Table 1: Plant Science

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Sessions have changed for the following unit.

BIOL3029 Molecular Plant Biology: Session: Now available in Semester 2 only

12/12/2018

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Plant Science

For a major in Plant Science, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area, which must include BIOL3043/3943, two additional senior BIOL units, and one of PPAT3003 or HORT3005.
Intermediate units of study
BIOL2029
Cells
6    P BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01
N BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 or BIOL2929
Semester 1
BIOL2929
Cells (Advanced)
6    P A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01)
N BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 orBIOL2029
Semester 1
BIOL2022
Biology Experimental Design and Analysis
6    A BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX
P 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1XX5)
N BIOL2922 or BIOL3006 or BIOL3906 or ENVX2001
Semester 2
BIOL2922
Biol Experimental Design and Analysis Adv

This unit of study is not available in 2019

6    A BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX
P [An annual average mark of at least 70 in the previous year] and [6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1XX5)]
N BIOL2022 or BIOL3006 or BIOL3906
Semester 2
BIOL2030
Botany
6    A Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6.
N BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2001 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2930
Semester 1
BIOL2930
Botany (Advanced)
6    A Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6.
P Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year
N BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2001 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2030
Semester 1
BIOL2031
Plants and Environment
6    A Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6.
N AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2931
Semester 2
BIOL2931
Plants and Environment (Advanced)
6    A Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6.
P Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year
N AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2031
Semester 2
BIOL2024
Ecology and Conservation
6    A BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX
N BIOL2924
Semester 2
BIOL2924
Ecology and Conservation (Advanced)
6    A BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX
P An annual average mark of at least 70 in the previous year
N BIOL2024
Semester 2
GEGE2001
Genetics and Genomics
6    A Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression.
N GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072
Semester 1
Semester 2
GEGE2901
Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)
6    A Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression.
P Annual average mark of at least 70
N GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972
Semester 1
Semester 2
Senior units of study
BIOL3004
Terrestrial Plant Ecology
6    A Students should have a basic understanding of plant biology, plant ecology and/or plant physiology. Some background knowledge in mathematics and chemistry would be beneficial.
P 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or AGEN2001 or GEOS2X21 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09
N ENSY3003 or ENSY3002
Semester 2
BIOL3007
Ecology
6    P [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N BIOL3907
Semester 2
BIOL3907
Ecology (Advanced)
6    P An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N BIOL3007
Semester 2
BIOL3009
Terrestrial Field Ecology
6    A Basic ecological concepts of species and communities, and experimental deisgn and analysis.
P [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N BIOL3909 or BIOL2009 or BIOL2909

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
Intensive July
BIOL3909
Terrestrial Field Ecology (Advanced)
6    A Basic ecological concepts of species and communities, and experimental design and analysis.
P An average mark of 70 or above in (12cp of BIOL2XXX) OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)]
N BIOL3009 or BIOL2009 or BIOL2909

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
Intensive July
BIOL3020
Applied Plant Function
6    A Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6
P BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or AGEN2001 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09
N BIOL3920, BIOL3043, BIOL3943, AGEN2005, PLNT3001, PLNT3901, PLNT3002, PLNT3902, ENSY3001
Semester 1
BIOL3026
Developmental Genetics
6    P (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX)
N BIOL3926
Semester 2
BIOL3926
Developmental Genetics (Advanced)
6    P An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX)]
N BIOL3929 or BIOL3026
Semester 2
BIOL3029
Molecular Plant Biology
6    P 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or BCMB2X0X or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X72 or GENE2002
Semester 1
HORT3005
Production Horticulture
6    P 72cp of 1000-3000 level units
Semester 1
PPAT3003
Plant Health and Disease
6    P 6 credit points of Microbiology units
Semester 1

