Table 1: Physiology

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Physiology

For a major in Physiology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area.
Intermediate units of study
PHSI2007
Key Concepts in Physiology
6    A Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01)
P 6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]
N PHSI2907 or MEDS2001
Semester 1
PHSI2907
Key Concepts in Physiology (Advanced)
6    A Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01)
P A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]}
N PHSI2007 or MEDS2001

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
PHSI2008
Integrated Physiology
6    A Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)]
P [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]}
N PHSI2908
Semester 2
PHSI2908
Integrated Physiology (Advanced)
6    A Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)]
P A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]}
N PHSI2008

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
Senior units of study
NEUR3003
Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience
6    A Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain".
P ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07
N NEUR3903
Semester 2
NEUR3903
Cellular and Developmental Neurosci. (Adv)
6    A Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain".
P ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year
N NEUR3003

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
NEUR3004
Integrative Neuroscience
6    A Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain".
P ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07
N NEUR3904
Semester 2
NEUR3904
Integrative Neuroscience (Advanced)
6    A Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain".
P ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year
N NEUR3004

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
NEUR3006
Neural Information Processing
6    A (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402
P 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units
N NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3906
Semester 1
NEUR3906
Neural Information Processing (Advanced)
6    A (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402
P 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year
N NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3006
Semester 1
PHSI3009
Frontiers in Cellular Physiology
6    P (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]
N PHSI3909


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3909
Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)
6    P A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]}
N PHSI3009


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or 3910) units of study concurrently.
Semester 1
PHSI3010
Reproduction, Development and Disease
6    P (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)]
N PHSI3910
Semester 1
PHSI3910
Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv
6    P A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]}
N PHSI3010
Semester 1
PHSI3911
Frontiers in Whole Body Physiology (Adv)
6    P A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406)}
N PHSI3011 or PHSI3007 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3908


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
PHSI3012
Physiology of Disease
6    P (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406)
N PHSI3007 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3908 or PHSI3912
Semester 2
PHSI3912
Physiology of Disease (Advanced)
6    P A mark of 70 or above in (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or 12 cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406)
N PHSI3012 or PHSI3007 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3908
Semester 2
PHSI3888
Physiology Interdisciplinary Project
6    P 12 credit points of (PHSI3XXX) and 12 cp from (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X06 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X08 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406)
N PHSI3007 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3908
Semester 2

