Biology

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The session has changed for the following unit:

BIOL3029 Molecular Plant Biology: Session: Now available in Semester 2 only

12/12/2018
2.

Prerequisites have changed for the following unit. They now read:

BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MEDS2003)

BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv) Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MEDS2003)]

20/2/2019

BIOLOGY

Advanced coursework and projects will be available in 2020 for students who complete this major.

Biology major

A major in Biology requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level experimental design units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level taxonomy units
(iv) 6 credit points of 2000-level breadth units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level field units
(vi) 6 credit points of 3000-level selective units
(vii) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary projects units

Biology minor*

A minor in Biology requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level experimental design units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level taxonomy units
(iv) 6 credit points of 2000-level breadth units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-selective units
*The Plant Sciences minor also articulates to the Biology major

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), project report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in a research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Practical field work: As advised and required by the project; approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS

2000-level units of study

Experimental design
BIOL2022 Biology Experimental Design and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1XX5) Prohibitions: BIOL2922 or BIOL3006 or BIOL3906 or ENVX2001 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides foundational skills essential for doing research in biology and for critically judging the research of others. We consider how biology is practiced as a quantitative, experimental and theoretical science. We focus on the underlying principles and practical skills you need to explore questions and test hypotheses, particularly where background variation (error) is inherently high. In so doing, the unit provides you with an understanding of how biological research is designed, analysed and interpreted using statistics. Lectures focus on sound experimental and statistical principles, using examples in ecology and other fields of biology to demonstrate concepts. In the practical sessions, you will design and perform, analyse (using appropriate statistical tools) and interpret your own experiments to answer research questions in topics relevant to your particular interest. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2016. Experimental design for the life sciences. 4th Ed. Oxford University Press
BIOL2922 Biol Experimental Design and Analysis Adv

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [An annual average mark of at least 70 in the previous year] and [6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1XX5)] Prohibitions: BIOL2022 or BIOL3006 or BIOL3906 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content of BIOL2922 will be based on BIOL2022 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Required: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2016. Experimental design for the life sciences. 4th Ed. Oxford
Taxonomy
BIOL2030 Botany

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lecture/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2001 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2930 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), anatomy project report and presentation (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to enhance biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes, and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frame works in plant identification, plant physiology, plant anatomy, and plant morphology. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by self-instructional audio-visual sessions and by small group discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. Successful completion of Botany will allow you to contribute to a range of disciplines including: ecology, bioinformatics, molecular and cell biology, genetics and biotechnology, environmental law, agriculture, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2930 Botany (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2001 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2030 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), advanced project report (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to inform biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frameworks in plant identification, and plant physiology, morphology and anatomy. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. The Advanced Botany unit of study requires engagement at a high standard of academic rigour and affords opportunities to engage with core aspect of Botany at depth and to create new knowledge. In partnership with academic staff advanced students will undertake an independent research project, which will develop skills in research and communication.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2021 Zoology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mathew Crowther Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL2921 or BIOL2011 or BIOL2911 or BIOL2012 or BIOL2912 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (60%), Lab book (20%), Oral presentation (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an overview of the functional and phylogenetic diversity of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. The material is presented within the conceptual framework of evolution, the foundation of biology. Lectures explore the diversity of major functional systems and behaviour in the context of environmental challenges and the ecological roles of different animal groups. Laboratory classes include dissections and demonstrations of the functional anatomy of invertebrates and vertebrates, as well as experiments. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Hickman CP, Roberts LS, Larson A, l'Anson H 2004. Integrated Principles of Zoology, 12th ed. McGraw Hill, NY. Withers, P. 1992 Comparative Animal Physiology. Saunders, New York
BIOL2921 Zoology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mathew Crowther Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures, one tutorial/lecture and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2021 or BIOL2011 or BIOL2911 or BIOL2012 or BIOL2912 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (60%), Lab book (20%), Advanced poster presentation (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content of BIOL2921 will be based on BIOL2021 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Hickman CP, Roberts LS, Larson A, l'Anson H 2004. Integrated Principles of Zoology, 12th ed. McGraw Hill, NY. Withers, P. 1992 Comparative Animal Physiology. Saunders, New York
Breadth
ANAT2009 Comparative Primate Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Coordinator: Dr Denise Donlon Associate Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures Prerequisites: 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX OR MEDS1X01 OR PSYC1XXX OR ARCA1XXX Assessment: Two quizzes (10%), theory exam (60%), practical exam (30%). Practical field work: One 2-hour practical per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of student covers the musculo-skeletal anatomy of the human body with particular emphasis on human evolution and comparisons with apes and fossil hominids. The topics covered include the versatility of the human hand, in manipulation and locomotion, bipedalism, climbing and brachiation in apes, and the change in pelvic anatomy associated with bipedalism and obstetric consequences.
Textbooks
Kapit, W and Elson, LM 2014 The Anatomy Coloring Book. Addison-Wesley. 4th edition
BIOL2021 Zoology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mathew Crowther Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL2921 or BIOL2011 or BIOL2911 or BIOL2012 or BIOL2912 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (60%), Lab book (20%), Oral presentation (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an overview of the functional and phylogenetic diversity of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. The material is presented within the conceptual framework of evolution, the foundation of biology. Lectures explore the diversity of major functional systems and behaviour in the context of environmental challenges and the ecological roles of different animal groups. Laboratory classes include dissections and demonstrations of the functional anatomy of invertebrates and vertebrates, as well as experiments. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Hickman CP, Roberts LS, Larson A, l'Anson H 2004. Integrated Principles of Zoology, 12th ed. McGraw Hill, NY. Withers, P. 1992 Comparative Animal Physiology. Saunders, New York
BIOL2921 Zoology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mathew Crowther Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures, one tutorial/lecture and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2021 or BIOL2011 or BIOL2911 or BIOL2012 or BIOL2912 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam (60%), Lab book (20%), Advanced poster presentation (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content of BIOL2921 will be based on BIOL2021 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Hickman CP, Roberts LS, Larson A, l'Anson H 2004. Integrated Principles of Zoology, 12th ed. McGraw Hill, NY. Withers, P. 1992 Comparative Animal Physiology. Saunders, New York
BIOL2030 Botany

