Table 1: Physics

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Physics

For a major in Physics, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area which must include:
(i) One Semester 1 Core unit (PHYS3034/3934); and
(ii) One Semester 2 Core unit (PHYS3035/3935); and
(iii) 12 credit points of senior elective units OR 6 credit points of senior elective units and 6 credit points of senior project units
Junior units of study
PHYS1001
Physics 1 (Regular)
6    A HSC Physics or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently.
N PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903
Intensive July
Semester 1
PHYS1002
Physics 1 (Fundamentals)
6    A Students are encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently.
N PHYS1001 or PHYS1901 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903
Semester 1
PHYS1901
Physics 1A (Advanced)
6    A (85 or above in HSC Physics or equivalent) OR (75 or above in one of PHYS1003 or PHYS1004) OR (PHYS1902 or PHYS1904). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently.
N PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
PHYS1903
Physics 1A (Special Studies Program)
6    A [92 or above in HSC Physics (or equivalent)] OR [80 or above in one of PHYS1904 or PHYS1902]. Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently.
N PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1901

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
PHYS1003
Physics 1 (Technological)
6    A HSC Physics or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently.
C Recommended Co-requisites: (MATH1003 or MATH1903) and (MATH1005 or MATH1905).
N PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904


It is recommended that PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 be completed before this unit
Intensive August
Semester 2
PHYS1004
Physics 1 (Environmental and Life Science)
6    A HSC Physics or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently.
N PHYS1003 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904


It is recommended that PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 be completed before this unit
Semester 2
PHYS1902
Physics 1B (Advanced)
6    A (85 or above in HSC Physics or equivalent) OR (75 or above in one of PHYS1001 or PHYS1002) OR (PHYS1901 or PHYS1903). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently.
C Recommended Co-requisites: (MATH1003 or MATH1903) and (MATH1005 or MATH1905)
N PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
PHYS1904
Physics 1B (Special Studies Program)
6    A 75 or above in PHYS1903 or 85 or above in PHYS1901. Entry is by invitation. This unit of study is deemed to be an Advanced unit of study. Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently.
N PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
Intermediate units of study
PHYS2011
Physics 2A
6    A (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05)
P (PHYS1901 or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1903) and (PHYS1902 or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904)
N PHYS2911 or PHYS2921
Semester 1
PHYS2911
Physics 2A (Advanced)
6    A (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05)
P 65 or above in (PHYS1901 or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1903) and 65 or above in (PHYS1902 or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904)
N PHYS2011 or PHYS2921
Semester 1
PHYS2012
Physics 2B
6    A (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05)
P (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921)
N PHYS2912 or PHYS2922
Semester 2
PHYS2912
Physics 2B (Advanced)
6    A (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05)
P 65 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 65 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921)
N PHYS2012 or PHYS2922
Semester 2
PHYS2013
Astrophysics and Relativity
6    A (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05)
P (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921)
N PHYS2923 or PHYS2913
Semester 2
PHYS2913
Astrophysics and Relativity (Advanced)
6    A (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05)
P 65 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 65 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921)
N PHYS2013 or PHYS2923
Semester 2
PHYS2921
Physics 2A (Special Studies Program)
6    A (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and (MATH1X05)
P 75 or above in (PHYS1901 or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1903) and 75 or above in (PHYS1902 or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904)
N PHYS2011 or PHYS2911

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
PHYS2922
Physics 2B (Special Studies Program)
6    A (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and (MATH1X05)
P 75 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 75 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921).
N PHYS2012 or PHYS2912

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
COSC2002
Computational Modelling
6    A HSC Mathematics; DATA1002, or equivalent programming experience, ideally in Python.
N COSC1003 or COSC1903 or COSC2902
Semester 1
COSC2902
Computational Modelling (Advanced)
6    A HSC Mathematics; DATA1002, or equivalent programming experience, ideally in Python.
P 48 credit points of 1000 level units with an average of 65
N COSC1003 or COSC1903 or COSC2002

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
PHYS2923
Astrophysics and Relativity (SSP)
6    A (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and (MATH1X05)
P 75 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 75 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921).
N PHYS2013 or PHYS2913

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
Senior core units of study
Students must complete both PHYS3034/3934 and PHYS3035/3935
PHYS3034
Quantum, Statistical and Comp Physics
6    A (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067)
P (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)
N PHYS3934, PHYS3039, PHYS3939, PHYS3042, PHYS3942, PHYS3043, PHYS3943, PHYS3044, PHYS3944, PHYS3090, PHYS3990, PHYS3991, PHYS3999, PHYS3099
Semester 1
PHYS3934
Quantum, Statistical and Comp Phys (Adv)
6    A (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067)
P Average of 70 or above in [(PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)]
N PHYS3034, PHYS3039, PHYS3939, PHYS3042, PHYS3942, PHYS3043, PHYS3943, PHYS3044, PHYS3944, PHYS3090, PHYS3990, PHYS3991, PHYS3999, PHYS3099
Semester 1
PHYS3035
Electrodynamics and Optics
6    A (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067)
P (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)
N PHYS3935, PHYS3040, PHYS3940, PHYS3941, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3080, PHYS3980
Semester 2
PHYS3935
Electrodynamics and Optics (Advanced)
6    A (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067)
P Average of 70 or above in [(PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)]
N PHYS3035, PHYS3040, PHYS3940, PHYS3941, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3080, PHYS3980
Semester 2
Senior elective units of study
PHYS3015
Topics in Senior Physics A
6    A 6 credit points of Intermediate Mathematics
P (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912)

