Table 1: Psychology

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Psychology

For a major in Psychology, the minimum requirement is 48 credit points across Intermediate and Senior Psychology* units of study, including (PSYC2010/2910 or PSYC2015/2915), PSYC2012, (PSYC2013 or PSYC2016), and (PSYC2014 or PSYC2017). No other Intermediate Psychology units can be counted towards a major. Students must complete at least 24 credit points of Senior Psychology units for a major (or 30 credit points of Senior Psychology units for students in the BPsych degree). PSYC3018 must be included for students who have not completed (PSYC2010/2910 or PSYC2015/2915) at the intermediate level. Students who wish to be eligible for entry into the Honours program must also include PSYC3010.
*Note: HPSC3023 Psychology & Psychiatry: History & Phil is available as a Senior Psychology unit and will count towards a major in Psychology. Successful completion of this unit of study is essential for students intending to take the Theoretical Thesis option in Psychology Honours.
Junior units of study
PSYC1001
Psychology 1001
6   

This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer/
Semester 1
Summer Main
PSYC1002
Psychology 1002
6   

This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer/
Semester 2
Summer Main
Intermediate units of study
PSYC2015
Brain and Behavioural Psychology
6    P PSYC1002
N PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2915
Semester 1
PSYC2915
Brain and Behavioural Psychology (Advanced)
6    P A mark of 75 or greater in PSYC1002
N PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2015
Semester 1
PSYC2016
Perception, Cognition, and Intelligence
6    P PSYC1002
N PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014
Semester 2
PSYC2017
Personality and Social Psychology
6    P PSYC1001 and PSYC1002
N PSYC2013 or PSYC2014
Semester 2
NB: PSYC2010/2910 replaced PSYC2011/2911 from 2017. PSYC2015/2915, PSYC2016, and PSYC2017 replaced PSYC2010/2910, PSYC2013, and PSYC2014 in 2019.
Senior units of study
PSYC3010
Advanced Statistics for Psychology
6    P PSYC2012 plus at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit of Study from PSYC2010; PSYC2910; PSYC2011; PSYC2911; PSYC2013; PSYC2014; PSYC2015, PSYC2915, PSYC2016; PSYC2017
Semester 2
PSYC3011
Learning and Behaviour
6    P (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and PSYC2012
N PSYC3911
Semester 1
PSYC3911
Learning and Behaviour (Advanced)
6    P (A mark of 75 or above in PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and PSYC2012
N PSYC3011
Semester 1
PSYC3012
Cognition, Language and Thought
6    P PSYC2012 and (PSYC2013 or PSYC2016)
Semester 1
PSYC3013
Perceptual Systems
6    P (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2016) and PSYC2012
N PSYC3913
Semester 2
PSYC3913
Perceptual Systems (Advanced)
6    P (A mark of 75 or above in PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2016) and PSYC2012
N PSYC3013
Semester 2
PSYC3014
Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience
6    P [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011]
N PSYC3914
Semester 2
PSYC3914
Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience Adv
6    P [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011]
N PSYC3014
Semester 2
PSYC3015
Personality and Psychology Assessment 2
6    P PSYC2012 and (PSYC2014 or PSYC2017)
Semester 1
PSYC3016
Developmental Psychology
6    P PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915
N PSYC3916
Semester 2
PSYC3916
Developmental Psychology (Advanced)
6    P A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915)
N PSYC3016
Semester 2
PSYC3017
Social Psychology
6    P PSYC2013 or PSYC2017
Semester 1
PSYC3018
Abnormal Psychology
6    P (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (PSYC2014 or PSYC2017)
Semester 1
PSYC3020
Applied Psychology
6    P 12 credit points of 1000-level psychology units and 12 credit points of 2000-level Psychology units
N PSYC3019
Semester 2
PSYC3888
Psychology Interdisciplinary Project
6    P 12 credit points of PSYC1XXX and 12 credit points of PSYC2XXX
Semester 1
Semester 2
SCPU3001
Science Interdisciplinary Project
6    P Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major.
Intensive December
Intensive February
Intensive January
Intensive July
Semester 1
Semester 2
HPSC3023
Psychology and Psychiatry: History and Phil
6    A HPSC2100 and HPSC2101
P (12 credit points of Intermediate HPSC units) OR (Credit or greater in an HPSC Intermediate unit) OR (12 Intermediate credit points in Psychology units)
Semester 1

