Table 1: Nanoscience and Technology

Table 1 lists units of study available to students in the Bachelor of Science and combined degrees. The units are available to students enrolled in other degrees in accordance with their degree resolutions.

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Nanoscience and Technology

A major in Nanoscience and Technology requires 24 credit points of study at senior level taken from the following:
- Materials Chemistry (CHEM3112/3912)
- Membranes, Self-Assembly & Surfaces (CHEM3116/3916)
- Quantum Physics/Computational Physics & Lab (PHYS3039/3939)
- Statistical Mechanics/Condensed Matter Physics & Lab (PHYS3099/3999)
- Mechanics of Solids 2 (MECH3361)
- Materials 2 (MECH3362)
CHEM3112
Materials Chemistry
6    P (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916).
N CHEM3912
Semester 1
CHEM3912
Materials Chemistry (Adv)
6    P WAM of 65 or greater and a Credit or better in: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)
N CHEM3112
Semester 1
CHEM3116
Membranes, Self Assembly and Surfaces
6    P (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)
N CHEM3916
Semester 2
CHEM3916
Membranes, Self Assembly & Surfaces(Adv)
6    P WAM of 65 or greater and a Credit or better in: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)
N CHEM3116
Semester 2
PHYS3039
Quantum Physics/Comp. Physics & Lab
6    P (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912)
N PHYS3939, PHYS3042, PHYS3942, PHYS3043, PHYS3943, PHYS3044, PHYS3944, PHYS3060, PHYS3960, PHYS3961, PHYS3062, PHYS3962, COSC3011, COSC3911
Semester 1
PHYS3939
Quantum Physics/Comp. Phys. & Lab (Adv)
6    P (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912), with average of at least 70.
N PHYS3039, PHYS3042, PHYS3942, PHYS3043, PHYS3943, PHYS3044, PHYS3944, PHYS3060, PHYS3960, PHYS3961, PHYS3062, PHYS3962, COSC3011, COSC3911
Semester 1
PHYS3099
Stat. Mechanics/Cond. Matter & Lab
6    P (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912) and (PHYS3039 or PHYS3939)
N PHYS3090, PHYS3990, PHYS3999, PHYS3062, PHYS3962, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3074, PHYS3974, PHYS3079, PHYS3979, PHYS3080, PHYS3980, PHYS3081, PHYS3981
Semester 2
PHYS3999
Stat. Mechanics/Cond. Matter & Lab (Adv)
6    P (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912) with average of at least 70; (PHYS3039 or PHYS3939)
N PHYS3090, PHYS3990, PHYS3099, PHYS3062, PHYS3962, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3074, PHYS3974, PHYS3079, PHYS3979, PHYS3080, PHYS3980, PHYS3081, PHYS3981
Semester 2
MECH3361
Mechanics of Solids 2
6    P AMME2301 and AMME2302
Semester 2
MECH3362
Materials 2
6    A This subject requires you to have two important skills to bring in: (1) A good understanding of basic knowledge and principles of material science and engineering from AMME2302 Materials I and mechanics of solids for simple structural elements (in tension, bending, torsion) from AMME2301 ; (2) Reasonable mathematical skills in calculation of stresses and strains in simple structural elements.
P AMME2301 and AMME2302
Semester 1

Nanoscience and Technology

A major in Nanoscience and Technology requires 24 credit points of study at senior level taken from the following:
- Materials Chemistry (CHEM3112/3912)
- Membranes, Self-Assembly & Surfaces (CHEM3116/3916)
- Quantum Physics/Computational Physics & Lab (PHYS3039/3939)
- Statistical Mechanics/Condensed Matter Physics & Lab (PHYS3099/3999)
- Mechanics of Solids 2 (MECH3361)
- Materials 2 (MECH3362)
CHEM3112 Materials Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916). Prohibitions: CHEM3912 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, written assignments, prac reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), UG Study Abroad Program.
This course concerns the inorganic chemistry of solid-state materials: compounds that possess 'infinite' bonding networks. The extended structure of solid materials gives rise to a wide range of important chemical, mechanical, electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Consequently such materials are of enormous technological significance as well as fundamental curiosity. In this course you will learn how chemistry can be used to design and synthesise novel materials with desirable properties. The course will start with familiar molecules such as C60 and examine their solid states to understand how the nature of chemical bonding changes in the solid state, leading to new properties such as electronic conduction. This will be the basis for a broader examination of how chemistry is related to structure, and how structure is related to properties such as catalytic activity, mechanical strength, magnetism, and superconductivity. The symmetry of solids will be used explain how their structures are classified, how they can transform between related structures when external conditions such as temperature, pressure and electric field are changed, and how this can be exploited in technological applications such as sensors and switches. Key techniques used to characterise solid-state materials will be covered, particularly X-ray diffraction, microscopy, and physical property measurements.
CHEM3912 Materials Chemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures, one 1-hour seminar and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: WAM of 65 or greater and a Credit or better in: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916) Prohibitions: CHEM3112 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, written assignments, prac reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), UG Study Abroad Program.
This course concerns the inorganic chemistry of solid-state materials: compounds that possess 'infinite' bonding networks. The extended structure of solid materials gives rise to a wide range of important chemical, mechanical, electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Consequently, such materials are of enormous technological significance as well as fundamental curiosity. In this course you will learn how chemistry can be used to design and synthesize novel materials with desirable properties. The course will start with familiar molecules such as C60 and examine their solid states to understand how the nature of chemical bonding changes in the solid state, leading to new properties such as electronic conduction. This will be the basis for a broader examination of how chemistry is related to structure, and how structure is related to properties such as catalytic activity, mechanical strength, magnetism, and superconductivity. The symmetry of solids will be used explain how their structures are classified, how they can transform between related structures when external conditions such as temperature, pressure and electric field are changed, and how this can be exploited in technological applications such as sensors and switches. Key techniques used to characterise solid-state materials will be covered, particularly X-ray diffraction, microscopy, and physical property measurements. CHEM3912 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3112 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
CHEM3116 Membranes, Self Assembly and Surfaces