Physiology

For a major in Physiology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area.
Intermediate units of study
PHSI2007 Key Concepts in Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hour lectures/week, 1 x 3 hours practical or tutorial/week Prerequisites: 6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903] Prohibitions: PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) Assessment: exam (40%), integrated task (10%), practical report (15%), quizzes (15%), mid-semester exam (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating from the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organ systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning, you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
Textbooks
Silverthorn D.U, Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Ed (Pearson, 2016)
PHSI2907 Key Concepts in Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hour lectures/week, 1 x 3 hours practical or tutorial/week Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2007 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) Assessment: exam (40%), project (25%), quizzes (15%), mid-semester exam (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will explore these concepts in four modules: compartmentalisation, cell specialisation, communication between cells and responding to the environment. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organs systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Furthermore, specialised activities in physiological research will allow small group learning and interaction with staff. Workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
Textbooks
Silverthorn D.U, Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Ed (Pearson, 2016)
PHSI2008 Integrated Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bronwyn McAllan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week, 1 x 3 hours practical or tutorial/week Prerequisites: [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2908 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)] Assessment: exam (40%), integrated task (10%), practical report and abstract (20%), individual report (10%), mid-semester exam (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The study of physiology is in essence the understanding of the integration of function and homeostasis. In this unit you will extend your learning in MEDS2001/PHSI2X07, applying your understanding of basic physiology to systems-based scenarios in three modules: sensory, metabolism and integrated physiology. This will consolidate your conceptual understanding of physiology and the homeostatic mechanisms that can change in disease. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, your understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the complex systems that regulate the human body and provide the platform for undertaking a major in Physiology in third year.
Textbooks
Silverthorn D.U, Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach, 7th Ed (Pearson, 2016)
PHSI2908 Integrated Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bronwyn McAllan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week, 1 x 3 hours practical or tutorial/week Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2008 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)] Assessment: exam (40%), integrated task (10%), project (20%), individual report (10%), mid-semester exam (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The study of physiology is in essence the understanding of the integration of function and homeostasis. In this unit you will extend your learning in MEDS2001/PHSI2X07, applying your understanding of basic physiology to systems-based scenarios in three modules: sensory, metabolism and integrated physiology. This will consolidate your conceptual understanding of physiology and how the homeostatic mechanisms that can change in disease. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, your understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the complex systems that regulate the human body and provide the platform for undertaking a major in Physiology in third year.
Senior units of study
NEUR3003 Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Catherine Leamey and A/Prof. Kevin Keay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures plus one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 Prohibitions: NEUR3903 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: final exam (50%), mid-semester exam (10%), major essay/report (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences. This course is a combination of small lectures on current issues in cellular and developmental neuroscience and a research-based library project. Issues covered in the lecture series will include the role of glial on cerebral blood flow and neural transmission, neurochemistry and psychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration and the development of central and peripheral nervous systems.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3903 Cellular and Developmental Neurosci. (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A-Prof Catherine Leamey A/Prof Kevin Keay, Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab session per week. Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3003 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Final exam. Mid-semester exam, Mini-lecture presentation and resources, Attendance at and participation in assessment of advanced student presentations (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3003. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3004 Integrative Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, A/Prof Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 Prohibitions: NEUR3904 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Mid-semester exam (10%), final exam (50%), 3 short in-semester assessments/reports (10% each), seminar participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences and to be taken in conjunction with NEUR3003. This course is a combination of small group lectures on current issues in neuroscience, seminar groups and mini research projects. Examples of recent seminar topics include imaging pain, emotions, neural development and plasticity, vision, stroke and hypertension, mechanisms of neural degeneration and long-term regulation of blood pressure.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3904 Integrative Neuroscience (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Up to one 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial and one two hour laboratory session per week on average. Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3004 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familiarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Mid-semester exam, Final exam, Major essay/report, Tutorial participation, Attendance at and participation in assessment of advanced student presentations (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3004. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience research.
BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3006 Neural Information Processing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures, per week, 1 x 2-hour research paper session (journal club, 8 weeks), 4 x 3-4 hours practical per semester Prerequisites: 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3906 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402 Assessment: mid-semester quiz (10%), paper sessions participation grade (10%), paper session presentation (10%), practical class group presentation (10%), scholarly essay (20%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction the mechanisms that drive neurons and neural circuits throughout the brain and body. The lectures explore how signal intensity is translated into nerve impulse codes and how this information is again translated through synapses to convey and interpret information about the external world, to control the body and to record information for future use (learning and memory). We also consider how sensory and motor information is integrated through neural circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Practical classes introduce some of the different ways in which the workings of the brain are studied. Each student chooses a journal club that focuses on a specific topic in neuroscience. In the weekly sessions, group members read, present and interpret original research papers, developing a deep understanding of the emerging scientific evidence in the topic area. This senior year unit of study will develop skills in critical analysis, interpretation and communication of new evidence.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3906 Neural Information Processing (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dario Protti Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures per week, 4 x 3-4 hour, mainstream course, prac per semester and 3-4 x 3 hours advanced practicals Prerequisites: 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3006 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402 Assessment: mid-semester quiz (10%), advanced pracs group report (20%), practical class group presentation (10%), grant proposal (20%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction into the mechanisms that drive neurons and neural circuits throughout the brain and body. The lectures explore how signal intensity is translated into nerve impulse codes and how this information is again translated through synapses to convey and interpret information about the external world, to control the body and to record information for future use. We also consider how sensory and motor information is integrated through neural circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Practical classes introduce some of the different ways in which the workings of the brain are studied. This senior year unit of study will develop skills in critical analysis, interpretation and communication of new evidence.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
