Medical Science

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The prerequisites have have changed for the following units:

AMED3001 Cancer:
Prerequisites now read: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]

AMED3003 Diagnostics & Biomarkers:
Prerequisites now read: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2905 or PHSI2006 or PHSI2906 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]

12/12/2018
2.

Classes have changed for the following units:

IMMU3102 Molecular and Cellular Immunology. Classes are now: Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week.Two hour tutorials will run weeks 2 to 7 and four hour practical will run from week 8 to 13.

IMMU3902Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced). Classes are now: Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week. Two hour tutorials will run weeks 2 to 7 and four hour practical will run from week 8 to 13.

14/1/2019
3.

The description has changed for the following unit. The description should now read:

IMMU3102  Molecular and Cellular Immunology. Description: This study unit builds on the series of lectures that outlined the general properties of the immune system, effector lymphocytes and their functions, delivered in the core courses, IMMU2101 - Introductory Immunology and BMED2404 - Microbes, Infection and Immunity (formerly IMMU2001 and BMED2807). In this unit the molecular and cellular aspects of the immune system are investigated in detail. We emphasise fundamental concepts to provide a scientific basis for studies of the coordinated and regulated immune responses that lead to elimination of infectious organisms. Guest lectures from research scientists eminent in particular branches of immunological research are a special feature of the course. These provide challenging information from the forefront of research that will enable the student to become aware of the many components that come under the broad heading 'Immunology'. Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week, for the duration of the course.
14/1/2019
 4.

The description has changed for the following unit. The description should now read:

IMMU3902 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced). Description: This unit is available to students who have performed well in Introductory Immunology (IMMU2101). Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material and carry out practical work as students in IMMU3102 but attend a series of specialized seminar and research based tutorial classes.

14/1/2019
5.

Prerequisites have changed for the following unit, they now read:
MEDS2004 Microbes, Infection and Immunity Prerequisites:MEDS2004: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1X08 or MEDS1X01 or MBLG1XX1

20/2/2019
6.

Prerequisites have changed for the following unit, they now read:

MEDS2005 Human Anatomy and Histology Prerequisites: 6 cp from (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901)

20/2/2019
7.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

20/2/2019
8.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

NEUR3003 (Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience) Prerequisites have changed, they now read:
Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07

NEUR3093 (Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience Adv) Prerequisites have changed, they now read:
Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year

NEUR3004 (Integrative Neuroscience) Prerequisites have changed, they now read:
Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07

NEUR3904 (Integrative Neurosciecne Adv) Prerequisites have changed, they now read:
Prerequisites: ANAT2X10 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year

3/9/2019

 

MEDICAL SCIENCE

Medical Science stream

Advanced coursework and projects will be available in 2020 for students who complete this major.
The Medical Science stream is 72 credit points, including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level stream core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level stream core units
(iii) A 60 credit point program in Medical Science

Medical Science program

This program is only available to students enrolled in Medical Science stream.
A program in Medical Science requires 60 credit points from this table including:
(i) A 48 credit point major in Medical Science
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level program core units

Medical Science major

This major is only available to students enrolled in Medical Science program.
A major in Medical Science requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level major core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 3000-level core interdisciplinary project unit
(iv) 18 credit points of 3000-level disciplinary selective or interdisciplinary project selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Stream core
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, presentations, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
Major core
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Practical field work: As advised and required by the project; approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
MEDS1001 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 1 Classes: this unit of study will involve between 5-6 hours of face-to-face activities run on the camperdown campus, these contact hours will comprise lectures; six 3-hour practical sessions; six workshops and tutorials Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1901 Assessment: Written and oral communication, quiz, practical and workshop reports, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the medical sciences suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology and medical sciences. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in the medical sciences.
Textbooks
TBA
MEDS1901 Human Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 1 Classes: this unit of study will involve between 5-6 hours of face-to-face activities run on the camperdown campus Prerequisites: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 Assessment: Written and oral presentation, quiz, assignment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components which may for example include guest lecturers from medical science industries. The nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
TBA
MEDS coded units of study are only available to students in the Medical Science stream.

