this principle to its neural substrates. Also covered are motivational aspects of behaviour, such as punishment and avoidance. The Abnormal Psychology section will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sex and appetite, together with related neurochemical mechanisms and the effects of various psychopharmacological agents on these processes. A number of perceptual phenomena will be studied, such as motion detection, recognition of faces, identification of emotion, hearing and hearing loss, taste discrimination, and chronic pain. The practical classes are designed for students with an interest in clinical and therapeutic Psychology, and will allow students to design and implement a behaviour modification programme.
Textbooks
Bouton, M.E. (2007). Learning and Behavior: A Contemporary Synthesis. Sinauer.
PSYC2910 Brain and Behaviour (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures and 1x1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 75 in PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017 Assessment: 1x2hr examination, 1x1500 word report, 1 x quiz, 1 x oral presentation/debate (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This Unit of Study focuses on the Behavioural Sciences, Neurosciences, Abnormal Psychology and the study of perception. The lecture content is the same as PSYC2011, and examines a range of phenomena and principles in behaviour, learning and perception, and their relations to underlying neural substrates. The emphasis in learning is on instrumental conditioning and the principle of reinforcement, ranging from applications of this principle to its neural substrates. Also covered are motivational aspects of behaviour, such as punishment and avoidance. The Abnormal Psychology section will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sex and appetite, together with related neurochemical mechanisms and the effects of various psychopharmacological agents on these processes. A number of perceptual phenomena will be studied, such as motion detection, recognition of faces, identification of emotion, hearing and hearing loss, taste discrimination, and chronic pain. The practical classes differ from PSYC2011, as it is targeted for those who would like to learn more about the experimental study of behaviour and the neurosciences. Students will gain hands-on laboratory experience in how the principles and phenomena of behavioural neuroscience may be studied experimentally.
Textbooks
Bouton, M.E. (2007). Learning and Behavior: A Contemporary Synthesis. Sinauer.
PSYC2013 Cognitive and Social Psychology

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2015 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, major assignment (1500-2000 word essay/report), minor assignment (short written practical exercise and/or tutorial quiz) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit expands the depth and range of topics introduced in the first year lectures on Cognitive Processes, Social Psychology and Developmental Psychology. The section on Cognitive Processes focuses on current theories of memory, attention, and reasoning and discusses the methods and issues involved in investigating these processes in both healthy individuals and people with cognitive dysfunctions. The second section on Social Psychology examines salient social constructs such as impression management, and prejudice, and explores how mental processes affect social judgment and behaviour. The final section on Developmental Psychology presents and evaluates evidence about the early influences on children's social and cognitive development.
PSYC2015 Brain and Behavioural Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week x 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week x 12 weeks Prerequisites: PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2915 Assessment: In-class debate (5%), tutorial quiz (15%), scientific report proposal (10%), scientific report (20%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed for students who would like to learn about the core concepts of clinical and biobehavioural psychology, and their applications to therapies, organisations, and an individual's behaviour. The emphasis is on behaviour, emotions, and motivational processes. You will learn how to analyse the environmental cause of behaviours, and how to use reinforcements, punishments and incentives to modify and motivate behaviour. Clinical Psychology will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sexual disorders, and eating disorders. The way in which these processes arise and are shaped in people will be presented in the section on Developmental Psychology. Neuroscience will focus on the evolutionary, genetic, neurobiological, and pharmacological mechanisms underlying the phenomena taught in the other sections. The practical classes are designed for students with an interest in clinical and therapeutic Psychology, and will train students to design and implement a behaviour modification programme.
PSYC2915 Brain and Behavioural Psychology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week x 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week x 12 weeks Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or greater in PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2015 Assessment: Scientific written report proposal (10%) Scientific written report (20%), a tutorial quiz (15%), an in-class debate (5% participation mark), and the final exam (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This advanced-level course is designed for students who would like to learn about the core concepts of clinical and biobehavioural psychology. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but the practical material offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. The emphasis of the lectures is on behaviour, emotions, and motivational processes. You will learn how to analyse the environmental causes of behaviours, and how to use reinforcements, punishments and incentives to modify and motivate behaviour. Clinical Psychology will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sexual disorders, and eating disorders. The way in which these processes arise and are shaped in people will be presented in the section on Developmental Psychology. Neuroscience will focus on the evolutionary, genetic, neurobiological, and pharmacological mechanisms underlying the phenomena taught in the other sections. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in different practical exercises with a focus on research methods used to examine the links between the brain and behaviours, emotions, cognitions, and their disorders. Students will design and conduct their own neuropsychology experiment.
