Medicinal Chemistry

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY (HONOURS)

The Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Honours) (Medicinal Chemistry) requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 4000-level Honours selective units from List 1, and
(ii) 6 credit points of 4000-level Honours selective units from List 2, and
(iii) 36 credit points of 4000-level Honours research project units

Honours Coursework Selective

List 1
CHEM4101 Chemistry Research Skills

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Brendan Kennedy Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr seminar/week for 8 weeks Prerequisites: (CHEM3X11 and CHEM3X15) or (24 cp of CHEM3XXX or (18 cp of CHEM3XXX and SCPU3001)) Assumed knowledge: Proficiency in safe chemical laboratory practices. Completion of a senior level laboratory course. Assessment: safety quiz (10%), oral presentations (5% and 15%), research proposal (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemical research involves the identification of a problem worthy of investigation, formulation of a hypothesis, the design of experiments and the communication of the outcomes of the research. This unit focuses on the preparation of a research proposal that should be distinct from your Honours project work currently being undertaken in the School of Chemistry. You will, in consultation with a member of the academic staff and the unit coordinator, develop a research proposal that provides an account of the relevant scientific literature that leads to the identification of specific research aims. The proposal will describe the methodologies needed to test your hypothesis and demonstrate the feasibility of these by reference to the existing literature and the significance of the research. You will present a short seminar based on you proposal. This unit will also introduce you to the relevant workplace health and safety requirements. By completing this unit you will be prepared to develop and initiate a chemical research project.
SOMS4101 Research Skills for Medical Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Daniel Johnstone, Michael Murray, Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr introduction to research skills lecture/seminar, 2-hr experimental design workshop, 4-hr research techniques workshop, 12 x 1-hr/week research seminars, 12-hrs of research evaluation skills workshops, 2-hr research ethics and integrity workshop Assessment: research techniques and experimental design (20%), research seminars (20%), research evaluation skills 1 (oral; 20%), research evaluation skills 2 (literature evaluation; 20%), research ethics and integrity (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Research in the medical sciences tackles the challenges to our bodies' health and wellbeing by investigating the causes of these challenges, how they manifest, and how they might be ameliorated. To successfully tackle these challenges medical science researchers need to be equipped with a toolkit of core transferable research skills. In this unit you will be challenged to identify, access, organise and critically appraise medical science literature in developing a rationale of your own individual research question. You will investigate how you will prosecute your research questions in group-based workshops that demonstrate a broad range of "types" of research questions, the nuances of your design and the appropriate biometrical approaches used to evaluate them. You will complete scenario-based workshops on research integrity and research data management that will instil professionalism in research enquiry. A number of theoretical and practical immersive workshops provided by core research facilities of the Bosch Institute will provide further understanding of current state of the art methodologies that will then be applied in the development of your research proposal. You will also be challenged with ethical dilemmas that form responsible practice in medical science research. On completing this unit you will have acquired a set of core skills that you can employ in a technical or research and development workplace.
The following unit will not run in 2020: SOMS4101.
List 2
SOMS4102 Communicating Ideas in Biomedical Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1-hr lecture/wk and 1-2hr workshop/wk for 10 weeks Assessment: weekly tweet and statement of purpose (10%), video presentation and podcast (45%), reflective essay (15%), images and story (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
In a world increasingly inundated with technology, data and pseudoscience, you, as a medical science graduate, have a very special responsibility to society. You are one of the few that can help to inform and explain difficult concepts to the broader community. The most important quality you need to develop is that of a confident communicator of and advocate for biomedical science. This cutting-edge contemporary unit will equip you with the critical thinking skills and tools to be an effective communicator of your biomedical knowledge and experience to non-experts. You will build on the many skills you have already developed in your university study and learn how to explain your 4th year project work in ways that are simple, engaging and effective. You will explore how responsible research and innovation and critical thinking underpins modern biomedical science and how modern social media techniques can facilitate information exchange. You will learn from other biomedical scientists who have successfully created media profiles. You will also learn from subject matter experts and use resources to guide your learning and practice. Your growth in this unit will be determined by the completion of assessments through which you will unpack complex ideas using contemporary communication tools. The skill to explain sophisticated concepts in simple and effective ways is key to success in every area of biomedicine. This unit will equip you with the tools to be effective communicators of biomedicine as you move into careers and post-graduate pathways.
SCIE4001 Science Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alice E Motion Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2-3 hrs/week, workshops 1-2hrs/week Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Assumed knowledge: Completion of a major in a science discipline. Basic knowledge of other sciences is beneficial. Experience in communication such as delivering oral presentations and producing written reports. An awareness of science in a societal context, e.g., of disciplinary applications. Assessment: seminar/workshop attendance and completion of 'course notebook' (10%; individual), written article communicating science topic to specific audience (25%; individual), illustrating science (sound/figure/animation/diagram etc; 15%), 3 minute presentation of science topic to specific audience (25%; individual), group report (25%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Mid-year honours students would take this unit of study in S1 (their second semester of study).
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough". This quote is widely attributed to Albert Einstein, but regardless of its provenance, it suggests that one measure of an expert's knowledge can be found in their ability to translate complex ideas so that they are accessible to anyone. The communication of science to the public is essential for science and society. In order to increase public understanding and appreciation of science, researchers must be able to explain their results, and the wider context of their research, to non-experts. This unit will explore some theoretical foundations of science communications, identify outstanding practitioners and empower students to produce effective science communication in different media. In this unit you will learn the necessary skills and techniques to tell engaging and informative science stories in order to bring complex ideas to life, for non-expert audiences. By undertaking this unit you will develop a greater understanding of the wider context of your honours unit, advance your communication skills and be able to explain your honours research to non-expert audiences such as friends, family or future employers. These transferable skills will equip you for future research - where emphasis is increasingly placed on public communication and/or outreach - or professional pathways - where effective communication of complex ideas is highly valued.
SCIE4002 Experimental Design and Data Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: 4 x 1 hr lectures/week, for six weeks, either online or face-to-face and 1 x 2 hour workshop/week for six weeks Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A. Prohibitions: ENVX3002 or STAT3X22 or STAT4022 or STAT3X12 Assumed knowledge: Completion of units in quantitative research methods, mathematics or statistical analysis at least at 1000-level. Assessment: design critique (20%), research plan (30%), analysis critique (20%), 2 x analysis quizzes (15% each) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
An indispensable attribute of an effective scientific researcher is the ability to collect, analyse and interpret data. Central to this process is the ability to create hypotheses and test these by using rigorous experimental designs. This modular unit of study will introduce the key concepts of experimental design and data analysis. Specifically, you will learn to formulate experimental aims to test a specific hypothesis. You will develop the skills and understanding required to design a rigorous scientific experiment, including an understanding of concepts such as controls, replicates, sample size, dependent and independent variables and good research practice (e. g. blinding, randomisation). By completing this unit you will develop the knowledge and skills required to appropriately analyse and interpret data in order to draw conclusions in the context of an advanced research project. From this unit of study, you will emerge with a comprehensive understanding of how to optimise the design and analysis of an experiment to most effectively answer scientific questions.
SCIE4003 Ethics in Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Hans Pols Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: part a: lecture/seminars 4hr/week for 3 weeks, in which all students participate, followed by two modules, part b (human ethics) and part c (animal ethics), from which students select one; each module comprises 8 hours of workshops over 1-2 weeks Prerequisites: 144 credit points of units of study and including a minimum of 24 credit points at the 3000- or 4000-level and 18 credit points of 3000- or 4000-level units from Science Table A Prohibitions: HSBH3004 or HPSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Successful completion of a Science major. Assessment: essay (40%), presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
In the contemporary world, a wide variety of ethical concerns impinge upon the practice of scientific research. In this unit you will learn how to identify potential ethical issues within science, acquire the tools necessary to analyse them, and develop the ability to articulate ethically sound insights about how to resolve them. In the first portion of the unit, you will be familiarised with how significant developments in post-World War II science motivated sustained ethical debate among scientists and in society. In the second portion of the unit, you will select from either a Human Ethics module or an Animal Ethics module and learn the requirements of how to ensure your research complies with appropriate national legislation and codes of conduct. By undertaking this unit you will develop the ability to conduct scientific research in an ethically justifiable way, place scientific developments and their application in a broader social context, and analyse the social implications and ethical issues that may potentially arise in the course of developing scientific knowledge.
The following unit will not run in 2020: SOMS4102.