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lecture/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2001 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2930 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), anatomy project report and presentation (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to enhance biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes, and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frame works in plant identification, plant physiology, plant anatomy, and plant morphology. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by self-instructional audio-visual sessions and by small group discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. Successful completion of Botany will allow you to contribute to a range of disciplines including: ecology, bioinformatics, molecular and cell biology, genetics and biotechnology, environmental law, agriculture, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2930 Botany (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2001 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2030 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), advanced project report (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to inform biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frameworks in plant identification, and plant physiology, morphology and anatomy. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. The Advanced Botany unit of study requires engagement at a high standard of academic rigour and affords opportunities to engage with core aspect of Botany at depth and to create new knowledge. In partnership with academic staff advanced students will undertake an independent research project, which will develop skills in research and communication.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2032 Australian Wildlife Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Herbert Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures; one 2-hour tutorial or practical session each week Prohibitions: ANSC2005 Assessment: Quizzes, presentation assignment, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australia is home to a broad diversity of vertebrate wildlife species, many of which are unique to the Australian environment, having evolved in isolation from other large land-masses for millions of years. This unit examines the diversity of Australian reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals (including all three mammalian lineages; monotremes, marsupials and eutherian mammals). We focus on the unique anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have enabled our wildlife to survive and thrive within varied Australian ecosystems. We also examine how the uniqueness of our wildlife is also one of its greatest challenges, being naive to the new threats that are present in our rapidly changing environments. At the end of this unit you should have an appreciation of the diversity and uniqueness of Australian wildlife; be able to determine the links between form and function in wildlife and understand the significance of these functional adaptations in relation to ecological challenges. You will also have an understanding of the interactions between humans and wildlife, and how the unique characteristics of our wildlife also make them vulnerable to threats within the rapidly changing Australian environment. Students will also develop enhanced scientific literacy and communication skills through tutorial activities and assessment tasks.
Textbooks
No text book requirements. Recommended reading throughout semester provided by each lecture relevant to their class content. Relevant scientific papers will be uploaded to LMS
BIOL2029 Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Murray Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 4-hour practical per week Prerequisites: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01 Prohibitions: BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 or BIOL2929 Assessment: 3-hour theory exam (60%), quizzes (lectures and laboratory work) (10%), marks for laboratory work (10%), report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cell Biology is one of the most dynamic areas in science today. In both plants and animals, cell to cell communication and coordination of the cell cycle, as well as cellular division and migration, are vital for normal development of various tissues from stem cells. In this unit you will investigate, the diversity of cell types, how these different cells interact with each other, how the cell cycle is controlled, as well as studying the roles of cellular movement, differentiation and interaction in reproduction and development. In Cells you will acquire a deep understanding of the established knowledge base and develop research skills to extend this knowledge. Discussions will incorporate recent advances in cell research including the regenerative potential of stem cells to replace damaged and diseased tissue and how the placenta can control the physiology of the mother and foetus. The laboratory program, provides you with hands on training in key techniques such as cell culture, cell signal transduction, mitochondrial physiology, drug discovery in marine organisms, digital microscopy and tissue specific gene expression. These skills will prepare you for a research pathway and/or a career that includes cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K., Walter P. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell (Sixth edition). Garland Publishing Inc., New York and London (ISBN-9780815344643)
BIOL2929 Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Murray Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 4-hour practical per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01) Prohibitions: BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 orBIOL2029 Assessment: 3-hour theory exam (60%), quizzes (lectures and laboratory work) (10%), marks for laboratory work (10%), advanced report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cell biology is one of the most dynamic areas of modern research. In both plants and animals, cell-to-cell communication and coordination of the cell cycle, as well as cellular division and migration, are vital for normal development of various tissues from stem cells. In this unit you will investigate, the diversity of cell types, how these different cells interact with each other, how the cell cycle is controlled, as well as studying the roles of cellular movement, differentiation and interaction in reproduction and development. In Cells you will acquire a deep understanding of the established knowledge base and develop research skills to extend this knowledge. Discussions will incorporate recent advances in cell research including the regenerative potential of stem cells to replace damaged and diseased tissue and how the placenta can control the physiology of the mother and foetus. The laboratory training will provide you with hands on experience with key equipment and techniques. The advanced program, will provide you with an opportunity to complete an authentic research project in a specialized area of cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K., Walter P. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell (Sixth edition). Garland Publishing Inc., New York and London (ISBN-9780815344643)
BIOL2033 Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tanya Latty Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 3-hour practical sessions a weekly basis Prohibitions: ENTO2001 Assessment: Practical test (10%), insect collection (30%), insect display (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Insects are the most abundant and diverse group of animals on earth; beetles alone account for 25% of animal life. Insects impact almost every facet of the ecosystem and our lives. Many insects play valuable and essential roles in pollinating different plant species, in predating and controlling insect pests and in recycling nutrients. Other insects are harmful and are the vectors for major diseases such as plague, malaria and recently emerged viral disease Zika. This unit will provide students with a broad introduction to entomology including insect evolution, ecology, anatomy and physiology. Students will learn applied entomological topics such as sustainable insect management in agricultural ecosystems, medical and veterinary entomology, insect-inspired technologies, and insects as a future food source for both livestock and humans. This theoretical background will be complemented by training in how to use and evaluate a range of identification tools such as lucid and traditional dichotomous keys that enable you to identify and classify major groups of insects. Practical classes will allow you to develop your identification, classification and preservation skills though examination of boxes of 'mystery insects' and through creating a museum-quality insect collection. Students will also learn procedures for caring and rearing live insects. By the end of the unit you will be well prepared to work in fields that require entomological skills.
Textbooks
Info will be made available via Canvas. Keys will be available in practical classes and in the lab Manual
