Agriculture

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Prohibitions added, they now read:

ENVI1003 (Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate) Prohibitions added, they now read:
N: AGEN1002
3/9/2019

AGRICULTURE

Agriculture stream

The Agriculture stream is 120 credit points, consisting of:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level stream core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level stream core units
(iii) A 108 credit point program in Agriculture

Agriculture program

This program is only available to students enrolled in Agriculture stream.
A program in Agriculture requires 108 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level program core units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level program selective units
(iii) 36 credit points of 4000-level program core units
(iv) A 48 credit point major in Animal Production, Plant Production or Soil Science and Hydrology

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Stream core
ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours per week of lectures; 2 hours per week of computer tutorials Prohibitions: ENVX1001 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or MATH1115 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 or BUSS1020 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness streams
This is an introductory data science unit for students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It provides the foundation for statistics and data science skills that are needed for a career in science and for further study in applied statistics and data science. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. It has 4 modules; exploring data, modelling data, sampling data and making decisions with data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, ENVX1002 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data.
Textbooks
Statistics, Fourth Edition, Freedman Pisani Purves
Program core
ENVI1003 Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, 2-hour computer lab per week, two-day weekend field trip Assessment: 2-hour exam (50%), field trip report (15%), group work presentation (20%), GIS reports (15%) Practical field work: Computer practicals and two-day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half, using Australian case studies, we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.
GEOS1001 Earth, Environment and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Sabin Zahirovic, Dr Bree Morgan, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1901 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assessment: Exam (40%), 2000 word essay (25%), practical reports (15%), presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the gateway unit of study for Human Geography, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies and Geology. Its objective is to introduce the big questions relating to the origins and current state of the planet: climate change, environment, landscape formation, and the growth of the human population. During the semester you will be introduced to knowledge, theories and debates about how the world's physical and human systems operate. The first module investigates the evolution of the planet through geological time, with a focus on major Earth systems such as plate tectonics and mantle convection and their interaction with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and human civilisations. The second module presents Earth as an evolving and dynamic planet, investigating global environmental change, addressing climate variability and human impacts on the natural environment and the rate at which these changes occur and how they have the potential to dramatically affect the way we live. Finally, the third module, focuses on human-induced challenges to Earth's future. This part of the unit critically analyses the relationships between people and their environments, with central consideration to debates on population change, resource use and the policy contexts of climate change mitigation and adaptation.
GEOS1901 Earth, Environment and Society Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Sabin Zahirovic, Dr Bree Morgan, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1001 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: Exam (40%), 2000 word essay (25%), practical reports (15%), presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1001, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.