Honours Core Research Project

MCHM4103 Medicinal Chemistry Honours Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Assessment: thesis (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will extend your undergraduate training in medicinal chemistry by undertaking a research project in an area of medicinal chemistry that interests you under the guidance and mentorship of a supervisor. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop hypotheses. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypotheses. You will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in an Honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for undertaking a PhD or for a variety of future careers.
MCHM4104 Medicinal Chemistry Honours Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: MCHM4103 Assessment: thesis (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will extend your undergraduate training in medicinal chemistry by undertaking a research project in an area of medicinal chemistry that interests you under the guidance and mentorship of a supervisor. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop hypotheses. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypotheses. You will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in an Honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for undertaking a PhD or for a variety of future careers.
MCHM4105 Medicinal Chemistry Honours Project C

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: MCHM4104 Assessment: thesis (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will extend your undergraduate training in medicinal chemistry by undertaking a research project in an area of medicinal chemistry that interests you under the guidance and mentorship of a supervisor. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop hypotheses. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypotheses. You will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in an Honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for undertaking a PhD or for a variety of future careers.
MCHM4106 Medicinal Chemistry Honours Project D

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: MCHM4105 Assessment: thesis (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will extend your undergraduate training in medicinal chemistry by undertaking a research project in an area of medicinal chemistry that interests you under the guidance and mentorship of a supervisor. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop hypotheses. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypotheses. You will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in an Honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for undertaking a PhD or for a variety of future careers.
MCHM4107 Medicinal Chemistry Honours Project E

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: MCHM4106 Assessment: thesis (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will extend your undergraduate training in medicinal chemistry by undertaking a research project in an area of medicinal chemistry that interests you under the guidance and mentorship of a supervisor. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop hypotheses. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypotheses. You will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in an Honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for undertaking a PhD or for a variety of future careers.
MCHM4108 Medicinal Chemistry Honours Project F

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: MCHM4107 Assessment: thesis (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will extend your undergraduate training in medicinal chemistry by undertaking a research project in an area of medicinal chemistry that interests you under the guidance and mentorship of a supervisor. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop hypotheses. You will then design and carry out experiments to test your hypotheses. You will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in an Honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for undertaking a PhD or for a variety of future careers.