Animal Production

ANIMAL PRODUCTION

Animal Production major

A major in Animal Production requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(iii) 12 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 3000-level major core units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project units
(vi) 12 credit points 3000-level or higher selective units

Animal Production minor

A minor in Animal Production requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(iii) 12 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level minor core units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes (15%), communication assessments (35%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: quizzes (14%), communication assessments (36%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week; online material; and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
Selective
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 2 field excursions. Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 2 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 3 field excursions Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 3 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in an authentic urban biodiversity management research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Cameron Clark Session: Semester 2 Classes: On average 6 hours per week (lectures and practicals); there will be several whole-day practical classes at the Camden campus Prohibitions: AGEN2006 Assumed knowledge: AGEN1004 or BIOL1XXX or AVBS1003 Assessment: Participation, written assignments, quizzes and end of semester examination Practical field work: There will be several whole day practical classes at the Camden campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the management of animals in natural and man-made environments. At the end of this unit of study, students will understand: the characteristics of the management systems of the major domestic species used for production in Australia and in a world wide context; the characteristics and principles underpinning sustainable management of native animals in natural and man-made environments; an appreciation of the dependence of living organisms upon their environment; an appreciation of indigenous land management and the husbandry practices and innovations that have been adopted by the production industries to retain their competitive advantage; a demonstrated capability in handling and husbandry of the major domestic production animal species, and an appreciation of the application of these skills to non-domestic species; a demonstrated understanding of the importance of high standards of animal welfare practice in the management of animals.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the unit content and for this reason no formal text is required. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course.

2000-level units of study

Core
AVBS2004 Animal Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Alex V. Chaves Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x lectures; 1x2h computer practical session; 1-2h online learning session on a weekly basis Prerequisites: BIOL1XX7 or AVBS1002 Prohibitions: ANSC3101 Assessment: problem-based learning report (30%), video (30%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Computer-based where students get familiarized with diet formulation software reports/outcomes and identifying limitation of the diet in each scenario. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Access afterhours to IBM-PC compatible computers that have Microsoft Windows XP or later are advisable. Most of the diet formulation software are Windows Compatible only.
One of the greatest limiting factors to the health and wellbeing of animals under our care is the nutritional value of their feed. Whether provided by nature or manufactured to meet the production and health needs of farmed animals, being able to provide suitable nutrition to animals in our care is fundamental to good animal health management. This Unit is broadly divided into three sections, namely: estimating the nutritive value of feeds; estimating the nutrient requirements of animals and diet formulation. The focus is on building up knowledge on animal nutrition by assessments of nutritional adequacy and solving of nutritional problems, with a particular emphasis on wildlife and animals used in agricultural production systems. The principles discussed in this course will be expanded in third year, in which species-specific systems will be described within the animal production major.
In this unit you will develop the skills to create diets based on sound science, to meet animal requirements for a variety of purposes and under a variety of constraints and identify deficiencies, excesses and imbalances in diets and optimising nutritional health and minimising disease risk.
Textbooks
There is no required text for the course. A number of textbooks are available on reserve at the library. Detail information is provided in this Unit of Study guide.
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week; one 3-hour practical session per week; and one tutorial per fortnight Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics; mechanisms of evolution; molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance; and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes and presentation (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week; one 3-hour practical session per week; and one tutorial per fortnight Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and/or in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.

