Applied Medical Science

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units:

AMED3001 Cancer:
Prerequisites have changed. They now read: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]

AMED3003 Diagnostics & Biomarkers:
Prerequisites have changed. They now read: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]

AMED3888 Clinical Science:
Prerequisites have changed. They now read: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]

12/12/2018
2.

Prerequisites have changed for the following unit, they now read:

MEDS2004 Microbes, Infection and Immunity Prerequisites: MEDS2004: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1X08 or MEDS1X01 or MBLG1XX1

20/2/2019

 

APPLIED MEDICAL SCIENCE

Advanced coursework and projects will be available in 2020 for students who complete this major.

Applied Medical Science major

A major in Applied Medical Science requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units according to the following rules:
(a) 6 credit points of 2000-level MIMI coded units or
(b) 6 credit points of 2000-level MEDS coded units for students in the Medical Science stream
(iv) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(v) 18 credit points of 3000-level core units
(vi) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project units

Applied Medical Science minor

A minor in Applied Medical Science requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units according to the following rules:
(a) 6 credit points of 2000-level MIMI coded units or
(b) 6 credit points of 2000-level MEDS coded units for students in the Medical Science stream
(iv) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(v) 12 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Practical field work: As advised and required by the project; approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
Selective
BIOL1008 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-3hr Lectures per week; six 3-hour practical sessions; six workshops/tutorials; students encouraged to spend 1-2 hours per week accessing online resources Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Written and oral presentation, quiz, skills-based assessment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
BIOL1908 Human Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-3hr Lectures per week; six 3-hour practical sessions; six workshops/tutorials; students encouraged to spend 1-2 hours per week accessing online resources Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Written and oral presentation, quiz, skills-based assessment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components which may for example include guest lecturers from medical science industries. The nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
BIOL1998 Human Biology (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalyn Gloag Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1908; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1996 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical report (25%), practical presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), pre laboratory quizzes (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The practical work syllabus consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, presentations, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
MEDS1001 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 1 Classes: this unit of study will involve between 5-6 hours of face-to-face activities run on the camperdown campus, these contact hours will comprise lectures; six 3-hour practical sessions; six workshops and tutorials Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1901 Assessment: Written and oral communication, quiz, practical and workshop reports, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the medical sciences suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology and medical sciences. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in the medical sciences.
Textbooks
TBA
MEDS1901 Human Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 1 Classes: this unit of study will involve between 5-6 hours of face-to-face activities run on the camperdown campus Prerequisites: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 Assessment: Written and oral presentation, quiz, assignment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components which may for example include guest lecturers from medical science industries. The nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
TBA
MEDS coded units of study are only available to students in the Medical Science stream.