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
PHYS3915
Topics in Senior Physics A (Advanced)
6    A 6 credit points of Intermediate Mathematics
P (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912) with average of at least 70

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
PHYS3025
Topics in Senior Physics B
6    A 6 credit points of Intermediate Mathematics
P (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912)

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
PHYS3925
Topics in Senior Physics B (Advanced)
6    P (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912) with average of at least 70

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
PHYS3036
Condensed Matter and Particle Physics
6    A Students will need to have some knowledge of special relativity, for example from prior study of PHYS2013 or PHYS2913, or from studying Chapter 12 of Introduction to Electrodynamics by D.J. Griffith. (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067)
P (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)
C PHYS3034 OR PHYS3934
N PHYS3099, PHYS3999, PHYS3936, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3074, PHYS3974, PHYS3080, PHYS3980
Semester 1
PHYS3936
Condensed Matter and Particle Phys (Adv)
6    A Students will need to have some knowledge of special relativity, for example from prior study of PHYS2013 or PHYS2913, or from studying Chapter 12 of Introduction to Electrodynamics by D.J. Griffith. (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067)
P Average of 70 or above in [(PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)]
C (PHYS3034 OR PHYS3934)
N PHYS3099, PHYS3999, PHYS3036, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3074, PHYS3974, PHYS3080, PHYS3980


Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, experimental lab 18h/semester
Semester 1
PHYS3037
Plasma and Astrophysics
6    A (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067)
P (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)
N PHYS3937 or PHYS3042 or PHYS3043 or PHYS3044 or PHYS3942 or PHYS3943 or PHYS3944
Semester 2
PHYS3937
Plasma and Astrophysics (Advanced)
6    A (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067)
P [An average mark of 70 or above in (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912 or PHYS2922)]
C PHYS3035 OR PHYS3935
N PHYS3037 or PHYS3042 or PHYS3043 or PHYS3044 or PHYS3942 or PHYS3943 or PHYS3944
Semester 2
Senior project units
SCPU3001
Science Interdisciplinary Project
6    P Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major.
Intensive December
Intensive February
Intensive January
Intensive July
Semester 1
Semester 2
PHYS3888
Physics Interdisciplinary Project
6    P (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)
N PHYS3941 or PHYS3991
Semester 2