2000-level units of study

Stream core
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 3-hour computer practical per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 or MATH1015 or DATA1001 or DATA1901)] OR [3cp from (MATH1XX1 or MATH1906 or MATH1XX3 or MATH1907) and an additional 3cp from (MATH1XX5)] Assessment: One exam during the exam period (50%),three reports (10% each), ten online quizzes (2% each) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness streams
This unit builds on introductory 1st year statistics units and is targeted towards students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It consists of two parts and presents, in an applied manner, the statistical methods that students need to know for further study and their future careers. In the first part the focus is on designed studies including both surveys and formal experimental designs. Students will learn how to analyse and interpret datasets collected from designs from more than than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part the focus is on finding patterns in data. In this part the students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression, and find patterns in datasets with many variables using principal components analysis and clustering. This part provides the foundation for the analysis of big data. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the statistical software package R. A key feature of the unit is using R to develop coding skills that are become essential in science for processing and analysing datasets of ever increasing size.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
Selective units-choose two units not in chosen major
SOIL2005 Soil and Water: Earth's Life Support Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Balwant Singh Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures: 3 hours per week; lab: 3 hours per week for 10 weeks Prohibitions: SOIL2003 or LWSC2002 Assessment: Field excursion: attendance and creative assessment (5%), the attendance at the excursion is complusory to get any mark for this assessment task; quiz: (10%); written assignment: modelling assessment including modelling (15%); laboratory report: group oral presentation and written assignment (20%); final exam: final written exam (50%) Practical field work: Approximately eight hours working field at Cobbitty Farm Wk 0 (Friday, 22 Feb 2019) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Soil and water are the two most essential natural resources on the Earth's surface which influence all forms of terrestrial life. This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the fundamental properties and processes of soil and water that affect food security and sustain ecosystems. These properties and processes are part of the grounding principles that underpin crop and animal production, nutrient and water cycling, and environmental sustainability. You will participate in a field excursion to examine soils in a landscape to develop knowledge and understanding of soil properties, water storage, water movement and cycling of organic carbon and nutrients in relation to food production and ecosystem functioning. At the end of this unit you will be able to articulate and quantify the factors and processes that determine the composition and behaviour of soil, composition of water, soil water storage and the movement of water on the land surface. You will also be able to describe the most important properties of soil and water for food production and sustaining ecosystem functions and link this to human and climatic factors. The field excursion, report and laboratory/computer exercises have been designed to develop communication, team work and collaborative efforts.
Textbooks
Brady, N.C. and Ray R. Weil. (2007). The Nature and Properties of Soils. 14th Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey. White, R.E. (2006) Principles and Practice of Soil Science: the Soil as a Natural Resource. 4th ed., Blackwell Science, Oxford. Diana H. Wall, Richard D. Bardgett, Valerie Behan-Pelletier, Jeffrey E. Herrick, T. Hefin Jones, Karl Ritz, Johan Six, Donald R. Strong, and Wim H. van der Putten (Eds.) (2012). Soil Ecology and Ecosystem Services. Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780199575923. Kutllek, M and Nielsen, D.R. (2015). Soil: The Skin of the Planet Earth, Springer, ISBN: 978-94-017-9788-7 (Print) 978-94-017-9789-4 (Online). Gordon, N. D., McMahon, T. A., Finlayson, B. L., Gippel, C. J., and Nathan, R. J. (2004) Stream Hydrology: an Introduction for Ecologists, John Wiley and Sons Inc.
AGRI2001 Plant Management in Agroecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Brett Whelan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures two hours per week; tutorial three hours per week; three field trips Prohibitions: AGRO3004 Assumed knowledge: Understanding of experimental design and analysis including dependent and independent variables, random and representative sampling, t-tests a simple designs and interpretation of univariate analysis. Assessment: Quizzes, practical report, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
World population is projected to reach 9 billion within 50 years and food production needs to double in a sustainable manner in order to feed human population. This profound challenge will be met by improving our knowledge and management of agroecosystems. This unit of study will provide students with the skills to understanding the biology and management of plants in dryland agroecosystems, focussing on major Australian broad acre crops. Dryland agroecosystems are defined as ecosystems modified for the purpose of producing crops, pastures and animals in environments where water limits productivity during part of the year. These agroecosystems involve regular agricultural interventions, such as cultivation, sowing, nutrient, weed, pest and disease management, and harvest. This unit will explore the interaction of environment, crops/pastures and agricultural management. You will gain knowledge and skills on crop physiological, growth and development responses to the climatic, edaphic, biotic factors in the growing environment. You will also develop a sound understanding of how to manage crops, weeds, diseases, pests and employ precision agriculture. This unit will prepare you to continue on a pathway of understanding and developing improved plant production systems and joining the vast range of professionals that are eagerly sought around the globe.
Textbooks
Pratley J (Ed.) (2003) Principles of Field Crop Production. 4th edition. Oxford University Press: Melbourne, Australia. Marschner P (Ed) (2012) Marschner's Mineral Nutrition of Higher Plants, 3rd edition. Elsevier, London Anderson WK, Garlinge JR (Eds) (2000) The Wheat Book. Department of Agriculture Western Australia: South Perth, Australia. Whelan, B.M., Taylor, J.A. (2013) Precision Agriculture for Grain Production Systems. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, Australia. Pearson CJ, Ison RL (1998) Agronomy of Grassland Systems. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, New York, Melbourne.
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes and presentation (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Sharp Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan and carry out a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.
Textbooks
TBA