2000-level units of study

MIMI coded
MIMI2002 Microbes, Infection and Immunity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, and scenario-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX3) Prohibitions: MEDS2004, BMED2404, MIMI2902, IMMU2101, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2022, MICR2922, BMED2807, BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Final examination (50%), practical exercises (20%), online quizzes (10%), integrated assessment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Transmission, pathogenicity and immune response to microbes are key concepts for understanding infectious disease processes. In this unit of study you will establish a conceptual foundation and, using an integrated approach, explore selected case studies of infection from a body system of origin perspective. You will explore the characteristics of viral, bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens and their virulence mechanisms for establishment and progression of disease. Comprehensive consideration of host immune response and characteristic pathological changes to tissue that arise will then be considered. Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to explain microbial pathogenic processes of infection including: mechanisms for colonisation, invasion and damage to host tissue; the ways in which your immune system recognises and destroys invading microbes; how T cell response is activated and antibodies function. You will learn about pathogenesis, symptoms, current challenges of treatment including antibiotic resistance, control and vaccination strategies. You will develop a holistic perspective of infectious diseases. You will work collaboratively to solve challenging problems in Biomedical Sciences. Practical classes will investigate normal flora, host defences and case studies of medically important microbes with linkage to disease outcome. You will also obtain experience and understanding of modern experimental techniques in microbiology and immunopathology.
MIMI2902 Microbes, Infection and Immunity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, online lecturettes, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry- and scenario-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX3) Prohibitions: MEDS2004, BMED2404, MIMI2002, IMMU2101, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2022, MICR2922, BMED2807, BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Final examination (50%), practical exercises (20%), online quizzes (10%), research publication-based assignment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Transmission, pathogenicity and immune response to microbes are key concepts for understanding infectious disease processes. In this unit you will establish a conceptual foundation and, using an integrated approach, explore selected infection case studies from a body system of origin perspective. You will explore characteristics of viral, bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens and their virulence mechanisms for establishment and progression of disease. Comprehensive consideration of host immune response and consequent characteristic pathological changes to tissue will be considered. Upon completion, you will be able to explain microbial pathogenic processes of infection including: mechanisms for colonisation, invasion and damage to host tissue; the ways your immune system recognises and destroys invading microbes; how T cell response is activated and antibodies function. You will learn about pathogenesis, symptoms, current challenges of treatment including antibiotic resistance, control and vaccination strategies. This advanced unit has the same overall structure as MIMI2002 but contains a unique science communication exercise in which you will actively participate in small group sessions and be assessed with a short essay. This advanced component explores how recent advances in microbiology, infection and immunity are communicated to the wider public and is based on recent publications with potential high impact for society.
MEDS coded
MEDS2004 Microbes, Infection and Immunity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online lecturettes, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1X08 or MEDS1X01 or MBLG1XX1 Prohibitions: MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Final examination (50%), practical exercises (20%), online quizzes (10%), integrated assessment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Transmission, pathogenicity and immune response to microbes are key concepts for understanding infectious disease processes. In this unit of study you will establish a conceptual foundation and, using an integrated approach, explore selected case studies of infection from a body system of origin perspective. You will explore the characteristics of viral, bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens and their virulence mechanisms for establishment and progression of disease. Comprehensive consideration of host immune response and characteristic pathological changes to tissue that arise will then be considered. Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to explain microbial pathogenic processes of infection including: mechanisms for colonisation, invasion and damage to host tissue; the ways in which your immune system recognises and destroys invading microbes; how T cell response is activated and antibodies function. You will learn about pathogenesis, symptoms, current challenges of treatment including antibiotic resistance, control and vaccination strategies. You will develop a holistic perspective of infectious diseases. You will work collaboratively to solve challenging problems in Biomedical Sciences. Practical classes will investigate normal flora, host defences and case studies of medically important microbes with linkage to disease outcome. You will also obtain experience and understanding of modern experimental techniques in microbiology and immunopathology.
Selective
PHSI2007 Key Concepts in Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: 6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903] Prohibitions: PHSI2907 or BMED2402 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Written and other tasks: Integrated Science project task (10%) , Laboratory report writing (25%), How Physiology Works (15%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating from the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organ systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning, you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
PHSI2907 Key Concepts in Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2007 or BMED2402 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Video submission of cell communication (25%), Laboratory report writing (25%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will explore these concepts in four modules: compartmentalisation, cell specialisation, communication between cells and responding to the environment. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organs systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Furthermore, specialised activities in physiological research will allow small group learning and interaction with staff. Workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
