Table 1: Molecular Biology and Genetics

Table 1 lists units of study available to students in the Bachelor of Science and combined degrees. The units are available to students enrolled in other degrees in accordance with their degree resolutions.

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Molecular Biology and Genetics

For a major in Molecular Biology and Genetics, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed below.
Junior units of study
MBLG1001
Molecular Biology and Genetics (Intro)
6    A 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry
N MBLG1901
Semester 2
MBLG1901
Molecular Biology and Genetics (Adv)
6    A HSC Chemistry and Biology OR 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry
P UAI (or ATAR equivalent) of 95 or minimum Band 5 in HSC chemistry and biology or by invitation
N MBLG1001
Semester 2
Intermediate units of study
6 credit points of Intermediate Biochemistry units (taken from BCHM2071/2971 and/or BCHM2072/2972) are a pre-requisite for BCHM3071/3971 and BCHM3072/3972, which are required for a major in Molecular Biology and Genetics.
BCHM2071
Protein Biochemistry
6    A CHEM1101 and CHEM1102
P (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry
N BCHM2971


Recommended concurrent units of study: MBLG2071 and BCHM2072 for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 2
BCHM2971
Protein Biochemistry (Advanced)
6    P (Distinction in (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry
N BCHM2071


Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 2
BCHM2072
Human Biochemistry
6    P (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry
N BCHM2972. All intermediate BMED units.


This unit is not available to BMedSc students. Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and BCHM2071 for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 1
BCHM2972
Human Biochemistry (Advanced)
6    P (Distinction in (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry
N BCHM2072. All intermediate BMED units.


This unit is not available to BMedSc students. Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 1
MBLG2071
Molecular Biology and Genomics
6    P (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 CP of Junior Chemistry
N MBLG2971


Recommended concurrent units of study: (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) and (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
Semester 1
MBLG2971
Molecular Biology and Genomics (Adv)
6    P (Distinction in either (MBLG1001 or MBLG901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry
N MBLG2071
Semester 1
MBLG2072
Genetics and Genomics
6    A 12cp of Junior Chemistry
P 6cp of Junior Biology and (one of MBLG1001 and MBLG1901) and 6cp of Junior Chemistry
N MBLG2972


For students planning a Molecular Biology and Genetics major, 12cp of Junior Chemistry is required.
Semester 2
MBLG2972
Genetics and Genomics (Adv)
6    A 12cp of Junior Chemistry
P Distinction average across 6cp of Junior Biology, 6cp of (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 6cp of Junior Chemistry.
N MBLG2072


For students planning for a Molecular Biology and Genetics major, 12cp of Junior Chemistry is required.
Semester 2
Senior units of study
BCHM3071
Molecular Biology & Biochemistry- Genes
6    P (MBLG 1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401, BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804).
N BCHM3971
Semester 1
BCHM3971
Molecular Biology & Biochem- Genes (Adv)
6    P (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804)
N BCHM3071
Semester 1
BCHM3072
Human Molecular Cell Biology
6    P (MBLG1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and 2804)
N BCHM3972
Semester 2
BCHM3972
Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)
6    P (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804).
N BCHM3072
Semester 2
BIOL3018
Gene Technology and Genomics
6    P (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL.
N BIOL3918
Semester 1
BIOL3918
Gene Technology and Genomics Advanced
6    P Distinction average across (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL.
N BIOL3018
Semester 1
BIOL3026
Developmental Genetics
6    P (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL.
N BIOL3926
Semester 2
BIOL3926
Developmental Genetics (Advanced)
6    P Distinction average across (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL.
N BIOL3026
Semester 2