2000-level units of study

Stream core
MEDS2003 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical session and 1 h tutorial per fortnight Prerequisites: 6p from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or BMED2804 Assessment: Group presentation (5%), In-class continuous assessment (25%), PeerWise MCQ design (10%), ELMA design essay and interpretation (10%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? What happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how fuel use is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. Our practicals, along with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to widely applied and cutting-edge tools that are essential for modern biochemistry and molecular biology. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the medical and life sciences.
Textbooks
Canvas, ELN Peerwise Site, Blackboard LMS Textbook: Biochemistry - Berg, Tymoczko, Gatto, Stryer 8th Ed or higher Wikipedia
Program core
MEDS2001 Key Concepts in Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Cameron Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: 6cp from [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903] Prohibitions: PHSI2907 or PHSI2007 or BMED2402 Assumed knowledge: Human biology Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Written and other tasks: Integrated Medical Science activity (10%), Laboratory report writing (25%), How Physiology Works (15%) - students will write a 1000 word piece explaining how a Specific physiological mechanism can be applied to two different cell types to elicit totally different cellular functions, Explaining Physiology (10% group) - students will work in groups of 5 to create a short 5 min, Presentation that explains a core concept in physiology to members of the general public. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating from the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organs systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning, you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole-body physiology.
MEDS2002 Key Concepts in Pharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brent McParland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: PCOL2555 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or BMED2401 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) Assessment: Cognitive, problem-based examination (40%), poster presentation (10%), practical exercises and peer evaluation (20%), online quizzes (10%), personal reflection (5%), contribution to online discussion (5%), integrated assessment (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit must be taken by all students enrolled in the BSc (Medical Science)
Pharmacology is the study of the properties and biological actions of drugs and chemicals and the keys role they play in the prevention and treatment of human diseases. In this unit of study you will be introduced to the fundamental concepts in pharmacology: a) principles of drug action, b) pharmacokinetics and precision medicine, c) drug design, and d) drug development and regulation. Additionally, you will learn the tools pharmacologists use in their investigations and develop skills in laboratory and problem-based enquiry. In both face-to-face and online learning environments you will learn the core concepts underpinning pharmacology and will have the opportunity to explore and apply these concepts through practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. By undertaking this unit you will not only learn to view health and disease through the lens of a pharmacologist, you will further develop valuable skills in critical thinking and problem solving, communication, digital literacy, teamwork and interdisciplinary effectiveness. This unit will help you to develop a coherent and connected knowledge of the medical sciences and their broad applications, while also giving you the foundations for increasing your disciplinary expertise in pharmacology.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site. Links to other learning technologies will be available via Canvas LMS. Textbooks will be available for purchase from Co-op bookshop, in hard copy and online via the library.
Major core
MEDS2004 Microbes, Infection and Immunity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online lecturettes, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1X08 or MEDS1X01 or MBLG1XX1 Prohibitions: MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Final examination (50%), practical exercises (20%), online quizzes (10%), integrated assessment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Transmission, pathogenicity and immune response to microbes are key concepts for understanding infectious disease processes. In this unit of study you will establish a conceptual foundation and, using an integrated approach, explore selected case studies of infection from a body system of origin perspective. You will explore the characteristics of viral, bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens and their virulence mechanisms for establishment and progression of disease. Comprehensive consideration of host immune response and characteristic pathological changes to tissue that arise will then be considered. Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to explain microbial pathogenic processes of infection including: mechanisms for colonisation, invasion and damage to host tissue; the ways in which your immune system recognises and destroys invading microbes; how T cell response is activated and antibodies function. You will learn about pathogenesis, symptoms, current challenges of treatment including antibiotic resistance, control and vaccination strategies. You will develop a holistic perspective of infectious diseases. You will work collaboratively to solve challenging problems in Biomedical Sciences. Practical classes will investigate normal flora, host defences and case studies of medically important microbes with linkage to disease outcome. You will also obtain experience and understanding of modern experimental techniques in microbiology and immunopathology.
MEDS2005 Human Anatomy and Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michelle Gerke-Duncan and Dr Sean Lal Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures/wk, 2hr tutorial-practical/wk Prerequisites: 6 cp from (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) Prohibitions: ANAT2011 or BMED2402 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 Assumed knowledge: MEDS1X01 Assessment: Assessment: Online weekly Quiz (,15-20 SBA) - Formative, In-semester formative assesment (laboratory quizzes) - Formative, Laboratory Summative Assessment Week 6 (45 minutes) - 20%, Laboratory Summative Assessment Week 12 (45 minutes) - 20%, Final Exam (2 hours) - 60% Mode of delivery: Block mode
Where is your gall bladder or pineal gland? How do nine meters of intestines fit into our body? MEDS2005 is for students who are studying human anatomy and histology in the Medical Sciences stream. In laboratory classes using human cadavers and histological slides of human tissues, you will gain fundamental knowledge of the anatomy and histology of the brain and nerves; the anatomy and histology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine and digestive systems, and musculoskeletal anatomy. Lectures and laboratory classes are the forums for discussion and debate about the structure and function of the human body. Learning will be augmented with online quizzes and self-directed learning modules with additional modules to broaden your horizons in areas of interest. There will be a disease of the week related to the systems we have covered. The unit teaches the language of anatomy and histology, and knowledge and practical skills in human anatomy and histology, preparing you for many applied anatomical settings. In the hands-on laboratory sessions you will work in teams, engaging with the content, building your interpersonal skills, and fostering a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. You will consider the processes of body donation and the ethical, legal and moral frameworks around which people donate their remains for anatomical learning, teaching and research. This unit contains assumed knowledge for entry into the graduate medical program at the University of Sydney, and is also suitable for graduate programs in dentistry, nursing, physical therapies, forensic sciences and many other applied, para-clinical and clinical fields, as well as for careers in the fields of biomedical research, innovation and development.

3000-level units of study

Core Interdsiciplinary Project
MEDS3888 to be developed for offering in 2020
Disciplinary Selective
AMED3001 Cancer