Psychology

For a major in Psychology, the minimum requirement is 48 credit points across Intermediate and Senior Psychology* units of study, including (PSYC2010/2910 or PSYC2015/2915), PSYC2012, (PSYC2013 or PSYC2016), and (PSYC2014 or PSYC2017). No other Intermediate Psychology units can be counted towards a major. Students must complete at least 24 credit points of Senior Psychology units for a major (or 30 credit points of Senior Psychology units for students in the BPsych degree). PSYC3018 must be included for students who have not completed (PSYC2010/2910 or PSYC2015/2915) at the intermediate level. Students who wish to be eligible for entry into the Honours program must also include PSYC3010.
*Note: HPSC3023 Psychology & Psychiatry: History & Phil is available as a Senior Psychology unit and will count towards a major in Psychology. Successful completion of this unit of study is essential for students intending to take the Theoretical Thesis option in Psychology Honours.
Junior units of study
PSYC1001 Psychology 1001

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1150 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer/
Psychology 1001 is a general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1001 covers the following areas: science and statistics in psychology; applied psychology; themes in the history of psychology; social psychology; personality theory; human development. This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/
Textbooks
Available on-line once semester commences
PSYC1002 Psychology 1002

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1150 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer/
Psychology 1002 is a further general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and it is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1002 covers the following areas: neuroscience; human mental abilities; learning and motivation; visual perception; cognitive processes; abnormal psychology.
This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site:
http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/
Textbooks
Available on-line once semester commences
Intermediate units of study
PSYC2015 Brain and Behavioural Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week x 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week x 12 weeks Prerequisites: PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2915 Assessment: In-class debate (5%), tutorial quiz (15%), scientific report proposal (10%), scientific report (20%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed for students who would like to learn about the core concepts of clinical and biobehavioural psychology, and their applications to therapies, organisations, and an individual's behaviour. The emphasis is on behaviour, emotions, and motivational processes. You will learn how to analyse the environmental causes of behaviours, and how to use reinforcements, punishments and incentives to modify and motivate behaviour. Clinical Psychology will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sexual disorders, and eating disorders. The way in which these processes arise and are shaped in people will be presented in the section on Developmental Psychology. Neuroscience will focus on the evolutionary, genetic, neurobiological, and pharmacological mechanisms underlying the phenomena taught in the other sections. The practical classes are designed for students with an interest in clinical and therapeutic Psychology, and will train students to design and implement a behaviour modification programme.
PSYC2915 Brain and Behavioural Psychology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week x 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week x 12 weeks Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or greater in PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 Assessment: Scientific written report proposal (10%) Scientific written report (20%), a tutorial quiz (15%), an in-class debate (5% participation mark), and the final exam (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This advanced-level course is designed for students who would like to learn about the core concepts of clinical and biobehavioural psychology. The advanced unit has the same overall concepts as the mainstream unit but the practical material offers a greater level of challenge and academic rigour. The emphasis of the lectures is on behaviour, emotions, and motivational processes. You will learn how to analyse the environmental causes of behaviours, and how to use reinforcements, punishments and incentives to modify and motivate behaviour. Clinical Psychology will focus on emotional and motivational disorders, such as anxiety and depression, addiction, sexual disorders, and eating disorders. The way in which these processes arise and are shaped in people will be presented in the section on Developmental Psychology. Neuroscience will focus on the evolutionary, genetic, neurobiological, and pharmacological mechanisms underlying the phenomena taught in the other sections. Students enrolled in the advanced stream will participate in different practical exercises with a focus on research methods used to examine the links between the brain and behaviours, emotions, cognitions, and their disorders. Students will design and conduct their own neuropsychology experiment.
