Nutrition Science

Errata
Item Errata Date
1. Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
20/2/2019
2. Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
20/2/2019
3.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins  Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

11/3/2019

NUTRITION AND DIETETICS

Nutrition and Dietetics program

This program is only available to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science and Master of Nutrition and Dietetics double degree.
A program in Nutrition and Dietetics requires 72 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level program core units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level program core units
(iii) A 48 credit point major in Nutrition Science

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Program core
BIOL1008 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-3hr Lectures per week; six 3-hour practical sessions; six workshops/tutorials; students encouraged to spend 1-2 hours per week accessing online resources Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Written and oral presentation, quiz, skills-based assessment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
BIOL1908 Human Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-3hr Lectures per week; six 3-hour practical sessions; six workshops/tutorials; students encouraged to spend 1-2 hours per week accessing online resources Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Written and oral presentation, quiz, skills-based assessment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in the human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in alternative components which may for example include guest lecturers from medical science industries. The nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
BIOL1998 Human Biology (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalyn Gloag Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1908; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1996 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901 or BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical report (25%), practical presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), pre laboratory quizzes (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What will it mean to be human in 2100? How will we be able to control our complex bodily mechanisms to maintain health and fight disease? Advances in human biology suggest we will age more slowly and new technologies will enhance many bodily structures and functions. This unit of study will explore maintenance of health through nutritional balance, aerobic health, defence mechanisms and human diversity. You will learn key structural features from the subcellular level to the whole organ and body, and learn about essential functional pathways that determine how the body regulates its internal environment and responds to external stimuli and disease. Together we will investigate nutrition, digestion and absorption, cardiovascular and lung function, reproduction, development, epigenetics, and regulation of function through various interventions. You will receive lectures from experts in the field of human biology and medical sciences, supported by practical classes, workshops and on-line resources that leverage off state-of-the-art technologies to develop your practical, critical thinking, communication, collaboration, digital literacy, problem solving, and enquiry-based skills in human biology. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth and depth of knowledge and skills for further studies in majors in medical sciences. The practical work syllabus consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (*) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.
CHEM1012 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1112 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x3-hr lecture; 1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviours, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do we develop lotions that don't burn us, how do we measure UV absorption by sunscreens, how can we measure and alter soil pH, how are sticky things made, and how do we determine the concentration of vitamin C in juice? Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1912 Chemistry 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101) or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Advanced units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B (Advanced) is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A (Advanced). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1992 Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prerequisites: 75 or above in CHEM1991 or CHEM1903 or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 Assessment: quizzes, assignment, skills-based assessment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Entry is by invitation. This unit of study is deemed to be an Advanced unit of study. Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Special Studies Program units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how food and medicines work, the properties of materials and substances. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as a demonstrated aptitude. Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is restricted to students who have gained a Distinction in Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) or by invitation. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1B and Chemistry 1B (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1B (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)

2000-level units of study

Program core
PHSI2007 Key Concepts in Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: 6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903] Prohibitions: PHSI2907 or BMED2402 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Written and other tasks: Integrated Science project task (10%) , Laboratory report writing (25%), How Physiology Works (15%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating from the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organ systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning, you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
PHSI2907 Key Concepts in Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2007 or BMED2402 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Video submission of cell communication (25%), Laboratory report writing (25%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will explore these concepts in four modules: compartmentalisation, cell specialisation, communication between cells and responding to the environment. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organs systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Furthermore, specialised activities in physiological research will allow small group learning and interaction with staff. Workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
PHSI2008 Integrated Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bronwyn McAllan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2908 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)] Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Written and other tasks (10%), Laboratory report writing (25%), How Physiology Works (15%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The study of physiology is in essence the understanding of the integration of function and homeostasis. In this unit you will extend your learning in MEDS2001/PHSI2X07, applying your understanding of basic physiology to systems-based scenarios in three modules: muscle, sensory and disease complications. This will consolidate your conceptual understanding of physiology and how the homeostatic mechanisms change in disease. The final module on disease will consolidate your understanding by demonstrating how body systems do not act in isolation, but rather how changes in their interdependence lead to homeostatic dysregulation and pathological outcomes. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, your understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the complex systems that regulate the human body and provide the platform for undertaking a major in Physiology in third year.
PHSI2908 Integrated Physiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Thorn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in {6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2008 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)] Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exams (30%), Written and other tasks (25%), Laboratory report writing (25%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The study of physiology is in essence the understanding of the integration of function and homeostasis. In this unit you will extend your learning in MEDS2001/PHSI2X07 by applying your understanding of basic physiology to systems-based scenarios in three modules: muscle, sensory and disease complications. This will consolidate your conceptual understanding of physiology and how the homeostatic mechanisms change in disease. The final module on disease will consolidate your understanding by demonstrating how body systems do not act isolation, but rather how changes in their interdependence lead to homeostatic dysregulation and pathological outcomes. This unit of study will extend the PHSI2008 unit. Activities will focus on current research in the area of physiology, including examples of its relevance to disease. Students will engage with active researchers and explore the role of physiology in multidisciplinary approaches to understanding body function. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, your understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work and provide an opportunity for students to apply and extend their understanding of physiological concepts. Completion of this unit will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the complex systems that regulate the human body and provide the platform for undertaking a major in Physiology in third year.