Table 1: Bioinformatics

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Bioinformatics major requirement (ii) has changed. It now reads:

(ii) At least one of STAT3022/3922 and STAT3888/3914; and

19/2/2019
2.

Prerequisites have changed for the following units. They now read:

BCHM3092 Proteomics and Functional Genomics Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]

BCHM3992 Proteomics and Functional Genomics (Adv) Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or MEDS2003 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
20/2/2019
3.

Prerequisites have changed for the following unit. They now read:

BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MEDS2003)

BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv) Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX or MEDS2003)]

20/2/2019

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Bioinformatics

For a major in Bioinformatics, students must complete a minimum of 24 credit points from senior units of study in the Life Sciences, Statistics, and Information Technologies, including:-
(i) At least one of BIOL3018/3918, BIOL3026/3926, BIOL3044/3944, BCHM3092/3992; and
(ii) At least one of STAT3012/3912 and STAT3014/3914; and
(iii) Either COMP3520 or (by departmental permission INFO3911 or INFO3912); and
(iv) BINF3101
Bioinformatics major (A) units of study
BIOL3018
Gene Technology and Genomics
6    P (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX)
N BIOL3918
Semester 1
BIOL3918
Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv)
6    P An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX)]
N BIOL3018
Semester 1
BIOL3026
Developmental Genetics
6    P (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX)
N BIOL3926
Semester 2
BIOL3926
Developmental Genetics (Advanced)
6    P An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX)]
N BIOL3929 or BIOL3026
Semester 2
BIOL3044
Evolution and Biodiversity

This unit of study is not available in 2019

6    P [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N BIOL3944 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 or PLNT3003 or PLNT3903
Semester 1
BIOL3944
Evolution and Biodiversity (Advanced)
6    P An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N BIOL3044 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 or PLNT3003 or PLNT3903
Semester 1
BCHM3092
Proteomics and Functional Genomics
6    P [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3992


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
BCHM3992
Proteomics and Functional Genomics (Adv)
6    P [An average mark of 75 or above in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)]
N BCHM3092


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
Bioinformatics major (B) units of study
STAT3022
Applied Linear Models
6    P STAT2X11 and (DATA2X02 or STAT2X12)
N STAT3912 or STAT3012 or STAT3922
Semester 1
STAT3922
Applied Linear Models (Advanced)
6    P STAT2X11 and [a mark of 65 or greater in (STAT2X12 or DATA2X02)]
N STAT3912 or STAT3012 or STAT3022
Semester 1
STAT3888
Statistical Machine Learning
6    A STAT3012 or STAT3912 or STAT3022 or STAT3922
P STAT2X11 and (DATA2X02 or STAT2X12)
N STAT3914 or STAT3014
Semester 2
STAT3914
Applied Statistics Advanced
6    A STAT3012 or STAT3912 or STAT3022 or STAT3922
P STAT2912 or (a mark of 65 or above in STAT2012 or DATA2002)
N STAT3014 or STAT3907 or STAT3902 or STAT3006 or STAT3002
Semester 2
Bioinformatics major (C) unit of study
COMP3520
Operating Systems Internals
6    P (COMP2017 OR COMP2129) AND (COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905)
Semester 2
INFO3911
IT Special Project 3A
6    P [85% average in IT units of study in previous year] AND [Permission from the School of IT]

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Enrolment by department permission for students with 85% average in School of IT units plus minimum 75% average in other units
Semester 1
INFO3912
IT Special Project 3B
6    P [85% average in IT units of study in previous year] AND [Permission from the School of IT]

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Enrolment by department permission for students with 85% average in School of IT units plus minimum 75% average in other units
Semester 2
Bioinformatics major (D) unit of study
BINF3101
Bioinformatics Project
6    A INFO2110 and (INFO1103 or INFO1903)
P 12cp from (BIOL2XXX or MBLG2XXX or BCMB2XXX or GEGE2XXX or BCHM2XXX or MICR2XXX or PCOL2XXX or QBIO2XXX or ENVX2XXX or DATA2002 or GENE2002)
N COMP3206 or BINF3001 or INFO3600 or SOFT3300 or SOFT3600 or SOFT3200 or SOFT3700
Semester 2