Physics

For a major in Physics, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area which must include:
(i) One Semester 1 Core unit (PHYS3034/3934); and
(ii) One Semester 2 Core unit (PHYS3035/3935); and
(iii) 12 credit points of senior elective units OR 6 credit points of senior elective units and 6 credit points of senior project units
Junior units of study
PHYS1001 Physics 1 (Regular)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 9 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: 3 hour exam plus laboratories, assignments and mid-semester tests (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is for students who gained 65 marks or better in HSC Physics or equivalent. The lecture series covers the topics of mechanics, thermal physics, and oscillations and waves.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1002 Physics 1 (Fundamentals)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 9 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1001 or PHYS1901 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903 Assumed knowledge: Students are encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: 3 hour exam plus laboratories, assignments and mid-semester tests (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed for students who have not studied Physics previously or scored below 65 in HSC Physics. The lecture series contains modules on the language of physics, mechanics, and oscillations and waves.
Textbooks
College Physics: A Strategic Approach by Knight, Jones and Field, 3rd edition. Pearsons 2014. Course lab manual.
PHYS1901 Physics 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 9 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903 Assumed knowledge: (85 or above in HSC Physics or equivalent) OR (75 or above in one of PHYS1003 or PHYS1004) OR (PHYS1902 or PHYS1904). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: 3-hour exam plus laboratories, assignments and mid-semester tests (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is intended for students who have a strong background in Physics and an interest in studying more advanced topics. It proceeds faster than Physics 1 (Regular), covering further and more difficult material. The lecture series contains modules on the topics of mechanics, thermal physics, oscillations and waves and chaos. The laboratory work also provides an introduction to computational physics using chaos theory as the topic of study.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1903 Physics 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures per week, 1x1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1901 Assumed knowledge: [92 or above in HSC Physics (or equivalent)] OR [80 or above in one of PHYS1904 or PHYS1902]. Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: 3hr exam plus laboratories, assignments, mid-semester tests and end-of-semester lab project presentation Practical field work: 1x3hr laboratory for 9 weeks, including short project-based exercises Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The unit is intended for high achieving students who have a strong background in Physics and an interest in studying more advanced topics. It shares lecture and tutorial classes with PHYS1901, with modules on the topics of mechanics, thermal physics oscillations and wave and chaos. However, it features a laboratory component that is very different, with project-based exercises and a more open-ended research format than other lab classes.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics, 14th edition with Modern Physics, Global Edition, Pearson 2015. Course lab manual
PHYS1003 Physics 1 (Technological)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Intensive August,Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 10 weeks, one 1-hour tutorial per week. Corequisites: Recommended Co-requisites: (MATH1003 or MATH1903) and (MATH1005 or MATH1905). Prohibitions: PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently. Assessment: 3 hour exam plus laboratories, tutorials, and assignments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended that PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 be completed before this unit
This unit of study is designed for students majoring in physical and engineering sciences and emphasis is placed on applications of physical principles to the technological world. The lecture series covers the topics of fluids, electromagnetism, and quantum physics.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1004 Physics 1 (Environmental and Life Science)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 10 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1003 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently. Assessment: 3-hour exam plus laboratories and assignments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended that PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 be completed before this unit
This unit of study has been designed specifically for students interested in further study in environmental and life sciences. The lecture series contains modules on the topics of properties of matter, electromagnetism, and radiation and its interactions with matter.
Textbooks
College Physics: A Strategic Approach by Knight, Jones and Field, 3rd edition. Pearsons 2014. Course lab manual.
PHYS1902 Physics 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 10 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Corequisites: Recommended Co-requisites: (MATH1003 or MATH1903) and (MATH1005 or MATH1905) Prohibitions: PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904 Assumed knowledge: (85 or above in HSC Physics or equivalent) OR (75 or above in one of PHYS1001 or PHYS1002) OR (PHYS1901 or PHYS1903). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently. Assessment: 3-hour exam plus laboratories, and assignments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is a continuation of the more advanced treatment of Physics 1A (Advanced). Students who have completed PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 at Distinction level may enrol. It proceeds faster than Physics 1 (Technological), covering further and more difficult material. The lecture series contains modules on the topics of fluids, electricity and magnetism, and quantum physics.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1904 Physics 1B (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr lectures per week, 1x1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 Assumed knowledge: 75 or above in PHYS1903 or 85 or above in PHYS1901. Entry is by invitation. This unit of study is deemed to be an Advanced unit of study. Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently. Assessment: 3hr exam plus laboratories, assignments, mid-semester tests and end-of-semester research project report and presentation Practical field work: 1x3hr laboratory for 4 weeks and a research project in the other weeks of semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The unit is a continuation for high achieving students of PHYS1904. It shares lecture and tutorial classes with PHYS1902, with modules on the topics of fluids, electricity and magnetism, and quantum physics. The lab component features a research project to be performed with researchers in one of the School's research groups.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics, 14th edition with Modern Physics, Global Edition, Pearson 2015. Course lab manual
Intermediate units of study
