Table 1: Biochemistry

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Biochemistry

For a major in Biochemistry, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area.
Junior units of study
BIOL1006
Life and Evolution
6    A HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February).
N BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996
Semester 1
BIOL1906
Life and Evolution (Advanced)
6    A 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent.
N BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
BIOL1996
Life and Evolution (SSP)
6    A 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent
N BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
BIOL1007
From Molecules to Ecosystems
6    A HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February).
N BIOL1907 or BIOL1997
Semester 2
BIOL1907
From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)
6    A 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent
N BIOL1007 or BIOL1997

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
BIOL1997
From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)
6    A 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent
N BIOL1007 or BIOL1907

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
Intermediate units of study
BCMB2001
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
6    P 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003
Semester 1
BCMB2901
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Advanced)
6    P A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or MEDS2003
Semester 1
BCMB2002
Proteins in Cells
6    P 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2902
Semester 2
BCMB2902
Proteins in Cells (Advanced)
6    P A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2002
Semester 2
Senior units of study
BCHM3071
Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes
6    P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3971


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
BCHM3971
Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3071


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
BCHM3081
Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins
6    P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3981


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
BCHM3981
Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3081


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
BCHM3072
Human Molecular Cell Biology
6    P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3972


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
BCHM3972
Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3072


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
BCHM3082
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry
6    P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3982


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
BCHM3982
Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3082
Semester 2
BCHM3092
Proteomics and Functional Genomics
6    P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3992


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
BCHM3992
Proteomics and Functional Genomics (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 or above in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3092


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
NUTM3001
Introductory Nutrition and Metabolism
6    A PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06
P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1