Bioinformatics

For a major in Bioinformatics, students must complete a minimum of 24 credit points from senior units of study in the Life Sciences, Statistics, and Information Technologies, including:-
(i) At least one of BIOL3018/3918, BIOL3026/3926, BIOL3044/3944, BCHM3092/3992; and
(ii) At least one of STAT3012/3912 and STAT3014/3914; and
(iii) Either COMP3520 or (by departmental permission INFO3911 or INFO3912); and
(iv) BINF3101
Bioinformatics major (A) units of study
BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the regulation, impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, and the genetic engineering of animals and plants. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.
BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Mary Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX or BIOL2XXX)] Prohibitions: BIOL3018 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24 1-hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3926 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Developmental genetics discusses major concepts and our current understanding of developmental biology with an emphasis on molecular genetics. The developmental genetics of animal and plant systems will be investigated, along with approaches used to determine gene function in relation to development of complex multicellular organisms. Topics include the features and resources for model organisms; the generation of mutants for forward and reverse genetics; the application of mutants to the study gene function and gene networks; spatial and temporal gene expression in pattern formation; quantitative trait loci analysis; utility of genome wide association studies; epigenetics in relation to inheritance; genome information in the study of human genetics. Reference will be made to the use of modern techniques in developmental biology such as transgenics, recombinant DNA technology, tissue-specific expression analysis. Various methods of genetic mapping will be covered. Practical work complements the theoretical aspects of the course and develops important skills in genetics.
BIOL3926 Developmental Genetics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24 1-hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX)] Prohibitions: BIOL3929 or BIOL3026 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components to BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year. Some assessment will be in an alternative format to components of BIOL3026.
BIOL3044 Evolution and Biodiversity

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ben Oldroyd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3944 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 or PLNT3003 or PLNT3903 Assessment: Practical reports and/or presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How did the diversity of life arise? Why are there so many species? Why do animals and plants seem so well designed for their environments? How do we explain patterns of distribution across continents? These are some of the key questions that we will examine in this Unit. The Unit begins with a survey of the history of evolutionary thought, and the so-called 'new synthesis'; the melding of Darwinian evolution, systematics and genetics. The Unit will provide training in the principles, methods, and applications of evolutionary biology including systems of classification, the genetics of speciation and hybrid zones, molecular evolution, reconstruction of phylogenies, population genetics, historical interpretation of geographic distributions, evolution of sex, adaptation, human evolution, and selfish gene theory. Examples from a broad range of organisms and data sources will be used throughout the Unit. This Unit is valuable for students who intend to seek employment in areas such as biodiversity research, bioinformatics, ecology, taxonomy, biological conservation and teaching.
Textbooks
Freeman and Herron (2011) Evolutionary Analysis, Pearson/Prentice Hall
BIOL3944 Evolution and Biodiversity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ben Oldroyd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3044 or BIOL3025 or BIOL3925 or PLNT3003 or PLNT3903 Assessment: Practical reports and/or presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content will be based on the standard unit BIOL3044 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. How did the diversity of life arise? Why are there so many species? Why do animals and plants seem so well designed for their environments? How do we explain patterns of distribution across continents? These are some of the key questions that we will examine in this Unit. The Unit begins with a survey of the history of evolutionary thought, and the so-called 'new synthesis'; the melding of Darwinian evolution, systematics and genetics. The Unit will provide training in the principles, methods, and applications of evolutionary biology including systems of classification, the genetics of speciation and hybrid zones, molecular evolution, reconstruction of phylogenies, population genetics, historical interpretation of geographic distributions, evolution of sex, adaptation, human evolution, and selfish gene theory. Examples from a broad range of organisms and data sources will be used throughout the Unit. This Unit is valuable for students who intend to seek employment in areas such as biodiversity research, bioinformatics, ecology, taxonomy, biological conservation and teaching.
Textbooks
Freeman and Herron (2011) Evolutionary Analysis, Pearson/Prentice Hall
BCHM3092 Proteomics and Functional Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2405 and 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3992 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will focus on the high throughput methods for the analysis of gene structure and function (genomics) and the analysis of proteins (proteomics), which are at the forefront of discovery in the biomedical sciences. The course will concentrate on the hierarchy of gene-protein-structure-function through an examination of modern technologies built on the concepts of genomics versus molecular biology, and proteomics versus biochemistry. Technologies to be examined include DNA sequencing, nucleic acid and protein microarrays, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, uses of mass spectrometry for high throughput protein identification, isotope tagging for quantitative proteomics, high-performance liquid chromatography, high-throughput functional assays, affinity chromatography and modern methods for database analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these technologies can provide insight into the molecular basis of changes in cellular function under both physiological and pathological conditions as well as how they can be applied to biotechnology for the discovery of biomarkers, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in proteomics and genomics.
BCHM3992 Proteomics and Functional Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stuart Cordwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [An average mark of 75 or above in 12cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCHM2X72 or BCMB2X01 or BCMB2X02 or DATA2002 or ENVX2001 or BIOL2X22 or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X71 or QBIO2001)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 75 or above in BMED2405 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2X71 or BCMB2X02 or MBLG2X71)] Prohibitions: BCHM3092 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam (theory and theory of prac 70%), in-semester (practical work and assignments 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study will focus on the high throughput methods for the analysis of gene structure and function (genomics) and the analysis of proteins (proteomics) which are at the forefront of discovery in the biomedical sciences. The course will concentrate on the hierarchy of gene-protein-structure-function through an examination of modern technologies built on the concepts of genomics versus molecular biology, and proteomics versus biochemistry. Technologies to be examined include DNA sequencing, nucleic acid and protein microarrays, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins, uses of mass spectrometry for high throughput protein identification, isotope tagging for quantitative proteomics, high-performance liquid chromatography, high-throughput functional assays, affinity chromatography and modern methods for database analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on how these technologies can provide insight into the molecular basis of changes in cellular function under both physiological and pathological conditions as well as how they can be applied to biotechnology for the discovery of biomarkers, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in proteomics and genomics.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3092. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in proteomics and genomics will be covered.
Bioinformatics major (B) units of study
STAT3022 Applied Linear Models