Plant Science

For a major in Plant Science, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed in this subject area, which must include BIOL3043/3943, two additional senior BIOL units, and one of PPAT3003 or HORT3005.
Intermediate units of study
BIOL2029 Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Murray Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 4-hour practical per week Prerequisites: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01 Prohibitions: BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 or BIOL2929 Assessment: 3-hour theory exam (60%), quizzes (lectures and laboratory work) (10%), marks for laboratory work (10%), report (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cell Biology is one of the most dynamic areas in science today. In both plants and animals, cell to cell communication and coordination of the cell cycle, as well as cellular division and migration, are vital for normal development of various tissues from stem cells. In this unit you will investigate, the diversity of cell types, how these different cells interact with each other, how the cell cycle is controlled, as well as studying the roles of cellular movement, differentiation and interaction in reproduction and development. In Cells you will acquire a deep understanding of the established knowledge base and develop research skills to extend this knowledge. Discussions will incorporate recent advances in cell research including the regenerative potential of stem cells to replace damaged and diseased tissue and how the placenta can control the physiology of the mother and foetus. The laboratory program, provides you with hands on training in key techniques such as cell culture, cell signal transduction, mitochondrial physiology, drug discovery in marine organisms, digital microscopy and tissue specific gene expression. These skills will prepare you for a research pathway and/or a career that includes cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K., Walter P. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell (Sixth edition). Garland Publishing Inc., New York and London (ISBN-9780815344643)
BIOL2929 Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Murray Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 4-hour practical per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX7 or BIOL1XX8 or MBLG1XXX or MEDS1X01) Prohibitions: BIOL2016 or BIOL2916 orBIOL2029 Assessment: 3-hour theory exam (60%), quizzes (lectures and laboratory work) (10%), marks for laboratory work (10%), advanced report (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cell biology is one of the most dynamic areas of modern research. In both plants and animals, cell-to-cell communication and coordination of the cell cycle, as well as cellular division and migration, are vital for normal development of various tissues from stem cells. In this unit you will investigate, the diversity of cell types, how these different cells interact with each other, how the cell cycle is controlled, as well as studying the roles of cellular movement, differentiation and interaction in reproduction and development. In Cells you will acquire a deep understanding of the established knowledge base and develop research skills to extend this knowledge. Discussions will incorporate recent advances in cell research including the regenerative potential of stem cells to replace damaged and diseased tissue and how the placenta can control the physiology of the mother and foetus. The laboratory training will provide you with hands on experience with key equipment and techniques. The advanced program, will provide you with an opportunity to complete an authentic research project in a specialized area of cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K., Walter P. (2014) Molecular Biology of the Cell (Sixth edition). Garland Publishing Inc., New York and London (ISBN-9780815344643)
BIOL2022 Biology Experimental Design and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1XX5) Prohibitions: BIOL2922 or BIOL3006 or BIOL3906 or ENVX2001 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides foundational skills essential for doing research in biology and for critically judging the research of others. We consider how biology is practiced as a quantitative, experimental and theoretical science. We focus on the underlying principles and practical skills you need to explore questions and test hypotheses, particularly where background variation (error) is inherently high. In so doing, the unit provides you with an understanding of how biological research is designed, analysed and interpreted using statistics. Lectures focus on sound experimental and statistical principles, using examples in ecology and other fields of biology to demonstrate concepts. In the practical sessions, you will design and perform, analyse (using appropriate statistical tools) and interpret your own experiments to answer research questions in topics relevant to your particular interest. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2016. Experimental design for the life sciences. 4th Ed. Oxford University Press
BIOL2922 Biol Experimental Design and Analysis Adv

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [An annual average mark of at least 70 in the previous year] and [6cp from (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or DATA1001 or MATH1XX5)] Prohibitions: BIOL2022 or BIOL3006 or BIOL3906 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (60%), one 2-hour exam (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content of BIOL2922 will be based on BIOL2022 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Required: Ruxton, G. and Colegrave, N. 2016. Experimental design for the life sciences. 4th Ed. Oxford
BIOL2030 Botany