PCOL2021 Key Concepts in Pharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brent McParland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: PCOL2555 or PCOL2011 or MEDS2002 or BMED2401 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2002 Assumed knowledge: [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) Assessment: Cognitive, problem-based examination (40%), poster presentation (10%), practical exercises (20%), written research topics (10%), online quizzes (10%), and contribution to online discussion (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Pharmacology is the study of the properties and biological actions of drugs and chemicals and the keys role they play in the prevention and treatment of human diseases. In this unit of study you will be introduced to the fundamental concepts in pharmacology: a) principles of drug action, b) pharmacokinetics and precision medicine, c) drug design, and d) drug development and regulation. Additionally, you will learn the tools pharmacologists use in their investigations and develop skills in laboratory and problem-based enquiry. In both face-to-face and online learning environments you will learn the core concepts underpinning pharmacology and will have the opportunity to explore and apply these concepts through practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. By undertaking this unit you will not only learn to view health and disease through the lens of a pharmacologist, you will further develop valuable skills in critical thinking and problem solving, communication, digital literacy, teamwork and interdisciplinary effectiveness. This unit will help you to develop a coherent and connected knowledge of the medical sciences and their broad applications, while also giving you the foundations for increasing your disciplinary expertise in pharmacology.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site. Links to other learning technologies will be available via Canvas LMS. Textbooks will be available for purchase from Co-op bookshop, in hard copy and online via the library.
BCMB2001 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quizzes, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. Our practicals, along with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to widely applied and cutting edge tools that are essential for modern biochemistry and molecular biology. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the life and medical sciences.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
BCMB2901 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, quiz, skills-based assessment, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. The advanced laboratory component will provide students with an authentic research laboratory experience while in the theory component, current research topics will be presented in a problem-based format through dedicated advanced tutorial sessions. This material will be assessed by creative student-centered activities supported by eLearning platforms.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
MEDS2001 Key Concepts in Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Cameron Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: 6cp from [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903] Prohibitions: PHSI2907 or PHSI2007 or BMED2402 Assumed knowledge: Human biology Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Written and other tasks: Integrated Medical Science activity (10%), Laboratory report writing (25%), How Physiology Works (15%) - students will write a 1000 word piece explaining how a Specific physiological mechanism can be applied to two different cell types to elicit totally different cellular functions, Explaining Physiology (10% group) - students will work in groups of 5 to create a short 5 min, Presentation that explains a core concept in physiology to members of the general public. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating from the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organs systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning, you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole-body physiology.
MEDS2002 Key Concepts in Pharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brent McParland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: PCOL2555 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or BMED2401 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) Assessment: Cognitive, problem-based examination (40%), poster presentation (10%), practical exercises and peer evaluation (20%), online quizzes (10%), personal reflection (5%), contribution to online discussion (5%), integrated assessment (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit must be taken by all students enrolled in the BSc (Medical Science)
Pharmacology is the study of the properties and biological actions of drugs and chemicals and the keys role they play in the prevention and treatment of human diseases. In this unit of study you will be introduced to the fundamental concepts in pharmacology: a) principles of drug action, b) pharmacokinetics and precision medicine, c) drug design, and d) drug development and regulation. Additionally, you will learn the tools pharmacologists use in their investigations and develop skills in laboratory and problem-based enquiry. In both face-to-face and online learning environments you will learn the core concepts underpinning pharmacology and will have the opportunity to explore and apply these concepts through practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. By undertaking this unit you will not only learn to view health and disease through the lens of a pharmacologist, you will further develop valuable skills in critical thinking and problem solving, communication, digital literacy, teamwork and interdisciplinary effectiveness. This unit will help you to develop a coherent and connected knowledge of the medical sciences and their broad applications, while also giving you the foundations for increasing your disciplinary expertise in pharmacology.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site. Links to other learning technologies will be available via Canvas LMS. Textbooks will be available for purchase from Co-op bookshop, in hard copy and online via the library.
MEDS2003 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical session and 1 h tutorial per fortnight Prerequisites: 6p from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or BMED2804 Assessment: Group presentation (5%), In-class continuous assessment (25%), PeerWise MCQ design (10%), ELMA design essay and interpretation (10%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? What happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how fuel use is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. Our practicals, along with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to widely applied and cutting-edge tools that are essential for modern biochemistry and molecular biology. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the medical and life sciences.
Textbooks
Canvas, ELN Peerwise Site, Blackboard LMS Textbook: Biochemistry - Berg, Tymoczko, Gatto, Stryer 8th Ed or higher Wikipedia
(MEDS coded units of study are only available to students in the Medical Science stream).