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916) Prohibitions: CHEM3916 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, written assignments, prac reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), UG Study Abroad Program.
Away from the covalent and ionic interactions that hold molecules and solids together is the world of fragile objects - folded polymers, membranes, surface adsorption and stable molecular aggregates - held together by weak forces such as van der Waals and the hydrophobic effect. The use of molecules rather than atoms as building blocks means that there are an enormous number of possibilities for stable aggregates with interesting chemical, physical and biological properties, many of which still wait to be explored. In this course we will examine the molecular interactions that drive self assembly and the consequences of these interactions in supramolecular assembly, lipid membrane formations and properties, microemulsions, polymer conformation and dynamics and range of fundamental surface properties including adhesion, wetting and colloidal stability.
CHEM3916 Membranes, Self Assembly & Surfaces(Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour seminar and one 4 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: WAM of 65 or greater and a Credit or better in: (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916) Prohibitions: CHEM3116 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, written assignments, prac reports (100%) Associated degrees: B A, B A (Adv)(Hons), B A (Adv)(Hons), M B B S, B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Molecular Biotechnology), UG Study Abroad Program.
Away from the covalent and ionic interactions that hold molecules and solids together is the world of fragile objects - folded polymers, membranes, surface adsorption and stable molecular aggregates - held together by weak forces such as van der Waals and the hydrophobic effect. The use of molecules rather than atoms as building blocks means that there are an enormous number of possibilities for stable aggregates with interesting chemical, physical and biological properties, many of which still wait to be explored. In this course we examine the molecular interactions that drive self assembly and the consequences of these interactions in supramolecular assembly, lipid membrane formations and properties, microemulsions, polymer conformation and dynamics and range of fundamental surface properties including adhesion, wetting and colloidal stability. CHEM3916 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3916 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
PHYS3039 Quantum Physics/Comp. Physics & Lab

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Twenty seven 1-hour lectures, eight 2-hour computer labs and six 4-hour experimental labs. Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912) Prohibitions: PHYS3939, PHYS3042, PHYS3942, PHYS3043, PHYS3943, PHYS3044, PHYS3944, PHYS3060, PHYS3960, PHYS3961, PHYS3062, PHYS3962, COSC3011, COSC3911 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments and laboratory reports (100%). Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
The lectures on Quantum Physics build on Intermediate Quantum Physics to cover more advanced topics, including atomic theory and spectroscopy, quantisation of the hydrogen atom, angular momentum in quantum mechanics, and perturbation theory.
The module on Computational Physics uses a mixture of lectures and computational lab sessions to explore problem solving using computers. It covers numerical schemes for solving ordinary and partial differential equations, with emphasis on choosing the best method to suit the problem, and on understanding numerical accuracy and stability. All coding is done in MATLAB, and no programming experience is assumed beyond that covered in Intermediate Physics.
In the Laboratory Classes, students will choose from a range of experiments that aim to give them an appreciation of the analytical, technical and practical skills required to conduct modern experimental work.
PHYS3939 Quantum Physics/Comp. Phys. & Lab (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Twenty seven 1-hour lectures, eight 2-hour computer labs and six 4-hour experimental labs. Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912), with average of at least 70. Prohibitions: PHYS3039, PHYS3042, PHYS3942, PHYS3043, PHYS3943, PHYS3044, PHYS3944, PHYS3060, PHYS3960, PHYS3961, PHYS3062, PHYS3962, COSC3011, COSC3911 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments and laboratory reports (100%). Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit covers the same topics as PHYS3039, but with greater depth and some more challenging material.
PHYS3099 Stat. Mechanics/Cond. Matter & Lab

