Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Errata
Item Errata Date
1. Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
20/2/2019
2.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3092 Proteomics and Functional Genomics Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

BCHM3992 Proteomics and Functional Genomics (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

20/2/2019
3.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

20/2/2019

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Advanced coursework and projects will be available in 2020 for students who complete this major.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology major

A major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level units according to the following rules:
(a) 6 credit points of 2000-level biochemistry units or
(b) 6 credit points of 2000-level MEDS coded units for students in the Medical Science stream
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level core units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level selective units
(vi) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project units

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology minor

A minor in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level units according to the following rules:
(a) 6 credit points of 2000-level biochemistry units or
(b) 6 credit points of MEDS coded units for student in the Medical Science stream
(iv) 6 credit points of 3000-level minor selective units from depth units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level minor selective units from breadth units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, presentations, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Practical field work: As advised and required by the project; approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS

2000-level units of study

Core
BCMB2002 Proteins in Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2902 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quiz, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. Our practicals, other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for protein biochemistry ranging from protein visualization, quantification, purification and enzymatic activity, to in silico studies and cellular targeting experiments. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the cellular and molecular biosciences.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
BCMB2902 Proteins in Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2002 Assessment: Assignment, skills-based assessment, quiz, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. There will be a research-focused approach to the advanced practical component, including real and virtual extensions to key experiments. This approach will continue in the lecture series with several unique advanced lectures covering current research topics. You will further investigate a selected area of interest from these topics using original source material and present your findings through an oral presentation in dedicated advanced tutorials.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
Biochemistry
BCMB2001 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quizzes, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. Our practicals, along with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to widely applied and cutting edge tools that are essential for modern biochemistry and molecular biology. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the life and medical sciences.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
BCMB2901 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, quiz, skills-based assessment, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. The advanced laboratory component will provide students with an authentic research laboratory experience while in the theory component, current research topics will be presented in a problem-based format through dedicated advanced tutorial sessions. This material will be assessed by creative student-centered activities supported by eLearning platforms.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
MEDS coded
MEDS2003 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical session and 1 h tutorial per fortnight Prerequisites: 6p from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or BMED2804 Assessment: Group presentation (5%), In-class continuous assessment (25%), PeerWise MCQ design (10%), ELMA design essay and interpretation (10%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? What happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how fuel use is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. Our practicals, along with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to widely applied and cutting-edge tools that are essential for modern biochemistry and molecular biology. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the medical and life sciences.
Textbooks
Canvas, ELN Peerwise Site, Blackboard LMS Textbook: Biochemistry - Berg, Tymoczko, Gatto, Stryer 8th Ed or higher Wikipedia