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Ormerod Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour computer laboratories per week. Prerequisites: STAT2X11 and (DATA2X02 or STAT2X12) Prohibitions: STAT3912 or STAT3012 or STAT3922 Assessment: 2 x assignment (15%), 3 x quizzes (30%), final exam (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In today's data-rich world more and more people from diverse fields are needing to perform statistical analyses and indeed more and more tools for doing so are becoming available; it is relatively easy to point and click and obtain some statistical analysis of your data. But how do you know if any particular analysis is indeed appropriate? Is there another procedure or workflow which would be more suitable? Is there such thing as a best possible approach in a given situation? All of these questions (and more) are addressed in this unit. You will study the foundational core of modern statistical inference, including classical and cutting-edge theory and methods of mathematical statistics with a particular focus on various notions of optimality. The first part of the unit covers various aspects of distribution theory which are necessary for the second part which deals with optimal procedures in estimation and testing. The framework of statistical decision theory is used to unify many of the concepts. You will apply the theory to various real-world problems using statistical software in laboratory sessions. By completing this unit you will develop the necessary skills to confidently choose the best statistical analysis to use in many situations.
STAT3922 Applied Linear Models (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Ormerod Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour computer laboratory per week. Prerequisites: STAT2X11 and [a mark of 65 or greater in (STAT2X12 or DATA2X02)] Prohibitions: STAT3912 or STAT3012 or STAT3022 Assessment: 2 x assignment (10%), 3 x quizzes (35%), final exam (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce the fundamental concepts of analysis of data from both observational studies and experimental designs using classical linear methods, together with concepts of collection of data and design of experiments. You will first consider linear models and regression methods with diagnostics for checking appropriateness of models, looking briefly at robust regression methods. Then you will consider the design and analysis of experiments considering notions of replication, randomization and ideas of factorial designs. Throughout the course you will use the R statistical package to give analyses and graphical displays. This unit is essentially an Advanced version of STAT3012, with additional emphasis on the mathematical techniques underlying applied linear models together with proofs of distribution theory based on vector space methods.
STAT3888 Statistical Machine Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Ormerod Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour computer laboratory per week. Prerequisites: STAT2X11 and (DATA2X02 or STAT2X12) Prohibitions: STAT3914 or STAT3014 Assumed knowledge: STAT3012 or STAT3912 or STAT3022 or STAT3922 Assessment: Written exam (40%), major project *50%), computer labs (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Data Science is an emerging and inherently interdisciplinary field. A key set of skills in this area fall under the umbrella of Statistical Machine Learning methods. This unit presents the opportunity to bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt from a Statistics or Data Science major, and apply them to a joint project with NUTM3888 where Statistics and Data Science students will form teams with Nutrition students to solve a real world problem using Statistical Machine Learning methods. The unit will cover a wide breadth of cutting edge supervised and unsupervised learning methods will be covered including principal component analysis, multivariate tests, discrimination analysis, Gaussian graphical models, log-linear models, classification trees, k-nearest neighbors, k-means clustering, hierarchical clustering, and logistic regression. In this unit, you will continue to understand and explore disciplinary knowledge, while also meeting and collaborating through project-based learning; identifying and solving problems, analysing data and communicating your findings to a diverse audience. All such skills are highly valued by employers. This unit will foster the ability to work in an interdisciplinary team, and this is essential for both professional and research pathways in the future.
STAT3914 Applied Statistics Advanced