3000-level units of study

Major core
AMED3001 Cancer

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Geraldine O'Neill Session: Semester 1 Classes: interactive face to face activities 4 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3901 Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, quiz, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What does it mean when someone tells you: "you have cancer"? Initially you're probably consumed with questions like: "how did this happen?" and "will this cancer kill me?". In this unit, we will explore all aspects of the "cancer problem" from the underlying biomedical and environmental causes, through to emerging approaches to cancer diagnosis and treatment. You will integrate medical science knowledge from a diverse range of disciplines and apply this to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer both at the individual and community level. Together we will explore the epidemiology, aetiology and pathophysiology of cancer. You will be able to define problems and formulate solutions related to the study, prevention and treatment of cancer with consideration throughout for the economic, social and psychological costs of a disease that affects billions. Face-to-face and online learning activities will allow you to work effectively in individual and collaborative contexts. You will acquire the skills to interpret and communicate observations and experimental findings related to the "cancer problem" to diverse audiences. Upon completion, you will have developed the foundations that will allow you to follow a career in cancer research, clinical and diagnostic cancer services and/or the corporate system that supports the health care system.
Textbooks
Recommended Textbook: 1.,Weinberg (2013) The Biology of Cancer. 2nd edition. Garland Science Recommended reading: 1.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2000). The hallmarks of cancer. Cell 100, 57-70. 2.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2011). Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation. Cell 144, 646-74
AMED3002 Interrogating Biomedical and Health Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jean Yang Session: Semester 1 Classes: face to face 5 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Assumed knowledge: Exploratory data analysis, sampling, simple linear regression, t-tests, confidence intervals and chi-squared goodness of fit tests, familiar with basic coding, basic linear algebra. Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biotechnological advances have given rise to an explosion of original and shared public data relevant to human health. These data, including the monitoring of expression levels for thousands of genes and proteins simultaneously, together with multiple databases on biological systems, now promise exciting, ground-breaking discoveries in complex diseases. Critical to these discoveries will be our ability to unravel and extract information from these data. In this unit, you will develop analytical skills required to work with data obtained in the medical and diagnostic sciences. You will explore clinical data using powerful, state of the art methods and tools. Using real data sets, you will be guided in the application of modern data science techniques to interrogate, analyse and represent the data, both graphically and numerically. By analysing your own real data, as well as that from large public resources you will learn and apply the methods needed to find information on the relationship between genes and disease. Leveraging expertise from multiple sources by working in team-based collaborative learning environments, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play an active role in finding meaningful solutions to difficult problems, creating an important impact on our lives.
AMED3003 Diagnostics and Biomarkers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fabienne Brilot-Turville Session: Semester 2 Classes: interactive face to face 4 hrs/week; online activities 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3903 Assessment: in-semester exam, skill based assessments, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Diagnostic sciences have evolved at a rapid pace and provide the cornerstone of our health care system. Effective diagnostic assays enable the identification of people who have, or are at risk of, a disease, and guide their treatment. Research into the pathophysiology of disease underpins the discovery of novel biomarkers and in turn, the development of revolutionary diagnostic assays that make use of state-of-the-art molecular and cellular methods. In this unit you will explore a diverse range of diagnostic tests and gain valuable practical experience in a number of core diagnostic methodologies, many of which are currently used in hospital laboratories. Together we will also cover the regulatory, social, and ethical aspects of the use of biomarkers and diagnostic tests and explore the pathways to their translation into clinical practice. By undertaking this unit, you will develop your understanding of diagnostic assays and biomarkers and acquire the skills needed to embark on a career in diagnostic sciences.
The following units of study will not run in 2019: AMED3901, AMED3903
Interdisciplinary Project
AMED3888 Clinical Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Gold Session: Semester 2 Classes: interactive face to face 4 hrs/week; online activities 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week; capstone placement (upto 8h total) Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3004 Assessment: Interdisciplinary creation (30%), written assignment on interdisciplinary project (25%), in-semester exam (30%), practical assessment (10%), capstone oral presentation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Clinical science is a multidisciplinary science that combines the principles of experimental science with translational medicine. As a clinical scientist, you will have the capacity to interpret test results, isolate causes of disease, and ultimately develop new treatments that will save lives. Clinical Science will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills that will give you a broad foundation of knowledge and open up a range of career opportunities in clinical sciences, including medical research, pharmaceutical development and clinical diagnostics. You will learn the language of the clinical world as you develop expertise in literature searching, study design, data interrogation and interpretation, evidence-based decision-making, and current knowledge in medical research. You will explore how discoveries in the medical sciences are translated into clinical practice, and pose your own clinical questions for investigation. You will study important medical conditions from the areas of infectious and genetic diseases and immunity. The interdisciplinary capstone experience of your study in Clinical Science will be a short placement in a sector of the clinical sciences of your interest, such as a diagnostic lab, a research lab or a clinical trials centre. Consequently, at the end of this unit you will have experienced what it is like to work in interdisciplinary clinical teams, which is essential for both professional and research pathways in the future.
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Pauline Ross Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.
Minor selective
AMED3001 Cancer