3000-level and higher units of study

Major Core
ANSC3106 Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sabrina Lomax Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week (including lectures, demonstrations, discussions and practical activities); classes will be held at the Camden campus; practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Prerequisites: AVBS1002 or BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assignments/presentations (50%), theory exam (50%) Practical field work: Practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3, the behavioural and physiological responses of mammals, birds and fish to stressors related to husbandry, housing, transport and slaughter are explored in some detail. This Unit enables students to develop an appreciation of the responses of animals to common interventions that arise in the context of interacting with humans, including the domestication of livestock species and the management of wildlife. The principles of animal responses to stress are illustrated with production species as the main examples. Contemporary approaches to the scientific measurement of animal stress and welfare, based on an appropriate selection of scientific disciplines including ethology, psychology, physiology and neuroscience, are assessed with an emphasis on farmed livestock species. Genetic, environmental and evolutionary determinants of pain, stress and fear responses in animals are considered in the light of what is known about cognition and motivation in animals. Methods for assessing and enhancing animal environments and husbandry systems are examined and the impact on animal behaviour and welfare of stockmanship is explored in the context of human-animal interactions. Finally, the design and conduct of scientific experiments are assessed with a focus on animal ethics and current welfare issues.
Textbooks
Broom, DM and Fraser, AF 2007, Domestic animal behaviour and welfare, 4th edition, CAB International, Cambridge Uni Press, Cambridge
Interdisciplinary Projects
ANSC3888 Production Systems Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Luciano Gonzalez Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week, tutorial/practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: AVBS2004 and GEGE2X01 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with data analysis and animal handling. Assessment: 3 x oral presentations (10% each), 1 x written assignment (70%) Practical field work: Approximately 6 weeks of self-directed learning and tutorial work for a farm case study (5 x 1 hr sessions/week). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Two days of practical classes will be held at the Camden campus.
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. The ability to identify and explore interdisciplinary links in livestock production is a crucial skill for emerging professionals and researchers alike. This unit presents the opportunity to bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt in livestock production and agriculture, and apply them to a real-world problem. For example, you will work on a project analysing a selected livestock production system following a whole system approach, and understanding drivers and trends shaping the business. This will allow you to identify limitations to livestock productivity, sustainability and profitability which can then be put in a business plan to reduce or overcome the impact of these limitations. Working on a multidisciplinary team will allow you to solve these limitations with a holistic approach proposing improvements across the system's components (soils, pastures, crops, animals, economics, technological advances, amongst others). In this unit, you will continue to understand and explore disciplinary knowledge around Animal Production, while also meeting and collaborating with students from across the University through project-based learning; identifying and solving problems of livestock production systems, collecting and analysing data and communicating your findings to a diverse audience. All of these skills are highly valued by employers. This unit will foster the ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and this is essential for both professional and research pathways in the future.
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Pauline Ross Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of a team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.
Selective
ANSC3102 Animal Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Simon de Graaf Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hours per week, tutorials 1 hour per week, practicals 3 hours per week; there will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Prerequisites: AVBS1002 and AVBS2XXX Assumed knowledge: A background in animal anatomy and physiology Assessment: Written and oral assignments (30%), mid-semester practical exam (15%), end of semester written exam (55%) Practical field work: There will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a comprehensive programme on basic and applied aspects of male and female reproductive biology, with particular emphasis on livestock and domestic animals. The fundamental topics include reproductive cycles, sexual differentiation, gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, gestation and parturition. An understanding of the applications of advanced reproductive technologies is developed through lectures, tutorials and the assignments. In addition, practical instruction is given on semen collection and processing, manipulation of the reproductive cycle, artificial insemination, and pregnancy diagnosis in sheep and pigs. Classes are held at the Camperdown Campus in Sydney and at the Camden Campus Animal Reproduction Unit and Mayfarm piggery.
Textbooks
Senger, PL 2013, Pathways to pregnancy and parturition 3rd ed., Current Conceptions Inc
