Human Movement

HUMAN MOVEMENT

Advanced coursework and projects will be available in 2020 for students who complete this major.

Human Movement major

This major is only available to students enrolled in the Health stream, as a second major.
A major in Human Movement requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 18 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 12 credit points of 3000-level core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Human Movement minor

This minor is only available to students enrolled in the Health stream.
A minor in Human Movement requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 18 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cliffton Chan, Dr Joanna Diong Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical:tutorial/week Assessment: Mid semester practical exam (30%), end semester practical exam (30%), end semester exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Semester 1 Unit Coordinators are Dr Cliffton Chan and A/Prof Leslie Nicholson, Semester 2 unit coordinator is Dr Joanna Diong
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jan Douglas-Morris Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical-tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Assessment: Online test (5%), mid-semester practical exam (30%), end-semester practical exam (25%), end-semester theory exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the detailed gross, radiological and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Material will be presented in lectures, practical and tutorial sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.

2000-level units of study

Core
BIOS2170 Body Systems and Human Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Knight Session: Semester 1 Classes: (3x 1hr lec and 1x2hr tut/prac or 1x 3hr tut/prac)/wk Prohibitions: BIOS1170 or BMED2403 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2006 Assessment: mid semester exam (40%), end semester exam (60%) using mcq and short answer questions; formative assessment after each topic. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will present the gross anatomy, functional histology, physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and renal systems (including acid-base homeostasis) relevant to human movement. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadaveric material is studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory. It includes classes during which students interpret physiological data and explain the physiological principles associated demonstrated. These classes link across all topics culminating in a capstone activity which emphasizes the integrated nature of human movement and performance.
BIOS2171 Human Neuroscience in Health and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Kay Double Session: Semester 2 Classes: (3x1hr lec and 1x2hr tut or 1x2hr prac)/wk Prohibitions: BIOS1171 or BIOS1166 or ANAT2010 or ANAT2910 Assessment: 1x1.2hr exam (30%) and 1x2hr exam (50%) and tutorial/practical class assessments (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This intermediate unit of study will introduce the human nervous system and its function, in the context of neuroscience in the healthy human and that associated with human disease. The unit will teach human neuroanatomy and neurophysiology and will introduce a range of disorders associated with dysfunction of the human nervous system and their treatments. This knowledge will be expanded using case studies of specific disorders of, or affecting, the nervous system spanning neurology and mental health, including disorders of increasing prevalence. Fields to be covered include aetiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of such disorders. The unit is designed to equip students to pursue advanced studies in clinical neuroscience or to pursue studies in a professional degree program in medicine or other health professions. Material will be presented in lectures, tutorial and practical classes. Active learning approaches including case-based, on-line and collaborative learning will be used.
Textbooks
Crossman, A.R., Neary, D (2010) Neuroanatomy, an illustrated colour text, 4th Ed. Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier. Kandel, E. R., Schwartz, J. H., Jessell, T. M., Siegelbaum, S. A. and Hudspeth, A. J. (2013). Principles of neural science. McGraw-Hill. Other texts will be recommended as additional reading material.
EXSS2030 Muscle Adaptations to Use and Disuse

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 13 x 1hr lectures 11 x 1hr tutorials Prohibitions: EXSS1029 Assessment: 4 x formative quizzes (0%) 4 x summative quizzes, each quiz 5% value (20% total) practical report (10%) class presentation (oral and written components)( 15%), 2 hour written end-of-semester exam (55%) Practical field work: 7 x 1hr practicals Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The purpose of the unit is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of skeletal muscle function and how muscle adapts to increased use, specifically how muscle responds to high-resistance training (HRT, also know as strength training) and to disuse. Students will gain an understanding of muscle force development in terms of myosin function and organization (sarcomeres, myofibrils, muscle fibers) and the neural processes involved in maximal voluntary contractions. Students will then apply this knowledge to understand how HRT works in terms of hypertrophy and neural adaptations, the process of muscle atrophy during disuse and the effects of retraining after disuse. Students will integrate this biological understanding with an evidence-base approach to HRT prescription. Students apply and integrate these approaches gain skills in the real-world prescription of HRT through participation in HRT program in practical session, and then gain skills in data analysis via interpretation of their own responses to training. Students will gain skills in the ability to critically evaluate, and communicate applications of evidence-base research in healthy and clinical populations. Finally the unit examines concepts on muscle energy balance in terms of methods and control of ATP production and use, and these concepts are used to understand the concepts of peripheral and central fatigue.
Textbooks
There is no recommended textbook for this unit of study. Content is directly sourced to original research. See Unit of Study website for reference listing.

3000-level units of study

Major core
EXSS3XX2 and EXSS3XX1 to be developed for offering in 2020.
Major selective
EXSS3XX3 to be developed for offering in 2020.
BIOS3065 Anatomical Analysis of Exercise

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Karen Ginn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture, 2hr practical, tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and BIOS1169 Assessment: Quizzes (3x10%), mid-semester exam (35%), end semester exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will extend the student's knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomy by applying functional anatomy principles to the analysis of exercises. Relevant research and advanced knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomical concepts will be used to explore exercises designed to: strengthen and lengthen specific muscles; improve muscle coordination; develop dynamic stability; and prevent the development of muscle imbalances that may contribute to musculoskeletal injury. The application of musculoskeletal anatomy principles to increase exercise difficulty and variety will also be explored. This unit will include laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
Minor selective
EXSS3XX1 and EXSS3XX3 to be developed for offering in 2020.
BIOS3065 Anatomical Analysis of Exercise

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Karen Ginn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture, 2hr practical, tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and BIOS1169 Assessment: Quizzes (3x10%), mid-semester exam (35%), end semester exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will extend the student's knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomy by applying functional anatomy principles to the analysis of exercises. Relevant research and advanced knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomical concepts will be used to explore exercises designed to: strengthen and lengthen specific muscles; improve muscle coordination; develop dynamic stability; and prevent the development of muscle imbalances that may contribute to musculoskeletal injury. The application of musculoskeletal anatomy principles to increase exercise difficulty and variety will also be explored. This unit will include laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.