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Geraldine O'Neill Session: Semester 1 Classes: interactive face to face activities 4 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3901 Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, quiz, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What does it mean when someone tells you: "you have cancer"? Initially you're probably consumed with questions like: "how did this happen?" and "will this cancer kill me?". In this unit, we will explore all aspects of the "cancer problem" from the underlying biomedical and environmental causes, through to emerging approaches to cancer diagnosis and treatment. You will integrate medical science knowledge from a diverse range of disciplines and apply this to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer both at the individual and community level. Together we will explore the epidemiology, aetiology and pathophysiology of cancer. You will be able to define problems and formulate solutions related to the study, prevention and treatment of cancer with consideration throughout for the economic, social and psychological costs of a disease that affects billions. Face-to-face and online learning activities will allow you to work effectively in individual and collaborative contexts. You will acquire the skills to interpret and communicate observations and experimental findings related to the "cancer problem" to diverse audiences. Upon completion, you will have developed the foundations that will allow you to follow a career in cancer research, clinical and diagnostic cancer services and/or the corporate system that supports the health care system.
Textbooks
Recommended Textbook: 1.,Weinberg (2013) The Biology of Cancer. 2nd edition. Garland Science Recommended reading: 1.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2000). The hallmarks of cancer. Cell 100, 57-70. 2.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2011). Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation. Cell 144, 646-74
AMED3002 Interrogating Biomedical and Health Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jean Yang Session: Semester 1 Classes: face to face 5 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Assumed knowledge: Exploratory data analysis, sampling, simple linear regression, t-tests, confidence intervals and chi-squared goodness of fit tests, familiar with basic coding, basic linear algebra. Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biotechnological advances have given rise to an explosion of original and shared public data relevant to human health. These data, including the monitoring of expression levels for thousands of genes and proteins simultaneously, together with multiple databases on biological systems, now promise exciting, ground-breaking discoveries in complex diseases. Critical to these discoveries will be our ability to unravel and extract information from these data. In this unit, you will develop analytical skills required to work with data obtained in the medical and diagnostic sciences. You will explore clinical data using powerful, state of the art methods and tools. Using real data sets, you will be guided in the application of modern data science techniques to interrogate, analyse and represent the data, both graphically and numerically. By analysing your own real data, as well as that from large public resources you will learn and apply the methods needed to find information on the relationship between genes and disease. Leveraging expertise from multiple sources by working in team-based collaborative learning environments, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play an active role in finding meaningful solutions to difficult problems, creating an important impact on our lives.
AMED3003 Diagnostics and Biomarkers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fabienne Brilot-Turville Session: Semester 2 Classes: interactive face to face 4 hrs/week; online activities 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3903 Assessment: in-semester exam, skill based assessments, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Diagnostic sciences have evolved at a rapid pace and provide the cornerstone of our health care system. Effective diagnostic assays enable the identification of people who have, or are at risk of, a disease, and guide their treatment. Research into the pathophysiology of disease underpins the discovery of novel biomarkers and in turn, the development of revolutionary diagnostic assays that make use of state-of-the-art molecular and cellular methods. In this unit you will explore a diverse range of diagnostic tests and gain valuable practical experience in a number of core diagnostic methodologies, many of which are currently used in hospital laboratories. Together we will also cover the regulatory, social, and ethical aspects of the use of biomarkers and diagnostic tests and explore the pathways to their translation into clinical practice. By undertaking this unit, you will develop your understanding of diagnostic assays and biomarkers and acquire the skills needed to embark on a career in diagnostic sciences.
ANAT3007 Visceral Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week. The first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the trunk currently being studied. Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] Prohibitions: ANAT2011 or ANAT3907 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2005 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 Assessment: theory exam - 55%, prac exam - 35%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the anatomy of the viscera of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Structures covered include the heart and associated great vessels, lungs, mediastinum and the abdominal viscera, the alimentary organs and the genitourinary system. The structure of anterior thoracic and abdominal walls and pelvis along with the nerve supply to the viscera and relevant endocrine structures is also covered. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of structure to function especially with respect to the important functions of breathing, digestion, excretion and reproduction. Students will be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi and Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3907 Visceral Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures, 2 x 2 hr tutorials Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)]} Prohibitions: ANAT2011 or ANAT3007 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2005 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 Assessment: theory exam - 50%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, advanced report on one of the special topics listed below - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy plus further studies of medical images, anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and details of development of selected head and neck structures. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the anatomy of the viscera of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Structures covered include the heart and associated great vessels, lungs, mediastinum and the abdominal viscera, the alimentary organs and the genitourinary system. The structure of anterior thoracic and abdominal walls and pelvis along with the nerve supply to the viscera and relevant endocrine structures is also covered. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of structure to function especially with respect to the important functions of breathing, digestion, excretion and reproduction. Students will be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy. Also further studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and of details of development of selected head and neck structures.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi and Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy
ANAT3004 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week Tutorials: the first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the head and neck currently being studied. Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)] Prohibitions: ANAT3904 or ANAT3994 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; [(BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: theory exam - 55%, prac exam - 35%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and CT scans and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3904 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, two hour tutorials per week. Tutorials: the first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the head and neck currently being studied. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {12cp from rom [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)]} Prohibitions: ANAT3004or ANAT3994 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: theory exam - 50%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, advanced report on one of the special topics outlined below - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy plus further studies of medical images, anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and details of development of selected head and neck structures. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The advanced course includes studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and also details of development of selected head and neck structures. Also studies of head and neck anatomy and development using ultrasound.
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy. Also further studies of anatomical features not covered in the mainstream course and of details of development of selected head and neck structures.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Colour Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3994 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, one two hour tutorials per week plus three hours dissection per week Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (ANAT3007 or ANAT3907) Prohibitions: ANAT3904 or ANAT3004 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) and demonstrated evidence of manual dexterity and ethical approach Assessment: theory exam - 45%, prac exam - 30%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10%, dissection writeups - 5%, report on one of the dissection topics - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, plus 3 hours dissection per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Course is subject to availability of donor material for dissection. Course is by invitation only.
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. Dissection activities further the understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck and develop highly advanced skills in dissection and prosection of cadaveric materials.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Colour Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3008 Musculoskeletal Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 2-hour tutorial per week Practical Work: One two hour practical class per week Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI12008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) Prohibitions: ANAT3908 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: One 90 minute paper (70%), one 60 minute paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides an opportunity for students to study the topographical and systems anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and the back regions. Emphasis is placed upon the identification and description of structures and the correlation of structure with function. This includes for the upper limb, its role in manipulation, for the lower limb standing and walking and for the back flexible support and protection. Emphasis is also given to the innervation of the limbs. The unit also aims to develop the general skills of observation, description, drawing, writing and discussion as applying to biological structure.