AVBS3008 Intensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sonia Liu Session: Semester 2 Classes: approximately 6 hrs/week: lecture 2-3 hrs/week, tutorial or MCQ 2hr/fortnight Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (ANSC3101 or AVBS2XXX or BIOL2XXX or FOOD2000 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2001 or GENE2002 or ITLS2000) Prohibitions: AVBS4008 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with data analysis and animal handling. Assessment: in-class MCQs x 4 (20%), efficacy and welfare written report (20%), group assignment virtual piggery (10%), final exam (50%) Practical field work: Approximately 6 afternoons at Mayfarm Piggery and Poultry Unit. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Poultry and pig farmers are faced with ever increasing challenges, from the increasing demand for affordable meat and eggs to the ever-present issues related to welfare and wellbeing of these traditionally intensively managed animals. This unit will investigate poultry and pig production with an emphasis towards giving you an understanding of the pig meat, poultry meat and whole egg industries under Australian conditions. You will examine and evaluate various aspects of the poultry and pig production systems important in maintaining efficiency and profitability. Current challenges in pig and poultry productions and hot topics in research will be discussed in lectures. Through examining aspects such as breeding, nutrition, housing, growth, performance, health and welfare you will develop practical skills that can be applied to aid local and international poultry and pig farmers as they strive to produce food of the highest quality in a sustainable and ethical fashion.
AVBS3009 Aquaculture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joy Becker Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week, tutorial 1 hr/week, practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: 6 credit points from (AVBS1002 or BIOL1XXX or GEOS1XXX or MBLG1XXX) and 6 credit points from (AVBS2XXX or BIOL2XXX) Prohibitions: AVBS4009 Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of animal husbandry and management; aquatic animal biology. Assessment: oral presentation (25%), annotated bibliography (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Aquaculture is a rapidly developing area of food production as the world faces a critical point in not being able to meet global demand for seafood. This unit of study explores in detail the husbandry of aquaculture broodstock and larval and juvenile culture techniques of finfish, molluscs and crustaceans. The biological principles of aquaculture including aquatic animal physiology, species selection, hatchery breeding and rearing and grow-out practices, aquaculture farming systems, animal health, welfare and disease and environmental impact are addressed. In this unit of study, you will attain practical skills relevant to aquaculture production and management of aquatic animals, such as animal handling, growth measures, fluid collection, health assessments and necropsy. The unit aims to inspire and motivate you through research-informed teaching and application of the principles of scientific thinking. By the end of this unit, you will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles of: the context of aquaculture in global food production; animal management and welfare of aquaculture species; comparative aspects of farming systems used in aquaculture; health and disease relevant to aquaculture; nutrition of aquaculture species; water quality and the environmental impact of aquaculture.
AVBS3010 Livestock Production Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Luciano Gonzalez Session: Semester 1 Classes: averaged as lecture 4hrs/week for 10 weeks, tutorials 1hr/week for 5 weeks, seminars 7 hrs/week for 1 week, practical 8 hrs/week for 1 week and 2 hrs/week for 1 week, site visit 4hrs/week for 1 week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (AVBS2XXX or ANSC3101 or BIOL2XXX or FOOD2000 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2001 or GENE2002 or ITLS2000) Prohibitions: AGRO4005 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with data analysis and animal handling. Assessment: 4 x practical reports (5%, 20% total), group-based farm system enterprise report (20%), group-based oral presentation (20%), final exam (40% ) Practical field work: 2 days of farm practical classes Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit requires three days of practicals at the Camden campus and field trip to commercial farms .
Livestock production systems are changing rapidly as a result of pressures to increase productivity, sustainability and profitability. These changes are further augmented by the rapid growth in new knowledge and emergence of new technologies, and changes in the diet of world populations. In this unit you will be exposed to contemporary livestock production systems through a whole-system approach integrating animals, pastures, environment, management and economics. The unit starts with a section describing the holistic approach to livestock production systems, then examines each component of the production system, and how these interact and affect each other. You will integrate concepts from animal biology and ecology, genetics, nutrition, reproduction, health and welfare, agronomy and economics. You will analyse farming systems and develop solutions to optimise production, sustainability and social goals. You will learn the use of simulation models and decision support systems, new technologies and holistic farm business analysis and planning. Computer-based and field classes will allow you to gain direct, practical experience in key areas required to work with the livestock industries in leading roles as consultants, advisors, managers or scientists in sustainable livestock enterprises
