Taronga Wildlife Conservation

Unit outlines will be available though Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

TARONGA WILDLIFE CONSERVATION

Advanced coursework and projects will be available in 2021 for students who complete this stream.

Taronga Wildlife Conservation stream

The Taronga Wildlife Conservation stream is 108 credit points, consisting of:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level stream core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level stream core units
(iii) A 96 credit point program in Taronga Wildlife Conservation

Taronga Wildlife Conservation program

This program is only available to students enrolled in Taronga Wildlife Conservation stream.
A program in Taronga Wildlife Conservation requires 96 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level program core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level program core units
(iii) 12 credit points of 4000-level program core units
(iv) 24 credits points of 4000-level project units or 24 credit points of Honours units
(v) 48 credit point Wildlife Conservation major

Wildlife Conservation major

This major is only available to students enrolled in Taronga Wildlife Conservation Stream
A major in Wildlife Conservation requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii)18 credit points of 3000-level major core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project units

Wildlife Conservation minor

A minor in Wildlife Conservation requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 12 credit points of 3000 level core units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Stream core
ENVX1002 Introduction to Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours per week of lectures; 2 hours per week of computer tutorials Prohibitions: ENVX1001 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or MATH1115 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 or BUSS1020 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, and Food and Agribusiness, and Taronga Wildlife Conservation streams
This is an introductory data science unit for students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It provides the foundation for statistics and data science skills that are needed for a career in science and for further study in applied statistics and data science. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. It has 4 modules; exploring data, modelling data, sampling data and making decisions with data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, ENVX1002 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data.
Textbooks
Statistics, Fourth Edition, Freedman Pisani Purves
Program core
AVBS1003 Animals and Us

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brandon Velie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical Assessment: Assignments, presentation, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Lectures and practicals for this unit of study take place on the University of Sydney Camperdown campus as well as at Taronga Zoo in the Institute of Science and Learning.
We live in a world surrounded by and dependent on animals. Australia has one of the highest rates of animal ownership in the world: dogs, cats, rabbits, birds and reptiles being common. In this unit, you explore animals in society (including companion, pocket and pet, wildlife and zoo animals). You will investigate relationships between humans and animals and normal function of animals including development, disease, aging and death. This unit will describe how human and animal health are related, outline legislation and policies on the care and use of animals, cover topical issues in animal welfare and ethics, provide opportunities for students to observe animal behaviours and discuss how cultural backgrounds influence our relationships with animals. You will visit captive and clinical animal facilities where animals are displayed for conservation, curiosity, aesthetics and research. Practicals and workshops will provide students with skills in critical thinking, communication, information/digital literacy and an evidence informed basis on which to make decisions. This unit is for students who are interested in a professional career working with animals, such as those in the AVBS stream and BVB/DVM program or who generally seek an understanding of how animals enrich our lives.
Textbooks
Animals and Us Unit of Study Guide
Core
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 2 field excursions. Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 2 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; 3 field excursions Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (25%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, 3 field excursions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in an authentic urban biodiversity management research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes (15%), communication assessments (35%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: quizzes (14%), communication assessments (36%), proficiency assessment (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-3 lectures per week; online material; and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS

2000-level units of study

Stream core
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 3-hour computer practical per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 or MATH1015 or DATA1001 or DATA1901)] OR [3cp from (MATH1XX1 or MATH1906 or MATH1XX3 or MATH1907) and an additional 3cp from (MATH1XX5)] Assessment: final exam (55%), reports (2 x 10%), ten online quizzes (5% total), group work presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Available as a degree core unit only in the Agriculture, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience, Food and Agribusiness and Taronga Wildlife Conservation streams
This unit builds on introductory 1st year statistics units and is targeted towards students in the agricultural, life and environmental sciences. It consists of two parts and presents, in an applied manner, the statistical methods that students need to know for further study and their future careers. In the first part the focus is on designed studies including both surveys and formal experimental designs. Students will learn how to analyse and interpret datasets collected from designs from more than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part the focus is on finding patterns in data. In this part the students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression, and find patterns in datasets with many variables using principal components analysis and clustering. This part provides the foundation for the analysis of big data. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the statistical software package R. A key feature of the unit is using R to develop coding skills that are become essential in science for processing and analysing datasets of ever increasing size.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are: Mead R, Curnow RN, Hasted AM (2002) 'Statistical methods in agriculture and experimental biology.' (Chapman and Hall: Boca Raton). Quinn GP, Keough MJ (2002) 'Experimental design and data analysis for biologists.' (Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK).
Program core
BIOL2032 Australian Wildlife Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catherine Herbert Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures; one 2-hour tutorial or practical session each week Prohibitions: ANSC2005 Assessment: Quizzes, presentation assignment, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australia is home to a broad diversity of vertebrate wildlife species, many of which are unique to the Australian environment, having evolved in isolation from other large land-masses for millions of years. This unit examines the diversity of Australian reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals (including all three mammalian lineages; monotremes, marsupials and eutherian mammals). We focus on the unique anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have enabled our wildlife to survive and thrive within varied Australian ecosystems. We also examine how the uniqueness of our wildlife is also one of its greatest challenges, being naive to the new threats that are present in our rapidly changing environments. At the end of this unit you should have an appreciation of the diversity and uniqueness of Australian wildlife; be able to determine the links between form and function in wildlife and understand the significance of these functional adaptations in relation to ecological challenges. You will also have an understanding of the interactions between humans and wildlife, and how the unique characteristics of our wildlife also make them vulnerable to threats within the rapidly changing Australian environment. Students will also develop enhanced scientific literacy and communication skills through tutorial activities and assessment tasks.
Textbooks
No text book requirements. Recommended reading throughout semester provided by each lecture relevant to their class content. Relevant scientific papers will be uploaded to LMS
Core
BIOL2024 Ecology and Conservation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL2924 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the ecological principles driving the major ecosystems of the world and ecological processes behind the world's major conservation issues. It aims to develop in students the core foundations for an understanding of Ecology and its application in conservation. Lectures will focus on the ecology of the major terrestrial and marine biomes of the world. Application of ecological theory and methods to practical conservation problems will be integrated throughout the unit of study. Practical sessions will provide hands-on experience in ecological sampling and data handling to understand the ecology of marine and terrestrial environments, as well as ecological simulations to understand processes. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 4th edition (2014). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
BIOL2924 Ecology and Conservation (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An annual average mark of at least 70 in the previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2024 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content of BIOL2924 will be based on BIOL2024 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 4th edition (2014). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
BIOL2022 Biology Experimental Design and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1XX5) Prohibitions: BIOL2922 or BIOL3006 or BIOL3906 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides foundational skills essential for doing research in biology and for critically judging the research of others. We consider how biology is practiced as a quantitative, experimental and theoretical science. We focus on the underlying principles and practical skills you need to explore questions and test hypotheses, particularly where background variation (error) is inherently high. In so doing, the unit provides you with an understanding of how biological research is designed, analysed and interpreted using statistics. Lectures focus on sound experimental and statistical principles, using examples in ecology and other fields of biology to demonstrate concepts. In the practical sessions, you will design and perform, analyse (using appropriate statistical tools) and interpret your own experiments to answer research questions in topics relevant to your particular interest. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2016. Experimental design for the life sciences. 4th Ed. Oxford University Press
BIOL2922 Biol Experimental Design and Analysis Adv

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [An annual average mark of at least 70 in the previous year] and [6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1XX5)] Prohibitions: BIOL2022 or BIOL3006 or BIOL3906 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content of BIOL2922 will be based on BIOL2022 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Required: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2016. Experimental design for the life sciences. 4th Ed. Oxford

