Geography

GEOGRAPHY (HONOURS)

The Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Honours) (Geography) requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 4000-level Honours coursework core units, and
(ii) 6 credit points of 4000-level Honours coursework selective units, and
(iii) 36 credit points of 4000-level Honours research project units

Honours Coursework Core

GEOG4111 Advanced Research in Geography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: lecture/seminar for 9 hours over 3 weeks, 2-day retreat, 10 hours practical/lab/GIS classes Assumed knowledge: Have an understanding of the subfields of geography within its context as an academic discipline and be aware of the contested and situated nature of geographical research, including the co-constitutive nature of social and biophysical phenomena. Assessment: major essay (4, 000 words; 40%), group presentation (15%), poster (15%), methodology report (1, 500 words; 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
The defining characteristic of geographical research is the way it generates new knowledge about biophysical and human environments by the novel integration of conceptual ideas and methodological practices. This tradition allows geographers to innovatively address key global problems, including the quest for greater sustainability, the need for social and environmental justice, the dilemmas of climate change, and the promise and contradictions of a globalised world. In this unit of study you will develop an understanding of how this 'geographical way of thinking' shapes how professional geographers go about their research, their professional practice, and how this shapes their imprint on global knowledge creation. In the first section of this unit, you will engage in active debate with teaching staff and fellow students about the key pillars of geographical knowledge, and how they are employed in real-life settings. In the second section of the unit, students will divide into groups based around their research interests, with each group developing deeper practical skills relating to a specific methodology (for example GIS applications; qualitative methods; geochemical analysis, etc). Upon completing this unit, you will have the background context and deeper technical skills relevant for a geographical research project.

Honours Coursework Selective

GEOL4101 Research Skills in Geology and Geophysics A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Derek Wyman Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: variable but typically intensive workshop format: lectures 8-10 hrs/week; 2-4 hours practical Assumed knowledge: Have a coherent understanding of key themes in geology and geophysics within the context of Earth system science, and understand principles and concepts relating to Earth's structure, its internal and external dynamics and evolution. Assessment: students complete two of six modules only, each of the two modules completed contributes 50% of the assessment weighting for the unit; [1x assignment/report (50%)] or [1x report (35%), lab skills practical (15%)] depending on the modules chosen Practical field work: Field Work only in Special Projects Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit must be taken by all students in the Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Honours, Geology; and Honours, Geophysics)
Geology and Geophysics are wide-ranging disciplines with specialisations or research topics that involve varying degrees of field work, laboratory analysis, computer modelling, etc. One of their defining characteristics is the need to respond to unique real-world challenges with innovative combinations of acquired knowledge and new research. As environmental and climate challenges multiply and the need for sustainable resource practices intensifies, geologists and geophysicists must continually respond with new strategies for a changing planet. In GEOL4101 and GEOL4102, you will develop the ability to enhance your skill sets in response to specific research challenges. The units are designed to flexibly address your particular research needs by allowing you to select the most relevant two modules from a variety of offerings that include intensive workshop courses developed within the School, field studies in relevant terranes or environments, or short collaboration projects with external institutions or organisations. The units also provide the flexibility to allow the creation of your own unique module that targets your field of investigation. Upon completing these units, you will have gained a deeper understanding of your sub-discipline and research area early in your Honours year, which will facilitate an independent and novel scientific contribution in your field.
SCIE4001 Science Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alice E Motion Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2-3 hrs/week, workshops 1-2hrs/week Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Assumed knowledge: Completion of a major in a science discipline. Basic knowledge of other sciences is beneficial. Experience in communication such as delivering oral presentations and producing written reports. An awareness of science in a societal context, e.g., of disciplinary applications. Assessment: seminar/workshop attendance and completion of 'course notebook' (10%; individual), written article communicating science topic to specific audience (25%; individual), illustrating science (sound/figure/animation/diagram etc; 15%), 3 minute presentation of science topic to specific audience (25%; individual), group report (25%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Mid-year honours students would take this unit of study in S1 (their second semester of study).
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough". This quote is widely attributed to Albert Einstein, but regardless of its provenance, it suggests that one measure of an expert's knowledge can be found in their ability to translate complex ideas so that they are accessible to anyone. The communication of science to the public is essential for science and society. In order to increase public understanding and appreciation of science, researchers must be able to explain their results, and the wider context of their research, to non-experts. This unit will explore some theoretical foundations of science communications, identify outstanding practitioners and empower students to produce effective science communication in different media. In this unit you will learn the necessary skills and techniques to tell engaging and informative science stories in order to bring complex ideas to life, for non-expert audiences. By undertaking this unit you will develop a greater understanding of the wider context of your honours unit, advance your communication skills and be able to explain your honours research to non-expert audiences such as friends, family or future employers. These transferable skills will equip you for future research - where emphasis is increasingly placed on public communication and/or outreach - or professional pathways - where effective communication of complex ideas is highly valued.
SCIE4003 Ethics in Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Hans Pols Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: part a: lecture/seminars 4hr/week for 3 weeks, in which all students participate, followed by two modules, part b (human ethics) and part c (animal ethics), from which students select one; each module comprises 8 hours of workshops over 1-2 weeks Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A Prohibitions: HSBH3004 or HPSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Successful completion of a Science major. Assessment: essay (40%), presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
In the contemporary world, a wide variety of ethical concerns impinge upon the practice of scientific research. In this unit you will learn how to identify potential ethical issues within science, acquire the tools necessary to analyse them, and develop the ability to articulate ethically sound insights about how to resolve them. In the first portion of the unit, you will be familiarised with how significant developments in post-World War II science motivated sustained ethical debate among scientists and in society. In the second portion of the unit, you will select from either a Human Ethics module or an Animal Ethics module and learn the requirements of how to ensure your research complies with appropriate national legislation and codes of conduct. By undertaking this unit you will develop the ability to conduct scientific research in an ethically justifiable way, place scientific developments and their application in a broader social context, and analyse the social implications and ethical issues that may potentially arise in the course of developing scientific knowledge.