AGRO4006 New and Emerging Tech in Animal Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Luciano Gonzalez Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 3-hour lecture followed by one 3-hour practical per week at Camden Campus (practicals include demonstration and hands-on with remote sensing, GIS and ICT technologies) Prerequisites: 6cp from BIOL1XXX Assessment: Final Assignment presentation (10%) and document (40%), video proposal for major assignment (10%) and practical reports (computer labs and field classes, 40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of new and emerging livestock technologies in Australia and overseas. Examples of these technologies include (1) next-generation infrared and laser scanning to determine physiological status and whole body composition, (2) diet formulation to enhance the nutritional and eating quality of livestock food products, (3) new vaccines and other therapeutics to regulate fertility, growth and behaviour whilst enhancing welfare and wellbeing, (4) microRNA technology to influence cellular, endocrine and physiological processes, (5) new genomics and laboratory-based reproductive technologies for advanced livestock breeding, (6) technologies to monitor and control animal behaviour, (7) unmanned ground and aerial vehicles to monitor livestock and the environment, (8) sensors and advanced image-capture technology to record the attributes of soil, air and the feedbase, (9) data-fusion science to integrate, analyse and interpret collected data, and (10) modelling of livestock systems. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through on-line discussion postings, laboratory reports and presentations, and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups. At successful completion of the unit students will have a sound knowledge of new and emerging technologies that will shape the livestock industries in Australia and overseas. This will provide valuable grounding for students preparing for postgraduate study and other learning and career paths.
Textbooks
No prescribed text but referral to references listed from library
Minor Core
ANSC3106 Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sabrina Lomax Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week (including lectures, demonstrations, discussions and practical activities); classes will be held at the Camden campus; practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Prerequisites: AVBS1002 or BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assignments/presentations (50%), theory exam (50%) Practical field work: Practical class activities will be held at the Mayfarm, Corstophine Dairy, and Camden poultry research unit, and there will be a full day excursion to Symbio Wildlife Zoo Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3, the behavioural and physiological responses of mammals, birds and fish to stressors related to husbandry, housing, transport and slaughter are explored in some detail. This Unit enables students to develop an appreciation of the responses of animals to common interventions that arise in the context of interacting with humans, including the domestication of livestock species and the management of wildlife. The principles of animal responses to stress are illustrated with production species as the main examples. Contemporary approaches to the scientific measurement of animal stress and welfare, based on an appropriate selection of scientific disciplines including ethology, psychology, physiology and neuroscience, are assessed with an emphasis on farmed livestock species. Genetic, environmental and evolutionary determinants of pain, stress and fear responses in animals are considered in the light of what is known about cognition and motivation in animals. Methods for assessing and enhancing animal environments and husbandry systems are examined and the impact on animal behaviour and welfare of stockmanship is explored in the context of human-animal interactions. Finally, the design and conduct of scientific experiments are assessed with a focus on animal ethics and current welfare issues.
Textbooks
Broom, DM and Fraser, AF 2007, Domestic animal behaviour and welfare, 4th edition, CAB International, Cambridge Uni Press, Cambridge
ANSC3888 Production Systems Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Luciano Gonzalez Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week, tutorial/practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: AVBS2004 and GEGE2X01 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with data analysis and animal handling. Assessment: 3 x oral presentations (10% each), 1 x written assignment (70%) Practical field work: Approximately 6 weeks of self-directed learning and tutorial work for a farm case study (5 x 1 hr sessions/week). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Two days of practical classes will be held at the Camden campus.
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. The ability to identify and explore interdisciplinary links in livestock production is a crucial skill for emerging professionals and researchers alike. This unit presents the opportunity to bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt in livestock production and agriculture, and apply them to a real-world problem. For example, you will work on a project analysing a selected livestock production system following a whole system approach, and understanding drivers and trends shaping the business. This will allow you to identify limitations to livestock productivity, sustainability and profitability which can then be put in a business plan to reduce or overcome the impact of these limitations. Working on a multidisciplinary team will allow you to solve these limitations with a holistic approach proposing improvements across the system's components (soils, pastures, crops, animals, economics, technological advances, amongst others). In this unit, you will continue to understand and explore disciplinary knowledge around Animal Production, while also meeting and collaborating with students from across the University through project-based learning; identifying and solving problems of livestock production systems, collecting and analysing data and communicating your findings to a diverse audience. All of these skills are highly valued by employers. This unit will foster the ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and this is essential for both professional and research pathways in the future.