Animal Health, Disease and Welfare

Unit outlines will be available though Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

ANIMAL HEALTH, DISEASE AND WELFARE (HONOURS)

The Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Honours) (Animal Health, Disease and Welfare) requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 4000-level Honours coursework selective units, and
(ii) 24 credit points of 4000-level Honours research project units

Honours Coursework Selective

AVBS4012 Extensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Russell Bush Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 3 hours per week, practicals 3 hours per week, five-day study tour to the Riverina Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 or {144 credit points of units of study including a minimum of 12 credit points from [ANSC3106 and (ANSC3888 or AVBS3888 or SCPU3001)]} Assumed knowledge: Senior tertiary level knowledge inanimalproduction management andbehaviour and welfare of production animals Assessment: Case study (10%), practical report (20%), meat grading (15%), excursion report (15%) and written exam (40%) Practical field work: Five-day study tour to the Riverina Campus: Camden, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the concepts of sheep (wool and meat) and beef cattle production in the Australian environment within the context of world food and fibre consumption and production. The key products as well as domestic and export markets for these are presented. The course provides a historical perspective of the basis for each of these industries and describes each of the production systems designed to meet the demand for these products.
Production in both the tropical and temperate regions of Australia will be covered and include the key elements of extensive grazing and intensive feedlot systems. Major issues will include breeds and breeding systems, basic nutrition and production practices and animal welfare issues as they affect the quality and quantity of product marketed.
The concepts of first stage processing of both meat and fibre products in abattoirs and top-making plants respectively will be presented. The major factors that influence the quality of product and therefore grading and market demand will be presented.
Lecture material will be supported with appropriate practical classes, a 2 day trip to the University's 'Arthursleigh' farm and a 5 day study tour to the Riverina to evaluate different commercial production systems. Students will also have an opportunity to compete in the annual Inter Collegiate Meat Judging (ICMJ) competition as a member of the University of Sydney team. This competition involves teams from numerous universities throughout Australia as well as Japan and the USA.
SCIE4002 Experimental Design and Data Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: 4 x 1 hr lectures/week, for six weeks, either online or face-to-face and 1 x 2 hour workshop/week for six weeks Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Prohibitions: ENVX3002 or STAT3X22 or STAT4022 or STAT3X12 Assumed knowledge: Completion of units in quantitative research methods, mathematics or statistical analysis at least at 1000-level. Assessment: design critique (20%), research plan (30%), analysis critique (20%), 2 x analysis quizzes (15% each) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
An indispensable attribute of an effective scientific researcher is the ability to collect, analyse and interpret data. Central to this process is the ability to create hypotheses and test these by using rigorous experimental designs. This modular unit of study will introduce the key concepts of experimental design and data analysis. Specifically, you will learn to formulate experimental aims to test a specific hypothesis. You will develop the skills and understanding required to design a rigorous scientific experiment, including an understanding of concepts such as controls, replicates, sample size, dependent and independent variables and good research practice (e. g. blinding, randomisation). By completing this unit you will develop the knowledge and skills required to appropriately analyse and interpret data in order to draw conclusions in the context of an advanced research project. From this unit of study, you will emerge with a comprehensive understanding of how to optimise the design and analysis of an experiment to most effectively answer scientific questions.
SCIE4003 Ethics in Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Hans Pols Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: part a: lecture/seminars 4hr/week for 3 weeks, in which all students participate, followed by two modules, part b (human ethics) and part c (animal ethics), from which students select one; each module comprises 8 hours of workshops over 1-2 weeks Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A Prohibitions: HSBH3004 or HPSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Successful completion of a Science major. Assessment: essay (40%), presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
In the contemporary world, a wide variety of ethical concerns impinge upon the practice of scientific research. In this unit you will learn how to identify potential ethical issues within science, acquire the tools necessary to analyse them, and develop the ability to articulate ethically sound insights about how to resolve them. In the first portion of the unit, you will be familiarised with how significant developments in post-World War II science motivated sustained ethical debate among scientists and in society. In the second portion of the unit, you will select from either a Human Ethics module or an Animal Ethics module and learn the requirements of how to ensure your research complies with appropriate national legislation and codes of conduct. By undertaking this unit you will develop the ability to conduct scientific research in an ethically justifiable way, place scientific developments and their application in a broader social context, and analyse the social implications and ethical issues that may potentially arise in the course of developing scientific knowledge.