ANAT3908 Musculoskeletal Anatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures Prerequisites: An average mark of 70 or above from 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2X10 or PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X06 or PHSI2X07 or PHSI2X08 or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or BIOL2X21 or BIOL2X22 or BIOL2X24 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31] or [BMED2401 and BMED2402]} Prohibitions: ANAT3008 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; [(BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: One 90 minute paper(70%), one practical examination (30%) Practical field work: 2 x 2hr Anatomy Wetlab Laboratories Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an opportunity for students to study the topographical and systems anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and the back regions. Emphasis is placed upon the identification and description of structures and the correlation of structure with function, which for the upper limb includes its role in manipulation, for the lower limb standing and walking and for the back flexible support and protection. Emphasis is also given to the innervation of the limbs and the consequences of nerve lesions for limb function. The unit also aims to develop the general skills of observation, description, drawing, writing and discussion as applying to biological structure. The unit builds upon or compliments other macroscopic anatomy units offered by the Department and provides for the development of skills, which could be relevant to a later honours project or higher degree in the field of structural biology.
ANAT3009 Functional Systems Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Lindsay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2h/wk; Practical class 3hr/wk Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)] Prohibitions: HSTO3001 or HSTO3902 or EMHU3001 or EMHU3002 or ANAT3909 Assumed knowledge: (BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996) or (BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 or BIOL1997) or (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: Mid-semester exam - 45mins (20%), Final Theory Exam -2hrs (40%), Final Practical Exam -1hr (40%), regular formative discussions and quizzes, Mode of delivery: Block mode
ANAT3009 provides students with the theoretical knowledge of the histology of the whole body. Hands-on practical training is gained in the operation of a light microscope to examine complex human and animal histological slides. An in-depth understanding is gained about the alimentary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive systems and that knowledge is applied to current trends in research and the clinical field. Students are exposed to current research regarding implantation and placental development and the clinical field by examining IVF treatment. This encourages students to apply their knowledge to various fields and gain a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. The practical sessions ensure students apply lecture content and necessitate group work to complete practical discussion points. Students develop their written and oral communication skills in the language and conventions of the subject through regular discussions. The theoretical and practical skills gainedcan provide a basis for further studies in fields such as anatomy, histology, and pathology or in post graduate medicine or in areas of research requiring knowledge of advanced histological examination.
ANAT3909 Functional Systems Histology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Lindsay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2h/wk; Practical class 3hr/wk; Project work self-directed during semester Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) Prohibitions: HSTO3001 or HSTO3902 or EMHU3001 or EMHU3002 or ANAT3009 Assumed knowledge: (BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996) or (BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 or BIOL1997) or (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: Video presentation and script (,15-20 MCQ and SAQs) - 20%, Final Theory Exam (2 hours) - 40%, Final Practical Exam (1 hour) - 40%, Formative discussion and quizzes (During designated practical sessions) - 0% Mode of delivery: Block mode
ANAT3909 provides students with the theoretical knowledge of the histology of the whole body. Hands-on practical training is gained in the operation of a light microscope to examine complex human and animal histological slides. An in-depth understanding is gained about the alimentary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive systems and that knowledge is applied to current trends in research and the clinical field. Students are exposed to current research regarding implantation and placental development and the clinical field by examining IVF treatment. This encourages students to apply their knowledge to various fields and gain a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. The practical sessions ensure students apply lecture content and necessitate group work to complete practical discussion points. Students develop their written and oral communication skills in the language and conventions of the subject through regular discussions, and video creation. The theoretical and practical skills gainedcan provide a basis for further studies in fields such as anatomy, histology, pathology or in post graduate medicine or in areas of research requiring knowledge of advanced histological examination.
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester practical work and assignments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3072 Human Molecular Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3972 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3072 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3072. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in modern molecular cell biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
CPAT3201 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour research tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Prohibitions: CPAT3901 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), one major research essay (1500w) (20%), two 0.5-hour in-semester exams (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1 unit of study modules will provide a theoretical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in theoretical modules include: tissue responses to exogenous factors, adaptive responses to foreign agents, cardiovascular/pulmonary/gut responses to disease, forensic science, neuropathology and cancer. The aims of the course are: - To give students an overall understanding of the fundamental biological mechanisms governing disease pathogenesis in human beings. - To introduce to students basic concepts of the pathogenesis, natural history and complications of common human diseases. - To demonstrate and exemplify differences between normality and disease. - To explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Together with CPAT3202, the unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquires should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas and Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
CPAT3901 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1 (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures (2 h/wk) and online lecturettes (3 x 20 min/wk); group focus tutorial (3 x 2 h over 2-3 weeks); guided museum session (1 h/wk); and preparation of online research notebooks (1 h/wk). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) or BCHM2081 or BCHM2981) or BCHM2082 or BCHM2982)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Prohibitions: CPAT3201 Assumed knowledge: A working knowledge of biology Assessment: Week 2 in-semester quiz 1 - 5% (12 MCQ)?Museum tour and report (module 1) - 5%Week 6 in-semester quiz 2 - 5% (12 MCQ)Museum tour and report (module 2) - 5%Week 8 in-semester quiz 3 - 5% (12 MCQ)Museum tour and report (module 3) - 5%Week 9 in-semester quiz 4 - 5% (12 MCQ)Museum tour and report (module 4) - 5% Week 10-12 Group focus learning module that precedes assignment of the pathogenesis essays to each group; students will then work in small groups to build short oral presentations (5 min) on the assigned topics. These presentations will be delivered within the groups and in the presence of a content expert that will provide feed back together with group feed back for each presentation. This will be a formative task.Week 13 Pathogenesis report - 20%Exam period final exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
A deep understanding of pathological mechanisms for disease progression leads to improved human health outcomes. As human populations across the world are ageing, the increasing burden of age-related disease will become one of the greatest challenges facing modern medical science. To equip students with skills appropriate for job-ready careers in the biomedical sciences specialising in pathology it is necessary to provide an integrated understanding of how to evaluate and analyse crucial pathological mechanisms governing disease progression in humans. You will participate in inquiry-led learning modules focused on the systems theory of disease and the underlying mechanisms that promote disease progression in humans. To demonstrate disease you will review high-resolution imagery of pathological specimens using innovative online tools combined with in-depth description of immunological, molecular and biochemical process that underpin the pathogenesis of disease in a range of major body organs. You will undertake investigations to gain an advanced understanding of the health complications of common human diseases. You will learn to use a process of high-level deduction to identify key differences between normality and disease in order to explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Through undertaking this unit you will develop the necessary skill set to define and strategically assess how different organ systems react to injury/insult and how to apply basic concepts of disease processes, which ultimately improve the capacity to manage and intervene in fundamental and clinical aspects of health and disease.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site and the Pathology museum website. Robbins Basic Pathology; 9th Edition, Eds Kumar, Abbas, Fausto and Mitchell
