Table 1: Microbiology

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Microbiology

For a major in Microbiology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed below.
Intermediate units of study
MICR2031
Microbiology
6    A Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1
N MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2931
Semester 1
MICR2931
Microbiology (Advanced)
6    A Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1
P A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX)
N MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2031
Semester 1
MIMI2002
Microbes, Infection and Immunity
6    A CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903
P (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX3)
N MEDS2004, BMED2404, MIMI2902, IMMU2101, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2022, MICR2922, BMED2807, BMED2808
Semester 2
MIMI2902
Microbes, Infection and Immunity (Advanced)
6    A CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903
P A mark of 70 or above in (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX3)
N MEDS2004, BMED2404, MIMI2002, IMMU2101, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2022, MICR2922, BMED2807, BMED2808

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
Senior units of study
MICR3011
Microbes in Infection
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404]
N MICR3911


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
MICR3911
Microbes in Infection (Advanced)
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and a mark of 70 or above in (MICR2X22 or MIMI2X02)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 70 or above in BMED2404]
N MICR3011
Semester 1
MICR3032
Cellular and Molecular Microbiology
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and MICR2X22] OR (BMED2401 and BMED2404) OR [12cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N MICR3932


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
MICR3932
Cellular and Molecular Microbiology (Adv)
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 70 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [6cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31) and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N MICR3032


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
MICR3042
Microbiology Research Skills
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and MICR2X22] OR (BMED2401 and BMED2404) OR [12cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N MICR3942


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
MICR3942
Microbiology Research Skills (Adv)
6    A MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31
P 6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [6cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N MICR3022 or MICR3922 or MICR3042


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
VIRO3001
Virology
6    A Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from (BCHM2XXX or BCMB2X01 or BIOL2XXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or IMMU2101 or MICR2XXX or PCOL2X0X or PHSI2X0X)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404]
N VIRO3901


Students are strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902. BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
VIRO3901
Virology (Advanced)
6    A Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems
P [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2XXX or BCMB2X01 or BIOL2XXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or IMMU2101 or MICR2XXX or PCOL2X0X or PHSI2X0X)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 70 or above in BMED2404]
N VIRO3001


Students are strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902. BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 1
VIRO3002
Medical and Applied Virology
6    A Fundamental concepts of microorganisms and biomolecules
P 6cp from (BMED2404 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or MICR2X22)
N VIRO3902
Semester 2
VIRO3902
Medical and Applied Virology (Advanced)
6    A Fundamental concepts of microorganisms and biomolecules
P A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BMED2404 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or MICR2X22)
N VIRO3002
Semester 2

