Animal Health, Disease and Welfare

Errata
Item Errata Date
1. Prerequisites have changed for the following unit, they now read:

MEDS2004 Microbes, Infection and Immunity Prerequisites: MEDS2004: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1X08 or MEDS1X01 or MBLG1XX1
20/2/2019

ANIMAL HEALTH, DISEASE AND WELFARE

Advanced coursework and projects will be available in 2020 for students who complete this major.

Animal Health, Disease and Welfare major

A major in Animal Health, Disease and Welfare requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iv) 18 credit points of 3000-level major core units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project units

Animal Health, Disease and Welfare minor

A minor in Animal Health, Disease and Welfare requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iv) 6 credit points of 3000-level minor core units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level minor selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), project report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in a research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Practical field work: As advised and required by the project; approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS

2000-level units of study

Core
AVBS2001 Introductory Veterinary Pathogenesis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Damien Higgins Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week (lectures and practicals) Prerequisites: 12cp of (BIOL1XX6 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX1 or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1) Assumed knowledge: The basic structure, morphology, metabolism and behaviour of bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Fundamental histological structure and function of cells and key tissues, including blood vessels, skin, liver, lung, kidneys, intestine, and organs and cells of the immune system (lymph node, spleen, white blood cells). Assessment: Online exercises (15%), mid-semester exam (25%), practical assessment (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The overarching theme for this unit of study is the concept of the interaction between the host (or the animal), the agent of disease (genetics, physical, chemical and infectious agents) and environmental factors. In disease states, the host responds to the aetiological agent of disease and the environment through one of the basic five pathological processes that occur in tissues. These include inflammation and repair, degeneration and necrosis, circulatory disturbances, tissue deposits and pigments, and disorders of growth. A case based approach will be used whenever possible to illustrate these principles and enable the student to develop a problem solving approach and the skills of critical thinking.
Textbooks
See unit of study guide.
Selective
(MEDS coded units of study are only available to students in the Medical Science stream).
IMMU2011 Immunobiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Umaimainthan Palendira Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lecturettes, weekly Interactive lectures, fortnightly Workshops and Practicals. ~4-5h face-to-face per week Prerequisites: BIOL1XX7 or (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1 Prohibitions: IMMU2911 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), practical reports (30%), title and abstract task (15%) and final exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Immunobiology is the study of defence mechanisms that protect living organisms against life-threatening infections. In this unit of study you will explore the essential features of the host immune responses mounted by animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, plants and microbes themselves. Studies in animal and microbial immunobiology are leading to breakthroughs in veterinary and clinical medicine, including combatting infectious diseases, maximising transplant success, treating allergies, autoimmune diseases and cancer, as well as the development of new vaccines to prevent disease. Understanding the immunobiology of plants also enables us to protect crops from disease which enhances our food security. In this unit of study you will be provided with an overview of immunobiology as a basic research science. We will explore the nature of the immune cells and molecules that recognise danger and how the immune system of animals and plants respond at the cellular and molecular level. Practical and tutorial sessions are designed to illustrate particular concepts introduced in other face-to-face activities. Further self-directed learning activities, including online learning activities, will facilitate integration of fundamental information and help you apply this knowledge to the ways in which the host organism defends against disease. Upon completion, you will have developed the foundations to undertake further studies in Biology, Animal Health, Immunology and Pathology. Ultimately, this could lead you to a career in medical research, biosecurity and/or Veterinary Science.
Textbooks
Abbas, Lichtman and Pillai (2016) Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of The Immune System, 5th Edition
IMMU2911 Immunobiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Umaimainthan Palendira Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lecturettes, weekly Interactive lectures, fortnightly Workshops and Practicals . ~4-5h face-to-face per week Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in [BIOL1XX7 or (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1] Prohibitions: IMMU2011 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Online quizzes (20%), practical reports (15%), journal article comprehension task (5%), title and abstract written task (10%) and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Immunobiology is the study of defence mechanisms that protect living organisms against life-threatening infections. In this unit of study you will explore the essential features of the host immune responses and how it evolved from unicellular organisms to complex multi-cellular organisms. Studies in animal and microbial immunobiology are leading to breakthroughs in veterinary and clinical medicine, including combatting infectious diseases, maximising transplant success, treating allergies, autoimmune diseases and cancer, as well as development of new vaccines to prevent disease. Understanding the immunobiology of plants also enables us to protect crops from disease which enhances our food security. In this unit of study you will be provided with a detailed overview of immunobiology as a basic research science. We will explore in detail the nature of the immune cells and molecules that recognise danger and how the immune system of animals and plants respond at the cellular and molecular level. Advanced practical and tutorial sessions are designed to illustrate particular concepts introduced in other face-to-face activities. Further self-directed learning activities, including online learning activities, will facilitate integration of fundamental information and help you apply this knowledge to the ways in which the host organism defends against disease. This advanced version of Immunobiology has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components which may for example include guest lectures from experts. The nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Abbas, Lichtman and Pillai (2016) Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of The Immune System, 5th Edition