PHYS2011 Physics 2A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week for 11 weeks; one 2-hour computational laboratory and one 3-hour experimental laboratory per week for 10 weeks. Prerequisites: (PHYS1901 or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1903) and (PHYS1902 or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904) Prohibitions: PHYS2911 or PHYS2921 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, one 1-hour computational test, practical work, practical report and presentation, computational lab work (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In combination with two semesters of Junior Physics, this unit of study continues a first pass through the major branches of classical and modern physics, providing students with a sound basis for later Physics units or for studies in other areas of science or technology. Hence, this unit suits students continuing with the study of Physics at the Intermediate level, and those wishing to round out their knowledge of physics before continuing in other fields. The modules in this unit of study are: Optics: The wave nature of light, and its interactions with matter; applications including spectroscopy and fibre optics. Thermodynamics: The thermal properties of matter. Computational Physics: In a PC-based computing laboratory students use simulation software to conduct virtual experiments in physics, which illustrate and extend the relevant lectures. Students also gain general skills in the use of computers to solve problems in physics. An introductory session of MATLAB is held in the first three lab sessions for students who are not familiar with programming. Practical: Experimental Physics is taught as a laboratory module and includes experiments in the areas of electrical circuits, nuclear decay and particles, properties of matter, and other topics. Assessment is based on mastery of each attempted experiment. At the end of the semester students prepare a short report on one experiment and make an oral presentation on it.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics with Modern Physics Technology Update, 13th edition. with Mastering Physics, Pearsons, 2014.
PHYS2911 Physics 2A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week for 11 weeks; one 2-hour computational laboratory and one 3-hour experimental laboratory per week for 10 weeks. Prerequisites: 65 or above in (PHYS1901 or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1903) and 65 or above in (PHYS1902 or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904) Prohibitions: PHYS2011 or PHYS2921 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, one 1-hour computational test, practical work, practical report and presentation, computational lab work (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed for students with a strong interest in Physics. The lecture topics are as for PHYS2011. They are treated in greater depth and with more rigorous attention to derivations than in PHYS2011. The assessment reflects the more challenging nature of the material presented.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics with Modern Physics Technology Update, 13th edition. with Mastering Physics, Pearsons, 2014.
PHYS2012 Physics 2B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week; one 2-hour computational laboratory per week for 11 weeks. Prerequisites: (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921) Prohibitions: PHYS2912 or PHYS2922 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 3-hour exam, assignments, one 1-hour computational test, computational lab work and project, practical work and report (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed for students continuing with the study of Physics at the general Intermediate level, and represents the beginning of a more in-depth study of the main topics of classical and modern physics. The modules in this unit of study are: Quantum Physics: The behaviour of matter and radiation at the microscopic level. Electromagnetic Properties of Matter: Electric and magnetic effects in materials; the combination of electric and magnetic fields to produce light and other electromagnetic waves; the effects of matter on electromagnetic waves. Computational Physics: The computational physics component is similar to that of PHYS2011.
Textbooks
Serway, Moses and Moyer. Modern Physics. 3rd edition. Brooks/Cole. 2005.
PHYS2912 Physics 2B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, one-2 hour computational laboratory per week for 11 weeks. Prerequisites: 65 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 65 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921) Prohibitions: PHYS2012 or PHYS2922 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 3-hour exam, assignments, one 1-hour computational test, computational lab work and project, practical work and report (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to PHYS2911 for an overall description of the Advanced Intermediate Physics program. The lecture topics are as for PHYS2012 with some advanced content. Computational Physics: As for PHYS2012, but at a more advanced level.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics with Modern Physics Technology Update, 13th edition. with Mastering Physics, Pearsons, 2014.
PHYS2013 Astrophysics and Relativity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week for 11 weeks and one 3-hour experimental laboratory per week for 12 weeks. Prerequisites: (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921) Prohibitions: PHYS2923 or PHYS2913 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, practical work, practical report and oral presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on the foundation provided by Junior Physics and first semester of Intermediate Physics, to provide introductions to Cosmology (Structure and evolution of the Universe), and Special Relativity (Space and time at high velocities). Practical: Experimental Physics is taught as a laboratory module and includes experiments in the areas of analysis of stellar images, electromagnetic phenomena, electronic instrumentation, quantum physics, and other topics. Assessment is based on mastery of each attempted experiment. At the end of the semester students may work in teams on a project. Students prepare a written report and oral presentation on their project or one experiment.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics with Modern Physics Technology Update, 13th edition. with Mastering Physics, Pearsons, 2014.
PHYS2913 Astrophysics and Relativity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week for 11 weeks; one 3-hour experimental laboratory per week for 12 weeks. Prerequisites: 65 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 65 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921) Prohibitions: PHYS2013 or PHYS2923 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 3-hour exam, assignments, practical work, practical report and oral presentation (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The lecture topics are as PHYS2013 with some advanced content. Practical: as for PHYS2013.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman, University Physics with Modern Physics Technology Update, 13th edition. with Mastering Physics, Pearsons, 2014.