PSYC2016 Perception, Cognition, and Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Barton L. Anderson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1hour lectures, 1x 1hr tutorials Prerequisites: PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 Assessment: Research report (35%), Quiz (15%), Exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this Unit of Study, you will study three of the core topics of Psychology: Perception, Cognition, and Intelligence. Our sensory systems generate our experience of our bodies and what exists in the world. In the perception component, you will learn how our sensory systems influence our ability to act in the world and the conditions and consequences of perceptual errors. The cognition component of the course will focus on the theoretical and methodological issues that arise in how we attend to, remember, think, problem solve, and make decisions, and consider the consequences of how biases and heuristics influence our choices. The intelligence component will explore the historical evolution of the concept of intelligence, issues in its measurement, the relationship to concepts of creativity, emotional intelligence, and the influence of the environment. You will participate in inquiry-led tutorials that will reinforce and expand on concepts in the unit, and develop broad thinking skills to relate evidence to rational arguments and choices that can be applied to any problem solving domain.
PSYC2017 Personality and Social Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Fiona White Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1 hour lectures/week for 13 weeks; 1 x 1 hour tutorial/week for 12 weeks, commencing in Week 2 Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 Assessment: Final exam (50%), report (30%), Tutorial Quiz (15%), Research participation (5%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All of us observe our social worlds and try to understand why people behave, think, and feel as they do. In this unit you will study a number of influential theories, philosophical and empirical approaches in Personality and Social Psychology. You will examine key topics in the scientific assessment of personality, attitudes and emotions, including an introduction to psychometric testing (e. g. , validity and reliability) in Personality and Social Psychology. Specifically, in the Personality component you will be exposed to conceptual analysis and will be expected to examine critically theories from the Psychodynamic, Behaviourist, Humanist, Social Cognitive and Psychometric traditions. In the Social Psychology component you will examine salient social constructs such as social influence, the causes of prejudice and possible reduction strategies, and explore how cognitive processes affect social judgment and behaviour. In this unit you will develop a broad understanding of the leading theories and research in the areas of Personality and Social Psychology.
NB: PSYC2010/2910 replaced PSYC2011/2911 from 2017. PSYC2015/2915, PSYC2016, and PSYC2017 replaced PSYC2010/2910, PSYC2013, and PSYC2014 in 2019.
Senior units of study
PSYC3010 Advanced Statistics for Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2012 plus at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit of Study from PSYC2010; PSYC2910; PSYC2011; PSYC2911; PSYC2013; PSYC2014; PSYC2015, PSYC2915, PSYC2016; PSYC2017 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, class tests, practical exercises (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study expands upon students' knowledge of the general linear model and its applications in the analysis of data from psychological research. The first half of the course introduces students to contrast analysis and interaction analyses as an extension of ANOVA, which allows for more focused analysis of data where group comparisons are the primary interest. The second half focuses on multiple regression and its extensions, which are used when the primary interest is to predict or explain a particular variable based on a set of other variables.
Textbooks
Keith, Z. T. (2006). Multiple Regression and Beyond. New York: Pearson Education, Inc.
PSYC3011 Learning and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3911 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word prac report, tutorial quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit addresses the fundamental concepts and more important research findings related to contemporary theories of associative learning in animals and humans. It examines the application of such fundamental research to issues such as drug use and food choice. It is designed to foster skills in reading primary sources in this area, and provide the opportunity for hands-on experience in carrying out a research project.
Textbooks
Bouton, M. E. (2016). Learning and Behavior: A contemporary synthesis, 2nd edition. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer.
PSYC3911 Learning and Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x 1-hr lectures and 1x 2-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: (A mark of 75 or above in PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3011 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2500 word prac report, tutorial quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit addresses the fundamental concepts and more important research findings related to contemporary theories of associative learning in animals and humans. It examines the application of such fundamental research to issues such as drug use and food choice. It is designed to foster skills in reading primary sources in this area, and provide the opportunity for hands-on experience in carrying out a research project. In the advanced unit of study students will learn techniques to model learning and behaviour, and independently apply these skills to experimental data that they have collected.
Textbooks
Bouton, M. E. (2016). Learning and Behavior: A contemporary synthesis, 2nd edition. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer.
PSYC3012 Cognition, Language and Thought