3000-level units of study

Major core
AVBS3004 Wildlife Conservation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: a mixture of lectures, practicals and tutorials for up to 6 hours per week, plus up to 2 days on field activities Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (AVBS2XXX or BIOL2XXX or GEGE2X01 or QBIO2XXX) Prohibitions: AVBS3003 or AVBS4003 Assessment: participation in tutorials and practicals - quiz and presentation (25%), group project - written report and oral presentation (20%), written assignment (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Day field trips may be included . Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
With multiple pressures on earth's biodiversity, the field of Wildlife Conservation is increasing in importance, empowering decision makers to understand and protect wildlife and the ecosystems which support them. This unit of study explores the techniques and methods for undertaking conservation research, including population genetics and forensic analysis of eDNA, the complexity introduced when considering multiple stakeholders, and the use of the scientific method to inform wildlife conservation issues. You will investigate biodiversity surveys, species identification, forensics, phylogeography, population genetics and genetic management applied to wildlife conservation, and the socio-political and cultural issues which influence stakeholders. You will analyse current issues within wildlife conservation and articulate and acknowledge a variety of stakeholder views including Indigenous Australian perspectives, both orally and in written form. You will understand the processes involved in formulating an evidence-based management approach to contentious wildlife conservation issues, and how the scientific method can be leveraged to build a compelling conservation management plan.
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
Textbooks
Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3907 Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, weekly tutorial and 3-hour practical per week Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3007 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, presentations, one essay, one project report (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3007 Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be encouraged to pursue the objectives by more independent means in a series of research tutorials. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester 2. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
Textbooks
As for BIOL3007
WILD3001 Taronga Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Camilla Whittington Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture/tutorial 1 hr/week, structured practical/project work 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (BIOL2X22 or BIOL2X24 or BIOL2032 or ENVX2001 or GEGE2X01) Assessment: project proposal (5%), written assignment (10%), group project schedule (10%), group project report (25%), group oral presentation (10%), final exam (40% ) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit will be taught at Taronga Zoo, Mosman.
Evidence-based decision making is at the heart of wildlife conservation. The application of evidence helps to support and inform management and helps answer questions such as 'what are our conservation goals', 'what action will be effective', 'can we create greater impacts for conservation' and 'where should our valuable resources be allocated'. The ability to undertake evidence-based decision making is a crucial skill not only in wildlife conservation but in many careers. This unit presents the opportunity to undertake a project bringing together concepts and skills you have learnt in your discipline and apply them to a real-world problem. For example, you may participate in a wildlife conservation project that will address threats to a species or habitat through the analysis of a range of information (such as peer-reviewed publications, expert assessments, Indigenous knowledge) before assessing the effectiveness of any current management plans. You may address questions such as 'how do species adapt in an urban environment', or 'how have biosecurity systems contributed to maintaining Australia's biodiversity'. In this unit you will continue to understand and explore disciplinary knowledge. You will collaborate with other students from the Taronga Wildlife Conservation degree stream gaining skills in identifying and solving problems, collecting and analysing data and communicating findings to diverse audiences. This unit will also foster your ability to be an independent learner and work effectively in group contexts. All of these skills are highly valued by employers.
Interdisciplinary project
WILD3888 Taronga Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Camilla Whittington Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture/tutorial 1 hr/week, structured practical/project work 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: ENVX2001 and BIOL2032 and 12 credit points from (BIOL2X22 or BIOL2X24 or GEGE2X01)] Assessment: project proposal (individual; 5%), project abstract (group; 10%), individual reflection (10%), project report (group; 25%), project presentation (group; 10%), final exam (40% ) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit will be taught at Taronga Zoo, Mosman.
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. The ability to identify and explore interdisciplinary links is a crucial skill for emerging conservation professionals and researchers alike. Conservation scientists need to consider and address the social and economic constraints in the environments within which their activities take place, to ensure successful implementation. This unit presents the opportunity to bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt in your discipline and apply them to a real-world problem. For example, you will participate in a wildlife conservation project that will traverse biological, ethical, sociological and Indigenous studies, and apply your understanding of conservation concepts to problems that are big challenges for the 21st Century. In this unit you will continue to understand and explore interdisciplinary knowledge, while also meeting and collaborating with students from the Taronga Wildlife Conservation degree stream and from across the University through project-based learning; identifying and solving problems, collecting and analysing data and communicating your findings to diverse audiences. This unit will also foster the ability to work with and in disciplinary teams, essential for both professional and research pathways. All of these skills are highly valued by employers.
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Pauline Ross Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of a team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.
Minor Core
AVBS3004 Wildlife Conservation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: a mixture of lectures, practicals and tutorials for up to 6 hours per week, plus up to 2 days on field activities Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (AVBS2XXX or BIOL2XXX or GEGE2X01 or QBIO2XXX) Prohibitions: AVBS3003 or AVBS4003 Assessment: participation in tutorials and practicals - quiz and presentation (25%), group project - written report and oral presentation (20%), written assignment (15%), final exam (40%) Practical field work: Day field trips may be included . Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
With multiple pressures on earth's biodiversity, the field of Wildlife Conservation is increasing in importance, empowering decision makers to understand and protect wildlife and the ecosystems which support them. This unit of study explores the techniques and methods for undertaking conservation research, including population genetics and forensic analysis of eDNA, the complexity introduced when considering multiple stakeholders, and the use of the scientific method to inform wildlife conservation issues. You will investigate biodiversity surveys, species identification, forensics, phylogeography, population genetics and genetic management applied to wildlife conservation, and the socio-political and cultural issues which influence stakeholders. You will analyse current issues within wildlife conservation and articulate and acknowledge a variety of stakeholder views including Indigenous Australian perspectives, both orally and in written form. You will understand the processes involved in formulating an evidence-based management approach to contentious wildlife conservation issues, and how the scientific method can be leveraged to build a compelling conservation management plan.
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
Textbooks
Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3907 Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, weekly tutorial and 3-hour practical per week Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3007 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, presentations, one essay, one project report (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3007 Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be encouraged to pursue the objectives by more independent means in a series of research tutorials. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester 2. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
Textbooks
As for BIOL3007