Molecular Biology and Genetics

For a major in Molecular Biology and Genetics, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from senior units of study listed below.
Junior units of study
MBLG1001 Molecular Biology and Genetics (Intro)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 1-hour tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight Prohibitions: MBLG1901 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, in-semester skills test and assignments (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), M Nutr Diet, B E, B Med Sc, B Pharm, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
The lectures in this unit of study introduce the "Central Dogma" of molecular biology and genetics -i.e., the molecular basis of life. The course begins with the information macromolecules in living cells: DNA, RNA and protein, and explores how their structures allow them to fulfill their various biological roles. This is followed by a review of how DNA is organised into genes leading to discussion of replication and gene expression (transcription and translation). The unit concludes with an introduction to the techniques of molecular biology and, in particular, how these techniques have led to an explosion of interest and research in Molecular Biology. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments which explore the measurement of enzyme activity, the isolation of DNA and the 'cutting' of DNA using restriction enzymes. However, a key aim of the practicals is to give students higher level generic skills in computing, communication, criticism, data analysis/evaluation and experimental design.
Textbooks
Introduction to Molecular Biology MBLG1001 & MBLG1901, 3rd edition compiled by D. Hancock, G. Denyer and B. Lyon, Pearson ISBN 978 1 4860 0039 5
MBLG1901 Molecular Biology and Genetics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 1-hour tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight; four 1-hour seminars per semester. Prerequisites: UAI (or ATAR equivalent) of 95 or minimum Band 5 in HSC chemistry and biology or by invitation Prohibitions: MBLG1001 Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Biology OR 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, in-semester skills test and assignments (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B E, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
The lectures in this unit of study introduce the "Central Dogma" of molecular biology and genetics, i.e., the molecular basis of life. The course begins with the information macro-molecules in living cells: DNA,RNA and protein, and explores how their structures allow them to fulfill their various biological roles. This is followed by a review of how DNA is organised into genes leading to discussion of replication and gene expression (transcription and translation). The unit concludes with an introduction to the techniques of molecular biology and, in particular, how these techniques have led to an explosion of interest and research in Molecular Biology. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments which explore the measurement of enzyme activity, the isolation of DNA and the 'cutting' of DNA using restriction enzymes. However,a key aim of the practicals is to give students higher level generic skills in computing, communication, criticism, data analysis/evaluation and experimental design. The advanced component is designed for students interested in continuing in molecular biology. It consists of 7 advanced lectures (replacing 7 regular lectures) and 3 advanced laboratory sessions (replacing 3 regular practical classes). The advanced lectures will focus on the experiments which led to key discoveries in molecular biology. The advanced practical sessions will give students the opportunity to explore alternative molecular biology experimental techniques. Attendance at MBLG1999 seminars is strongly encouraged.
Textbooks
Introduction to Molecular Biology MBLG1001 & MBLG1901, 3rd edition compiled by D. Hancock, G. Denyer and B. Lyon, Pearson ISBN 978 1 4860 0039 5
Intermediate units of study
6 credit points of Intermediate Biochemistry units (taken from BCHM2071/2971 and/or BCHM2072/2972) are a pre-requisite for BCHM3071/3971 and BCHM3072/3972, which are required for a major in Molecular Biology and Genetics.
BCHM2071 Protein Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sashi Kant Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour tutorial and seven 3-4-hour practical session per semester Prerequisites: (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: BCHM2971 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1101 and CHEM1102 Assessment: One 2.5-hour theory and theory of practical exam (65%), two one hour in-semester quizzes(15%), practical assignments and laboratory book reports (20%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: Recommended concurrent units of study: MBLG2071 and BCHM2072 for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This unit of study introduces biochemistry by describing the physical and chemical activities of proteins and their functions in cells. The details of protein interactions with other cellular components are presented and the relationship of protein structure and function is discussed. Techniques in protein chemistry and analysis, including proteomics are introduced together with key experiments which reveal the physical basis of the functioning of proteins. This course builds on the protein science presented in MBLG1001 and is ideally suited to students studying intermediate Chemistry, Pharmacology, Cell Biology, Immunology or Physiology together with Biochemistry. The practical course will nurture technical skills in biochemistry and will include protein preparation, the analysis of protein structure and enzymatic assays.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry, 6th edition, by Nelson and Cox Resources Manual for Biochemistry 2 Practical Sessions, Sem 2.
BCHM2971 Protein Biochemistry (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sashi Kant Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour tutorial and seven 3- 4-hour practical per semester Prerequisites: (Distinction in (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: BCHM2071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour theory and theory of practical exam (65%), two one hour in-semester quizzes(15%), practical assignments and laboratory book reports (20%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This advanced unit of study introduces biochemistry by describing the physical and chemical activities of proteins and their functions in cells. The details of protein interactions with other cellular components are presented and the relationship of protein structure and function is discussed. Techniques in protein chemistry and analysis, including proteomics are discussed together with key experiments which reveal the physical basis of the functioning of proteins. This course builds on the protein science presented in MBLG1X01 and is ideally suited to students studying Intermediate Chemistry, Pharmacology, Cell Biology, Immunology or Physiology together with Biochemistry. The advanced practical course will nurture technical skills in protein biochemistry and will include protein preparation, the interpretation of protein structure, enzymatic assays and biochemical analysis.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry, 6th edition, by Nelson and Cox Resources Manual for Biochemistry 2 Practical Sessions, Sem 2