4000-level units of study

Program core
AFNR4001 Professional Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops over four years; 40 days of professional experience, 1 week long excursion Prohibitions: AGRF4000 Assessment: One blog posting (10%), one on-line (multi-media) (30%) and one portfolio (60%) Practical field work: 40 days of professional experience, 1 week long excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is designed to allow students to critically reflect on the relationship between the rural enterprise and environment and how they can contribute to the future decisions and management affecting the rural community. It is a core unit of study in 4th year for the BScAgr which requires students to complete 40 days of professional experience with the expectation that students will examine the nature of facts from their degree in this environment. A minimum of 15 days must be completed on-farm/field. The remaining days do not have to be on-farm. The unit will be counted towards 4th year, but professional experience placements will normally be undertaken throughout the degree. In the early stages of the Professional Development program students participate in 1st year rural field tours that have been developed so they can experience a range of activities, such as research, extension, on-farm and industry both in the rural and urban environment to complement their learning within their individual degree programs. Building on this various workshops have been developed to assist students to identify a rural environment theme or issue of their interest with the specific emphasis being placed on them reflecting on how their new understandings of their theme of interest affects their personal and professional development. To complete this unit students will present a portfolio of their theme including critical reflection on the pivotal relationships between the academic degree, rural environment, professional experience, and beliefs and values if the rural community. Through developing these pivotal relationships, students will be able to use their new understandings to support and guide the future developments in the rural enterprise and environment. By developing and presenting the portfolio and engaging in other online activities the students will enhance their skills in inquiry, information literacy and communication. In particular the autonomous development of case studies reflecting the contemporary issues in agriculture and their professional placements the students will have to consider their understandings of ethical, social and professional issues and further develop the personal and intellectual autonomy.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
AFNR4101 Research Project A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Budiman Minasny Session: Semester 1 Classes: No formal classes, approximately 18 hours per week Prerequisites: 144 credit points of level 1000-3000 units of study Assessment: Research proposal presentation, critical literature review and written proposal. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop a student's ability to undertake a major research project in an area of specialization. The unit builds on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. This unit is a corequisite with AFNR4102 and each student will work with an academic supervisor in an area of specialization and develop a well-defined research project to be executed. The research project is undertaken to advance the students ability to build well-developed research skills, a strong analytical capacity, and the ability to provide high quality research results demonstrating a sound grasp of the research question. Working with an academic supervisor, students will develop their ability to define a research project including the producing of testable hypotheses, identifying existing knowledge from reviewing the literature, and the design and execution of a research strategy towards solving the research question. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem. They will enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the development of experimental programs. Students will experience presenting a project proposal. They will improve their written and planning skills by composing a research project proposal and the writing of a critical literature review.
AFNR4102 Research Project B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Budiman Minasny Session: Semester 2 Classes: No formal classes, approximately 18 hours per week Prerequisites: AFNR4101 Assessment: Poster, oral presentation and research paper. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a continuation of the major research project initiated in AFNR4101 and continues to build on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. Working with their academic supervisor in the area of specialization the student will continue to pursue the defined research project towards presenting final results and conclusions. The research results will be communicated as a poster, an oral presentation, and a research paper. The research paper is to be formatted as an article of a scientific journal. Students will continue to build their research skills, develop strong analytical capacity, demonstrate a sound grasp of the topic, and an ability to interpret results in a broad framework. Working with an academic supervisor, students will develop their ability to produce results of high quality, draw reliable conclusions, and identify future areas of research. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem.The project will enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the managing the research program. Students will improve their communication skills through oral presentation of their research findings, the production of a poster detailing their research findings and the writing of a research paper.
AFNR4XXX to be developed for offering in 2020