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lecture/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2001 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2930 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), anatomy project report and presentation (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to enhance biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes, and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frame works in plant identification, plant physiology, plant anatomy, and plant morphology. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by self-instructional audio-visual sessions and by small group discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. Successful completion of Botany will allow you to contribute to a range of disciplines including: ecology, bioinformatics, molecular and cell biology, genetics and biotechnology, environmental law, agriculture, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2930 Botany (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Rosanne Quinnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures/week; one 3-hour practical/week; a series of five 1-hour tutorial/week in the latter part of the semester Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or AGEN2001 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2030 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), advanced project report (20%), practical exam (30%), theory exam (35%) Practical field work: null Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to inform biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frameworks in plant identification, and plant physiology, morphology and anatomy. Lectures and practical classes are augmented by discussions to foster a sense of self-reliance and collaboration. The Advanced Botany unit of study requires engagement at a high standard of academic rigour and affords opportunities to engage with core aspect of Botany at depth and to create new knowledge. In partnership with academic staff advanced students will undertake an independent research project, which will develop skills in research and communication.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2031 Plants and Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Brent Kaiser Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 4-hour practical session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2931 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Online quiz (20%), lab assignment (15%), presentation (15%), exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants grow across a range of environments, influencing form, function and ultimately reproductive success. Being sessile, plants lack the luxury of seeking an alternative 'stress-free lifestyle' and therefore rely on genetic and physical adaptations to survive and reproduce. To understand how a plant can achieve such flexibility requires knowledge of plant structure and the influence of environmental drivers on plant growth and function. In this unit, you will examine the physiological processes controlling plant growth and reproduction linked to environmental constraints. You will understand the relationship between tissue and cellular structure and their underlying role in physiological and metabolic activities, particularly processes involving light capture, photosynthesis, water regulation, nutrient management and metabolite redistribution. Lectures and interactive practicals will together introduce you to plant processes that underpin life on earth. Experimentation and analysis of plant physiological processes will develop a skill base that will lead to a greater understanding and appreciation of common plant processes. As a component of the Plant Science minor and the Plant Production major, BIOL2031 will provide an important platform to extend your interests in plant science and plant related fields across the curriculum.
Textbooks
Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. (2010) Plant Physiology, Fifth Edition. Sinauer Associates. Sunderland, MA.
BIOL2931 Plants and Environment (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Brent Kaiser Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures/week; one 4-hour practical/week Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 in previous year Prohibitions: AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2031 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: On-line quiz (20%), lab assignment (15%), independent project (15%), exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants grow across a range of environments, which influence form, function and ultimately reproductive success. Being sessile, plants lack the luxury of seeking an alternative 'stress-free lifestyle' and therefore rely on genetic and physical adaptations to help survive and reproduce. To understand how a plant can achieve such flexibility requires an understanding of plant structure and the influence that environmental drivers have on plant growth and function. In this unit, you will examine the physiological processes controlling plant growth and reproduction linked to environmental constraints. You will understand the relationship between tissue and cellular structure and their underlying role in physiological and metabolic activities, particularly processes involving light capture, photosynthesis, water regulation, nutrient management and metabolite redistribution. Lectures and interactive practicals will together introduce you to plant processes that we commonly depend upon for food production, and plant related materials. Experimentation and analysis of plant physiological processes will develop a skill base that will lead to a greater understanding and appreciation of common plant processes that guide plant growth. As a component of the Plant Science minor, this unit will provide an important platform to extend your interests in plant science and plant-related fields, including ecology, cell biology, genetics, breeding, agriculture, molecular biology, environmental law, education and the arts. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as BIOL2031 but material is discussed in a manner that offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. Students enrolled in BIOL2931 participate in alternative components, which include a separate practical stream. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Resources required by the unit will be provided on the Blackboard learning management page for the unit. Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. (2010) Plant Physiology, Fifth Edition. Sinauer Associates. Sunderland, MA.
