Neuroscience

NEUROSCIENCE (HONOURS)

The Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Honours) (Neuroscience) requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 4000-level Honours coursework selective units, and
(ii) 36 credit points of 4000-level Honours research project units

Honours Coursework Selective

SOMS4101 Research Skills for Medical Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Daniel Johnstone, Michael Murray, Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr introduction to research skills lecture/seminar, 2-hr experimental design workshop, 4-hr research techniques workshop, 12 x 1-hr/week research seminars, 12-hrs of research evaluation skills workshops, 2-hr research ethics and integrity workshop Assessment: research techniques and experimental design (20%), research seminars (20%), research evaluation skills 1 (oral; 20%), research evaluation skills 2 (literature evaluation; 20%), research ethics and integrity (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Research in the medical sciences tackles the challenges to our bodies' health and wellbeing by investigating the causes of these challenges, how they manifest, and how they might be ameliorated. To successfully tackle these challenges medical science researchers need to be equipped with a toolkit of core transferable research skills. In this unit you will be challenged to identify, access, organise and critically appraise medical science literature in developing a rationale of your own individual research question. You will investigate how you will prosecute your research questions in group-based workshops that demonstrate a broad range of "types" of research questions, the nuances of your design and the appropriate biometrical approaches used to evaluate them. You will complete scenario-based workshops on research integrity and research data management that will instil professionalism in research enquiry. A number of theoretical and practical immersive workshops provided by core research facilities of the Bosch Institute will provide further understanding of current state of the art methodologies that will then be applied in the development of your research proposal. You will also be challenged with ethical dilemmas that form responsible practice in medical science research. On completing this unit you will have acquired a set of core skills that you can employ in a technical or research and development workplace.
SOMS4102 Communicating Ideas in Biomedical Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1-hr lecture/wk and 1-2hr workshop/wk for 10 weeks Assessment: weekly tweet and statement of purpose (10%), video presentation and podcast (45%), reflective essay (15%), images and story (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
In a world increasingly inundated with technology, data and pseudoscience, you, as a medical science graduate, have a very special responsibility to society. You are one of the few that can help to inform and explain difficult concepts to the broader community. The most important quality you need to develop is that of a confident communicator of and advocate for biomedical science. This cutting-edge contemporary unit will equip you with the critical thinking skills and tools to be an effective communicator of your biomedical knowledge and experience to non-experts. You will build on the many skills you have already developed in your university study and learn how to explain your 4th year project work in ways that are simple, engaging and effective. You will explore how responsible research and innovation and critical thinking underpins modern biomedical science and how modern social media techniques can facilitate information exchange. You will learn from other biomedical scientists who have successfully created media profiles. You will also learn from subject matter experts and use resources to guide your learning and practice. Your growth in this unit will be determined by the completion of assessments through which you will unpack complex ideas using contemporary communication tools. The skill to explain sophisticated concepts in simple and effective ways is key to success in every area of biomedicine. This unit will equip you with the tools to be effective communicators of biomedicine as you move into careers and post-graduate pathways.
The following unit will not run in 2020: SOMS4101, SOMS4102.