CPAT3202 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 2 Classes: Practical Module Prerequisites: 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Corequisites: CPAT3201 Prohibitions: CPAT3901 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), Museum Practical Reports (40%). Practical field work: One 2-hour microscopic practical and one 2-hour museum practical per week. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2 unit of study modules will provide a practical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in practical modules include disease specimen evaluation on a macroscopic and microscopic basis. The aims of the course are: - To enable students to gain an understanding of how different organ systems react to injury and to apply basic concepts of disease processes. - To equip students with skills appropriate for careers in the biomedical sciences and for further training in research or professional degrees. At the end of the course students will: - Have acquired practical skills in the use of a light microscope. - Have an understanding of basic investigative techniques for disease detection in pathology. - Be able to evaluate diseased tissue at the macroscopic and microscopic level. - Have the ability to describe, synthesise and present information on disease pathogenesis. - Transfer problem-solving skills to novel situations related to disease pathogenesis. This unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquiries should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au.
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas and Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
CPAT3902 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2 (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures (2h/wk) and online lecturettes (3 x 20 min/wk); Microscopy tutorial (1.5 h); guided museum session (1 h/wk); and preparation of online research notebooks (1 h/wk). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) or BCHM2081 or BCHM2981) or BCHM2082 or BCHM2982)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Prohibitions: CPAT3202 Assumed knowledge: A working knowledge of biology Assessment: Week 2 pre-quiz 1 - 5% (10 MCQ)?Week 4 pre-quiz 2 - 5% (10 MCQ)Week 6 Electronic notebook 1 - 10% (Narrative Plan document that is to be populated with data obtained by the student)?Week 8 pre-quiz 3 - 5% (10 MCQ)Week 10 pre-quiz 4 - 5% (10 MCQ)Week 12 Electronic notebook 1 - 10% (Narrative Plan document that is to be populated with data obtained by the student)?Week 13 or 14 Practical exam - 20% (Specimen and micrograph-based practical exam) followed by final exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Understanding the underlying mechanisms of disease and disease progression, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity on individual health outcomes are some of the great challenges facing modern medical sciences in the 21st century. To equip students with skills appropriate for careers in the biomedical sciences and for further training in research or professional degrees it is necessary to provide an integrated understanding of how to evaluate and analyse crucial pathological mechanisms governing disease progression in humans. You will participate in inquiry-led museum and practical class sessions that review human pathological specimens using innovative online tools combined with high-resolution microscopy to crystallise and reinforce concepts developed in the unit. You will undertake investigations to gain an advanced understanding of the pathogenesis, natural history and related health complications of common human diseases. You will learn to use methodologies to exemplify key differences between normality and disease in order to explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Through undertaking this unit you will develop the necessary practical skills required to employ advanced imaging technologies that are increasingly used to define and strategically assess how different organ systems react to injury/insult, which ultimately improve the capacity to manage and intervene in fundamental and clinical aspects of health and disease.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site; through electronic notebooks and the Pathology museum website. Robbins Basic Pathology; 9th Edition, Eds Kumar, Abbas, Fausto and Mitchell
HSTO3003 Cells and Development: Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Frank Lovicu Session: Semester 2 Classes: Four to five 1-hour theory lectures and/or one 1-hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 72cp of 1000 to 3000 level units Assumed knowledge: (ANAT2008 or BMED2401 or MEDS2005) and Human biology; BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, tutorial research papers and Seminar (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
The main emphasis of this unit of study concerns the mechanisms that control animal development. Early developmental processes including fertilisation, cleavage, and gastrulation leading to the formation of the primary germ layers and subsequent body organs are described in a range of animals, mainly vertebrates. Stem cells of both embryonic and adult origin will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the parts played by inductive cell and tissue interactions in cell and tissue differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation. This will be studied at both cellular and molecular levels.
Textbooks
Gilbert, SF. Developmental Biology. 11th edition. Sinauer Associates Inc. 2016.
HSTO3004 Cells and Development: Practical (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stuart Fraser Session: Semester 2 Prerequisites: An annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year and 72cp of 1000 to 3000 level units Assumed knowledge: (ANAT2008 or BMED2401 or MEDS2005) and Human biology; BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: Practical class reports and Seminars (100%) Practical field work: Two 3-hour practicals per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This advanced unit of study complements HSTO3003 (Cells and Development: Theory) and is catered to provide students with laboratory research experience leading to Honours and higher degrees. It will primarily cover the design and application of experimental procedures involved in cell and developmental biology, using appropriate molecular and cellular techniques to answer developmental questions raised in HSTO3003. This unit of study will promote hands on experience, allowing students to observe and examine developing and differentiating tissues at the macroscopic and microscopic level. The main emphasis of this unit of study will concentrate on practical approaches to understanding the mechanisms that control animal development. Some projects may examine early developmental processes such as fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and the formation of the primary germ layers and tissues. The parts played by stem cells and inductive cell and tissue interactions in differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation can also be examined at cellular and molecular levels.
Textbooks
Gilbert, SF. Developmental Biology. 11th edition. Sinauer Associates Inc. 2016.
IMMU3102 Molecular and Cellular Immunology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Carl Feng Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11 Prohibitions: IMMU3902 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This study unit builds on the series of lectures that outlined the general properties of the immune system, effector lymphocytes and their functions, delivered in the core courses, IMMU2101 - Introductory Immunology and BMED2404 - Microbes, Infection and Immunity (formerly IMMU2001 and BMED2807). In this unit the molecular and cellular aspects of the immune system are investigated in detail. We emphasise fundamental concepts to provide a scientific basis for studies of the coordinated and regulated immune responses that lead to elimination of infectious organisms. Guest lectures from research scientists eminent in particular branches of immunological research are a special feature of the course. These provide challenging information from the forefront of research that will enable the student to become aware of the many components that come under the broad heading 'Immunology'. Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week, for the duration of the course. This unit directly complements the unit 'Immunology in Human Disease IMMU3202' and students are very strongly advised to undertake these study units concurrently.
Textbooks
Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier.
IMMU3902 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Carl Feng Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 lectures, 1 special seminar/tutorial (2 hours), 1 practical (4 hours) every 2 weeks. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in (IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11) Prohibitions: IMMU3102 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Introductory Immunology (IMMU2101). Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as students in IMMU3102 but carry out advanced level practical work and a series of specialized seminar based tutorial classes.
Textbooks
Textbooks Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier.
IMMU3202 Immunology in Human Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Allison Abendroth Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one tutorial and one 4 hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11 Prohibitions: IMMU3903 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: .
This study unit builds on the series of lectures that outlined the general properties of the immune system, effector lymphocytes and their functions, delivered in the core courses, IMMU2101 - Introductory Immunology and BMED2404 - Microbes, Infection and Immunity (formerly IMMU2001 and BMED2807). We emphasise fundamental concepts to provide a scientific basis for studies in clinical immunology; dysfunctions of the immune system e.g. autoimmune disease, immunodeficiencies, and allergy, and immunity in terms of host - pathogen interactions. This unit has a strong focus on significant clinical problems in immunology and the scientific background to these problems. The unit includes lectures from research scientists and clinicians covering areas such as allergy, immunodeficiency, autoimmune disease and transplantation. This course provides challenging information from the forefront of clinical immunology and helps the student develop an understanding of immune responses in human health and disease. Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week, for the duration of the course. This unit directly complements the unit 'Molecular and Cellular Immunology IMMU3102' and students are very strongly advised to undertake these study units concurrently.
Textbooks
Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier
IMMU3903 Immunology in Human Disease (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Allison Abendroth Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 lectures,1 seminar/tutorial (2 hours) and1 practical (4 hours) every 2 weeks. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in (IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11) Prohibitions: IMMU3202 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Introductory Immunology (IMMU2101). Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as students in IMMU3202 but carry out advanced level practical work and a series of specialized seminar based tutorial classes.
Textbooks
Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier
INFD3012 Infectious Diseases