4000-level units of study

Program core
WILD400X to be developed for offering in 2021
Program project
WILD400X to be developed for offering in 2021
Honours
WILD4103 Taronga Conservation Honours Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Prohibitions: WILD4003 or WILD4004 or WILD4005 or WILD4006 Assessment: thesis 100% Practical field work: Honours projects may involve fieldwork, arrangements will differ between students and will be tailored to specific research topics. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will complete a research project in the discipline of Wildlife Conservation. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop a hypothesis. You will then design and carry out research to test your hypothesis. In terms of assessment, you will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in a 20, 000 word honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for either undertaking a PhD or any variety of future careers.
WILD4104 Taronga Conservation Honours Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: WILD4103 Prohibitions: WILD4003 or WILD4004 or WILD4005 or WILD4006 Assessment: thesis 100% Practical field work: Honours projects may involve fieldwork, arrangements will differ between students and will be tailored to specific research topics. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will complete a research project in the discipline of Wildlife Conservation. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop a hypothesis. You will then design and carry out research to test your hypothesis. In terms of assessment, you will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in a 20, 000 word honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for either undertaking a PhD or any variety of future careers.
WILD4105 Taronga Conservation Honours Project C

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: WILD4104 Prohibitions: WILD4003 or WILD4004 or WILD4005 or WILD4006 Assessment: thesis 100% Practical field work: Honours projects may involve fieldwork, arrangements will differ between students and will be tailored to specific research topics. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will complete a research project in the discipline of Wildlife Conservation. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop a hypothesis. You will then design and carry out research to test your hypothesis. In terms of assessment, you will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in a 20, 000 word honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for either undertaking a PhD or any variety of future careers.
WILD4106 Taronga Conservation Honours Project D

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: individual work supported by the supervisor Corequisites: WILD4105 Prohibitions: WILD4003 or WILD4004 or WILD4005 or WILD4006 Assessment: thesis 100% Practical field work: Honours projects may involve fieldwork, arrangements will differ between students and will be tailored to specific research topics. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Independent research can be a life changing experience. In this unit you will complete a research project in the discipline of Wildlife Conservation. Together with your supervisor, you will identify a novel research question and develop a hypothesis. You will then design and carry out research to test your hypothesis. In terms of assessment, you will communicate the research plan and findings through written tasks and oral presentations culminating in a 20, 000 word honours thesis. Successful completion of your Honours will clearly demonstrate that you have mastered significant research and professional skills for either undertaking a PhD or any variety of future careers.