Honours Core Research Project

NEUR4103 Neuroscience Honours Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kevin Keay Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: laboratory-based project supported by the supervisor Assessment: written examination (80%), oral examination (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: All candidates must meet with the Honours coordinator before the end of semester two of the preceding year (semester one for mid-year applicants) to discuss your intentions to undertake honours in Neuroscience.
Research in the field of neuroscience aims to enhance our knowledge of the structure of the nervous system and the mechanisms that underlie its functioning in both healthy and pathological states. As such, neuroscience research encompasses investigations into: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, disorders of chronic pain, addiction, sensory information such as vision, audition, balance, somatosensation and olfaction, and the integration of these modalities. These functions can be studied using a range of approaches including: understanding the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs and neurotransmitters that affect neurons and related cells; characterising the electrophysiological properties of neurons and related cells (either isolated or within a larger network of cells); or examining the behaviour of the whole organism. Research in neuroscience thus falls across the disciplines of Anatomy and Histology, Physiology, Pharmacology and Psychology. This unit represents part of the project-based requirements to complete Honours in Neuroscience. Completion of the project aims to provide training in advanced scientific methodologies, technical skills and critical thinking skills. You will be expected to design and carry out experiments, collect and analyse data and evaluate your experimental results. The findings you obtain will be interpreted in relation to previous research done in this area and to the general field in which the work is relevant. On successful completion of the honours project you will have developed generic attributes of analytical and critical thinking, communication and laboratory research skills as well as an in-depth advanced knowledge of your chosen research topic.
NEUR4104 Neuroscience Honours Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kevin Keay Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: laboratory-based project supported by the supervisor Corequisites: NEUR4103 Assessment: written examination (80%), oral examination (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: All candidates must meet with the Honours coordinator before the end of semester two of the preceding year (semester one for mid-year applicants) to discuss your intentions to undertake honours in Neuroscience.
Research in the field of neuroscience aims to enhance our knowledge of the structure of the nervous system and the mechanisms that underlie its functioning in both healthy and pathological states. As such, neuroscience research encompasses investigations into: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, disorders of chronic pain, addiction, sensory information such as vision, audition, balance, somatosensation and olfaction, and the integration of these modalities. These functions can be studied using a range of approaches including: understanding the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs and neurotransmitters that affect neurons and related cells; characterising the electrophysiological properties of neurons and related cells (either isolated or within a larger network of cells); or examining the behaviour of the whole organism. Research in neuroscience thus falls across the disciplines of Anatomy and Histology, Physiology, Pharmacology and Psychology. This unit represents part of the project-based requirements to complete Honours in Neuroscience. Completion of the project aims to provide training in advanced scientific methodologies, technical skills and critical thinking skills. You will be expected to design and carry out experiments, collect and analyse data and evaluate your experimental results. The findings you obtain will be interpreted in relation to previous research done in this area and to the general field in which the work is relevant. On successful completion of the honours project you will have developed generic attributes of analytical and critical thinking, communication and laboratory research skills as well as an in-depth advanced knowledge of your chosen research topic.
NEUR4105 Neuroscience Honours Project C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kevin Keay Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: laboratory-based project supported by the supervisor Corequisites: NEUR4104 Assessment: written examination (80%), oral examination (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: All candidates must meet with the Honours coordinator before the end of semester two of the preceding year (semester one for mid-year applicants) to discuss your intentions to undertake honours in Neuroscience.
Research in the field of neuroscience aims to enhance our knowledge of the structure of the nervous system and the mechanisms that underlie its functioning in both healthy and pathological states. As such, neuroscience research encompasses investigations into: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, disorders of chronic pain, addiction, sensory information such as vision, audition, balance, somatosensation and olfaction, and the integration of these modalities. These functions can be studied using a range of approaches including: understanding the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs and neurotransmitters that affect neurons and related cells; characterising the electrophysiological properties of neurons and related cells (either isolated or within a larger network of cells); or examining the behaviour of the whole organism. Research in neuroscience thus falls across the disciplines of Anatomy and Histology, Physiology, Pharmacology and Psychology. This unit represents part of the project-based requirements to complete Honours in Neuroscience. Completion of the project aims to provide training in advanced scientific methodologies, technical skills and critical thinking skills. You will be expected to design and carry out experiments, collect and analyse data and evaluate your experimental results. The findings you obtain will be interpreted in relation to previous research done in this area and to the general field in which the work is relevant. On successful completion of the honours project you will have developed generic attributes of analytical and critical thinking, communication and laboratory research skills as well as an in-depth advanced knowledge of your chosen research topic.
NEUR4106 Neuroscience Honours Project D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kevin Keay Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: laboratory-based project supported by the supervisor Corequisites: NEUR4105 Assessment: written examination (80%), oral examination (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: All candidates must meet with the Honours coordinator before the end of semester two of the preceding year (semester one for mid-year applicants) to discuss your intentions to undertake honours in Neuroscience.
Research in the field of neuroscience aims to enhance our knowledge of the structure of the nervous system and the mechanisms that underlie its functioning in both healthy and pathological states. As such, neuroscience research encompasses investigations into: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, disorders of chronic pain, addiction, sensory information such as vision, audition, balance, somatosensation and olfaction, and the integration of these modalities. These functions can be studied using a range of approaches including: understanding the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs and neurotransmitters that affect neurons and related cells; characterising the electrophysiological properties of neurons and related cells (either isolated or within a larger network of cells); or examining the behaviour of the whole organism. Research in neuroscience thus falls across the disciplines of Anatomy and Histology, Physiology, Pharmacology and Psychology. This unit represents part of the project-based requirements to complete Honours in Neuroscience. Completion of the project aims to provide training in advanced scientific methodologies, technical skills and critical thinking skills. You will be expected to design and carry out experiments, collect and analyse data and evaluate your experimental results. The findings you obtain will be interpreted in relation to previous research done in this area and to the general field in which the work is relevant. On successful completion of the honours project you will have developed generic attributes of analytical and critical thinking, communication and laboratory research skills as well as an in-depth advanced knowledge of your chosen research topic.
NEUR4107 Neuroscience Honours Project E