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jamie Triccas Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 4 hour practical class per week. Prerequisites: BMED2404 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11 Assessment: Formal examination (60%): one 2 hour exam. Progressive assessment (40%): includes tutorial case presentation, mid-semester quiz and practical assessment. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Infectious diseases occur as a result of interactions between a host and a microbial parasite. This unit of study will explain how infectious agents interact with human hosts at the molecular, cellular, individual patient and community levels to cause diseases and how the hosts attempt to combat these infections. The unit will be taught by the discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology of the Department of Medicine within the Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine with involvement of associated clinical and research experts who will contribute lectures and theme sessions on their own special interests. The unit will integrate lectures with clinical case studies and hands-on practical sessions to provide students with current knowledge of infectious diseases.
Textbooks
Infectious Diseases: Pathogenesis, Prevention and Case Studies. Edited by Shetty et al. Wiley-Blackwell 2009. ISBN 9781405135436.
MICR3011 Microbes in Infection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week. Eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404] Prohibitions: MICR3911 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 2-hour exam; Practical (40%): case study: worksheet, lab work, presentation; one quiz; one 1-hour theory of prac exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The practical component is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR et al. Medical Microbiology. 8th edition. Mosby. 2016.
MICR3911 Microbes in Infection (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week including six 1-hour advanced sessions. Eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and a mark of 70 or above in (MICR2X22 or MIMI2X02)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 70 or above in BMED2404] Prohibitions: MICR3011 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1.5-hour exam (45%), one essay, one in-semester exam; Practical (40%): case study: worksheet, lab work, presentation; quiz; one 1-hour theory of prac exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Intermediate Microbiology. This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The unique aspect of this advanced unit that differentiates it from the mainstream unit is six tutorial style sessions that replace six mainstream lectures in the theme 'Emerging and re-emerging diseases'. These dedicated research-led interactive advanced sessions support self-directed learning and involve discussion around specific topics that will vary from year to year. Nominated research papers and reviews in the topic area will be explored with supported discussion of the relevance to and impact of the work on current thinking around emergence of microbial disease. The focus will be on microbial change that lies critically at the centre of understanding the reasons for the emergence of new diseases and challenges in an era of significant scientific ability to diagnose and treat infection. The practical component is identical to the mainstream unit and is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lectures. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR.et al. Medical Microbiology. 8th ed., Mosby, 2016
NEUR3003 Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Catherine Leamey and A/Prof. Kevin Keay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures plus one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: NEUR3903 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Final exam. Mid-semester exam, Major essay/report, attendance and particpation in assessment of Advanced student presentations (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences. This course is a combination of small lectures on current issues in cellular and developmental neuroscience and a research-based library project. Issues covered in the lecture series will include the role of glial on cerebral blood flow and neural transmission, neurochemistry and psychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration and the development of central and peripheral nervous systems.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3903 Cellular and Developmental Neurosci. (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A-Prof Catherine Leamey A/Prof Kevin Keay, Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab session per week. Prerequisites: Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3003 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Final exam. Mid-semester exam, Mini-lecture presentation and resources, Attendance at and participation in assessment of advanced student presentations (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3003. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3004 Integrative Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, A/Prof Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: NEUR3904 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Mid-semester exam, Final exam, 3 short in-semester assessments/reports, Tutorial participation, attendance and at participation in assessment of Advanced student presentations (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences and to be taken in conjunction with NEUR3003. This course is a combination of small group lectures on current issues in neuroscience, seminar groups and mini research projects. Examples of recent seminar topics include imaging pain, emotions, neural development and plasticity, vision, stroke and hypertension, mechanisms of neural degeneration and long-term regulation of blood pressure.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3904 Integrative Neuroscience (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, Dr Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Up to one 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial and one two hour laboratory session per week on average. Prerequisites: Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3004 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Mid-semester exam, Final exam, Major essay/report, Tutorial participation, Attendance at and participation in assessment of advanced student presentations (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit encompasses the material taught in NEUR3004. Advanced students perform a research project and present a mini-lecture on a current topic in neuroscience research.
BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3005 Functional Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, one guest leacture, 3 three-hour seminars Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3905 Assumed knowledge: [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam ( in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, 'Neuroscience in the Media' 3 team-based assessment tasks during seminars and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circuits and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal cord specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional and structural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated into the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. The Neuroscience in the Media seminars will develop neuroscience literature searching skills as well as developing critical thinking and analysis of the accuracy of the media portrayal of neuroscience research. Building on these skills and working in small groups, students will re-frame and communicate neuroscience evidence through the production of a short video. Students will also learn the skills required to write an unbiased and accurate popular media article based on a recent neuroscience research paper. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte's. The Human Brain by Todd Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
NEUR3905 Functional Neuroanatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, 8 one-hour seminars Prerequisites: Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3005 Assumed knowledge: [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam (in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, Journal Club participation, Journal Club presentation and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circutis and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal corde specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional ans tructural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated intot the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. By undertaking the advanced unit students will participate in weekly small group seminars under the guidance of a research-active academic. The seminars will take the form of a Journal Club, a style practiced widely in research laboratories around the world. The aim of the Journal Club is to develop critical thinking and detailed knowledge in a specific area of neuroscience research through group discussions. The Journal Club will also develop the skills required to lead a discussion in a small group setting as well as research and write a scholarly neuroscience review article. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte. Nolte's The Human Brain by Todd. Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