PHYS2921 Physics 2A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 2hrs/week for 13 weeks; laboratory 5hrs/wk for 11 wks; tutorial 1 hr/wk for 12 wks, duty tutor 2 hrs/wk. Prerequisites: 75 or above in (PHYS1901 or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1903) and 75 or above in (PHYS1902 or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1904) Prohibitions: PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and (MATH1X05) Assessment: Final examination 40% (Optics/Thermodynamics modules), Experimental Lab sessions and logbook 18%, Experimental Lab Talk 4.5%, Experimental Lab Report (draft and final) 7.5%, Computational Lab sessions 8%, Computational Lab mid-semester test 4%, Computational Lab Exam 8%, Assignments (2x Optics, 1x Thermodynamics) 7.5%, and in class Quiz (Thermodynamics) 2.5%. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Are you someone with a very strong interest in Physics who wants a more open-ended approach to your learning? This unit of study gives a first pass through the major branches of classical and modern physics, providing a sound basis for later Physics units or for studies in other areas of science or technology. You will learn about Optics - the wave nature of light, and its interactions with matter; and applications including spectroscopy and fibre optics; Thermodynamics-Entropy, free energy, and the thermal properties of matter; Computational Physics Laboratory, where you will perform simulations that essentially conduct virtual experiments in physics, which illustrate and extend the relevant lectures. An introductory session of MATLAB is held in the first three lab sessions for students who are not familiar with programming. In Experimental Physics Laboratory, you will perform experimental tests and investigations that underlie modern society. This involves a mix of prescribed measurement exercises and open-ended investigations, and the option of a research style project, on topics including electrical circuits, nuclear decay and particles, and properties of matter. The lecture modules will be identical to PHYS2911 Physics 2A (Advanced) but the labs will be different. The differentiations from PHYS2911 Physics 2A (Advanced) are that both Experimental and Computational Labs in PHYS2921 Physics 2A (SSP) offer open ended style prescribed lab exercises in place of conventional prescribed exercises, and in the case of Experimental Labs, the additional option of doing a research project in place of some of the open-ended prescribed exercises.
PHYS2922 Physics 2B (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3hrs/week for 13 weeks; laboratory 2hrs/wk for 11wks, tutorial 1hr/wk for 12 wks, duty tutor 1 hr/wk. Prerequisites: 75 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 75 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921). Prohibitions: PHYS2012 or PHYS2912 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and (MATH1X05) Assessment: Final examination 50% (Quantum Physics/Electromagnetics modules), Computational Laboratory 8%, Computational Physics Lab Exam 12%, Computational Physics, Lab Test 5%, Assignments (1x Quantum, 2x Electromagnetics) 10%, and in class Quizzes (1x Quantum, 1x Electromagnetics) 15%. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Are you someone with a very strong interest in Physics who wants a more open-ended approach to your learning? This unit of study delves into the topics of Quantum physics, Electromagnetic Properties of Matter, and Computational Physics (Laboratory). In Quantum physics, you will learn about the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, including the quantum physics of two-level systems (such as the Stern-Gerlach experiment, single-photon interferometry, two-level atoms, and spin-1/2 particles in a magnetic field), quantum measurement and its consequences for non-classical behavior, non-classical properties of quantum entanglement and the implications of Bell nonlocality, wavefunction approaches to quantum mechanics, including the Schroedinger equation, and the quantum harmonic oscillator. In Electromagnetics, you will learn about electrostatics, Gauss's Law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, conductors, magnetism and magnetic materials (ferromagnetism, paramagnetism, diamagnetism), and Laplace's equation. Computational Physics Lab will involve you performing numerical calculations and simulations that essentially conduct virtual experiments in Quantum Physics, which illustrate and extend the relevant lectures. The lecture modules will be identical to PHYS2912 Physics 2B (Advanced) but the labs will be different. The differentiation from PHYS2912 Physics 2B (Advanced) is that the Computational Lab module for PHYS2922 Physics 2B (SSP) offers open-ended style, prescribed exercises in place of conventional prescribed exercises, as well as the option of doing a research style project (subject to not also choosing a 2nd research project in the Experimental Lab of Phys2923 Astrophysics and Relativity (SSP)).
COSC2002 Computational Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tristram Alexander Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2x1 hr/week; labs 1x1 hr/wk + 1x2 hrs/wk Prohibitions: COSC1003 or COSC1903 or COSC2902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics; DATA1002, or equivalent programming experience, ideally in Python. Assessment: In-lab checkpoints (10%), Assignment (10%), Class test 1 (20%), Class test 2 (20%), Final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce a wide range of modelling and simulation techniques for tackling real-world problems using a computer. Data is often expensive to obtain, so by harnessing the enormous computational processing power now available to us we can answer what if questions based on data we already have. You will learn how to break a problem down into its key components, identifying necessary assumptions for the purposes of simulation. You will learn how to develop suitable metrics within computational models, to allow comparison of simulation data with real-world data. You will learn how to iteratively improve simulations as you validate them against real results, and you will gain experience in identifying the types of exploratory questions that computational modelling opens up. Programming will be in python. You will learn how to generate probabilistic data, solve systems of differential equations numerically, and tackle complex adaptive systems using agent-based models. Dynamical systems ranging from traffic flow to social segregation will be considered. By doing this unit you will develop the skills to go behind your data, understand why the data you observe might be as it is, and test scenarios which might otherwise be inaccessible.
COSC2902 Computational Modelling (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tristram Alexander Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2x1 hr/wk; Labs 1x1 hr/wk + 1x2 hr/wk Prerequisites: 48 credit points of 1000 level units with an average of 65 Prohibitions: COSC1003 or COSC1903 or COSC2002 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics; DATA1002, or equivalent programming experience, ideally in Python. Assessment: In-lab checkpoints [10%] Assignment [10%] Class test 1 [20%] Class test 2 [20%] Final exam [40%] Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will introduce a wide range of modelling and simulation techniques for tackling real-world problems using a computer. Data is often expensive to obtain, so by harnessing the enormous computational processing power now available to us we can answer what if questions based on data we already have. You will learn how to break a problem down into its key components, identifying necessary assumptions for the purposes of simulation. You will learn how to develop suitable metrics within computational models, to allow comparison of simulation data with real-world data. You will learn how to iteratively improve simulations as you validate them against real results, and you will gain experience in identifying the types of exploratory questions that computational modelling opens up. Programming will be in python. You will learn how to generate probabilistic data, solve systems of differential equations numerically, and tackle complex adaptive systems using agent-based models. Dynamical systems ranging from traffic flow to social segregation will be considered. By doing this unit you will develop the skills to go behind your data, understand why the data you observe might be as it is, and test scenarios which might otherwise be inaccessible. This is an advanced unit. It runs jointly with the associated mainstream unit, however the lab work and assessment requires a greater level of academic rigour. You will be required to engage in more challenging real-world computational modelling problems than the mainstream unit, and explore more deeply the reasons behind simulation results.