MEDS2004 Microbes, Infection and Immunity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online lecturettes, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1X08 or MEDS1X01 or MBLG1XX1 Prohibitions: MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Final examination (50%), practical exercises (20%), online quizzes (10%), integrated assessment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Transmission, pathogenicity and immune response to microbes are key concepts for understanding infectious disease processes. In this unit of study you will establish a conceptual foundation and, using an integrated approach, explore selected case studies of infection from a body system of origin perspective. You will explore the characteristics of viral, bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens and their virulence mechanisms for establishment and progression of disease. Comprehensive consideration of host immune response and characteristic pathological changes to tissue that arise will then be considered. Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to explain microbial pathogenic processes of infection including: mechanisms for colonisation, invasion and damage to host tissue; the ways in which your immune system recognises and destroys invading microbes; how T cell response is activated and antibodies function. You will learn about pathogenesis, symptoms, current challenges of treatment including antibiotic resistance, control and vaccination strategies. You will develop a holistic perspective of infectious diseases. You will work collaboratively to solve challenging problems in Biomedical Sciences. Practical classes will investigate normal flora, host defences and case studies of medically important microbes with linkage to disease outcome. You will also obtain experience and understanding of modern experimental techniques in microbiology and immunopathology.
MICR2031 Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2931 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: written assignment (10%), group oral presentation (20%) and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the earth's trees. This unit of study will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require if you specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology or science education.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
MICR2931 Microbiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2031 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: two written assignments (10%, 20%), and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the Earth's trees. In this unit of study you will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Detailed aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require to specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology, or science education. As an Advanced unit, MICR2931 provides increased challenge and academic rigour to develop a greater understanding and depth of disciplinary expertise. You will actively participate in a series of small group tutorials investigating the molecular detail of microbial communication and function, which will culminate in you creating a scientific research report that communicates your understanding of recent research in microbiology.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
MIMI2002 Microbes, Infection and Immunity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, and scenario-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX3) Prohibitions: MEDS2004, BMED2404, MIMI2902, IMMU2101, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2022, MICR2922, BMED2807, BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Final examination (50%), practical exercises (20%), online quizzes (10%), integrated assessment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Transmission, pathogenicity and immune response to microbes are key concepts for understanding infectious disease processes. In this unit of study you will establish a conceptual foundation and, using an integrated approach, explore selected case studies of infection from a body system of origin perspective. You will explore the characteristics of viral, bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens and their virulence mechanisms for establishment and progression of disease. Comprehensive consideration of host immune response and characteristic pathological changes to tissue that arise will then be considered. Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to explain microbial pathogenic processes of infection including: mechanisms for colonisation, invasion and damage to host tissue; the ways in which your immune system recognises and destroys invading microbes; how T cell response is activated and antibodies function. You will learn about pathogenesis, symptoms, current challenges of treatment including antibiotic resistance, control and vaccination strategies. You will develop a holistic perspective of infectious diseases. You will work collaboratively to solve challenging problems in Biomedical Sciences. Practical classes will investigate normal flora, host defences and case studies of medically important microbes with linkage to disease outcome. You will also obtain experience and understanding of modern experimental techniques in microbiology and immunopathology.
MIMI2902 Microbes, Infection and Immunity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, online lecturettes, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry- and scenario-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX3) Prohibitions: MEDS2004, BMED2404, MIMI2002, IMMU2101, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2022, MICR2922, BMED2807, BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Final examination (50%), practical exercises (20%), online quizzes (10%), research publication-based assignment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Transmission, pathogenicity and immune response to microbes are key concepts for understanding infectious disease processes. In this unit you will establish a conceptual foundation and, using an integrated approach, explore selected infection case studies from a body system of origin perspective. You will explore characteristics of viral, bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens and their virulence mechanisms for establishment and progression of disease. Comprehensive consideration of host immune response and consequent characteristic pathological changes to tissue will be considered. Upon completion, you will be able to explain microbial pathogenic processes of infection including: mechanisms for colonisation, invasion and damage to host tissue; the ways your immune system recognises and destroys invading microbes; how T cell response is activated and antibodies function. You will learn about pathogenesis, symptoms, current challenges of treatment including antibiotic resistance, control and vaccination strategies. This advanced unit has the same overall structure as MIMI2002 but contains a unique science communication exercise in which you will actively participate in small group sessions and be assessed with a short essay. This advanced component explores how recent advances in microbiology, infection and immunity are communicated to the wider public and is based on recent publications with potential high impact for society.