NEUR3006 Neural Information Processing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: two lectures, 1 two-hour research paper session (journal club, 8 weeks) Prerequisites: 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3906 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402 Assessment: one 2hr exam, 1500w essay, paper session oral presentation and participation marks, one prac report plus prac quizzes Practical field work: 1 x 3hour Prac (total of 5 such practical sessions) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction the mechanisms that drive neurons and neural circuits throughout the brain and body. The lectures explore how signal intensity is translated into nerve impulse codes and how this information is again translated through synapses to convey and interpret information about the external world, to control the body and to record information for future use (learning and memory). We also consider how sensory and motor information is integrated through neural circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Practical classes introduce some of the different ways in which the workings of the brain are studied. Each student chooses a journal club that focuses on a specific topic in neuroscience. In the weekly sessions, group members read, present and interpret original research papers, developing a deep understanding of the emerging scientific evidence in the topic area. This senior year unit of study will develop skills in critical analysis, interpretation and communication of new evidence.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3906 Neural Information Processing (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dario Protti Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 hour lectures per week Prerequisites: 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units and an annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3006 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402 Assessment: One 2hr exam, prac assessment consisting of one group poster presentation and two short MCQ quizzes, one advanced prac report, one written grant proposal (up to 2,000 words) and oral presentation of grant proposal. Practical field work: 1 x 3hour Prac (total of 6 such practical sessions) with the mainstream course and 3-4 x 3 hour advanced pracs. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction into the mechanisms that drive neurons and neural circuits throughout the brain and body. The lectures explore how signal intensity is translated into nerve impulse codes and how this information is again translated through synapses to convey and interpret information about the external world, to control the body and to record information for future use. We also consider how sensory and motor information is integrated through neural circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Practical classes introduce some of the different ways in which the workings of the brain are studied. This senior year unit of study will develop skills in critical analysis, interpretation and communication of new evidence.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
PCOL3022 Neuropharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jonathon Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, five 1 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to three 4 hour practicals). Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015) Prohibitions: PCOL3921 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the 2000 level pharmacology units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Each student will conduct a capstone elective project (laboratory or literature-based) in applied pharmacology supervised by academic members of the department.
Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE Holtzman, DM and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundations for Clinical Neuroscience, 3rd ed. McGraw Hill, 2015.
PCOL3922 Neuropharmacology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jonathon Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, five 1 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to three 4 hour practicals). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015)] Prohibitions: PCOL3022 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the 2000 level pharmacology units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Each student will conduct a capstone elective project (laboratory or literature-based) in applied pharmacology supervised by academic members of the department.
Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE, Holtzman, DM and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundations for Clinical Neuroscience, 3rd ed. McGraw Hill, 2015.
PHSI3009 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Cook Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr/ week lectures and 6 x 2 hr large class tutorials (CBL) per semester Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: PHSI3905 or PHSI3906 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3909 Assessment: one mid-semester exam (MCQ), one 2 hr final exam (MCQ), two presentations for challenge-based learning and 1 practical class report Practical field work: 3 x 2-4 hr practicals per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Challenge-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techniques for investigating cell signalling and the biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for a science graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3909 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Cook Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr/ week lectures and 3 x 2 hrs large class tutorials (CBL) per semester Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]} Prohibitions: PHSI3009 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3906 Assessment: one mid-semester exam (MCQ), one 2hr final exam (MCQ), one presentation for challenge-based learning and one Advanced research report Practical field work: 3 x 2-4 hr practicals per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Challenge-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techiques for investigating cell signalling and biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science a graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3010 Reproduction, Development and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Stephen Assinder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures per week; 1 guest lecture/problem-based learning class introduction/organisation session per week. 2 x 3 hour problem-based learning classes per semester. Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: PHSI3905 or PHSI3906 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3910 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 3 x 3 hr practicals per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and re-activation of developmental processes in adult disease. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3910 Reproduction, Development and Disease Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Stephen Assinder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures per week; 1 guest lecture/problem-based learning class introduction/organisation session per week; 2 x 3 hour stem cell laboratory presentations per semester. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [12cp from (BCMB2X02 or BIOL2X29 or GEGE2X01)] or [12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2406)]} Prohibitions: PHSI3010 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3905 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3906 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam,stem cell labortory class (2 presentations), 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 4 x 4 hr practicals per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal and how these may go awry leading to significant human conditions or even disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating reproductive physiology, sexual dimorphism and human pathophysiology. Students enrolling in PHSI3910 complete a separate laboratory class centered on stem cell differentiation to replace the problem-based learning exercises in PHSI3010.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3012 Physiology of Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Naylor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 12 x 1hr tutorials, 1 x 6hr practical Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406) Prohibitions: PHSI3007 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3908 or PHSI3912 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 2 practical class reports Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate normal homeostasis throughout the whole body and how defects in these processes can lead to significant human disease. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. The processes leading to cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic disease will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body level. Problem-based learning will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease and practical classes will utilise both wet lab and online resources to dissect the processes by which normal physiological processes become aberrant leading to human disease.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3912 Physiology of Disease (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Naylor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 6hr practical, advanced project attendance. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {(PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406) Prohibitions: PHSI3012 or PHSI3007 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3908 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, Advanced project report Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate normal homeostasis throughout the whole body and how defects in these processes can lead to significant human disease. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. The processes leading to cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic disease will be the specific will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body level. Students will undertake an Advanced Project Problem-based learning will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease and Practical classes will utilise both wet lab and online resources to dissect the processes by which normal physiological processes become aberrant leading to human disease.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