BIOL2031 Plants and Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Brent Kaiser Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 4-hour practical session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2931 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quiz (20%), lab assignment (15%), presentation (15%), exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants grow across a range of environments, influencing form, function and ultimately reproductive success. Being sessile, plants lack the luxury of seeking an alternative 'stress-free lifestyle' and therefore rely on genetic and physical adaptations to survive and reproduce. To understand how a plant can achieve such flexibility requires knowledge of plant structure and the influence of environmental drivers on plant growth and function. In this unit, you will examine the physiological processes controlling plant growth and reproduction linked to environmental constraints. You will understand the relationship between tissue and cellular structure and their underlying role in physiological and metabolic activities, particularly processes involving light capture, photosynthesis, water regulation, nutrient management and metabolite redistribution. Lectures and interactive practicals will together introduce you to plant processes that underpin life on earth. Experimentation and analysis of plant physiological processes will develop a skill base that will lead to a greater understanding and appreciation of common plant processes. As a component of the Plant Science minor and the Plant Production major, BIOL2031 will provide an important platform to extend your interests in plant science and plant related fields across the curriculum.
Textbooks
Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. (2010) Plant Physiology, Fifth Edition. Sinauer Associates. Sunderland, MA.
BIOL2931 Plants and Environment (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Brent Kaiser Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures/week; one 4-hour practical/week Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2031 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: On-line quiz (20%), lab assignment (15%), independent project (15%), exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants grow across a range of environments, which influence form, function and ultimately reproductive success. Being sessile, plants lack the luxury of seeking an alternative 'stress-free lifestyle' and therefore rely on genetic and physical adaptations to help survive and reproduce. To understand how a plant can achieve such flexibility requires an understanding of plant structure and the influence that environmental drivers have on plant growth and function. In this unit, you will examine the physiological processes controlling plant growth and reproduction linked to environmental constraints. You will understand the relationship between tissue and cellular structure and their underlying role in physiological and metabolic activities, particularly processes involving light capture, photosynthesis, water regulation, nutrient management and metabolite redistribution. Lectures and interactive practicals will together introduce you to plant processes that we commonly depend upon for food production, and plant related materials. Experimentation and analysis of plant physiological processes will develop a skill base that will lead to a greater understanding and appreciation of common plant processes that guide plant growth. As a component of the Plant Science minor, this unit will provide an important platform to extend your interests in plant science and plant-related fields, including ecology, cell biology, genetics, breeding, agriculture, molecular biology, environmental law, education and the arts. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as BIOL2031 but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in BIOL2931 participate in alternative components, which include a separate practical stream. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Resources required by the unit will be provided on the Blackboard learning management page for the unit. Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. (2010) Plant Physiology, Fifth Edition. Sinauer Associates. Sunderland, MA.
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes and presentation (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Sharp Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan and carry out a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.
Textbooks
TBA
IMMU2011 Immunobiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Umaimainthan Palendira Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lecturettes, weekly Interactive lectures, fortnightly Workshops and Practicals. ~4-5h face-to-face per week Prerequisites: BIOL1XX7 or (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1 Prohibitions: IMMU2911 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), practical reports (30%), title and abstract task (15%) and final exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Immunobiology is the study of defence mechanisms that protect living organisms against life-threatening infections. In this unit of study you will explore the essential features of the host immune responses mounted by animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, plants and microbes themselves. Studies in animal and microbial immunobiology are leading to breakthroughs in veterinary and clinical medicine, including combatting infectious diseases, maximising transplant success, treating allergies, autoimmune diseases and cancer, as well as the development of new vaccines to prevent disease. Understanding the immunobiology of plants also enables us to protect crops from disease which enhances our food security. In this unit of study you will be provided with an overview of immunobiology as a basic research science. We will explore the nature of the immune cells and molecules that recognise danger and how the immune system of animals and plants respond at the cellular and molecular level. Practical and tutorial sessions are designed to illustrate particular concepts introduced in other face-to-face activities. Further self-directed learning activities, including online learning activities, will facilitate integration of fundamental information and help you apply this knowledge to the ways in which the host organism defends against disease. Upon completion, you will have developed the foundations to undertake further studies in Biology, Animal Health, Immunology and Pathology. Ultimately, this could lead you to a career in medical research, biosecurity and/or Veterinary Science.
Textbooks
Abbas, Lichtman and Pillai (2016) Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of The Immune System, 5th Edition
IMMU2911 Immunobiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Umaimainthan Palendira Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lecturettes, weekly Interactive lectures, fortnightly Workshops and Practicals . ~4-5h face-to-face per week Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in [BIOL1XX7 or (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1] Prohibitions: IMMU2011 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Online quizzes (20%), practical reports (15%), journal article comprehension task (5%), title and abstract written task (10%) and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Immunobiology is the study of defence mechanisms that protect living organisms against life-threatening infections. In this unit of study you will explore the essential features of the host immune responses and how it evolved from unicellular organisms to complex multi-cellular organisms. Studies in animal and microbial immunobiology are leading to breakthroughs in veterinary and clinical medicine, including combatting infectious diseases, maximising transplant success, treating allergies, autoimmune diseases and cancer, as well as development of new vaccines to prevent disease. Understanding the immunobiology of plants also enables us to protect crops from disease which enhances our food security. In this unit of study you will be provided with a detailed overview of immunobiology as a basic research science. We will explore in detail the nature of the immune cells and molecules that recognise danger and how the immune system of animals and plants respond at the cellular and molecular level. Advanced practical and tutorial sessions are designed to illustrate particular concepts introduced in other face-to-face activities. Further self-directed learning activities, including online learning activities, will facilitate integration of fundamental information and help you apply this knowledge to the ways in which the host organism defends against disease. This advanced version of Immunobiology has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components which may for example include guest lectures from experts. The nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Abbas, Lichtman and Pillai (2016) Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of The Immune System, 5th Edition
MICR2031 Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2931 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: written assignment (10%), group oral presentation (20%) and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the earth's trees. This unit of study will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require if you specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology or science education.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
MICR2931 Microbiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2031 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: two written assignments (10%, 20%), and online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the Earth's trees. In this unit of study you will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Detailed aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require to specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology, or science education. As an Advanced unit, MICR2931 provides increased challenge and academic rigour to develop a greater understanding and depth of disciplinary expertise. You will actively participate in a series of small group tutorials investigating the molecular detail of microbial communication and function, which will culminate in you creating a scientific research report that communicates your understanding of recent research in microbiology.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017