BIOL2024 Ecology and Conservation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL2924 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the ecological principles driving the major ecosystems of the world and ecological processes behind the world's major conservation issues. It aims to develop in students the core foundations for an understanding of Ecology and its application in conservation. Lectures will focus on the ecology of the major terrestrial and marine biomes of the world. Application of ecological theory and methods to practical conservation problems will be integrated throughout the unit of study. Practical sessions will provide hands-on experience in ecological sampling and data handling to understand the ecology of marine and terrestrial environments, as well as ecological simulations to understand processes. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 4th edition (2014). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
BIOL2924 Ecology and Conservation (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: An annual average mark of at least 70 in the previous year Prohibitions: BIOL2024 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The content of BIOL2924 will be based on BIOL2024 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 4th edition (2014). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes and presentation (50%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
GEGE2901 Genetics and Genomics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Sharp Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures; one 3-hour practical session; and one peer assisted study session on a weekly basis Prerequisites: Annual average mark of at least 70 Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2072 or GEGE2001 or MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: Mendellian genetics, mechanisms of evolution, molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance, and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Assignments, quizzes, presentation, final exam Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution. The Advanced mode of Genetics and Genomics will provide you with challenge and a higher level of academic rigour. You will have the opportunity to plan and carry out a project that will develop your skills in contemporary genetics/molecular biology techniques and will provide you with a greater depth of disciplinary understanding. The Advanced mode will culminate in a written report and in an oral presentation where you will discuss a recent breakthrough that has been enabled by the use of modern genetics and genomics technologies. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the how genetics has shaped the earth and how it will shape the future.
Textbooks
TBA
Senior units of study
BIOL3004 Terrestrial Plant Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tina Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: The general weekly schedule comprises 2 x 1 hour lectures and 1 x 3 hour practical session. A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or AGEN2001 or GEOS2X21 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09 Prohibitions: ENSY3003 or ENSY3002 Assumed knowledge: Students should have a basic understanding of plant biology, plant ecology and/or plant physiology. Some background knowledge in mathematics and chemistry would be beneficial. Assessment: Assessment tasks include two in-class quizzes (10% each); field report (20%); 2000w group-based land management plan (35%); 500w individual component to the land management plan (15%); group-based oral presentation (10%). Practical field work: A mandatory 2-3 day field trip to southern New South Wales will take place in the middle of the semester. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australian native vegetation is a unique resource for diversity, ecosystem services and public use. The objective of this unit is to provide a broad understanding of three major plant terrestrial ecosystems that are found across Australia: forests, heathlands and grasslands and how they are managed. While the focus will be on native plant systems in an Australian setting, their importance at a global level will also be discussed. You will develop an understanding of the characteristics of key plant ecosystems, including where they are found and their main ecophysiology features. Each of the ecosystems described has the potential to be a?ected (positively or negatively) by a range of natural and anthropogenic disturbances. They include ?re, climate change (drought and temperature), changes in nutrient ?ows and more broadly human-induced disturbances such as logging, mining, urban development and agricultural management. The impact of these disturbances along with mitigation via conservation and associated management changes will also be covered. Finally, government policy around conservation/management of these ecosystems will be examined. At the completion of this unit you will have developed an understanding of the environmental and economic importance of forests, heathlands and grasslands, their vulnerability to a range of external factors and the extent that these can be mitigated.
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
Textbooks
Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3907 Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, weekly tutorial and 3-hour practical per week Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3007 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, presentations, one essay, one project report (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3007 Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their previous performance. Students taking this unit of study participate in alternatives to some elements of the standard course and will be encouraged to pursue the objectives by more independent means in a series of research tutorials. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students in week 1 of semester 2. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