VIRO3001 Virology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Newsome Session: Semester 1 Classes: 26 1-hour lectures, seven 4-hour practical classes, one 2-hour tutorial Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from (BCHM2XXX or BCMB2X01 or BIOL2XXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or IMMU2101 or MICR2XXX or PCOL2X0X or PHSI2X0X)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404] Prohibitions: VIRO3901 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems Assessment: Pre-class assessment for practical classes: (5 x 1%), continuous assessment for practical classes: (3 x 2%), project assessment for practical classes: (7%), presentation on virology-themed research literature: (7%), theory of practical exam: (15%) (30 minutes), theory exam (60%) (120 minutes). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students are strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902. BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Viruses are some of the simplest biological machinery known yet they are also the etiological agents for some of the most important human diseases. New technologies that have revolutionised the discovery of viruses are also revealing a hitherto unappreciated abundance and diversity in the ecosphere, and a wider role in human health and disease. Developing new gene technologies have enabled the use of viruses as therapeutic agents, in novel vaccine approaches, gene delivery and in the treatment of cancer. This unit of study is designed to introduce students who have a basic understanding of molecular biology to the rapidly evolving field of virology. Viral infection in plant and animal cells and bacteria is covered by an examination of virus structure, genomes, gene expression and replication. Building upon these foundations, this unit progresses to examine host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, cell injury, the immune response and the prevention and control of infection and outbreaks. The structure and replication of sub-viral agents: viroids and prions, and their role in disease are also covered. The practical component provides hands-on experience in current diagnostic and research techniques such as molecular biology, cell culture, serological techniques, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses and is designed to enhance the students' practical skills and complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Tutorials cover a range of topical issues and provide a forum for students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills. The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Microbiology within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences with the involvement of the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
VIRO3901 Virology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Newsome Session: Semester 1 Classes: 29 1-hour lectures, seven 4-hour practical classes, four 1-hour tutorials Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2XXX or BCMB2X01 or BIOL2XXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or IMMU2101 or MICR2XXX or PCOL2X0X or PHSI2X0X)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 70 or above in BMED2404] Prohibitions: VIRO3001 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems Assessment: Pre-class assessment for practical classes: (5 x 1%), continuous assessment for practical classes: (3 x 2%), project assessment for practical classes: (7%), individual presentation on virology-themed research literature: (7%), theory of practical exam: (15%) (30 minutes), theory exam: (60%) (120 minutes) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students are strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902. BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Intermediate Microbiology and is based on VIRO3001 with additional lectures related to the research interests in the Discipline. Consequently, the unit of study content may change from year to year. Viruses are some of the simplest biological machinery known yet they are also the etiological agents for some of the most important human diseases. New technologies that have revolutionised the discovery of viruses are also revealing a hitherto unappreciated abundance and diversity in the ecosphere, and a wider role in human health and disease. Developing new gene technologies have enabled the use of viruses as therapeutic agents, in novle vaccine approaches, gene delivery and in the treatment of cancer. This unit of study is designed to introduce students who have a basic understanding of molecular biology to the rapidly evolving field of virology. Viral infection in plant and animal cells and bacteria is covered by an examination of virus structure, genomes, gene expression and replication. Building upon these foundations, this unit progresses to examine host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, cell injury, the immune response and the prevention and control of infection and outbreaks. The structure and replication of sub-viral agents: viroids and prions, and their role in disease are also covered. The practical component provides hands-on experience in current diagnostic and research techniques such as molecular biology, cell culture, serological techniques, immunofluroescence and immunoblot analyses and is designed to enhance the students' practical skills and complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Advanced lectures cover cutting-edge research in the field of virology in small group discussions and presentations that provide a forum for students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills. The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Microbiology within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences with the involvement of the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
VIRO3002 Medical and Applied Virology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Barry Slobedman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week Prerequisites: 6cp from (BMED2404 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or MICR2X22) Prohibitions: VIRO3902 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms and biomolecules Assessment: One 2-hour exam covering lecture material, one 2-hour theory of practical exam, written assignment and oral presentation (100%) Practical field work: One 4 hour practical session per week, in most weeks of semester. Practical session slots are also used for oral presentations. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores diseases in human caused by viruses, with focus on the way viruses infect individual patients and spread in the community, and how virus infections are diagnosed, treated and/or prevented. Host/Virus interactions will also be described with a focus on the viral mechanisms that have evolved to combat and/or evade host defence systems. These features will be used to explain the symptoms, spread and control of the most medically important viruses that cause serious disease in humans . The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School with the involvement of associated clinical and research experts who will contribute lectures on their own special interests and with contributions from the Discipline of Microbiology. In the practical classes students will have the opportunity to develop their skills in performing methods currently used in diagnostic and research laboratories such as molecular analysis of viral genomes, immunofluorescent staining of viral antigens, cell culture and the culture of viruses.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
VIRO3902 Medical and Applied Virology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Barry Slobedman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, and one interactive 2-hour tutorials (approx 6 in total, including for oral presentations) Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BMED2404 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or MICR2X22) Prohibitions: VIRO3002 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms and biomolecules Assessment: One 2-hour exam covering lecture material, one 2-hour theory of practical exam, written assignment, oral presentation and tutorial participation (100%) Practical field work: One 4 hour practical session per week, in most weeks of semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is based on the VIRO3002 course with inclusion of tutorials, including with leading research medical virologists, enabling students to gain additional experience with cutting edge virology research. The content of this unit may change from year to year based on research interests within the department.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
Interdisciplinary Project Selective
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Pauline Ross Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.