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kevin Keay Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: laboratory-based project supported by the supervisor Corequisites: NEUR4106 Assessment: written examination (80%), oral examination (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: All candidates must meet with the Honours coordinator before the end of semester two of the preceding year (semester one for mid-year applicants) to discuss your intentions to undertake honours in Neuroscience.
Research in the field of neuroscience aims to enhance our knowledge of the structure of the nervous system and the mechanisms that underlie its functioning in both healthy and pathological states. As such, neuroscience research encompasses investigations into: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, disorders of chronic pain, addiction, sensory information such as vision, audition, balance, somatosensation and olfaction, and the integration of these modalities. These functions can be studied using a range of approaches including: understanding the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs and neurotransmitters that affect neurons and related cells; characterising the electrophysiological properties of neurons and related cells (either isolated or within a larger network of cells); or examining the behaviour of the whole organism. Research in neuroscience thus falls across the disciplines of Anatomy and Histology, Physiology, Pharmacology and Psychology. This unit represents part of the project-based requirements to complete Honours in Neuroscience. Completion of the project aims to provide training in advanced scientific methodologies, technical skills and critical thinking skills. You will be expected to design and carry out experiments, collect and analyse data and evaluate your experimental results. The findings you obtain will be interpreted in relation to previous research done in this area and to the general field in which the work is relevant. On successful completion of the honours project you will have developed generic attributes of analytical and critical thinking, communication and laboratory research skills as well as an in-depth advanced knowledge of your chosen research topic.
NEUR4108 Neuroscience Honours Project F

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kevin Keay Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: laboratory-based project supported by the supervisor Corequisites: NEUR4107 Assessment: written examination (80%), oral examination (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: All candidates must meet with the Honours coordinator before the end of semester two of the preceding year (semester one for mid-year applicants) to discuss your intentions to undertake honours in Neuroscience.
Research in the field of neuroscience aims to enhance our knowledge of the structure of the nervous system and the mechanisms that underlie its functioning in both healthy and pathological states. As such, neuroscience research encompasses investigations into: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, disorders of chronic pain, addiction, sensory information such as vision, audition, balance, somatosensation and olfaction, and the integration of these modalities. These functions can be studied using a range of approaches including: understanding the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs and neurotransmitters that affect neurons and related cells; characterising the electrophysiological properties of neurons and related cells (either isolated or within a larger network of cells); or examining the behaviour of the whole organism. Research in neuroscience thus falls across the disciplines of Anatomy and Histology, Physiology, Pharmacology and Psychology. This unit represents part of the project-based requirements to complete Honours in Neuroscience. Completion of the project aims to provide training in advanced scientific methodologies, technical skills and critical thinking skills. You will be expected to design and carry out experiments, collect and analyse data and evaluate your experimental results. The findings you obtain will be interpreted in relation to previous research done in this area and to the general field in which the work is relevant. On successful completion of the honours project you will have developed generic attributes of analytical and critical thinking, communication and laboratory research skills as well as an in-depth advanced knowledge of your chosen research topic.