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Geraldine O'Neill Session: Semester 1 Classes: interactive face to face activities 4 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3901 Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, quiz, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What does it mean when someone tells you: "you have cancer"? Initially you're probably consumed with questions like: "how did this happen?" and "will this cancer kill me?". In this unit, we will explore all aspects of the "cancer problem" from the underlying biomedical and environmental causes, through to emerging approaches to cancer diagnosis and treatment. You will integrate medical science knowledge from a diverse range of disciplines and apply this to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer both at the individual and community level. Together we will explore the epidemiology, aetiology and pathophysiology of cancer. You will be able to define problems and formulate solutions related to the study, prevention and treatment of cancer with consideration throughout for the economic, social and psychological costs of a disease that affects billions. Face-to-face and online learning activities will allow you to work effectively in individual and collaborative contexts. You will acquire the skills to interpret and communicate observations and experimental findings related to the "cancer problem" to diverse audiences. Upon completion, you will have developed the foundations that will allow you to follow a career in cancer research, clinical and diagnostic cancer services and/or the corporate system that supports the health care system.
Textbooks
Recommended Textbook: 1.,Weinberg (2013) The Biology of Cancer. 2nd edition. Garland Science Recommended reading: 1.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2000). The hallmarks of cancer. Cell 100, 57-70. 2.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2011). Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation. Cell 144, 646-74
AMED3002 Interrogating Biomedical and Health Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jean Yang Session: Semester 1 Classes: face to face 5 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Assumed knowledge: Exploratory data analysis, sampling, simple linear regression, t-tests, confidence intervals and chi-squared goodness of fit tests, familiar with basic coding, basic linear algebra. Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biotechnological advances have given rise to an explosion of original and shared public data relevant to human health. These data, including the monitoring of expression levels for thousands of genes and proteins simultaneously, together with multiple databases on biological systems, now promise exciting, ground-breaking discoveries in complex diseases. Critical to these discoveries will be our ability to unravel and extract information from these data. In this unit, you will develop analytical skills required to work with data obtained in the medical and diagnostic sciences. You will explore clinical data using powerful, state of the art methods and tools. Using real data sets, you will be guided in the application of modern data science techniques to interrogate, analyse and represent the data, both graphically and numerically. By analysing your own real data, as well as that from large public resources you will learn and apply the methods needed to find information on the relationship between genes and disease. Leveraging expertise from multiple sources by working in team-based collaborative learning environments, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play an active role in finding meaningful solutions to difficult problems, creating an important impact on our lives.
AMED3003 Diagnostics and Biomarkers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fabienne Brilot-Turville Session: Semester 2 Classes: interactive face to face 4 hrs/week; online activities 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3903 Assessment: in-semester exam, skill based assessments, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Diagnostic sciences have evolved at a rapid pace and provide the cornerstone of our health care system. Effective diagnostic assays enable the identification of people who have, or are at risk of, a disease, and guide their treatment. Research into the pathophysiology of disease underpins the discovery of novel biomarkers and in turn, the development of revolutionary diagnostic assays that make use of state-of-the-art molecular and cellular methods. In this unit you will explore a diverse range of diagnostic tests and gain valuable practical experience in a number of core diagnostic methodologies, many of which are currently used in hospital laboratories. Together we will also cover the regulatory, social, and ethical aspects of the use of biomarkers and diagnostic tests and explore the pathways to their translation into clinical practice. By undertaking this unit, you will develop your understanding of diagnostic assays and biomarkers and acquire the skills needed to embark on a career in diagnostic sciences.
The following units of study will not run in 2019: AMED3901, AMED3903

4000-level units of study

The following units of study will not run in 2019: AMED4001
Further units to be developed for offering in 2020