PHYS2923 Astrophysics and Relativity (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2hrs/week for 13 weeks; laboratory 3hrs/wk for 12 weeks, tutorial 1 hr/wk for 12 wks, duty tutor 1 hr/wk. Prerequisites: 75 or above in (PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904) and 75 or above in (PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or PHYS1903 or PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921). Prohibitions: PHYS2013 or PHYS2913 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and (MATH1X05) Assessment: Final examination 40% (Relativity/Astrophysics modules), Experimental Lab sessions and logbook 25%, Experimental Lab Talk 6%, Experimental Lab report (draft and final) 11%, Assignments (3x Relativity, 2x Astrophysics) 14%, and in class Quiz (Astrophysics) 4%. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Are you someone with a very strong interest in Physics who wants a more open-ended approach to your learning? This unit of study delves into Cosmology/Astrophysics, Special Relativity, and Laboratory Experimental Physics. In Special Relativity, you will learn about Einstein's theory of special relativity, relative motion, twin paradox, Doppler shift, Lorentz transformations, spacetime and causality, relativistic momentum, relativistic kinetic energy, and mass as a measure of energy. In Cosmology/Astrophysics, you will learn about cosmological models, the cosmological principle, the Friedmann equations, the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric, cosmological redshift, the cosmic microwave background radiation, big-bang nucleosynthesis, the thermal history of the Universe, inflation, dark matter and dark energy. Experimental Physics Laboratory will involve you performing experimental test and investigations of relevant topics in a mix of prescribed measurement exercises and open ended investigations, as well as the option of a research project. The lecture modules will be identical to PHYS2913 Astrophysics and Relativity (Advanced) but the labs will be different. The differentiation from PHYS2913 Astrophysics and Relativity (Advanced) is that Experimental Laboratory for PHYS2923 Astrophysics and Relativity (SSP) offers open-ended style, prescribed experiments in place of conventional prescribed exercises, as well as the option of doing a research style project (subject to not also choosing a 2nd research project in the Computational Lab of Phys2922 Physics 2B (SSP)).
Senior core units of study
Students must complete both PHYS3034/3934 and PHYS3035/3935
PHYS3034 Quantum, Statistical and Comp Physics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, computational lab 3h/week Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922) Prohibitions: PHYS3934, PHYS3039, PHYS3939, PHYS3042, PHYS3942, PHYS3043, PHYS3943, PHYS3044, PHYS3944, PHYS3090, PHYS3990, PHYS3991, PHYS3999, PHYS3099 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: Weekly Quiz x 12 (25%), 3x topical assignments (15%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Final Exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Quantum statistical physics has revolutionized the world we live in- providing a profound understanding of the microscopic world and driving the technological revolution of the last few decades. Modern physics increasingly relies on solving equations using computational techniques, for modelling anything from the big bang to quantum dot lasers. Building on 2000-level physics, this unit will develop the full formalism for deriving properties of individual atoms and large collections of atoms, and introduce advanced numerical techniques. You will start from Schroedinger's equation and derive the full properties of hydrogen atoms, and systems of particles. You will study perturbation techniques qualitatively, including for the interaction of radiation with atoms. You will study the theoretical foundation of statistical mechanics, including both classical and quantum distributions. You will apply a variety of numerical schemes for solving ordinary and partial differential equations, learn about the suitability of particular methods to particular problems, and their accuracy and stability. The module includes computational lab sessions, in which you will actively solve a range of physics problems. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills that will enable you to numerically solve complex problems in physics and beyond.
PHYS3934 Quantum, Statistical and Comp Phys (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, computational lab 3h/week Prerequisites: Average of 70 or above in [(PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)] Prohibitions: PHYS3034, PHYS3039, PHYS3939, PHYS3042, PHYS3942, PHYS3043, PHYS3943, PHYS3044, PHYS3944, PHYS3090, PHYS3990, PHYS3991, PHYS3999, PHYS3099 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: Weekly Quiz x 12 (25%), 3x topical assignments (15%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Quantum statistical physics has revolutionized the world we live in - providing a profound understanding of the microscopic world and driving the technological revolution of the last few decades. Modern physics increasingly relies on solving equations using computational techniques, for modelling anything from the big bang to quantum dot lasers. The advanced unit covers the same overall concepts as PHYS3034 but with a greater level of challenge and academic rigour, largely in separate lectures. You will study techniques of quantum mechanics to predict the energy-level structure of electrons in atoms, introducing techniques useful in the broad field of quantum physics, with applications e. g. in atomic clocks. You will study the theoretical foundation of statistical mechanics, including both classical and quantum distributions. You will apply a variety of numerical schemes for solving ordinary and partial differential equations, learn about the suitability of particular methods to particular problems, and their accuracy and stability. The module includes computational lab sessions, in which you will actively solve a range of physics problems. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills that will enable you to numerically solve complex problems in physics and beyond.
PHYS3035 Electrodynamics and Optics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, experimental lab 18h/semester Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922) Prohibitions: PHYS3935, PHYS3040, PHYS3940, PHYS3941, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3080, PHYS3980 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: Quiz x 4 - 15%, 2x topical assignments 10%, 1 x overarching problem assignment - 10%, Experimental physics logbook 10%, Experimental physics report - 15%, Final exam - 40% Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The development of electrodynamic field theory laid the foundation on which all of modern physics is built, from relativity to quantum field theory. Its application to electromagnetic waves and optics underpins all of modern telecommunications, but also some of the most delicate physics experiments, from gravitational wave detection to quantum computing. This is a core unit in the physics major, which has three components: electrodynamics lectures, optics lectures, and experimental lab. In electrodynamics you will learn to manipulate Maxwell's equations in their differential form. You will apply the formalism to deriving properties of electromagnetic waves, including the interaction of waves with matter through reflection and absorption. This will lead to optics lectures in which you will investigate aspects of modern optics, using the laser to illustrate the topics covered, in combination with a discussion of the basic optical properties of materials, including the Lorentz model. You will investigate spontaneous and stimulated emission of light, laser rate equations, diffraction, Gaussian beam propagation, anisotropic media and nonlinear optics. You will carry out in-depth experimental investigations into key aspects of electrodynamics, optics, as well as other topics in physics, with expert tutoring.