3000-level units of study

Field
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
Textbooks
Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3907 Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, weekly tutorial and 3-hour practical per week Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3007 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, presentations, one essay, one project report (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3007 Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be encouraged to pursue the objectives by more independent means in a series of research tutorials. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester 2. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
Textbooks
As for BIOL3007
BIOL3008 Marine Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman Session: Intensive July Classes: Intensive 8-day field course held in the pre-semester break. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or (6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)) Prohibitions: BIOL3908 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928 Assessment: Discussion groups, research project proposal, biodiversity survey report, data analysis and checking, research project report (100%). Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This field course provides a practical introduction to the experimental analysis of marine populations and assemblages. Students gain experience using a range of intertidal sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments. No particular mathematical or statistical skills are required for this subject. Group experimental research projects in the field are the focus of the unit during the day, with lectures and discussion groups about the analysis of experimental data and current issues in experimental marine ecology occurring in the evening.
Textbooks
No textbook is prescribed but Coastal Marine Ecology of Temperate Australia. Eds. Underwood, A.J. and Chapman, M.G. 1995. University of New South Wales Press, provides useful background reading.
BIOL3908 Marine Field Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman. Session: Intensive July Classes: One 8-day field course held in the pre-semester break, plus four 1-hour tutorials during semester 2. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either- 12cp Intermediate BIOL, or (6cp Intermediate BIOL and(MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)) Prohibitions: BIOL3008 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928 Assessment: Discussion groups, research project proposal, biodiversity report, data analysis and checking, research project report (100%). Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas nvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This unit has the same objectives as Marine Field Ecology BIOL3008, and is suitable for students wishing to pursue certain aspects of marine field ecology in a greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from applicants on the basis of past performance. Students taking this unit of study will be expected to take part in a number of additional tutorials after the field course on advanced aspects of experimental design and analysis and will be expected to incorporate these advanced skills into their analyses and project reports. This unit may be taken as part of the BSc(Advanced).
Textbooks
As for BIOL 3008.
BIOL3009 Terrestrial Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Glenda Wardle Session: Intensive July Classes: Note: One 7-day field trip held in the pre-semester break (week immediately prior to start of Semester 2) and four 4-hour practical classes on Friday mornings during weeks 1-4 of Semester 2 Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3909 or BIOL2009 or BIOL2909 Assumed knowledge: Basic ecological concepts of species and communities, and experimental deisgn and analysis. Assessment: Field practical skills (10%), field survey methods quiz (10%), research project proposal and brief presentation (10%), sampling project report (20%), specimen collection (10%), major research project report (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This intensive field-based course provides practical experience in terrestrial ecology suited to a broad range of careers in ecology, environmental consulting and wildlife management. Students learn a broad range of ecological sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments. The field work takes place in native forest and incorporates survey techniques for plants, small mammals and invertebrates and thus provides a good background for ecological consulting work and an introduction into large-scale project management. Students attend a week-long field course and participate in a large-scale research project as well as conducting their own research project. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking in the context of environmental management and technical skills are developed in the area of data handling and analysis, report writing and team work. Invited experts contribute to the lectures and discussions on issues relating to the ecology, conservation and management of Australia's terrestrial flora and fauna.
BIOL3909 Terrestrial Field Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Glenda Wardle Session: Intensive July Classes: One 7-day field trip held in the pre-semester break (week immediately prior to start of semester 2) and four 4-hour practical classes on Friday mornings during weeks 1-4 of semester 2 Prerequisites: An average mark of 70 or above in (12cp of BIOL2XXX) OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3009 or BIOL2009 or BIOL2909 Assumed knowledge: Basic ecological concepts of species and communities, and experimental design and analysis. Assessment: Field survey methods quiz (10%), sample and data processing (10%), research project proposal and brief presentation (10%), sampling project report (20%), major research project report (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3009 Terrestrial Field Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from applicants on the basis of previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will complete an individual research project on a topic negotiated with a member of staff. It is expected that much of the data collection will be completed during the field trip but some extra time may be needed during semester 2. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students at the beginning of the unit. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
BIOL3010 Tropical Wildlife Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Greenlees Session: Intensive February Classes: One week intensive field trip to the Northern Territory plus one week intensive lecture and prac session at Sydney University. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL, or (6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)) Prohibitions: BIOL3910 or BIOL2010 or BIOL2910 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam, one 1-hour practical exam, one 1500-word report, one 2000-word paper, one 15-minute oral presentation (100%). Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit runs in February. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
Australia has a unique terrestrial vertebrate fauna, but also has the worst record of recent mammalian extinctions. Because of Australia's unusual climate, landforms, and the rarity of many species, the management of our native wildlife presents special challenges for biologists, conservationists and land managers. This unit of study addresses the biogeography, ecology and management of Australia's terrestrial fauna. The subject comprises of a five-day field course at Mary River Park in the Northern Territory. During the course, students will learn how to carry out wildlife surveys, how to identify animals, how to track wildlife, and how to design and complete a field experiment. The field trip will be complemented by guest lectures from experts in the fields of evolution, ecology and wildlife management. A one day field trip to Litchfield National Park will be held on the last day of the field course.
BIOL3910 Tropical Wildlife Biology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Greenlees Session: Intensive February Classes: One week intensive field trip to the Northern Territory plus one week intensive lecture and prac session at Sydney University. Prerequisites: Distinction average in either- 12cp Intermediate BIOL, or (6cp Intermediate BIOL and(MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)) Prohibitions: BIOL3010 or BIOL2010 or BIOL2910 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam, one 1-hour practical exam, one 1500-word report, one 2000-word paper, one 15-minute oral presentation (100%). Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit runs in February. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3010 Tropical Wildlife Biology and Management, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be required to pursue the objectives by more independent means. For example, student willl be able to design and carry out their own field or laboratory experiment, and complete it during the five day firled trip. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students at the beginning of the unit.