PHSI3009 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Cook Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr/week lectures, 3 x 3 hr practical class sessions per semester, 4 x 2 hr Challenge Based Learning (CBL) tutorials per semester, 2 x 1 hr literature-based research project tutorials per semester Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: PHSI3909 Assessment: mid-semester exam (MCQ) (15%), 2hr final exam (MCQ) (40%), presentation for challenge-based learning (15%), practical class report (15%), report on a literature based project (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Everything that happens in our bodies is the result of the actions of cells. In this Unit of Study, you will have the opportunity to: Build on your existing understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of how our bodies work, explore what goes wrong if key cell types do not work as expected and learn about the exciting new techniques and paradigms that allow us to link events at the level of the body to the activity of single cells. This unit will help you develop a strong framework for future study and employment in medicine and health.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3909 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Cook Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr/week lectures, 3 x 3 hr practical class sessions per semester, 4 x 2 hr Challenge Based Learning (CBL) tutorials per semester Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]} Prohibitions: PHSI3009 Assessment: mid-semester exam (MCQ) (15%), 2hr final exam (MCQ) (40%), presentation for challenge-based learning (15%), Advanced project (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or 3910) units of study concurrently.
Everything that happens in our bodies is the result of the actions of cells. In this Unit of Study, you will have the opportunity to: Build on your existing understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of how our bodies work, explore what goes wrong if key cell types do not work as expected and learn about the exciting new techniques and paradigms that allow us to link events at the level of the body to the activity of single cells. This unit will help you develop a strong framework for future study and employment in medicine and health.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3010 Reproduction, Development and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Assinder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr/week lectures and 6 x 2 hr large class tutorials (CBL) per semester, practical or library project Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] Prohibitions: PHSI3910 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 3 practical class reports Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and re-activation of developmental processes in adult disease. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3910 Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Assinder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr/week lectures and 6 x 2 hr large class tutorials (CBL) per semester, practical or library project Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]} Prohibitions: PHSI3010 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam,stem cell laboratory class (2 presentations), 3 practical class reports Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology. Students enrolling in PHSI3910 complete a separate laboratory class centered on stem cell differentiation to replace the problem-based learning exercises in PHSI3010.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3911 Frontiers in Whole Body Physiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures weekly, 1 x 1 hr masterclass lecture, 5 x 2 hr class tutorials per semester (Weeks 2, 3 and 12) Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406)} Prohibitions: PHSI3011 or PHSI3007 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3908 Assessment: one mid-semester exam, one 2hr final exam, two tutorial reports, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 4 x 4 hr practicals per semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate homeostasis throughout the whole body with a particular focus not only on the interplay between major organ systems, but also variability amongst individuals. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. Our current understandings of how we function will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body levels. This is detailed knowledge that is key to understanding the transitions that occur from health to disease. Hands on practical classes will explore the physiology presented in the lectures and tutorial sessions will investigate what "normal" is in terms of whole body physiology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science; Siverthorn D, Human Physiology: an integrated approach. 7th Edition Pearson.
PHSI3012 Physiology of Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Naylor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures per week, 12 x 1 hr tutorials, 1 x 6 hr practical Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406) Prohibitions: PHSI3007 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3908 or PHSI3912 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 2 practical class reports Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate normal homeostasis throughout the whole body and how defects in these processes can lead to significant human disease. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. The processes leading to cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic disease will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body level. Problem-based learning will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease and practical classes will utilise both wet lab and online resources to dissect the processes by which normal physiological processes become aberrant leading to human disease.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3912 Physiology of Disease (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Naylor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures per week, 1 x 6 hr practical, advanced project attendance Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or 12 cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406) Prohibitions: PHSI3012 or PHSI3007 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3908 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, Advanced project report Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate normal homeostasis throughout the whole body and how defects in these processes can lead to significant human disease. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. The processes leading to cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic disease will be the specific will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body level. Students will undertake an Advanced Project Problem-based learning will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease and Practical classes will utilise both wet lab and online resources to dissect the processes by which normal physiological processes become aberrant leading to human disease.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3888 Physiology Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, on-line resources and project-based tutorials and workshops Prerequisites: 12 credit points of (PHSI3XXX) and 12 cp from (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X06 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X08 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406) Prohibitions: PHSI3007 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3908 Assessment: Written assignments 20%; and written exam (30%), Project report (25%), Project oral presentation (20%), Team work participation and evaluation (5%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. The ability to identify and explore interdisciplinary links is a crucial skill for emerging professionals and researchers alike. This unit presents the opportunity to bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt in your discipline and apply them to a real-world problem. For example, you will work on projects that might examine how simple robotics or AR/VR or 3D printing methods can help rehabilitate patients, how machine learning can be used to define signalling pathways, use design thinking approaches to address patient care or the design user interfaces or work with public health or epidemiology to develop policy and communications around global health challenges. All these projects will challenge you to apply your existing knowledge to truly interdisciplinary areas. In this unit, you will continue to understand and explore disciplinary knowledge, while also meeting and collaborating with students from across the University through project-based learning; identifying and solving problems, collecting and analysing data and communicating your findings to a diverse audience. All of these skills are highly valued by employers. This unit will foster the ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and this is essential for both professional and research pathways in the future.