Honours Core Research Project

GEOG4103 Geography Honours Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dale Dominey-Howes Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Assessment: oral presentation (10%), thesis (90%) Practical field work: Honours in Geography typically involves practical fieldwork. Arrangements will differ between students and be tailored to the specific requirements of research topics. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will complete a research project in the discipline of Geography. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop a hypothesis. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypothesis. In terms of assessment, you will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in a 20, 000 word honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for either undertaking a PhD or any variety of future careers.
GEOG4104 Geography Honours Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dale Dominey-Howes Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: GEOG4103 Assessment: oral presentation (10%), thesis (90%) Practical field work: Honours in Geography typically involves practical fieldwork. Arrangements will differ between students and be tailored to the specific requirements of research topics. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will complete a research project in the discipline of Geography. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop a hypothesis. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypothesis. In terms of assessment, you will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in a 20, 000 word honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for either undertaking a PhD or any variety of future careers.
GEOG4105 Geography Honours Project C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dale Dominey-Howes Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: GEOG4104 Assessment: oral presentation (10%), thesis (90%) Practical field work: Honours in Geography typically involves practical fieldwork. Arrangements will differ between students and be tailored to the specific requirements of research topics. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will complete a research project in the discipline of Geography. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop a hypothesis. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypothesis. In terms of assessment, you will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in a 20, 000 word honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for either undertaking a PhD or any variety of future careers.
GEOG4106 Geography Honours Project D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dale Dominey-Howes Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: GEOG4105 Assessment: oral presentation (10%), thesis (90%) Practical field work: Honours in Geography typically involves practical fieldwork. Arrangements will differ between students and be tailored to the specific requirements of research topics. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will complete a research project in the discipline of Geography. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop a hypothesis. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypothesis. In terms of assessment, you will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in a 20, 000 word honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for either undertaking a PhD or any variety of future careers.
GEOG4107 Geography Honours Project E

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dale Dominey-Howes Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: GEOG4106 Assessment: oral presentation (10%), thesis (90%) Practical field work: Honours in Geography typically involves practical fieldwork. Arrangements will differ between students and be tailored to the specific requirements of research topics. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will complete a research project in the discipline of Geography. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop a hypothesis. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypothesis. In terms of assessment, you will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in a 20, 000 word honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for either undertaking a PhD or any variety of future careers.
GEOG4108 Geography Honours Project F

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dale Dominey-Howes Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: GEOG4107 Assessment: oral presentation (10%), thesis (90%) Practical field work: Honours in Geography typically involves practical fieldwork. Arrangements will differ between students and be tailored to the specific requirements of research topics. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will complete a research project in the discipline of Geography. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop a hypothesis. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypothesis. In terms of assessment, you will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in a 20, 000 word honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for either undertaking a PhD or any variety of future careers.