BCHM2072 Human Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week, one tutorial per fortnight, and 2-3 hours per week of practical Prerequisites: (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: BCHM2972. All intermediate BMED units. Assessment: One 3-hour exam (65%), practical work (25%), in semester assignments (10%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex, S S & Nut), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), M Nutr Diet, B E, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: This unit is not available to BMedSc students. Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and BCHM2071 for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This unit of study aims to describe how cells work at the molecular level, with a special emphasis on human biochemistry. The chemical reactions that occur inside cells are described in the first series of lectures, Cellular Metabolism. Aspects of the molecular architecture of cells that enable them to transduce messages and communicate with each other are described in the second half of the unit of study, Signal Transduction. At every stage there is emphasis on the 'whole body' consequences of reactions, pathways and processes. Cellular Metabolism describes how cells extract energy from fuel molecules like fatty acids and carbohydrates, how the body controls the rate of fuel utilisation and how the mix of fuels is regulated (especially under different physiological circumstances such as starvation and exercise). The metabolic inter-relationships of the muscle, brain, adipose tissue and liver and the role of hormones in coordinating tissue metabolic relationships is discussed. The unit also discusses how the body lays down and stores vital fuel reserves such as fat and glycogen, how hormones modulate fuel partitioning between tissues and the strategies involved in digestion and absorption and transport of nutrients. Signal Transduction covers how communication across membranes occurs (i.e. via surface receptors and signaling cascades). This allows detailed molecular discussion of the mechanism of hormone action and intracellular process targeting. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments that investigate the measurement of glucose utilisation using radioactive tracers and the design of biochemical assay systems. During the unit of study, generic skills are nurtured by frequent use of analytical and problem solving activities. Opportunities are provided to redesign and repeat experiments so as to provide a genuine research experience. Student exposure to generic skills will be extended by the introduction of exercises designed to teach oral communication, instruction writing and planning skills.
BCHM2972 Human Biochemistry (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week, one tutorial per fortnight, and 2-3 hours per week of practical. Prerequisites: (Distinction in (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: BCHM2072. All intermediate BMED units. Assessment: One 3-hour exam (65%), practical work (25%), in semester assignments (10%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: This unit is not available to BMedSc students. Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This advanced unit aims to describe how cells work at the molecular level, with a special emphasis on human biochemistry. The chemical reactions that occur inside cells are described in the first series of lectures, Cellular Metabolism. Aspects of the molecular architecture of cells that enable them to transduce messages and communicate with each other are described in the second half of the unit of study, Signal Transduction. At every stage there is emphasis on the 'whole body' consequences of reactions, pathways and processes. Cellular Metabolism describes how cells extract energy from fuel molecules like fatty acids and carbohydrates, how the body controls the rate of fuel utilization and how the mix of fuels is regulated (especially under different physiological circumstances such as starvation and exercise). The metabolic inter-relationships of the muscle, brain, adipose tissue and liver and the role of hormones in coordinating tissue metabolic relationships is discussed. The unit also discusses how the body lays down and stores vital fuel reserves such as fat and glycogen, how hormones modulate fuel partitioning between tissues and the strategies involved in digestion and absorption and transport of nutrients. Signal Transduction covers how communication across membranes occurs (i.e., via surface receptors and signaling cascades). This allows detailed molecular discussion of the mechanism of hormone action and intracellular process targeting. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments that investigate the measurement of glucose utilisation using radioactive tracers and the design of biochemical assay systems. During the unit of study, generic skills are nurtured by frequent use of analytical and problem solving activities. Opportunities are provided to redesign and repeat experiments so as to provide a genuine research experience. Student exposure to generic skills will be extended by the introduction of exercise designed to teach oral communication, instruction writing and planning skills.
The differences between the advanced and regular versions of this Unit of Study is in the in-semester assignments and some of the practical sessions.
MBLG2071 Molecular Biology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Vanessa Gysbers Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 4-hour practical per fortnight and five 1-hour tutorials. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 CP of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: MBLG2971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work, laboratory reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex, S S & Nut), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), M Nutr Diet, B E, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study.