Honours Core Research Project

AVBS4015 Research Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Muir Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students must attend the compulsory course "Introduction to Animal Research (ITAR)" which is usually held in the week prior to the start of semester. There is no regular face-to-face teaching. The equivalent of 12 hours per week should be allocated from the course work timetable for research project activity. Relevant workshops, for example on scientific writing and statistical analysis will be completed during the sessions when the student is enrolled in AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017 and AVBS4018. Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3. Students need to have obtained a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining honours; and must have the approval of the faculty to enrol. Corequisites: AVBS4016 and AVBS4017 and AVBS4018 Prohibitions: AVBS4013 or AVBS4014 Assessment: Written research proposal, literature review on the research topic, oral presentation on the research proposal, oral presentation on the research at the end of the project, research capabilities, written manuscript (assessment tasks scheduled throughout the four units comprising the AVBS Research Projects program - AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017, ABVS4018 - with the final grade averaged over all four units). Practical field work: Dependent on the particular research project Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The AVBS Research Projects program is composed of 24 credit points and consists of units AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017 and AVBS4018. The units need to be taken in chronological order, commencing with enrolment in unit AVBS4015, which must be completed in a semester prior to unit AVBS4018. All four units are connected to the overall completion of the research project. Prior to start of this unit of study, students after consultation with an academic(s) and/or researcher(s) choose an area of research interest and this will form the basis of the entire Research Project A program (24 credit points in total). In unit AVBS4015 students will be required to undertake assessment tasks and conduct research activities.
At the end of this Unit of Study, students will:
Identify a research area, define a problem that impacts on animals and analyse this problem using information from various sources; critically evaluate current research (experimental design, statistical analysis, technical limitations) and identify where the present knowledge limiting for the chosen research topic; assimilate and manage information from within and across disciples to provide new concepts or understanding in the area of research; become familiar with scientific principles of research and the ethical use of animals in research; undertake research related to the project; meet set assessment tasks designed to develop written and oral presentation skills; apply the range of interpersonal skills necessary to work with peers and other researchers; meet deadlines and maintain accurate records related to the project.
Textbooks
No textbooks are required
AVBS4016 Research Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Muir Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: There is no regular face-to-face teaching. The equivalent of 12 hours per week should be allocated from the course work timetable for research project activity. Relevant workshops, for example on scientific writing and statistical analysis will be completed during the sessions when the student is enrolled in AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017 and AVBS4018. Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3. Students need to have obtained a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining honours; and must have the approval of the faculty to enrol. Corequisites: AVBS4015 and AVBS4017 and AVBS4018 Prohibitions: AVBS4013 or AVBS4014 Assessment: See AVBS4015 Practical field work: Dependent on the particular research project Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will actively work on the research projects identified at the start of unit AVBS4015. This is will include, where appropriate, undertaking animal and laboratory studies, collection and analysis of samples and data, recording of data, continue to evaluate information from various sources and meet set assessment deadlines.
See under AVBS4015 for further information.
AVBS4017 Research Project C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Muir Session: Semester 1,Semester 1,Semester 2,Semester 2 Classes: The equivalent of 12 hours per week should be allocated from the coursework timetable for research project activity. Relevant workshops, for example on scientific writing and statistical analysis will be completed during the sessions when the student is enrolled in AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017 and AVBS4018 Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3. Students need to have obtained a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining honours; and must have the approval of the faculty to enrol. Corequisites: AVBS4015 and AVBS4016 and AVBS4018 Prohibitions: AVBS4013 or AVBS4014 Assessment: See AVBS4015 Practical field work: Dependent on the particular research project Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
See under AVBS4015 and AVBS4016.
AVBS4018 Research Project D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Muir Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: There is no regular face-to-face teaching. The equivalent of 12 hours per week should be allocated from the coursework timetable for research project activity. Relevant workshops, for example on scientific writing and statistical analysis will be completed during the sessions when the student is enrolled in AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017 and AVBS4018. Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3. Students need to have obtained a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining honours; and must have the approval of the faculty to enrol. Corequisites: AVBS4015 and AVBS4016 and AVBS4017 Prohibitions: AVBS4013 or AVBS4014 Assessment: See AVBS4015 Practical field work: Dependent on the particular research project Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
See under AVBS4015 and AVBS4016. Students must complete unit AVBS4018 in a separate semester to unit AVBS4015, and AVBS4015 must be completed prior to AVBS4018.