BIOL3016 Coral Reef Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Will Figueira Session: Intensive July Classes: Fieldwork 80 hours block mode (during July) Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp from BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3916 or BIOL2020 or BIOL2920 or NTMP3001 Assessment: Participation in field work, essay, project report and an exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
Coral Reef Biology is an intensive unit held at a research station on the Great Barrier Reef. The unit focuses on the dominant taxa in coral reef environments and the linkages between them. Emphasis is placed on the biological adaptations for life in tropical waters and the ecological, oceanographic and physiological processes involved. Aspects covered include: processes influencing the distribution of coral reefs, symbiosis, reef connectivity, lagoon systems, nutrient cycling and the impacts of climate change and other anthropogenic pressures on the world's corals reefs.
BIOL3916 Coral Reef Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Will Figueira Session: Intensive July Classes: Fieldwork 80 hours block mode (during July) Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3016 or BIOL2020 or BIOL2920 or NTMP3001 Assessment: Participation in field work, essay, project report and exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit requires School permission to enrol; please see the School of Life and Environmental Sciences website for details on how to apply. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered.
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3016, Coral Reef Biology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects of tropical marine biology in greater depth, with a focus on the GBR. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will pursue individual projects in consultation with, and under the guidance of, the course coordinator. The aim is to design a project relating to the particular interests of the student. The nature of these projects will vary from year to year. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
Major selective
BIOL3004 Terrestrial Plant Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tina Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: The general weekly schedule comprises 2 x 1 hour lectures and 1 x 3 hour practical session. A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or AGEN2001 or GEOS2X21 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09 Prohibitions: ENSY3003 or ENSY3002 Assumed knowledge: Students should have a basic understanding of plant biology, plant ecology and/or plant physiology. Some background knowledge in mathematics and chemistry would be beneficial. Assessment: Assessment tasks include two in-class quizzes (10% each); field report (20%); 2000w group-based land management plan (35%); 500w individual component to the land management plan (15%); group-based oral presentation (10%). Practical field work: A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australian native vegetation is a unique resource for diversity, ecosystem services and public use. The objective of this unit is to provide a broad understanding of three major plant terrestrial ecosystems that are found across Australia: forests, heathlands and grasslands and how they are managed. While the focus will be on native plant systems in an Australian setting, their importance at a global level will also be discussed. You will develop an understanding of the characteristics of key plant ecosystems, including where they are found and their main ecophysiology features. Each of the ecosystems described has the potential to be a?ected (positively or negatively) by a range of natural and anthropogenic disturbances. They include ?re, climate change (drought and temperature), changes in nutrient ?ows and more broadly human-induced disturbances such as logging, mining, urban development and agricultural management. The impact of these disturbances along with mitigation via conservation and associated management changes will also be covered. Finally, government policy around conservation/management of these ecosystems will be examined. At the completion of this unit you will have developed an understanding of the environmental and economic importance of forests, heathlands and grasslands, their vulnerability to a range of external factors and the extent that these can be mitigated.
BIOL3013 Marine Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Will Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp from BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3913 Assessment: Practical reports, data exercises and exams (100%). Practical field work: Combination of field, lab and computer based practical activities Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We will examine in detail processes that are important for the establishment and maintenance of marine communities. Lectures will expose students to the key ideas, researchers and methodologies within selected fields of marine biology. Laboratory sessions and field excursions will complement the lectures by providing students with hands-on experience with the organisms and the processes that affect them. Students will develop critical analysis and scientific writing skills while examining the current literature.
BIOL3913 Marine Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Will Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: See BIOL3013. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3013 Assessment: Practical reports, data exercises and exams (100%). Practical field work: Combination of field, lab and computer-based practical activities Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of the BIOL3013 Marine Biology unit. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year but generally involves an individual or group project, conducted with unit instructors, which takes the place of one of the practical-based assessments..
BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the regulation, impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, and the genetic engineering of animals and plants. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.
BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX)] Prohibitions: BIOL3018 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24 1-hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3926 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Developmental genetics discusses major concepts and our current understanding of developmental biology with an emphasis on molecular genetics. The developmental genetics of animal and plant systems will be investigated, along with approaches used to determine gene function in relation to development of complex multicellular organisms. Topics include the features and resources for model organisms; the generation of mutants for forward and reverse genetics; the application of mutants to the study gene function and gene networks; spatial and temporal gene expression in pattern formation; quantitative trait loci analysis; utility of genome wide association studies; epigenetics in relation to inheritance; genome information in the study of human genetics. Reference will be made to the use of modern techniques in developmental biology such as transgenics, recombinant DNA technology, tissue-specific expression analysis. Various methods of genetic mapping will be covered. Practical work complements the theoretical aspects of the course and develops important skills in genetics.
BIOL3029 Molecular Plant Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Brian Jones Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2hrs/week for 13 weeks, Practicals 1 x 3hr practical/week for 13 weeks Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or BCMB2X0X or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X72 or GENE2002 Assessment: Laboratory eNotebook - (Week 5 x 5% + Week 13 x 5%, total = 10%), Research paper (2500 words, 20%), Oral presentation (20%), Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The enormous variety of plant forms is a reflection of the need to adapt to a life lived with environmental extremes. Plants provide the air we breathe, the food we eat and the landscapes we love. Having diverged from animals prior to the evolution of multicellularity, plants also provide us with a unique opportunity to discover how environmental adaptability and productivity features are enabled at the molecular level. This unit of study explores the molecular mechanisms that give rise to plant form and function, focussing on higher plants. You will learn about plant genomes and the molecular tool kits that are used in the making of a plant, the signaling pathways that drive growth and responses to the environment, and how this deep knowledge is being used to improve plant performance and better manage ecosystems. By doing this unit, students will advance their knowledge of how plants grow, develop and adapt in the context of the molecular mechanisms controlling these processes. The new tools of biology are giving us an unprecedented understanding of life. The skills developed in this unit will enable you to play a role in designing better ways to manage plants and ecosystems.