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2012 and (PSYC2013 or PSYC2016) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one major essay/research report (2000-2500 words), practical exercise(s) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit extends the theories and methods of investigating memory and attentional processes discussed in PSYC2013/PSYC2016 to consider a number of domains of higher cognitive processing. One strand of the course will focus on the cognitive processes involved in speech perception, language comprehension, language production, and reading. The remainder of the course will deal with the cognitive processes involved in reasoning and skilled behaviour across a range of domains. The practical program will expose students to a variety of the research methods used to investigate higher cognitive processes, develop their understanding of how these methods can be used to investigate hypotheses about mental processes and consider applications of cognitive research to real-world problems and issues.
PSYC3013 Perceptual Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2016) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3913 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, one 2000 word report, tutorial quiz, group presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Perception poses many challenges: how do we see colour and movement? How do we perceive surfaces and materials? How does combining information from multiple senses improve our perception? This unit draws on behavioural and neurophysiological perspectives to deepen understanding of current research topics in perception. The emphasis is on how visual information is processed to accomplish functions such as perceiving a single edge, extracting the contours that form a face, or the spatial relations needed to call offside on the sports field. Students also gain conceptual tools for evaluating the empirical and theoretical worth of recent research in perception. During the tutorial component of the course students will develop a practical experiment in which they formulate and test a hypothesis. In this way students gain important research experience that gives them valuable insight into the scientific process as it exists both in professional work and in the empirical research project required for the Honours degree.
Textbooks
Sensation and Perception, Third Edition
PSYC3913 Perceptual Systems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x 1-hr lectures and 1x 2-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: (A mark of 75 or above in PSYC2X10 or PSYC2X11 or PSYC2016) and PSYC2012 Prohibitions: PSYC3013 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, one 2000 word report, laboratory participation, group presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Perception poses many challenges: how do we see colour and movement? How do we perceive surfaces and materials? How does combining information from multiple senses improve our perception? This unit draws on behavioural and neurophysiological perspectives to deepen understanding of current research topics in perception. The emphasis is on how visual information is processed to accomplish functions such as perceiving a single edge, extracting the contours that form a face, or the spatial relations needed to call offside on the sports field. Students also gain conceptual tools for evaluating the empirical and theoretical worth of recent research in perception. During the tutorial component of the course students will develop a practical experiment in which they formulate and test a hypothesis. In this way students gain important research experience that gives them valuable insight into the scientific process as it exists both in professional work and in the empirical research project required for the Honours degree. In the advanced unit of study students will be placed in laboratories and will learn research techniques while helping conduct experiments in these laboratories.
Textbooks
Sensation and Perception, Third Edition
PSYC3014 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [(PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011] Prohibitions: PSYC3914 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one major essay/report 2000-2500 words, tutorial quizzes and participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. The implications of focal cognitive deficits in neurological patients for models of normal cognitive function will also be explored. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. In addition to lectures, a practical component will cover basic neuroanatomy and neuroscientific methods. The practical component will also introduce students to experimental and neuropsychological approaches to studying the relationahip between brain and behaviour.
PSYC3914 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience Adv