Microbiology

For a major in Microbiology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed below.
Intermediate units of study
MICR2031 Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2931 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: written assignment (10%), group oral presentation (20%) and online quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the earth's trees. This unit of study will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require if you specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology or science education.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
MICR2931 Microbiology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 3-hour practical per week; five tutorial sessions Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2031 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Theory 60%: 45-minute mid-semester theory exam (20%) and 1.5-hour theory exam (40%); Practical 40%: two written assignments (10%, 20%), and online quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the Earth's trees. In this unit of study you will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Detailed aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require to specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology, or science education. As an Advanced unit, MICR2931 provides increased challenge and academic rigour to develop a greater understanding and depth of disciplinary expertise. You will actively participate in a series of small group tutorials investigating the molecular detail of microbial communication and function, which will culminate in you creating a scientific research report that communicates your understanding of recent research in microbiology.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
MIMI2002 Microbes, Infection and Immunity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, and scenario-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX3) Prohibitions: MEDS2004, BMED2404, MIMI2902, IMMU2101, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2022, MICR2922, BMED2807, BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Final examination (50%), practical exercises (20%), online quizzes (10%), integrated assessment (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Transmission, pathogenicity and immune response to microbes are key concepts for understanding infectious disease processes. In this unit of study you will establish a conceptual foundation and, using an integrated approach, explore selected case studies of infection from a body system of origin perspective. You will explore the characteristics of viral, bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens and their virulence mechanisms for establishment and progression of disease. Comprehensive consideration of host immune response and characteristic pathological changes to tissue that arise will then be considered. Upon completion of this unit, you will be able to explain microbial pathogenic processes of infection including: mechanisms for colonisation, invasion and damage to host tissue; the ways in which your immune system recognises and destroys invading microbes; how T cell response is activated and antibodies function. You will learn about pathogenesis, symptoms, current challenges of treatment including antibiotic resistance, control and vaccination strategies. You will develop a holistic perspective of infectious diseases. You will work collaboratively to solve challenging problems in Biomedical Sciences. Practical classes will investigate normal flora, host defences and case studies of medically important microbes with linkage to disease outcome. You will also obtain experience and understanding of modern experimental techniques in microbiology and immunopathology.
MIMI2902 Microbes, Infection and Immunity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, online lecturettes, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry- and scenario-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX3) Prohibitions: MEDS2004, BMED2404, MIMI2002, IMMU2101, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2022, MICR2922, BMED2807, BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Final examination (50%), practical exercises (20%), online quizzes (10%), research publication-based assignment (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Transmission, pathogenicity and immune response to microbes are key concepts for understanding infectious disease processes. In this unit you will establish a conceptual foundation and, using an integrated approach, explore selected infection case studies from a body system of origin perspective. You will explore characteristics of viral, bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens and their virulence mechanisms for establishment and progression of disease. Comprehensive consideration of host immune response and consequent characteristic pathological changes to tissue will be considered. Upon completion, you will be able to explain microbial pathogenic processes of infection including: mechanisms for colonisation, invasion and damage to host tissue; the ways your immune system recognises and destroys invading microbes; how T cell response is activated and antibodies function. You will learn about pathogenesis, symptoms, current challenges of treatment including antibiotic resistance, control and vaccination strategies. This advanced unit has the same overall structure as MIMI2002 but contains a unique science communication exercise in which you will actively participate in small group sessions and be assessed with a short essay. This advanced component explores how recent advances in microbiology, infection and immunity are communicated to the wider public and is based on recent publications with potential high impact for society.
Senior units of study
MICR3011 Microbes in Infection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week. Eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404] Prohibitions: MICR3911 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 2-hour exam; Practical (40%): case study: worksheet, lab work, presentation; one quiz; one 1-hour theory of prac exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The practical component is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR et al. Medical Microbiology. 8th edition. Mosby. 2016.
MICR3911 Microbes in Infection (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Helen Agus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week including six 1-hour advanced sessions. Eight 3-hour practical sessions and three 2-hour clinical tutorials per semester Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and a mark of 70 or above in (MICR2X22 or MIMI2X02)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 70 or above in BMED2404] Prohibitions: MICR3011 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1.5-hour exam (45%), one essay, one in-semester exam; Practical (40%): case study: worksheet, lab work, presentation; quiz; one 1-hour theory of prac exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Intermediate Microbiology. This unit is designed to further develop an interest in, and understanding of, medical microbiology from the introduction in Intermediate Microbiology. Through an examination of microbial structure, virulence, body defences and pathogenesis, the process of acquisition and establishment of disease is covered. The unit is divided into three themes: 1. Clinical Microbiology: host defences, infections, virulence mechanisms; 2. Public health microbiology: epidemiology, international public health, transmission, water and food borne outbreaks; 3. Emerging and re-emerging diseases: the impact of societal change with respect to triggering new diseases and causing the re-emergence of past problems, which are illustrated using case studies. The unique aspect of this advanced unit that differentiates it from the mainstream unit is six tutorial style sessions that replace six mainstream lectures in the theme 'Emerging and re-emerging diseases'. These dedicated research-led interactive advanced sessions support self-directed learning and involve discussion around specific topics that will vary from year to year. Nominated research papers and reviews in the topic area will be explored with supported discussion of the relevance to and impact of the work on current thinking around emergence of microbial disease. The focus will be on microbial change that lies critically at the centre of understanding the reasons for the emergence of new diseases and challenges in an era of significant scientific ability to diagnose and treat infection. The practical component is identical to the mainstream unit and is designed to enhance students' practical skills and to complement the lectures. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Clinical tutorial sessions underpin and investigate the application of the material covered in the practical classes.
Textbooks
Murray PR.et al. Medical Microbiology. 8th ed., Mosby, 2016
MICR3032 Cellular and Molecular Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures per week and one 2-hour practical or tutorial per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and MICR2X22] OR (BMED2401 and BMED2404) OR [12cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3932 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1-hour exam (mid semester); one 2-hour exam (end of semester); Prac (40%): One 2-hour exam (open book, mid-semester), one oral presentation (end of semester); one in-prac bioinformatics assessment task, one 1.5 hr bioinformatics prac exam (end of semester) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This Unit of Study introduces students to key concepts in cellular and molecular microbiology. The lectures explore areas of microbial evolution, pathogenesis, physiology, ecology, biotechnology and genetics, with each key theme explored with a series of 6 lectures led by an expert in the field. Lectures will be complemented with practical/tutorial sessions that explore recent research in these areas. The first set of practical/tutorial sessions are small-group sessions led by demonstrators, that are focused on critical interpretation of the scientific literature in the area of host-microbe interactions. The focus is on experimental design, and analysis of the raw data. The second set of pracs are bioinformatics labs, which introduce software such as ORF Finder, BLAST, ClustalX, and TreeView and databases such as NCBI-Nucleotide and KEGG; the aim is to figure out the identity, functions, and biotechnological applications of a mystery piece of microbial DNA. It is recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study MICR3042 or MICR3942.
MICR3932 Cellular and Molecular Microbiology (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three lectures per week and one 2-hour prac/tute per week Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 70 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [6cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31) and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3032 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Theory (60%): One 1-hour theory exam (mid semester); one 2-hour exam (end of semester); Prac (40%): one written assessment task, assessment of website. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit of study introduces students to key concepts in cellular and molecular microbiology. The lectures explore areas of microbial evolution, pathogenesis, physiology, ecology, biotechnology and genetics, with each key theme explored with a series of 6 lectures led by an expert in the field.The first set of practical/tutorial sessions are small-group sessions led by an academic, which are focused on critical interpretation of the scientific literature in the area of host-microbe interactions. The focus is on evaluating the scientific significance of published papers, and determining the level of experimental support for key conclusions. The second set of prac sessions teaches the creative presentation of science to both fellow scientists and the public by designing a website around an area of interest in microbiology. It is recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study, MICR3042 or MICR3942.
Textbooks
None
MICR3042 Microbiology Research Skills