PHYS3935 Electrodynamics and Optics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, experimental lab 18h/semester Prerequisites: Average of 70 or above in [(PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)] Prohibitions: PHYS3035, PHYS3040, PHYS3940, PHYS3941, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3080, PHYS3980 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: Quiz x 4 (15%), 2x topical assignments (10%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Experimental physics logbook (10%), Experimental physics report (15%), Final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The development of electrodynamic field theory laid the foundation on which all of modern physics is built, from relativity to quantum field theory. Its application to electromagnetic waves and optics underpins all of modern telecommunications, but also some of the most delicate physics experiments, from gravitational wave detection to quantum computing. This is a core unit in the physics major, which has three components: electrodynamics lectures, optics lectures, and experimental lab. The advanced unit covers the same concepts as PHYS3035 but with a greater level of challenge and academic rigour, largely in separate lectures. You will apply Mawell's equations to derive properties of electromagnetic waves, the interaction of waves with matter, waveguides, radiation and Gauge transformations. This will lead to optics lectures in which you will investigate aspects of modern optics, using the laser to illustrate the topics covered, in combination with a discussion of the basic optical properties of materials, including the Lorentz model. You will investigate spontaneous and stimulated emission of light, laser rate equations, diffraction, Gaussian beam propagation, anisotropic media and nonlinear optics. You will design your own in-depth experimental investigations into key aspects of electrodynamics, optics, as well as other topics in physics, with expert tutoring.
Senior elective units of study
PHYS3015 Topics in Senior Physics A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 1 Classes: 40 hours per semester. Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912) Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Intermediate Mathematics Assessment: Exams and/or assignments and/or practical reports. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is normally restricted to students not majoring in Physics, giving them the flexibility to take a combination of modules that is not offered in the standard units. Please obtain permission from the Senior Physics Coordinator.
PHYS3915 Topics in Senior Physics A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 1 Classes: 40 hours per semester Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912) with average of at least 70 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Intermediate Mathematics Assessment: Exams and/or assignments and/or laboratory reports (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study covers the same topics as PHYS3015, with some more challenging material.
PHYS3025 Topics in Senior Physics B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 2 Classes: 40 hours per semester. Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912) Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Intermediate Mathematics Assessment: Exams and/or assignments and/or practical reports. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is normally restricted to students not majoring in Physics, giving them the flexibility to take a combination of modules that is not offered in the standard units. Please obtain permission from the Senior Physics Coordinator.
PHYS3925 Topics in Senior Physics B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 2 Classes: 40 hours per semester Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912) with average of at least 70 Assessment: Exams and/or assignments and/or laboratory reports (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study covers the same topics as PHYS3025, with some more challenging material.
PHYS3036 Condensed Matter and Particle Physics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, experimental lab 18h/semester Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922) Corequisites: PHYS3034 OR PHYS3934 Prohibitions: PHYS3099, PHYS3999, PHYS3936, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3074, PHYS3974, PHYS3080, PHYS3980 Assumed knowledge: Students will need to have some knowledge of special relativity, for example from prior study of PHYS2013 or PHYS2913, or from studying Chapter 12 of Introduction to Electrodynamics by D.J. Griffith. (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: 2x topical assignments 10%, 1 x overarching problem assignment 10%, Experimental physics logbook 10%, Experimental physics report 15%, Final exam 55% Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Condensed matter physics is the science behind semiconductors and all modern electronics, while particle physics describes the very fabric of our Universe. Surprisingly these two seemingly separate aspects of physics use in part very similar formalisms. This selective unit in the physics major will provide an introduction to both these fields, complemented with experimental labs. You will study the basic constituents of matter, such as quarks and leptons, examining their fundamental properties and interactions. You will gain understanding of extensions to the currently accepted Standard Model of particle physics, and on the relationships between high energy particle physics, cosmology and the early Universe. You will study condensed matter systems, specifically the physics that underlies the electromagnetic, thermal, and optical properties of solids. You will discuss recent discoveries and new developments in semiconductors, nanostructures, magnetism, and superconductivity. You will learn and apply new experimental and data analysis techniques by carrying out in-depth experimental investigations on selected topics in physics, with expert tutoring. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills in experimental physics, measurement, and data analysis.
PHYS3936 Condensed Matter and Particle Phys (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 1 Prerequisites: Average of 70 or above in [(PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922)] Corequisites: (PHYS3034 OR PHYS3934) Prohibitions: PHYS3099, PHYS3999, PHYS3036, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3069, PHYS3969, PHYS3074, PHYS3974, PHYS3080, PHYS3980 Assumed knowledge: Students will need to have some knowledge of special relativity, for example from prior study of PHYS2013 or PHYS2913, or from studying Chapter 12 of Introduction to Electrodynamics by D.J. Griffith. (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: 2x topical assignments (10%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Experimental physics logbook (10%), Experimental physics report (15%), Final exam (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/week, experimental lab 18h/semester