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour computer laboratory per week plus an extra hour each week which will alternate between lectures and tutorials. Prerequisites: STAT2912 or (a mark of 65 or above in STAT2012 or DATA2002) Prohibitions: STAT3014 or STAT3907 or STAT3902 or STAT3006 or STAT3002 Assumed knowledge: STAT3012 or STAT3912 or STAT3022 or STAT3922 Assessment: Written exam (40%), major project (50%), computer labs (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an Advanced version of STAT3014. There will be 3 lectures per week in common with STAT3014. The unit will have extra lectures focusing on multivariate distribution theory developing results for the multivariate normal, partial correlation, the Wishart distribution and Hotelling's T^2. There will also be more advanced tutorial and assessment work associated with this unit.
Bioinformatics major (C) unit of study
COMP3520 Operating Systems Internals

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (COMP2017 OR COMP2129) AND (COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905) Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide a comprehensive discussion of relevant OS issues and principles and describe how those principles are put into practice in real operating systems. The contents include internal structure of OS; several ways each major aspect (process scheduling, inter-process communication, memory management, device management, file systems) can be implemented; the performance impact of design choices; case studies of common OS (Linux, MS Windows NT, etc.).
INFO3911 IT Special Project 3A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: [85% average in IT units of study in previous year] AND [Permission from the School of IT] Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment by department permission for students with 85% average in School of IT units plus minimum 75% average in other units
This unit enables talents students with maturing IT knowledge to integrate various IT skills and techniques to carry out projects. These projects are largely research intensive.
INFO3912 IT Special Project 3B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: [85% average in IT units of study in previous year] AND [Permission from the School of IT] Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment by department permission for students with 85% average in School of IT units plus minimum 75% average in other units
This unit enables talents students with maturing IT knowledge to integrate various IT skills and techniques to carry out projects. These projects are largely research intensive.
Bioinformatics major (D) unit of study
BINF3101 Bioinformatics Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 2 Classes: Meeting with academic supervisor 1 hour per week and class meeting 1 hour per week. Prerequisites: 12cp from (BIOL2XXX or MBLG2XXX or BCMB2XXX or GEGE2XXX or BCHM2XXX or MICR2XXX or PCOL2XXX or QBIO2XXX or ENVX2XXX or DATA2002 or GENE2002) Prohibitions: COMP3206 or BINF3001 or INFO3600 or SOFT3300 or SOFT3600 or SOFT3200 or SOFT3700 Assumed knowledge: INFO2110 and (INFO1103 or INFO1903) Assessment: Oral group presentations, individual and group reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and practice the skills acquired in the prerequisite and qualifying units, in the context of designing and building a substantial bioinformatics application. Working in groups, students will carry out the full range of activities including requirements capture, analysis and design, coding, testing and documentation.