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dee Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week from week 1-7, one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and MICR2X22] OR (BMED2401 and BMED2404) OR [12cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3942 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Two 40-min in-semester theory exams (20% each). One 1-hour theory of prac exam (20%). In-lab continuous assessment, two prac reports, one short video presentation (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Research in molecular microbiology is needed to tackle problems in medicine, agriculture, environmental science, and biotechnology. This Unit of Study focuses on developing practical skills and training in experimental approaches and that are essential for laboratory research in molecular microbiology, together with knowledge of the underlying theoretical concepts. We will focus on key areas of modern microbiology including Bioremediation, where micro-organisms are used to break down harmful substrates in the environment; Microbial biotechnology, which explores how microbes can be used as cellular factories to produce useful products; Medical microbiology, where molecular epidemiology is used to track a disease outbreak, and Yeast genetics, where we explore genes and protein interaction networks that cells regulate in their response to antibiotic agents. It is strongly recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study MICR3032 or MICR3932.
MICR3942 Microbiology Research Skills (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dee Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week from Week 1-7. Project work equivalent to 4 hours per week. Research project in an academic microbiology lab, 48 hours total, at times decided between student and supervisor. Research projects will be announced at the start of semester. Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 75 or above in MICR2X22] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404 and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (BMED2401 or BMED2404)] OR [6cp from (MICR2024 or MICR2X31) and a mark of 75 or above in 6cp from (GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: MICR3022 or MICR3922 or MICR3042 Assumed knowledge: MICR2X21 or MICR2024 or MICR2X31 Assessment: Two 40-min in-semester theory of prac exams (20% each). Two reports, presentation of research via short video, supervisor mark based on performance in research project (60%). Practical field work: Research project in an academic microbiology lab, 48 hours total, at times decided between student and supervisor. Research projects will be announced at the start of semester. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Research in molecular microbiology is needed to tackle problems in medicine, agriculture, environmental science, and biotechnology. This Unit of Study focuses on developing practical skills and training in experimental approaches that are essential for laboratory research in molecular microbiology, together with knowledge of the underlying theoretical concepts. In this Unit the practical component is entirely replaced by a research project undertaken in an academic microbiology lab. The lecture material in MICR3942 focuses on the areas of microbial biotechnology and bioremediation, and the genetic and molecular diversity of medically important eukaryotic microbes. It is strongly recommended that students also take the complementary unit of study, MICR3032 or MICR3932.
VIRO3001 Virology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Newsome Session: Semester 1 Classes: 26 1-hour lectures, seven 4-hour practical classes, one 2-hour tutorial Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and 6cp from (BCHM2XXX or BCMB2X01 or BIOL2XXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or IMMU2101 or MICR2XXX or PCOL2X0X or PHSI2X0X)] OR [BMED2401 and BMED2404] Prohibitions: VIRO3901 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems Assessment: Pre-class assessment for practical classes: (5 x 1%), continuous assessment for practical classes: (3 x 2%), project assessment for practical classes: (7%), presentation on virology-themed research literature: (7%), theory of practical exam: (15%) (30 minutes), theory exam (60%) (120 minutes). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students are strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902. BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Viruses are some of the simplest biological machinery known yet they are also the etiological agents for some of the most important human diseases. New technologies that have revolutionised the discovery of viruses are also revealing a hitherto unappreciated abundance and diversity in the ecosphere, and a wider role in human health and disease. Developing new gene technologies have enabled the use of viruses as therapeutic agents, in novel vaccine approaches, gene delivery and in the treatment of cancer. This unit of study is designed to introduce students who have a basic understanding of molecular biology to the rapidly evolving field of virology. Viral infection in plant and animal cells and bacteria is covered by an examination of virus structure, genomes, gene expression and replication. Building upon these foundations, this unit progresses to examine host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, cell injury, the immune response and the prevention and control of infection and outbreaks. The structure and replication of sub-viral agents: viroids and prions, and their role in disease are also covered. The practical component provides hands-on experience in current diagnostic and research techniques such as molecular biology, cell culture, serological techniques, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses and is designed to enhance the students' practical skills and complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Tutorials cover a range of topical issues and provide a forum for students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills. The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Microbiology within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences with the involvement of the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