Textbooks
Schumann GL and Darcy CJ. 2010. Essential Plant Pathology (2nd ed.). APS Press, St Paul, Minn., USA.
BIOL3033 Applied Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tanya Latty Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2hr/week, practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2XXX or ENTO2001 or MEDS200X or ANAT2XXX or PHSI2XXX or BMED240X or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2101 Prohibitions: ENTO4003 Assessment: Assessments will include a consultant report (15%), a research proposal (15%), a final group presentation (25%), an arthropod identification test (15%) and a final exam (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Insects effect almost every facet of our lives from vectoring major diseases like the plague, malaria and Zika virus to the billions of dollars of free ecosystems services they provide by consuming pest insects, pollinating agricultural crops and removing waste. This unit takes an applied approach to entomology by covering topics such as medical entomology, sustainable pest management, pollination ecology, insects as human/livestock foods and insect conservation. You will learn how to identify a variety of economically and medically important arthropods and how to sample insects in a variety of settings. You will also learn how insects are managed in agricultural, urban and natural environments as well as how we can use insects to solve some of humanities most pressing problems. You will learn about the many important ecosystems services that insects provide, as well as how practitioners can help encourage and support populations of beneficial insects. Field trips to Westmead hospital's medical entomology unit and the Biosecurity unit at Botany Bay will show you how practicing entomologists use their knowledge of insects to solve important problems. You will build your skills in research and inquiry through group research projects that you design and run. This unit will give you the basic skills needed to pursue careers in a variety of entomology-related fields.
Textbooks
Sindel BM (Ed) (2000). Australian Weed Management Systems. R.G. and F.J. Richardson, Melbourne.
BIOL3020 Applied Plant Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Warren Session: Semester 1 Classes: You are required to attend 2 x lectures, 1 x 4-hour practical session on a weekly basis. On-line Learning Requirements. Please check for updates regularly. Prerequisites: BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or AGEN2001 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09 Prohibitions: BIOL3920, BIOL3043, BIOL3943, AGEN2005, PLNT3001, PLNT3901, PLNT3002, PLNT3902, ENSY3001 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assessment in BIOL3020 is based on a written laboratory report (30%), laboratory notebook (15%), group presentation (15%) anda 2-hour exam at the end of semester (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants are truly amazing. Plants lift water to heights that defy physics. Plants take sunlight and simple inorganic ingredients to create a bewildering diversity of organic compounds. What's even more amazing is that we are only just beginning to understand how plants achieve these amazing feats. This unit explores how plants function and illustrates how this knowledge can be applied to real-World problems. Major topics include how plants function as integrated systems, resource partitioning and the dilemmas faced by plants, interaction of plants with the world around them. Emphasis will be placed on integration of plant responses from molecular through to whole plant scales, and how this knowledge can be practically applied to maximise plant growth, optimise use of water and nutrients, and understand how plants a?ect (and are a?ected by) their environment. Lectures are augmented by experimental work that leads to practical hands-on experience with research tools and techniques that can be applied across the sciences, and bespoke instruments used in the world's leading plant science research laboratories. This unit of study complements other senior units of study in the Plant Science minor and is essential for those seeking a career in plant biology and plant-related ?elds, including ecology, cell biology, genetics, breeding, agriculture, molecular biology, environmental law, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Pedigo LP and Rice ME. 2009. Entomology and Pest Management. 6th edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
BIOL3926 Developmental Genetics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24 1-hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX)] Prohibitions: BIOL3929 or BIOL3026 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components to BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year. Some assessment will be in an alternative format to components of BIOL3026.
BIOL3045 Animal Ecological Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and three practicals per week Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3945 or BIOL3011 or BIOL3911 or BIOL3012 or BIOL3912 Assessment: Two practical reports (20% and 40% of total marks, respectively), one 1.5-hour exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animal Ecological Physiology is a conceptually based unit of study that covers physiological interactions between organisms and their environments. The unit explores evolutionary processes that allow animals to persist in variable environments. These concepts are essential to understanding biodiversity and ecological function of animal populations, and how these are likely to change under future climate change. The unit will be suitable for those with an interest in zoology, as well as students with a particular interest in ecology and evolution. There is a strong focus on experimental biology and incorporating theory into practical classes, during which students design their own experiments. Good working knowledge of statistical analyses is assumed. The unit provides essential skills for conducting and presenting research, and for critical evaluation of published research.
BIOL3945 Animal Ecological Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and three practicals per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3045 or BIOL3011 or BIOL3911 or BIOL3012 or BIOL3912 Assessment: One practical report (20%) and one advanced report (40%), one 1.5-hour exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3045 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. Animal Ecological Physiology is a conceptually based unit of study that covers physiological interactions between organisms and their environments. The unit explores evolutionary processes that allow animals to persist in variable environments. These concepts are essential to understanding biodiversity and ecological function of animal populations, and how these are likely to change under future climate change. The unit will be suitable for those with an interest in zoology, as well as students with a particular interest in ecology and evolution. There is a strong focus on experimental biology and incorporating theory into practical classes, during which students design their own experiments. Good working knowledge of statistical analyses is assumed. The unit provides essential skills for conducting and presenting research, and for critical evaluation of published research.
BIOL3046 Animal Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp from BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3946 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.
Textbooks
Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3946 Animal Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3046 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3046 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.
Textbooks
Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.
Interdisciplinary Project
The unit of study BIOL3888 is not available in 2019