Condensed matter physics is the science behind semiconductors and all modern electronics, while particle physics describes the very fabric of our Universe. Surprisingly these two seemingly separate aspects of physics use in part very similar formalisms. This selective unit in the physics major will provide an introduction to both these fields, complemented with experimental labs. You will study the basic constituents of matter, such as quarks and leptons, examining their fundamental properties and interactions. You will gain understanding of extensions to the currently accepted Standard Model of particle physics, and on the relationships between high energy particle physics, cosmology and the early Universe. You will study condensed matter systems, specifically the physics that underlies the electromagnetic, thermal, and optical properties of solids. You will discuss recent discoveries and new developments in semiconductors, nanostructures, magnetism, and superconductivity. The advanced stream has several separate lectures and more open-ended experimental physics projects: You will learn and apply new experimental and data analysis techniques by designing and carrying out in-depth experimental investigations on selected topics in physics, with expert tutoring. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills in experimental physics, measurement, and data analysis.
PHYS3037 Plasma and Astrophysics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/fortnight, experimental lab 18h/semester Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922) Prohibitions: PHYS3937 or PHYS3042 or PHYS3043 or PHYS3044 or PHYS3942 or PHYS3943 or PHYS3944 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: 2x topical assignments (11%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Experimental physics logbook (10%), Experimental physics report (15%), Online quizzes (4%), Final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Looking at the sky it is easy to forget our Sun and the stars are continuous giant nuclear explosions, or that nebulas are vast fields of ionized gases, all obeying the same laws of physics as anything else in the universe. Astrophysics gives us great insight in the larger structures of the universe, and plasma physics is key to understanding matter in space, but also in fusion reactors or for advanced material processing. This selective unit in the physics major will provide an introduction to astrophysics and plasma physics, complemented with experimental labs. You will study three key concepts in astrophysics: the physics of radiation processes, stellar evolution, and binary stars. You will gain understanding of the physics of fundamental phenomena in plasmas and apply basic methods of theoretical and experimental plasma physics. Examples will be given, where appropriate, of the application of these concepts to naturally occurring and man-made plasmas. You will learn and apply new experimental and data analysis techniques by carrying out in-depth experimental investigations on selected topics in physics, with expert tutoring. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills in experimental physics, measurement, and data analysis.
PHYS3937 Plasma and Astrophysics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Boris Kuhlmey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 3h/week, tutorial 1h/fortnight, experimental lab 18h/semester Prerequisites: [An average mark of 70 or above in (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911 or PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912 or PHYS2922)] Corequisites: PHYS3035 OR PHYS3935 Prohibitions: PHYS3037 or PHYS3042 or PHYS3043 or PHYS3044 or PHYS3942 or PHYS3943 or PHYS3944 Assumed knowledge: (MATH2021 OR MATH2921 OR MATH2061 OR MATH2961 OR MATH2067) Assessment: 2x topical assignments (11%), 1 x overarching problem assignment (10%), Experimental physics logbook (10%), Experimental physics report(15%), Online quizzes: (4%), Final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Looking at the sky it is easy to forget our Sun and the stars are continuous giant nuclear explosions, or that nebulas are vast fields of ionized gases, all obeying the same laws of physics as anything else in the universe. Astrophysics gives us great insight in the larger structures of the universe, and plasma physics is key to understanding matter in space, but also in fusion reactors or for advanced material processing. This selective unit in the physics major will provide an introduction to astrophysics and plasma physics, complemented with experimental labs. You will study three key concepts in astrophysics: the physics of radiation processes, stellar evolution, and binary stars. You will gain understanding of the physics of fundamental phenomena in plasmas and apply basic methods of theoretical and experimental plasma physics. The advanced stream has several separate, more in-depth lectures and more open-ended experimental physics projects: You will learn and apply new experimental and data analysis techniques by designing and carrying out in-depth experimental investigations on selected topics in physics, with expert tutoring. In completing this unit you will gain understanding of the foundations of modern physics and develop skills in experimental physics, measurement, and data analysis.
Senior project units
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Pauline Ross Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.
PHYS3888 Physics Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ben Fulcher and Dr Alessandro Tuniz Session: Semester 2 Classes: Up to 2h/week of lectures and tutorials, 4h/week of project group work, project experimental work and/or computational lab work. Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 OR PHYS2911 OR PHYS2921) AND (PHYS2012 OR PHYS2912 OR PHYS2922) Prohibitions: PHYS3941 or PHYS3991 Assessment: Assignments (55%), Project report (15%), Project oral presentation (10%), Team work and practical participation and evaluation (20%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. Accordingly, the ability to work across interdisciplinary boundaries is a crucial skill for emerging professionals and researchers alike. With quantitative modelling becoming widespread across industry and conventionally qualitative sciences, physicists have a crucial role to play in applying their expertise broadly. In this unit, you will gain an appreciation for the unique skills and ways of thinking that have allowed physicists to contribute to a wide range of real-world problems. This unit contains two components: (i) a lecture and interactive problem-based group-tutorial component on interdisciplinary physics, complex systems, and artificial intelligence, and (ii) an interdisciplinary project-based component. For the project component, you will work in groups to tackle a real-world interdisciplinary problem. For example, you will take streaming measurements of brain activity using scalp electrodes and, through collaboration with data scientists, use machine learning techniques to develop a predictive classifier to develop a brain-computer interface of your design. Through project-based learning, you will learn to leverage the diverse skills represented in your team, and develop skills in experimental measurement, numerical processing, and statistical modelling. Skills in identifying and solving problems, collecting and analysing data, and communicating your findings to diverse audiences are highly valued in modern research and by employers.