VIRO3901 Virology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Newsome Session: Semester 1 Classes: 29 1-hour lectures, seven 4-hour practical classes, four 1-hour tutorials Prerequisites: [6cp from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLGXXXX) and a mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BCHM2XXX or BCMB2X01 or BIOL2XXX or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002 or IMMU2101 or MICR2XXX or PCOL2X0X or PHSI2X0X)] OR [BMED2401 and a mark of 70 or above in BMED2404] Prohibitions: VIRO3001 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems Assessment: Pre-class assessment for practical classes: (5 x 1%), continuous assessment for practical classes: (3 x 2%), project assessment for practical classes: (7%), individual presentation on virology-themed research literature: (7%), theory of practical exam: (15%) (30 minutes), theory exam: (60%) (120 minutes) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students are strongly advised to complete VIRO3001 or VIRO3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002 or VIRO3902. BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
This unit is available to students who have performed well in Intermediate Microbiology and is based on VIRO3001 with additional lectures related to the research interests in the Discipline. Consequently, the unit of study content may change from year to year. Viruses are some of the simplest biological machinery known yet they are also the etiological agents for some of the most important human diseases. New technologies that have revolutionised the discovery of viruses are also revealing a hitherto unappreciated abundance and diversity in the ecosphere, and a wider role in human health and disease. Developing new gene technologies have enabled the use of viruses as therapeutic agents, in novle vaccine approaches, gene delivery and in the treatment of cancer. This unit of study is designed to introduce students who have a basic understanding of molecular biology to the rapidly evolving field of virology. Viral infection in plant and animal cells and bacteria is covered by an examination of virus structure, genomes, gene expression and replication. Building upon these foundations, this unit progresses to examine host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, cell injury, the immune response and the prevention and control of infection and outbreaks. The structure and replication of sub-viral agents: viroids and prions, and their role in disease are also covered. The practical component provides hands-on experience in current diagnostic and research techniques such as molecular biology, cell culture, serological techniques, immunofluroescence and immunoblot analyses and is designed to enhance the students' practical skills and complement the lecture series. In these practical sessions experience will be gained handling live, potentially pathogenic microbes. Advanced lectures cover cutting-edge research in the field of virology in small group discussions and presentations that provide a forum for students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills. The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Microbiology within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences with the involvement of the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
VIRO3002 Medical and Applied Virology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Barry Slobedman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week Prerequisites: 6cp from (BMED2404 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or MICR2X22) Prohibitions: VIRO3902 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms and biomolecules Assessment: One 2-hour exam covering lecture material, one 2-hour theory of practical exam, written assignment and oral presentation (100%) Practical field work: One 4 hour practical session per week, in most weeks of semester. Practical session slots are also used for oral presentations. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores diseases in human caused by viruses, with focus on the way viruses infect individual patients and spread in the community, and how virus infections are diagnosed, treated and/or prevented. Host/Virus interactions will also be described with a focus on the viral mechanisms that have evolved to combat and/or evade host defence systems. These features will be used to explain the symptoms, spread and control of the most medically important viruses that cause serious disease in humans . The unit will be taught by the Discipline of Infectious Diseases and Immunology within the Sydney Medical School with the involvement of associated clinical and research experts who will contribute lectures on their own special interests and with contributions from the Discipline of Microbiology. In the practical classes students will have the opportunity to develop their skills in performing methods currently used in diagnostic and research laboratories such as molecular analysis of viral genomes, immunofluorescent staining of viral antigens, cell culture and the culture of viruses.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
VIRO3902 Medical and Applied Virology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Barry Slobedman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, and one interactive 2-hour tutorials (approx 6 in total, including for oral presentations) Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in 6cp from (BMED2404 or IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or MICR2X22) Prohibitions: VIRO3002 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms and biomolecules Assessment: One 2-hour exam covering lecture material, one 2-hour theory of practical exam, written assignment, oral presentation and tutorial participation (100%) Practical field work: One 4 hour practical session per week, in most weeks of semester. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is based on the VIRO3002 course with inclusion of tutorials, including with leading research medical virologists, enabling students to gain additional experience with cutting edge virology research. The content of this unit may change from year to year based on research interests within the department.
Textbooks
Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.