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Thirty eight 1-hour lectures and six 4-hour experimental labs. Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912) and (PHYS3039 or PHYS3939) Prohibitions: PHYS3090, PHYS3990, PHYS3999, PHYS3062, PHYS3962, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3074, PHYS3974, PHYS3079, PHYS3979, PHYS3080, PHYS3980, PHYS3081, PHYS3981 Assessment: One 1.5-hour exam, one 1-hour exam, assignments and laboratory reports (100%). Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
The lectures on Statistical Mechanics aim to provide a theoretical foundation for statistical mechanics, including both classical and quantum distributions.
The lectures on Condensed Matter Physics provide a basic introduction to condensed matter systems, specifically the physics that underlies the electromagnetic, thermal, and optical properties of solids. The course draws on basic quantum theory and statistical mechanics and considers recent discoveries and new developments in semiconductors, nanostructures, magnetism, and superconductivity.
In the Laboratory Classes, students will choose from a range of experiments that aim to give them an appreciation of the analytical, technical and practical skills required to conduct modern experimental work.
Textbooks
An Introduction to Thermal Physics, David V. Schroeder.
PHYS3999 Stat. Mechanics/Cond. Matter & Lab (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Thirty eight 1-hour lectures and six 4-hour experimental labs. Prerequisites: (PHYS2011 or PHYS2911) and (PHYS2012 or PHYS2912) with average of at least 70; (PHYS3039 or PHYS3939) Prohibitions: PHYS3090, PHYS3990, PHYS3099, PHYS3062, PHYS3962, PHYS3068, PHYS3968, PHYS3074, PHYS3974, PHYS3079, PHYS3979, PHYS3080, PHYS3980, PHYS3081, PHYS3981 Assessment: One 1.5-hour exam, one 1-hour exam, assignments and laboratory reports (100%). Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit covers the same topics as PHYS3099, but with greater depth and some more challenging material.
Textbooks
An Introduction to Thermal Physics, David V. Schroeder
MECH3361 Mechanics of Solids 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week. 6 hours of laboratory work per semester. Prerequisites: AMME2301 and AMME2302 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%), Final Exam (50%) Associated degrees: B E, B Med Sc, B S T, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit of study aims to: teach the fundamentals of analyzing stress and deformation in a solid under complex loading associated with the elemental structures/components in aerospace, mechanical and biomedical engineering; develop the following attributes: understand the fundamental principles of solid mechanics and basic methods for stress and deformation analysis of a solid structure/element in the above mentioned engineering areas; gain the ability to analyze problems in terms of strength and deformation in relation to the design, manufacturing and maintenance of machines, structures, devices and elements in the above mentioned engineering areas. At the end of this unit students will have a good understanding of the following: applicability of the theories and why so; how and why to do stress analysis; why we need equations of motion/equilibrium; how and why to do strain analysis; why we need compatibility equations; why Hooke's law, why plasticity and how to do elastic and plastic analysis; how and why to do mechanics modeling; how to describe boundary conditions for complex engineering problems; why and how to solve a mechanics model based on a practical problem; why and how to use energy methods for stress and deformation analysis; why and how to introduce plates and shells and how to do analysis for plate and shell structures; why and how to do stress concentration analysis and its relation to fracture and service life of a component/structure; how and why to do fundamental plastic deformation analysis; how and why the finite element method is introduced and used for stress and deformation analysis. The ultimate outcome is that the students have the ability to solve engineering problems by comprehensively using the skills attained above.
MECH3362 Materials 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorials per week. 3 hours of laboratory work per semester Prerequisites: AMME2301 and AMME2302 Assumed knowledge: This subject requires you to have two important skills to bring in: (1) A good understanding of basic knowledge and principles of material science and engineering from AMME2302 Materials I and mechanics of solids for simple structural elements (in tension, bending, torsion) from AMME2301 ; (2) Reasonable mathematical skills in calculation of stresses and strains in simple structural elements. Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%), Final Exam (55%) Associated degrees: B E, B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit aims for students to understand the relationship between properties of materials and their microstructures and to improve mechanical design based on knowledge of mechanics and properties of materials.
At the end of this unit students should have the capability to select proper materials for simple engineering design.
Course content will include: short-term and long-term mechanical properties; introductory fracture and fatigue mechanics, dislocations; polymers and polymer composite materials; ceramics and glasses; structure-property relationships; selection of materials in mechanical design.