BIOL3888 Biology Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Pauline Ross Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hrs lectures and 3hrs workshop/group work per week Prerequisites: Completion of 72cp of units of study, including 12cp from (BIOL2XXX or IMMU2X11 or GEGE2X01 or MICR2X31) Assessment: Assignments and written exam (50%), Project report (20%), Project oral presentation (10%), Team work participation and evaluation (20%). Practical field work: to be advised Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. The ability to identify and explore interdisciplinary links is a crucial skill for emerging professionals and researchers alike. This unit presents the opportunity to bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt in your discipline and apply them to a real-world problem. For example, you will participate in one of a range of biology projects that will traverse cells to ecosystems, applying your understanding of biological mechanisms to problems that are big challenges for the 21st century. In this unit, you will continue to understand and explore disciplinary knowledge, while also meeting and collaborating with students from across the University through project-based learning; identifying and solving problems, collecting and analysing data and communicating your findings to a diverse audience. All of these skills are highly valued by employers. This unit will foster the ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and this is essential for both professional and research pathways in future.
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Pauline Ross Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.
Minor selective
BIOL3004 Terrestrial Plant Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tina Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: The general weekly schedule comprises 2 x 1 hour lectures and 1 x 3 hour practical session. A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or AGEN2001 or GEOS2X21 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09 Prohibitions: ENSY3003 or ENSY3002 Assumed knowledge: Students should have a basic understanding of plant biology, plant ecology and/or plant physiology. Some background knowledge in mathematics and chemistry would be beneficial. Assessment: Assessment tasks include two in-class quizzes (10% each); field report (20%); 2000w group-based land management plan (35%); 500w individual component to the land management plan (15%); group-based oral presentation (10%). Practical field work: A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australian native vegetation is a unique resource for diversity, ecosystem services and public use. The objective of this unit is to provide a broad understanding of three major plant terrestrial ecosystems that are found across Australia: forests, heathlands and grasslands and how they are managed. While the focus will be on native plant systems in an Australian setting, their importance at a global level will also be discussed. You will develop an understanding of the characteristics of key plant ecosystems, including where they are found and their main ecophysiology features. Each of the ecosystems described has the potential to be a?ected (positively or negatively) by a range of natural and anthropogenic disturbances. They include ?re, climate change (drought and temperature), changes in nutrient ?ows and more broadly human-induced disturbances such as logging, mining, urban development and agricultural management. The impact of these disturbances along with mitigation via conservation and associated management changes will also be covered. Finally, government policy around conservation/management of these ecosystems will be examined. At the completion of this unit you will have developed an understanding of the environmental and economic importance of forests, heathlands and grasslands, their vulnerability to a range of external factors and the extent that these can be mitigated.
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
Textbooks
Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3907 Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, weekly tutorial and 3-hour practical per week Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3007 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, presentations, one essay, one project report (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3007 Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be encouraged to pursue the objectives by more independent means in a series of research tutorials. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester 2. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
Textbooks
As for BIOL3007
BIOL3013 Marine Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Will Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp from BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3913 Assessment: Practical reports, data exercises and exams (100%). Practical field work: Combination of field, lab and computer based practical activities Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We will examine in detail processes that are important for the establishment and maintenance of marine communities. Lectures will expose students to the key ideas, researchers and methodologies within selected fields of marine biology. Laboratory sessions and field excursions will complement the lectures by providing students with hands-on experience with the organisms and the processes that affect them. Students will develop critical analysis and scientific writing skills while examining the current literature.
BIOL3913 Marine Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Will Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: See BIOL3013. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3013 Assessment: Practical reports, data exercises and exams (100%). Practical field work: Combination of field, lab and computer-based practical activities Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of the BIOL3013 Marine Biology unit. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year but generally involves an individual or group project, conducted with unit instructors, which takes the place of one of the practical-based assessments..
BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the regulation, impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, and the genetic engineering of animals and plants. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.
BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX)] Prohibitions: BIOL3018 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24 1-hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3926 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Developmental genetics discusses major concepts and our current understanding of developmental biology with an emphasis on molecular genetics. The developmental genetics of animal and plant systems will be investigated, along with approaches used to determine gene function in relation to development of complex multicellular organisms. Topics include the features and resources for model organisms; the generation of mutants for forward and reverse genetics; the application of mutants to the study gene function and gene networks; spatial and temporal gene expression in pattern formation; quantitative trait loci analysis; utility of genome wide association studies; epigenetics in relation to inheritance; genome information in the study of human genetics. Reference will be made to the use of modern techniques in developmental biology such as transgenics, recombinant DNA technology, tissue-specific expression analysis. Various methods of genetic mapping will be covered. Practical work complements the theoretical aspects of the course and develops important skills in genetics.
BIOL3926 Developmental Genetics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24 1-hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX)] Prohibitions: BIOL3929 or BIOL3026 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components to BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year. Some assessment will be in an alternative format to components of BIOL3026.
BIOL3029 Molecular Plant Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Brian Jones Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2hrs/week for 13 weeks, Practicals 1 x 3hr practical/week for 13 weeks Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or BCMB2X0X or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X72 or GENE2002 Assessment: Laboratory eNotebook - (Week 5 x 5% + Week 13 x 5%, total = 10%), Research paper (2500 words, 20%), Oral presentation (20%), Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The enormous variety of plant forms is a reflection of the need to adapt to a life lived with environmental extremes. Plants provide the air we breathe, the food we eat and the landscapes we love. Having diverged from animals prior to the evolution of multicellularity, plants also provide us with a unique opportunity to discover how environmental adaptability and productivity features are enabled at the molecular level. This unit of study explores the molecular mechanisms that give rise to plant form and function, focussing on higher plants. You will learn about plant genomes and the molecular tool kits that are used in the making of a plant, the signaling pathways that drive growth and responses to the environment, and how this deep knowledge is being used to improve plant performance and better manage ecosystems. By doing this unit, students will advance their knowledge of how plants grow, develop and adapt in the context of the molecular mechanisms controlling these processes. The new tools of biology are giving us an unprecedented understanding of life. The skills developed in this unit will enable you to play a role in designing better ways to manage plants and ecosystems.