3000-level units of study

Major core
AVBS3005 to be developed for offering in 2020
AVBS3001 Agents of Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gary Muscatello Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3 hours per week, laboratories/tutorials 2 hours per week, group work 1 hour per week Prerequisites: AVBS2001 Assessment: 1500wd individual review (25%), 1000wd scenario-based group assignment (15%), 2 hour exam (50%), MCQ (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to examine and appreciate the diversity of various disease causing agents (microbiological and parasitological) of significance to animal industries and the various strategies employed by those agents in the host-pathogen-environment interaction. This study is based on an understanding of the physical, chemical and genetic characteristics of infectious agents of disease and builds on the pathological and immunological processes taught in AVBS2001 Introductory Veterinary Pathogenesis. A scenario/case based approach will be used whenever possible to enable the students to develop problem solving approaches and skills in critical thinking. Cases selected will be those that best illustrate particular concepts and/or are of particular significance to the animal/veterinary industry. Research and industry focus activities will infuse the subject content and student learning outcomes of this unit. This unit is located at the Camperdown campus.
Textbooks
A Unit of Study outline and LMS will contain detailed information and notes for this unit.
ANSC3106 Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sabrina Lomax Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week (including lectures, demonstrations, discussions and practical activities); classes will be held at the Camden campus; practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Prerequisites: AVBS1002 or BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assignments/presentations (50%), theory exam (50%) Practical field work: Practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3, the behavioural and physiological responses of mammals, birds and fish to stressors related to husbandry, housing, transport and slaughter are explored in some detail. This Unit enables students to develop an appreciation of the responses of animals to common interventions that arise in the context of interacting with humans, including the domestication of livestock species and the management of wildlife. The principles of animal responses to stress are illustrated with production species as the main examples. Contemporary approaches to the scientific measurement of animal stress and welfare, based on an appropriate selection of scientific disciplines including ethology, psychology, physiology and neuroscience, are assessed with an emphasis on farmed livestock species. Genetic, environmental and evolutionary determinants of pain, stress and fear responses in animals are considered in the light of what is known about cognition and motivation in animals. Methods for assessing and enhancing animal environments and husbandry systems are examined and the impact on animal behaviour and welfare of stockmanship is explored in the context of human-animal interactions. Finally, the design and conduct of scientific experiments are assessed with a focus on animal ethics and current welfare issues.
Textbooks
Broom, DM and Fraser, AF 2007, Domestic animal behaviour and welfare, 4th edition, CAB International, Cambridge Uni Press, Cambridge
Interdisciplinary project
AVBS3888 to be developed for offering in 2020
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Pauline Ross Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.
Minor core
AVBS3001 Agents of Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gary Muscatello Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3 hours per week, laboratories/tutorials 2 hours per week, group work 1 hour per week Prerequisites: AVBS2001 Assessment: 1500wd individual review (25%), 1000wd scenario-based group assignment (15%), 2 hour exam (50%), MCQ (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to examine and appreciate the diversity of various disease causing agents (microbiological and parasitological) of significance to animal industries and the various strategies employed by those agents in the host-pathogen-environment interaction. This study is based on an understanding of the physical, chemical and genetic characteristics of infectious agents of disease and builds on the pathological and immunological processes taught in AVBS2001 Introductory Veterinary Pathogenesis. A scenario/case based approach will be used whenever possible to enable the students to develop problem solving approaches and skills in critical thinking. Cases selected will be those that best illustrate particular concepts and/or are of particular significance to the animal/veterinary industry. Research and industry focus activities will infuse the subject content and student learning outcomes of this unit. This unit is located at the Camperdown campus.
Textbooks
A Unit of Study outline and LMS will contain detailed information and notes for this unit.
Minor selective
AVBS3888 and AVBS3005 to be developed for offering in 2020
ANSC3106 Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sabrina Lomax Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week (including lectures, demonstrations, discussions and practical activities); classes will be held at the Camden campus; practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Prerequisites: AVBS1002 or BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assignments/presentations (50%), theory exam (50%) Practical field work: Practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3, the behavioural and physiological responses of mammals, birds and fish to stressors related to husbandry, housing, transport and slaughter are explored in some detail. This Unit enables students to develop an appreciation of the responses of animals to common interventions that arise in the context of interacting with humans, including the domestication of livestock species and the management of wildlife. The principles of animal responses to stress are illustrated with production species as the main examples. Contemporary approaches to the scientific measurement of animal stress and welfare, based on an appropriate selection of scientific disciplines including ethology, psychology, physiology and neuroscience, are assessed with an emphasis on farmed livestock species. Genetic, environmental and evolutionary determinants of pain, stress and fear responses in animals are considered in the light of what is known about cognition and motivation in animals. Methods for assessing and enhancing animal environments and husbandry systems are examined and the impact on animal behaviour and welfare of stockmanship is explored in the context of human-animal interactions. Finally, the design and conduct of scientific experiments are assessed with a focus on animal ethics and current welfare issues.
Textbooks
Broom, DM and Fraser, AF 2007, Domestic animal behaviour and welfare, 4th edition, CAB International, Cambridge Uni Press, Cambridge