3000-level units of study

Major core
BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3981 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3081 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3081. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in protein biochemistry will be covered.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester practical work and assignments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
Major selective
BCHM3072 Human Molecular Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3972 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3072 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3072. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in modern molecular cell biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3092 Proteomics and Functional Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3992 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will focus on the high throughput methods for the analysis of gene structure and function (genomics) and the analysis of proteins (proteomics), which are at the forefront of discovery in the biomedical sciences. The course will concentrate on the hierarchy of gene-protein-structure-function through an examination of modern technologies built on the concepts of genomics versus molecular biology, and proteomics versus biochemistry. Technologies to be examined include DNA sequencing, nucleic acid and protein microarrays, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, uses of mass spectrometry for high throughput protein identification, isotope tagging for quantitative proteomics, high-performance liquid chromatography, high-throughput functional assays, affinity chromatography and modern methods for database analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these technologies can provide insight into the molecular basis of changes in cellular function under both physiological and pathological conditions as well as how they can be applied to biotechnology for the discovery of biomarkers, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in proteomics and genomics.
BCHM3992 Proteomics and Functional Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3092 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will focus on the high throughput methods for the analysis of gene structure and function (genomics) and the analysis of proteins (proteomics) which are at the forefront of discovery in the biomedical sciences. The course will concentrate on the hierarchy of gene-protein-structure-function through an examination of modern technologies built on the concepts of genomics versus molecular biology, and proteomics versus biochemistry. Technologies to be examined include DNA sequencing, nucleic acid and protein microarrays, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, uses of mass spectrometry for high throughput protein identification, isotope tagging for quantitative proteomics, high-performance liquid chromatography, high-throughput functional assays, affinity chromatography and modern methods for database analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these technologies can provide insight into the molecular basis of changes in cellular function under both physiological and pathological conditions as well as how they can be applied to biotechnology for the discovery of biomarkers, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in proteomics and genomics.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3092. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in proteomics and genomics will be covered.
BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3982 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with molecular biology methods and studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry.
BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3082 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with new methods, including magnetic resonance techniques and molecular biology methods, as well as studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry. Qualified students will attend some lectures/practical classes in common with BCHM3082 and some separate lectures/ practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in metabolic biochemistry will be covered.
PCOL3012 Drug Design and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Rachel Codd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per week. Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405)] or 12cp from BCMB2XXX Prohibitions: PCOL3912 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, class and online quizzes, assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students with a basic understanding of pharmacology to the field of medicinal chemistry associated with drug design and development. The course covers the fundamental aspects of drug discovery and development with reference to the essentials of chemistry and illustrates drug development with examples that include neuraminidase inhibitors and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The role of computers in drug design is emphasised by classwork and assignments on molecular modelling and structure-activity relationships. The course also extends to a section on the design of diverse pharmacological agents which include compounds for imaging by positron emission tomography (PET), and kinase inhibitors.
Textbooks
Patrick, Graham L. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry. 5th edition. Oxford University Press. 2013.
PCOL3912 Drug Design and Development (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Rachel Codd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per week. Prerequisites: a mark of 70 or above in {(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405)] or 12cp from BCMB2XXX} Prohibitions: PCOL3012 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, in class and online quizzes, assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will consist of the lecture and practical components of PCOL3012. Students will be set special advanced assignments related to the material covered in core areas. These may also involve advanced practical work or detailed investigation of a theoretical problem.
Textbooks
Patrick, Graham L. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry. 5th edition. Oxford University Press. 2013.
Interdisciplinary project
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Pauline Ross Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.
BCMB3888 to be developed for offering in 2020
Minor selective depth
BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3981 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3081 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3081. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in protein biochemistry will be covered.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester practical work and assignments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
Minor selective breadth
BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3981 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3081 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3081. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in protein biochemistry will be covered.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester practical work and assignments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3072 Human Molecular Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3972 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3072 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3072. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in modern molecular cell biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3092 Proteomics and Functional Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3992 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will focus on the high throughput methods for the analysis of gene structure and function (genomics) and the analysis of proteins (proteomics), which are at the forefront of discovery in the biomedical sciences. The course will concentrate on the hierarchy of gene-protein-structure-function through an examination of modern technologies built on the concepts of genomics versus molecular biology, and proteomics versus biochemistry. Technologies to be examined include DNA sequencing, nucleic acid and protein microarrays, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, uses of mass spectrometry for high throughput protein identification, isotope tagging for quantitative proteomics, high-performance liquid chromatography, high-throughput functional assays, affinity chromatography and modern methods for database analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these technologies can provide insight into the molecular basis of changes in cellular function under both physiological and pathological conditions as well as how they can be applied to biotechnology for the discovery of biomarkers, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in proteomics and genomics.
BCHM3992 Proteomics and Functional Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3092 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will focus on the high throughput methods for the analysis of gene structure and function (genomics) and the analysis of proteins (proteomics) which are at the forefront of discovery in the biomedical sciences. The course will concentrate on the hierarchy of gene-protein-structure-function through an examination of modern technologies built on the concepts of genomics versus molecular biology, and proteomics versus biochemistry. Technologies to be examined include DNA sequencing, nucleic acid and protein microarrays, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, uses of mass spectrometry for high throughput protein identification, isotope tagging for quantitative proteomics, high-performance liquid chromatography, high-throughput functional assays, affinity chromatography and modern methods for database analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these technologies can provide insight into the molecular basis of changes in cellular function under both physiological and pathological conditions as well as how they can be applied to biotechnology for the discovery of biomarkers, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in proteomics and genomics.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3092. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in proteomics and genomics will be covered.
BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3982 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with molecular biology methods and studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry.
BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3082 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with new methods, including magnetic resonance techniques and molecular biology methods, as well as studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry. Qualified students will attend some lectures/practical classes in common with BCHM3082 and some separate lectures/ practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in metabolic biochemistry will be covered.
PCOL3012 Drug Design and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Rachel Codd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per week. Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405)] or 12cp from BCMB2XXX Prohibitions: PCOL3912 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, class and online quizzes, assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students with a basic understanding of pharmacology to the field of medicinal chemistry associated with drug design and development. The course covers the fundamental aspects of drug discovery and development with reference to the essentials of chemistry and illustrates drug development with examples that include neuraminidase inhibitors and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The role of computers in drug design is emphasised by classwork and assignments on molecular modelling and structure-activity relationships. The course also extends to a section on the design of diverse pharmacological agents which include compounds for imaging by positron emission tomography (PET), and kinase inhibitors.
Textbooks
Patrick, Graham L. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry. 5th edition. Oxford University Press. 2013.
PCOL3912 Drug Design and Development (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Rachel Codd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per week. Prerequisites: a mark of 70 or above in {(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2405)] or 12cp from BCMB2XXX} Prohibitions: PCOL3012 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, in class and online quizzes, assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will consist of the lecture and practical components of PCOL3012. Students will be set special advanced assignments related to the material covered in core areas. These may also involve advanced practical work or detailed investigation of a theoretical problem.
Textbooks
Patrick, Graham L. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry. 5th edition. Oxford University Press. 2013.