Textbooks
Schumann GL and Darcy CJ. 2010. Essential Plant Pathology (2nd ed.). APS Press, St Paul, Minn., USA.
BIOL3033 Applied Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tanya Latty Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2hr/week, practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2XXX or ENTO2001 or MEDS200X or ANAT2XXX or PHSI2XXX or BMED240X or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2101 Prohibitions: ENTO4003 Assessment: Assessments will include a consultant report (15%), a research proposal (15%), a final group presentation (25%), an arthropod identification test (15%) and a final exam (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Insects effect almost every facet of our lives from vectoring major diseases like the plague, malaria and Zika virus to the billions of dollars of free ecosystems services they provide by consuming pest insects, pollinating agricultural crops and removing waste. This unit takes an applied approach to entomology by covering topics such as medical entomology, sustainable pest management, pollination ecology, insects as human/livestock foods and insect conservation. You will learn how to identify a variety of economically and medically important arthropods and how to sample insects in a variety of settings. You will also learn how insects are managed in agricultural, urban and natural environments as well as how we can use insects to solve some of humanities most pressing problems. You will learn about the many important ecosystems services that insects provide, as well as how practitioners can help encourage and support populations of beneficial insects. Field trips to Westmead hospital's medical entomology unit and the Biosecurity unit at Botany Bay will show you how practicing entomologists use their knowledge of insects to solve important problems. You will build your skills in research and inquiry through group research projects that you design and run. This unit will give you the basic skills needed to pursue careers in a variety of entomology-related fields.
Textbooks
Sindel BM (Ed) (2000). Australian Weed Management Systems. R.G. and F.J. Richardson, Melbourne.
BIOL3020 Applied Plant Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Warren Session: Semester 1 Classes: You are required to attend 2 x lectures, 1 x 4-hour practical session on a weekly basis. On-line Learning Requirements. Please check for updates regularly. Prerequisites: BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or AGEN2001 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09 Prohibitions: BIOL3920, BIOL3043, BIOL3943, AGEN2005, PLNT3001, PLNT3901, PLNT3002, PLNT3902, ENSY3001 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assessment in BIOL3020 is based on a written laboratory report (30%), laboratory notebook (15%), group presentation (15%) anda 2-hour exam at the end of semester (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants are truly amazing. Plants lift water to heights that defy physics. Plants take sunlight and simple inorganic ingredients to create a bewildering diversity of organic compounds. What's even more amazing is that we are only just beginning to understand how plants achieve these amazing feats. This unit explores how plants function and illustrates how this knowledge can be applied to real-World problems. Major topics include how plants function as integrated systems, resource partitioning and the dilemmas faced by plants, interaction of plants with the world around them. Emphasis will be placed on integration of plant responses from molecular through to whole plant scales, and how this knowledge can be practically applied to maximise plant growth, optimise use of water and nutrients, and understand how plants a?ect (and are a?ected by) their environment. Lectures are augmented by experimental work that leads to practical hands-on experience with research tools and techniques that can be applied across the sciences, and bespoke instruments used in the world's leading plant science research laboratories. This unit of study complements other senior units of study in the Plant Science minor and is essential for those seeking a career in plant biology and plant-related ?elds, including ecology, cell biology, genetics, breeding, agriculture, molecular biology, environmental law, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Pedigo LP and Rice ME. 2009. Entomology and Pest Management. 6th edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
BIOL3045 Animal Ecological Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and three practicals per week Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3945 or BIOL3011 or BIOL3911 or BIOL3012 or BIOL3912 Assessment: Two practical reports (20% and 40% of total marks, respectively), one 1.5-hour exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animal Ecological Physiology is a conceptually based unit of study that covers physiological interactions between organisms and their environments. The unit explores evolutionary processes that allow animals to persist in variable environments. These concepts are essential to understanding biodiversity and ecological function of animal populations, and how these are likely to change under future climate change. The unit will be suitable for those with an interest in zoology, as well as students with a particular interest in ecology and evolution. There is a strong focus on experimental biology and incorporating theory into practical classes, during which students design their own experiments. Good working knowledge of statistical analyses is assumed. The unit provides essential skills for conducting and presenting research, and for critical evaluation of published research.
BIOL3945 Animal Ecological Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Seebacher Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and three practicals per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3045 or BIOL3011 or BIOL3911 or BIOL3012 or BIOL3912 Assessment: One practical report (20%) and one advanced report (40%), one 1.5-hour exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3045 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. Animal Ecological Physiology is a conceptually based unit of study that covers physiological interactions between organisms and their environments. The unit explores evolutionary processes that allow animals to persist in variable environments. These concepts are essential to understanding biodiversity and ecological function of animal populations, and how these are likely to change under future climate change. The unit will be suitable for those with an interest in zoology, as well as students with a particular interest in ecology and evolution. There is a strong focus on experimental biology and incorporating theory into practical classes, during which students design their own experiments. Good working knowledge of statistical analyses is assumed. The unit provides essential skills for conducting and presenting research, and for critical evaluation of published research.
BIOL3046 Animal Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp from BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3946 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.
Textbooks
Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3946 Animal Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ashley Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3046 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 Assessment: Practical reports, one 2-hour exam (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3046 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The unit will provide a broad overview of the scientific study of animal behaviour. It will consider mechanistic and functional explanations of animal behaviour across contexts including kin selection and altruism, sociality, foraging, aggression and competition, sexual selection and mate choice, the behaviour of predators and prey, and communication and signalling. The information presented and discussed in this unit will reflect the most up-to-date research in each aspect of the field of animal behaviour. Practical sessions are closely aligned with the lecture material and will foster the development of key skills by providing hands-on experience of experimental design, data collection and analysis.
Textbooks
Davies, Krebs, West: An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology, 4th edition, Wiley-Blackwell.