Textbooks
As for BIOL3007
BIOL3009 Terrestrial Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Glenda Wardle Session: Intensive July Classes: Note: One 7-day field trip held in the pre-semester break (week immediately prior to start of Semester 2) and four 4-hour practical classes on Friday mornings during weeks 1-4 of Semester 2 Prerequisites: [12cp of BIOL2XXX] OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3909 or BIOL2009 or BIOL2909 Assumed knowledge: Basic ecological concepts of species and communities, and experimental deisgn and analysis. Assessment: Field practical skills (10%), field survey methods quiz (10%), research project proposal and brief presentation (10%), sampling project report (20%), specimen collection (10%), major research project report (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This intensive field-based course provides practical experience in terrestrial ecology suited to a broad range of careers in ecology, environmental consulting and wildlife management. Students learn a broad range of ecological sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments. The field work takes place in native forest and incorporates survey techniques for plants, small mammals and invertebrates and thus provides a good background for ecological consulting work and an introduction into large-scale project management. Students attend a week-long field course and participate in a large-scale research project as well as conducting their own research project. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking in the context of environmental management and technical skills are developed in the area of data handling and analysis, report writing and team work. Invited experts contribute to the lectures and discussions on issues relating to the ecology, conservation and management of Australia's terrestrial flora and fauna.
BIOL3909 Terrestrial Field Ecology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Glenda Wardle Session: Intensive July Classes: One 7-day field trip held in the pre-semester break (week immediately prior to start of semester 2) and four 4-hour practical classes on Friday mornings during weeks 1-4 of semester 2 Prerequisites: An average mark of 70 or above in (12cp of BIOL2XXX) OR [6cp of BIOL2XXX and (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002)] Prohibitions: BIOL3009 or BIOL2009 or BIOL2909 Assumed knowledge: Basic ecological concepts of species and communities, and experimental design and analysis. Assessment: Field survey methods quiz (10%), sample and data processing (10%), research project proposal and brief presentation (10%), sampling project report (20%), major research project report (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. Students must apply via the School of Life Environmental Sciences rather than directly through Sydney Student Unit of Study Selection. Information on how to apply will be on the SOLES Student Portal on Canvas: https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/7931
This unit has the same objectives as BIOL3009 Terrestrial Field Ecology, and is suitable for students who wish to pursue certain aspects in greater depth. Entry is restricted, and selection is made from applicants on the basis of previous performance. Students taking this unit of study will complete an individual research project on a topic negotiated with a member of staff. It is expected that much of the data collection will be completed during the field trip but some extra time may be needed during semester 2. Specific details of this unit of study and assessment will be announced in meetings with students at the beginning of the unit. This unit of study may be taken as part of the BSc (Advanced) program.
BIOL3020 Applied Plant Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Warren Session: Semester 1 Classes: You are required to attend 2 x lectures, 1 x 4-hour practical session on a weekly basis. On-line Learning Requirements. Please check for updates regularly. Prerequisites: BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or AGEN2001 or AGEN2005 or BIOL2X09 Prohibitions: BIOL3920, BIOL3043, BIOL3943, AGEN2005, PLNT3001, PLNT3901, PLNT3002, PLNT3902, ENSY3001 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6 Assessment: Assessment in BIOL3020 is based on a written laboratory report (30%), laboratory notebook (15%), group presentation (15%) anda 2-hour exam at the end of semester (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants are truly amazing. Plants lift water to heights that defy physics. Plants take sunlight and simple inorganic ingredients to create a bewildering diversity of organic compounds. What's even more amazing is that we are only just beginning to understand how plants achieve these amazing feats. This unit explores how plants function and illustrates how this knowledge can be applied to real-World problems. Major topics include how plants function as integrated systems, resource partitioning and the dilemmas faced by plants, interaction of plants with the world around them. Emphasis will be placed on integration of plant responses from molecular through to whole plant scales, and how this knowledge can be practically applied to maximise plant growth, optimise use of water and nutrients, and understand how plants a?ect (and are a?ected by) their environment. Lectures are augmented by experimental work that leads to practical hands-on experience with research tools and techniques that can be applied across the sciences, and bespoke instruments used in the world's leading plant science research laboratories. This unit of study complements other senior units of study in the Plant Science minor and is essential for those seeking a career in plant biology and plant-related ?elds, including ecology, cell biology, genetics, breeding, agriculture, molecular biology, environmental law, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Pedigo LP and Rice ME. 2009. Entomology and Pest Management. 