Note: Recommended concurrent units of study: (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) and (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This unit of study extends the basic concepts introduced in MBLG1001/1901 and provides a firm foundation for students wishing to continue in the molecular biosciences as well as for those students who intend to apply molecular techniques to other biological or medical questions. The unit explores the regulation of the flow of genetic information in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The central focus is on the control of replication, transcription and translation and how these processes can be studied and manipulated in the laboratory. The processes of DNA mutation and repair are also discussed. Experiments in model organisms are presented to illustrate current advancements in the field, together with discussion of work carried out in human systems and the relevance to human genetic diseases. Tools of molecular biology are taught within the context of recombinant DNA cloning - with an emphasis on essential knowledge required to use plasmid vectors. The methods of gene introduction (examples of transgenic animals) are also discussed along with recent developments in stem cell biology. Other techniques include the separation and analysis of macromolecules, like DNA, RNA and proteins, by gel electrophoresis and Southern, Northern & Western blotting. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays is also discussed. In the genomics section, topics include structure, packaging and complexity of the genome: assigning genes to specific chromosomes, physical mapping of genomes as well as DNA and genome sequencing methods and international projects in genome mapping. The practical course complements the theory and builds on the skills learnt in MBLG1001. Specifically students will: use spectrophotometry for the identification and quantification of nucleic acids, explore the lac operon system for the investigation of gene expression control, perform plasmid isolation, and complete a PCR analysis for detection of polymorphisms. As with MBLG1001, strong emphasis is placed on the acquisition of generic and fundamental technical skills.
Textbooks
Watson, J et al. Molecular Biology of the Gene. Pearson 7th edition, 2013.
MBLG2971 Molecular Biology and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Vanessa Gysbers Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical per fortnight and five 1-hour tutorials. Prerequisites: (Distinction in either (MBLG1001 or MBLG901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: MBLG2071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work, laboratory reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex, S S & Nut), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B E, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
Extension of concepts presented in MBLG2071 which will be taught in the context of practical laboratory experiments.
Textbooks
Watson, J et al. Molecular Biology of the Gene. Pearson 7th edition, 2013.
MBLG2072 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Penny Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 2-3 hour practical per week, one tutorial every second week. Prerequisites: 6cp of Junior Biology and (one of MBLG1001 and MBLG1901) and 6cp of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: MBLG2972 Assumed knowledge: 12cp of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2 hour exam (50%), laboratory reports and quizzes (50%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: For students planning a Molecular Biology and Genetics major, 12cp of Junior Chemistry is required.
This unit of study brings together traditional genetic analysis and modern molecular biology to study genetics of all life forms from humans and other complex multicellular organisms through to single celled organisms such as bacteria. Students will be introduced to complex modes of Mendelian inheritance, including those involved in human diseases. The molecular basis for different patterns of inheritance will be discussed. The interaction of genes and gene products will be illustrated by the examination of the molecular genetics of development. The application of genomics to the study of genetic variation, molecular evolution and gene function in humans and model organisms will also be described. In the practical sessions students will investigate the genetics of a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in order to illustrate concepts covered in the lecture material. Students will develop familiarity and competence with equipment used in molecular genetic analysis, bioinformatics, microscopy and statistical tests. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study, which can lead to a major in Biology, and successful completion of this unit of study is required in order to progress in the Molecular Biology and Genetics major.
MBLG2972 Genetics and Genomics (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Penny Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 2-3 hour practical per week, one tutorial every second week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across 6cp of Junior Biology, 6cp of (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 6cp of Junior Chemistry. Prohibitions: MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: 12cp of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), laboratory reports and quizzes (50%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B E, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: For students planning for a Molecular Biology and Genetics major, 12cp of Junior Chemistry is required.
The content of MBLG2972 will be based on MBLG2072 but qualified students will participate in alternative components at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year but includes a practical project in the laboratory to improve molecular biology skills
Senior units of study
BCHM3071 Molecular Biology & Biochemistry- Genes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 6-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG 1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401, BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804). Prohibitions: BCHM3971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes X. 10th edition. Jones & Bartlett. 2011.