PSYC2016 Perception, Cognition, and Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bart Anderson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1hour lectures, 1x 1hr tutorials Prerequisites: PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 Assessment: Research report (35%), Quiz (15%), Exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study, you will study three of the core topics of Psychology: Perception, Cognition, and Intelligence. Our sensory systems generate our experience of our bodies and what exists in the world. In the perception component, you will learn how our sensory systems influence our ability to act in the world and the conditions and consequences of perceptual errors. The cognition component of the course will focus on the theoretical and methodological issues that arise in how we attend to, remember, think, problem solve, and make decisions, and consider the consequences of how biases and heuristics influence our choices. The intelligence component will explore the historical evolution of the concept of intelligence, issues in its measurement, the relationship to concepts of creativity, emotional intelligence, and the influence of the environment. You will participate in inquiry-led tutorials that will reinforce and expand on concepts in the unit, and develop broad thinking skills to relate evidence to rational arguments and choices that can be applied to any problem solving domain.
PSYC2017 Personality and Social Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Fiona White Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week for 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week for 12 weeks, commencing in Week 2 Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 Assessment: Final exam (50%), essay/report (30%), written practical exercise/Tutorial Quiz (15%), Research participation (5%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All of us observe our social worlds and try to understand why people behave, think, and feel as they do. In this unit you will study a number of influential theories, philosophical and empirical approaches in Personality and Social Psychology. You will examine key topics in the scientific assessment of personality, attitudes and emotions, including an introduction to psychometric testing (e. g. , validity and reliability) in Personality and Social Psychology. Specifically, in the Personality component you will be exposed to conceptual analysis and will be expected to examine critically theories from the Psychodynamic, Behaviourist, Humanist, Social Cognitive and Psychometric traditions. In the Social Psychology component you will examine salient social constructs such as social influence, the causes of prejudice and possible reduction strategies, and explore how cognitive processes affect social judgment and behaviour. In this unit you will develop a broad understanding of the leading theories and research in the areas of Personality and Social Psychology.
Senior units of study
For a major in Neuroscience, 24 credit points must be chosen from any of the following units: PCOL3022/3922, NEUR3005/3905, NEUR3006/3906, NEUR3003/3903, NEUR3004/3904, PSYC3011/3911, PSYC3012, PSYC3013/3913, PSYC3014/3914. *Legacy units: NEUR3001/3901, NEUR3002/3902.
At least two subject areas must be chosen from the three subject areas NEUR, PSYC and PCOL.
NEUR3003 Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Catherine Leamey and A/Prof. Kevin Keay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures plus one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 Prohibitions: NEUR3903 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: final exam (50%), mid-semester exam (10%), major essay/report (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences. This course is a combination of small lectures on current issues in cellular and developmental neuroscience and a research-based library project. Issues covered in the lecture series will include the role of glial on cerebral blood flow and neural transmission, neurochemistry and psychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration and the development of central and peripheral nervous systems.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3903 Cellular and Developmental Neurosci. (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A-Prof Catherine Leamey A/Prof Kevin Keay, Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab session per week. Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3003 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Final exam. Mid-semester exam, Mini-lecture presentation and resources, Attendance at and participation in assessment of advanced student presentations (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3003. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3004 Integrative Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, A/Prof Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 Prohibitions: NEUR3904 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Mid-semester exam (10%), final exam (50%), 3 short in-semester assessments/reports (10% each), seminar participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences and to be taken in conjunction with NEUR3003. This course is a combination of small group lectures on current issues in neuroscience, seminar groups and mini research projects. Examples of recent seminar topics include imaging pain, emotions, neural development and plasticity, vision, stroke and hypertension, mechanisms of neural degeneration and long-term regulation of blood pressure.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3904 Integrative Neuroscience (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Up to one 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial and one two hour laboratory session per week on average. Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3004 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Mid-semester exam, Final exam, Major essay/report, Tutorial participation, Attendance at and participation in assessment of advanced student presentations (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3004. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience research.
BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3005 Functional Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, one guest lecture, 3 three-hour seminars, weekly 1.5 hour practical class. Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3905 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental knowledge of human anatomy and neuroanatomy (ANAT2X10 or MEDS2005 or BMED2402) Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam ( in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, 'Neuroscience in the Media' 3 team-based assessment tasks during seminars and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circuits and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal cord specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional and structural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated into the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. The Neuroscience in the Media seminars will develop neuroscience literature searching skills as well as developing critical thinking and analysis of the accuracy of the media portrayal of neuroscience research. Building on these skills and working in small groups, students will re-frame and communicate neuroscience evidence through the production of a short video. Students will also learn the skills required to write an unbiased and accurate popular media article based on a recent neuroscience research paper. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte's. The Human Brain by Todd Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
NEUR3905 Functional Neuroanatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, one guest lecture, 3 three-hour seminars, weekly 1.5 hour practical class. Prerequisites: Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3005 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental knowledge of human anatomy and neuroanatomy (ANAT2X10 or MEDS2005 or BMED2402) Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam (in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, Journal Club participation, Journal Club presentation and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circuits and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal cord specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional and structural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated into the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. By undertaking the advanced unit students will participate in weekly small group seminars under the guidance of a research-active academic. The seminars will take the form of a Journal Club, a style practiced widely in research laboratories around the world. The aim of the Journal Club is to develop critical thinking and detailed knowledge in a specific area of neuroscience research through group discussions. The Journal Club will also develop the skills required to lead a discussion in a small group setting as well as research and write a scholarly neuroscience review article. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte. Nolte's The Human Brain by Todd. Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
NEUR3006 Neural Information Processing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures, per week, 1 x 2-hour research paper session (journal club, 8 weeks), 4 x 3-4 hours practical per semester Prerequisites: 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3906 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402 Assessment: mid-semester quiz (10%), paper sessions participation grade (10%), paper session presentation (10%), practical class group presentation (10%), scholarly essay (20%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction the mechanisms that drive neurons and neural circuits throughout the brain and body. The lectures explore how signal intensity is translated into nerve impulse codes and how this information is again translated through synapses to convey and interpret information about the external world, to control the body and to record information for future use (learning and memory). We also consider how sensory and motor information is integrated through neural circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Practical classes introduce some of the different ways in which the workings of the brain are studied. Each student chooses a journal club that focuses on a specific topic in neuroscience. In the weekly sessions, group members read, present and interpret original research papers, developing a deep understanding of the emerging scientific evidence in the topic area. This senior year unit of study will develop skills in critical analysis, interpretation and communication of new evidence.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3906 Neural Information Processing (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dario Protti Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures per week, 4 x 3-4 hour, mainstream course, prac per semester and 3-4 x 3 hours advanced practicals Prerequisites: 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3006 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402 Assessment: mid-semester quiz (10%), advanced pracs group report (20%), practical class group presentation (10%), grant proposal (20%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction into the mechanisms that drive neurons and neural circuits throughout the brain and body. The lectures explore how signal intensity is translated into nerve impulse codes and how this information is again translated through synapses to convey and interpret information about the external world, to control the body and to record information for future use. We also consider how sensory and motor information is integrated through neural circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Practical classes introduce some of the different ways in which the workings of the brain are studied. This senior year unit of study will develop skills in critical analysis, interpretation and communication of new evidence.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
PCOL3022 Neuropharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarasa Mohammadi Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, tutorials and practicals. Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015) Prohibitions: PCOL3922 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the 2000 level pharmacology units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Each student will conduct a capstone elective project (laboratory or literature-based) in applied pharmacology supervised by academic members of the department.
Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE Holtzman, DM and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundations for Clinical Neuroscience, 3rd ed. McGraw Hill, 2015.
PCOL3922 Neuropharmacology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarasa Mohammadi Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, tutorials and practicals. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015)] Prohibitions: PCOL3022 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the 2000 level pharmacology units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Each student will conduct a capstone elective project (laboratory or literature-based) in applied pharmacology supervised by academic members of the department.
Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE, Holtzman, DM and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundations for Clinical Neuroscience, 3rd ed. McGraw Hill, 2015.
PSYC3011 Learning and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Evan Livesey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3911 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word prac report, tutorial quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit addresses the fundamental concepts and more important research findings related to contemporary theories of associative learning in animals and humans. It examines the application of such fundamental research to issues such as drug use and food choice. It is designed to foster skills in reading primary sources in this area, and provide the opportunity for hands-on experience in carrying out a research project.