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and 6 credit points from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017)] OR [A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) and PCOL2011] Prohibitions: PSYC3014 Assessment: One 2 hour exam (end of semester), one quiz (mid-semester), one presentation, one written assignment (lab report), attendance and participation in tutorial/practical exercises (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration, and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. The lecture material will be the same as for PSYC3014, however, the practical class is targeted for those who would like to learn more about the experimental study of behaviour and the neurosciences. The practical component of the advanced stream will cover basic neuroanatomy, histology and neuropharmacology and will introduce students to experimental approaches to studying brain-behaviour relationships.
PSYC3015 Personality and Psychology Assessment 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2012 and (PSYC2014 or PSYC2017) Assessment: One 2 hour exam; one 2000-2500 word major essay/report, and in-class activities (e.g., tutorial presentations, in-class quizzes) (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study addresses current issues in personality, psychological testing, intelligence, and individual differences. Students are introduced to different theoretical models used in personality, intelligence, emotional intelligence, and metacognition and expected to critically evaluate these theories based on the supporting research evidence. This unit also presents different psychological testing techniques and methods.
PSYC3016 Developmental Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915 Prohibitions: PSYC3916 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, 2000 word prac report, practical exercise(s) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines our understanding of human psychological development, focusing on selected issues and empirical traditions within the discipline of Developmental Psychology. Students are expected to gain an understanding of the theoretical influences that have come to dominate developmental research, and students will also be introduced to a range of theoretical and research approaches in contemporary Developmental Science. These include: sense of identity, conceptual development, children's thinking, social cognition, moral reasoning and behaviour, and the role of genetic and environmental influences on development. The course will also consider applications of developmental research and theory in developmental psychopathology and in educational contexts, as well as exploring children's experience of art, literature and drama. Students are expected to gain knowledge of, and develop a critical approach to, the analysis of current research and theoretical issues in these areas.
PSYC3916 Developmental Psychology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x 1-hr lectures and 1x 2-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (PSYC2013 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) Prohibitions: PSYC3016 Assessment: one 2 hour exam, 2000 word prac report, practical exercise(s) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines our understanding of human psychological development, focusing on selected issues and empirical traditions within the discipline of Developmental Psychology. Students are expected to gain an understanding of the theoretical influences that have come to dominate developmental research, and students will also be introduced to a range of theoretical and research approaches in contemporary Developmental Science. These include: sense of identity and self-worth, conceptual development, children's thinking, social cognition, moral reasoning and behaviour, and the role of genetic and environmental influences on development. The course will also consider applications of developmental research and theory in developmental psychopathology and in educational contexts, as well as exploring children's experience of art, literature and drama. Students are expected to gain knowledge of, and develop a critical approach to, the analysis of current research and theoretical issues in these areas. In the advanced unit of study students will collect, score, and analyse the data from children participating in research projects in the School's Developmental Laboratories.
PSYC3017 Social Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour tutorial per most weeks. Prerequisites: PSYC2013 or PSYC2017 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, one 2500 word research report (consisting of both group work and individually-written components), and tutorial presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit continues the coverage of topics in Social Psychology begun in PSYC1001 and PSYC2013. The unit is divided into topic areas, where the emphasis is on evaluating theories and the relevant evidence. Topics areas include among others: antisocial behaviours, discrimination, the self, emotion, cultural psychology, evolutionary psychology, and existential social psychology. Tutorials provide first-hand experience of research by involving students in a small group research project based on topics covered in the lectures. The tutorials also provide an opportunity to discuss issues pertaining to each step of the research process (e.g., ethical issues that underlie social psychological research, proper practice when collecting and handling data, how to communicate research findings in written and verbal form).
PSYC3018 Abnormal Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2015 or PSYC2915) and (PSYC2014 or PSYC2017) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word essay, and tutorial quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study critically examines core issues in abnormal psychology, concerning the description, explanation and treatment of psychological disorders. The unit of study will include topics such as:
(a) Adult abnormal psychology: Anxiety and related disorders (specific phobias, panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, OCD, PTSD); Substance-related and Addictive disorders (drug, alcohol, gambling); Eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa); Depressive disorders, Bipolar disorders; Schizophrenia, Personality disorders.
(b) Child abnormal psychology: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; Conduct disorder; Anxiety disorders, Depression.
Textbooks
Rieger, E. (Ed.) (2014) Abnormal Psychology: Leading researcher perspectives. Sydney: McGraw-Hill Education. (3rd Ed).
PSYC3020 Applied Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of 1000-level psychology units and 12 credit points of 2000-level Psychology units Prohibitions: PSYC3019 Assessment: One 2 hour examination (50%), one 2500 word written assignment (30%), class quizzes (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to introduce students to various ways in which psychological theory and research can be applied in the real world. In particular, this unit will focus on Health Psychology, Forensic Psychology, and Organisational Psychology. The Health Psychology component of this course may include investigation into why we engage in risky health behaviours including smoking, overeating and alcohol use; inequalities in health including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island health; dealing with chronic illness including death and dying, and survivorship. The Forensic Psychology component of the course may include investigation into lie detection, criminal offenders, victims of crime, and eyewitness memory. The Organisational Psychology component of the course may focus on personnel selection, training in organisations, performance measurement, workplace motivation, leadership and aspects of positive psychology.
PSYC3888 Psychology Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hrs lectures and 3hrs workshop/group work per week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of PSYC1XXX and 12 credit points of PSYC2XXX Assessment: An oral 'pitch' (15%), a written proposal (35%), and a final written report (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Our ever-changing world requires knowledge that extends across multiple disciplines. The ability to identify and explore interdisciplinary links is a crucial skill for emerging professionals and researchers alike. This unit presents the opportunity to bring together the concepts and skills you have learnt in your discipline and apply them to a real-world problem. For example, you will work on a project examining how virtual reality technologies can be used to remotely diagnose and treat common anxiety disorders in people. This will involve working with people from information technology disciplines to design and build games and tests with virtual reality equipment, and then to assess the effectiveness of these games. In this unit, you will continue to understand and explore disciplinary knowledge, while also meeting and collaborating with students from across the University through project-based learning; identifying and solving problems, collecting and analysing data and communicating your findings to a diverse audience. All of these skills are highly valued by employers. This unit will foster the ability to work in interdisciplinary teams, and this is essential for both professional and research pathways in the future.
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Pauline Ross Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.
HPSC3023 Psychology and Psychiatry: History and Phil

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Hans Pols and Dr Fiona Hibberd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (12 credit points of Intermediate HPSC units) OR (Credit or greater in an HPSC Intermediate unit) OR (12 Intermediate credit points in Psychology units) Assumed knowledge: HPSC2100 and HPSC2101 Assessment: 1x 2500wd essay (45%) and 1x2hr exam (45%) class participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Across the unit we examine one of the most interesting aspects of the history and philosophy of science. viz., the scientific practices and assumptions involved in making human beings an object of study. We will examine the ways in which psychologists and psychiatrists have investigated human nature, the kinds of experimental approaches they have developed to that end, the major controversies in this field, and the basic philosophical assumptions that have been made in the sciences of human nature. We investigate the developments of psychological theories and investigative methods as well as the development of psychiatric theory, treatment methods, and institutions.