6th edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24 1-hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and 6cp from (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX) Prohibitions: BIOL3926 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Developmental genetics discusses major concepts and our current understanding of developmental biology with an emphasis on molecular genetics. The developmental genetics of animal and plant systems will be investigated, along with approaches used to determine gene function in relation to development of complex multicellular organisms. Topics include the features and resources for model organisms; the generation of mutants for forward and reverse genetics; the application of mutants to the study gene function and gene networks; spatial and temporal gene expression in pattern formation; quantitative trait loci analysis; utility of genome wide association studies; epigenetics in relation to inheritance; genome information in the study of human genetics. Reference will be made to the use of modern techniques in developmental biology such as transgenics, recombinant DNA technology, tissue-specific expression analysis. Various methods of genetic mapping will be covered. Practical work complements the theoretical aspects of the course and develops important skills in genetics.
BIOL3926 Developmental Genetics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24 1-hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: An average mark of 75 or above in [(MBLG2X72 or GEGE2X01 or GENE2002) and (MBLG2X71 or BIOL2XXX or BCMB2XXX or QBIO2001 or IMMU2XXX)] Prohibitions: BIOL3929 or BIOL3026 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components to BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year. Some assessment will be in an alternative format to components of BIOL3026.
BIOL3029 Molecular Plant Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Brian Jones Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2hrs/week for 13 weeks, Practicals 1 x 3hr practical/week for 13 weeks Prerequisites: 6cp of BIOL2X23 or BIOL2X30 or BIOL2X31 or BCMB2X0X or GEGE2X01 or MBLG2X72 or GENE2002 Assessment: Laboratory eNotebook - (Week 5 x 5% + Week 13 x 5%, total = 10%), Research paper (2500 words, 20%), Oral presentation (20%), Final Exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The enormous variety of plant forms is a reflection of the need to adapt to a life lived with environmental extremes. Plants provide the air we breathe, the food we eat and the landscapes we love. Having diverged from animals prior to the evolution of multicellularity, plants also provide us with a unique opportunity to discover how environmental adaptability and productivity features are enabled at the molecular level. This unit of study explores the molecular mechanisms that give rise to plant form and function, focussing on higher plants. You will learn about plant genomes and the molecular tool kits that are used in the making of a plant, the signaling pathways that drive growth and responses to the environment, and how this deep knowledge is being used to improve plant performance and better manage ecosystems. By doing this unit, students will advance their knowledge of how plants grow, develop and adapt in the context of the molecular mechanisms controlling these processes. The new tools of biology are giving us an unprecedented understanding of life. The skills developed in this unit will enable you to play a role in designing better ways to manage plants and ecosystems.
Textbooks
Schumann GL and Darcy CJ. 2010. Essential Plant Pathology (2nd ed.). APS Press, St Paul, Minn., USA.
HORT3005 Production Horticulture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures; one 3-hour practical/workshop per week Prerequisites: 72cp of 1000-3000 level units Assessment: One 3-hour exam (55%), three assignments (45%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study covers topics on the production of high quality food from perennial fruit crops, wine grapes, vegetables. It also covers the key aspects of the postharvest handling and quality assurance of fresh produce. At the end of this unit students are expected to have a detailed understanding of these areas of horticultural food production and be able to discuss related literature and the physiological principles underlying the commercial success of these horticultural enterprises. Students will also gain research and enquiry skills through research based practical sessions and assignments.
Textbooks
Recommended reading:
PPAT3003 Plant Health and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Guest (coordinator), A/Prof Michael Kertesz, Dr Rosalind Deaker, Prof Robert Park Session: Semester 1 Classes: 26 one-hour lectures and 12 three-hour practical classes Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Microbiology units Assessment: Take-home quizzes (20%), project report (10%), practical exam (20%), end of semester exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the impacts of microbes on plant productivity, food security and the management of natural environments. The lecture component discusses how microbes interact with plants at the ecosystem, whole plant, cellular and molecular levels, conditioning nutrient availability and acquisition, growth, yield, quality and environmental responses. The biology and epidemiology of plant-associated microbes, infection processes, colonisation strategies, plant responses and breeding for disease resistance will be discussed. The practical component introduces techniques used in handling, measuring and identifying plant-associated fungi and bacteria, diagnosis of plant disease and investigations of plant-microbe interactions, and develops skills in enquiry and problem solving through experimental design, execution and interpretation of data. Students learn to work in a research team, plan effective work schedules, work safely in a research laboratory with a range of scientific equipment, keep appropriate records, and use statistical analysis and simulations in research. The unit is core to the BScAgr degree and is available as an elective to BEnvSys and BSc students.
Textbooks
Schumann GL and Darcy CJ 2010. Essential Plant Pathology (2nd ed.). APS Press, St Paul, Minn., USA