Biochemistry

For a major in Biochemistry, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area.
Junior units of study
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), project report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in a research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Practical field work: As advised and required by the project; approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
Intermediate units of study
BCMB2001 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quizzes, exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. Our practicals, along with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to widely applied and cutting edge tools that are essential for modern biochemistry and molecular biology. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the life and medical sciences.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
BCMB2901 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures per week; one 4-hour practical and one 1-hour tutorial session per fortnight Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 or MEDS2003 Assessment: Assignments, quiz, skills-based assessment, exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. The advanced laboratory component will provide students with an authentic research laboratory experience while in the theory component, current research topics will be presented in a problem-based format through dedicated advanced tutorial sessions. This material will be assessed by creative student-centered activities supported by eLearning platforms.
Textbooks
Stryer Biochemistry 8th Edition ISBN-13:978-1-4641-2610-9
BCMB2002 Proteins in Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2902 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quiz, final exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. Our practicals, other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for protein biochemistry ranging from protein visualization, quantification, purification and enzymatic activity, to in silico studies and cellular targeting experiments. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the cellular and molecular biosciences.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
BCMB2902 Proteins in Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2002 Assessment: Assignment, skills-based assessment, quiz, exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. There will be a research-focused approach to the advanced practical component, including real and virtual extensions to key experiments. This approach will continue in the lecture series with several unique advanced lectures covering current research topics. You will further investigate a selected area of interest from these topics using original source material and present your findings through an oral presentation in dedicated advanced tutorials.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
Senior units of study
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester practical work and assignments (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochem-Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Yeo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes XI. 11th edition. Jones and Bartlett. 2014.
BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3981 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochem-Proteins (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jacqui Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3081 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the functions of proteins in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. Its lecture component deals with how proteins adopt their biologically active forms, including discussions of protein structure, protein folding and how recombinant DNA technology can be used to design novel proteins with potential medical or biotechnology applications. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of proteins. It also covers physiologically and medically important aspects of proteins in living systems, including the roles of chaperones in protein folding inside cells, the pathological consequences of misfolding of proteins, how proteins are sorted to different cellular compartments and how the biological activities of proteins can be controlled by regulated protein degradation. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology and protein biochemistry laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3081. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in protein biochemistry will be covered.
Textbooks
Williamson M. How Proteins Work. Garland. 2012.
BCHM3072 Human Molecular Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3972 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Markus Hofer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3072 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3072. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in modern molecular cell biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 6th edition. Garland Science. 2014.
BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3982 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with molecular biology methods and studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry.
BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; two 3-hours practicals per fortnight Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3082 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 65%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will explore the biochemical processes involved in the operation of cells and how they are integrated in tissues and in the whole human body in normal and diseased states. These concepts will be illustrated by considering whole-body aspects of energy utilisation, fat and glycogen storage and their regulation under normal conditions compared to obesity and diabetes. Key concepts that will be discussed include energy balance, regulation of metabolic rate, control of food intake, tissue interactions in fuel selection, the role of adipose tissue and transport of fuel molecules from storage organs and into cells. Particular emphasis will be placed on how the modern concepts of metabolomics, coupled with new methods, including magnetic resonance techniques and molecular biology methods, as well as studies of the structure and function of enzymes, have led to our current understanding of how metabolic processes are normally integrated and how they become deranged in disease states. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern medical and metabolic biochemistry. Qualified students will attend some lectures/practical classes in common with BCHM3082 and some separate lectures/ practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in metabolic biochemistry will be covered.
BCHM3092 Proteomics and Functional Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3992 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will focus on the high throughput methods for the analysis of gene structure and function (genomics) and the analysis of proteins (proteomics), which are at the forefront of discovery in the biomedical sciences. The course will concentrate on the hierarchy of gene-protein-structure-function through an examination of modern technologies built on the concepts of genomics versus molecular biology, and proteomics versus biochemistry. Technologies to be examined include DNA sequencing, nucleic acid and protein microarrays, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, uses of mass spectrometry for high throughput protein identification, isotope tagging for quantitative proteomics, high-performance liquid chromatography, high-throughput functional assays, affinity chromatography and modern methods for database analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these technologies can provide insight into the molecular basis of changes in cellular function under both physiological and pathological conditions as well as how they can be applied to biotechnology for the discovery of biomarkers, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in proteomics and genomics.
BCHM3992 Proteomics and Functional Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3092 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will focus on the high throughput methods for the analysis of gene structure and function (genomics) and the analysis of proteins (proteomics) which are at the forefront of discovery in the biomedical sciences. The course will concentrate on the hierarchy of gene-protein-structure-function through an examination of modern technologies built on the concepts of genomics versus molecular biology, and proteomics versus biochemistry. Technologies to be examined include DNA sequencing, nucleic acid and protein microarrays, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, uses of mass spectrometry for high throughput protein identification, isotope tagging for quantitative proteomics, high-performance liquid chromatography, high-throughput functional assays, affinity chromatography and modern methods for database analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these technologies can provide insight into the molecular basis of changes in cellular function under both physiological and pathological conditions as well as how they can be applied to biotechnology for the discovery of biomarkers, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in proteomics and genomics.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3092. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in proteomics and genomics will be covered.
NUTM3001 Introductory Nutrition and Metabolism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Wendy Stuart-Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures, one tutorial per week, 1-5hour laboratory/presentation class most weeks Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Assumed knowledge: PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06 Assessment: In semester reports, presentations and quizzes (40%) one 2.5-hour exam (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Nutrition is a multidisciplinary science that covers the role of food in health and disease. Advances in biomolecular science have increased the focus of nutrition on the metabolic pathways that transform nutrients. This unit of study aims to explore fundamentals in nutritional science to develop an understanding of the core concepts in human nutrition through exploring the role of macro- and micro-nutrients and their interaction across the lifespan, mostly in the healthy individual. The focus will be the biochemical reactions that take place in cells, how these are influenced by different nutrients and what are the implications for the whole body. This unit of study will consider the structure and chemical characteristics of nutrients, their metabolism, and their roles in health and disease. This unit of study will explore how animal models, cell culture techniques and human trials have contributed to advancing nutritional science. Examples from current research will be used to illustrate how nutrients are metabolised, mostly in health, and the expanding scope of research in human nutrition.
Textbooks
Essentials of Human Nutrition 4th Edition, 2012. Edited by Jim Mann and A. Stewart Truswell. Oxford University Press. ISBN: 9780199566341*