BCHM3971 Molecular Biology & Biochem- Genes (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell. Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 6-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804) Prohibitions: BCHM3071 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of the activity of genes in living organisms, with a focus on eukaryotic and particularly human systems. The lecture component covers the arrangement and structure of genes, how genes are expressed, promoter activity and enhancer action. This leads into discussions on the biochemical basis of differentiation of eukaryotic cells, the molecular basis of imprinting, epigenetics, and the role of RNA in gene expression. Additionally, the course discusses the effects of damage to the genome and mechanisms of DNA repair. The modern techniques for manipulating and analysing macromolecules such as DNA and proteins and their relevance to medical and biotechnological applications are discussed. Techniques such as the generation of gene knockout and transgenic mice are discussed as well as genomic methods of analysing gene expression patterns. Particular emphasis is placed on how modern molecular biology and biochemical methods have led to our current understanding of the structure and functions of genes within the human genome. The practical course is designed to complement the lecture course and will provide students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in molecular biology laboratories.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3071. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in gene expression and manipulation will be covered.
Textbooks
Lewin, B. Genes X. 10th edition. Jones & Bartlett. 2011.
BCHM3072 Human Molecular Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 6-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001/1901) and 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and 2804) Prohibitions: BCHM3972 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B App Sc (Ex, S S & Nut), B App Sc (Ex &Sp Sc), B Sc (Nutr), B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science. 2008.
BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jill Johnston, Prof Iain Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and one 6-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001/1901) and Distinction in 12 CP of Intermediate BCHM/MBLG units (taken from MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971 or BCHM2072/2972). For BMedSc: (18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 and Distinction in BMED2405 and one of MBLG2071/2971 or BCHM2071/2971) or (Distinction average in BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2804). Prohibitions: BCHM3072 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study will explore the responses of cells to changes in their environment in both health and disease. The lecture course consists of four integrated modules. The first will provide an overview of the role of signalling mechanisms in the control of human cell biology and then focus on cell surface receptors and the downstream signal transduction events that they initiate. The second will examine how cells detect and respond to pathogenic molecular patterns displayed by infectious agents and injured cells by discussing the roles of relevant cell surface receptors, cytokines and signal transduction pathways. The third and fourth will focus on the life, death and differentiation of human cells in response to intra-cellular and extra-cellular signals by discussing the eukaryotic cell cycle under normal and pathological circumstances and programmed cell death in response to abnormal extra-cellular and intra-cellular signals. In all modules emphasis will be placed on the molecular processes involved in human cell biology, how modern molecular and cell biology methods have led to our current understanding of them and the implications of them for pathologies such as cancer. The practical component is designed to complement the lecture course, providing students with experience in a wide range of techniques used in modern molecular cell biology.
The lecture component of this unit of study is the same as BCHM3072. Qualified students will attend seminars/practical classes in which more sophisticated topics in modern molecular cell biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. et al. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science. 2008.
BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Neville Firth Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL. Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Associated degrees: B An Vet Bio Sc, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), UG Study Abroad Program.
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, the transformation of animal and plant cells, the genetic engineering of animals and plants, and the environmental release of genetically-modified (transgenic) organisms. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.
BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Neville Firth Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL. Prohibitions: BIOL3018 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), UG Study Abroad Program.
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of BIOL3018 Gene Technology & Genomics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mary Byrne, Dr Jenny Saleeba Session: Semester 2 Classes: Twenty-four 1 hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL. Prohibitions: BIOL3926 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit discusses major concepts and current understanding of developmental biology with an emphasis on molecular genetics. The developmental genetics of model plant and animal systems, and approaches used to determine how a complex multicellular organism is established from a single cell, will be investigated. Topics to be discussed will cover a broad range of developmental genetics in animal species, using examples from the model species Drosophila, C. elegans, and mouse. Plant specific processes such as leaf, root and flower development will also be covered. using examples from the model species Arabidopsis. The study of mutants in development will be used to highlight pattern formation, gene interactions and the importance of regulated gene expression in development. Reference will be made to the use of modern techniques in developmental biology such as transgenics, recombinant DNA technology, and tissue-specific expression analysis. Various methods of genetic mapping will be covered. Practical work complements the theoretical aspects of the course and develops important skills in genetics.
BIOL3926 Developmental Genetics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mary Byrne Session: Semester 2 Classes: Twenty-four 1 hour lectures/tutorials per semester and up to 3 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL. Prohibitions: BIOL3026 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments (100%). Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), UG Study Abroad Program.
Qualified students will participate in alternative components to BIOL3026 Developmental Genetics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year. Some assessment will be in an alternative format to components of BIOL3026.