Textbooks
Bouton, M. E. (2016). Learning and Behavior: A contemporary synthesis, 2nd edition. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer.
PSYC3911 Learning and Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Evan Livesey Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x 1-hr lectures and 1x 2-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: (A mark of 75 or above in PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3011 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2500 word prac report, tutorial quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit addresses the fundamental concepts and more important research findings related to contemporary theories of associative learning in animals and humans. It examines the application of such fundamental research to issues such as drug use and food choice. It is designed to foster skills in reading primary sources in this area, and provide the opportunity for hands-on experience in carrying out a research project. In the advanced unit of study students will learn techniques to model learning and behaviour, and independently apply these skills to experimental data that they have collected.
Textbooks
Bouton, M. E. (2016). Learning and Behavior: A contemporary synthesis, 2nd edition. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer.
PSYC3012 Cognitive Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2012 and (PSYC2013 or PSYC2016) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one major essay/research report (2000-2500 words), practical exercise(s) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit extends the theories and methods of investigating memory and attentional processes discussed in PSYC2013/PSYC2016 to consider a number of domains of higher cognitive processing including memory, language, categorisation, and reasoning. An integrating theme of the course will be how such cognitive capacities contribute to skilled behaviour and expertise across a range of domains of human behaviour, and how they are implemented in artificial intelligence systems. The practical program will expose students to a variety of the research methods used to investigate higher cognitive processes, develop their understanding of how these methods can be used to investigate hypotheses about mental processes and consider applications of cognitive research to real-world problems and issues.
PSYC3013 Perceptual Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Alais Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2016) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3913 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, one 2000 word report, tutorial quiz, group presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Perception poses many challenges: how do we see colour and movement? How do we perceive surfaces and materials? How does combining information from multiple senses improve our perception? This unit draws on behavioural and neurophysiological perspectives to deepen understanding of current research topics in perception. The emphasis is on how visual information is processed to accomplish functions such as perceiving a single edge, extracting the contours that form a face, or the spatial relations needed to call offside on the sports field. Students also gain conceptual tools for evaluating the empirical and theoretical worth of recent research in perception. During the tutorial component of the course students will develop a practical experiment in which they formulate and test a hypothesis. In this way students gain important research experience that gives them valuable insight into the scientific process as it exists both in professional work and in the empirical research project required for Honours.
Textbooks
Sensation and Perception, Third Edition
PSYC3913 Perceptual Systems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Alais Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x 1-hr lectures and 1x 2-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: (A mark of 75 or above in PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2016) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3013 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, one 2000 word report, laboratory participation, group presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Perception poses many challenges: how do we see colour and movement? How do we perceive surfaces and materials? How does combining information from multiple senses improve our perception? This unit draws on behavioural and neurophysiological perspectives to deepen understanding of current research topics in perception. The emphasis is on how visual information is processed to accomplish functions such as perceiving a single edge, extracting the contours that form a face, or the spatial relations needed to call offside on the sports field. Students also gain conceptual tools for evaluating the empirical and theoretical worth of recent research in perception. During the tutorial component of the course students will develop a practical experiment in which they formulate and test a hypothesis. In this way students gain important research experience that gives them valuable insight into the scientific process as it exists both in professional work and in the empirical research project required for Honours. In the advanced unit of study students will be placed in laboratories and will learn research techniques while helping conduct experiments in these laboratories.
Textbooks
Sensation and Perception, Third Edition
PSYC3014 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Irina Harris Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910)] Prohibitions: PSYC3914 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one major essay/report 2000-2500 words, tutorial quizzes and participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. The implications of focal cognitive deficits in neurological patients for models of normal cognitive function will also be explored. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. In addition to lectures, a practical component will cover basic neuroanatomy and neuroscientific methods. The practical component will also introduce students to experimental and neuropsychological approaches to studying the relationship between brain and behaviour.
PSYC3914 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Irina Harris Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures, and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910)] Prohibitions: PSYC3014 Assessment: One 2 hour exam (end of semester), one quiz (mid-semester), one presentation, one written assignment (lab report), attendance and participation in tutorial/practical exercises (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration, and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. The lecture material will be the same as for PSYC3014, however, the practical class is targeted for those who would like to learn more about the experimental study of behaviour and the neurosciences. The practical component of the advanced stream will cover basic neuroanatomy, histology and neuropharmacology and will introduce students to experimental approaches to studying brain-behaviour relationships.