Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

Year 1

Year 1 of the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine has the following 48 credit point structure:
VETS6101 The Veterinary Professional 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sanaa Zaki Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 week intensive at start of semester 1, then tutorials, lectures, presentations and independent study throughout the semester. Assumed knowledge: One semester of study in each of: general chemistry (physical and inorganic), organic chemistry, biology and biochemistry. Assessment: Presentation with peer feedback, self and peer assessment of leadership and teamwork competencies; written exam. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study introduces you to foundational knowledge, skills and attitudes for being an effective veterinary professional. Key themes include lifelong learning, professionalism, one health, communication, teamwork, ethics, the human-animal bond and anthrozoology, cultural competence, emotional intelligence and leadership. The course also orientates you to studying with the Faculty and University as you attain your veterinary degree. Specifically, this Unit of Study will prepare you for: contributing to society as a professional veterinarian; making the most of your veterinary degree; conducting effective veterinary consultations; working successfully in veterinary workplace environments and teams; fostering positive practices in relation to professional wellbeing and self-care; maintaining clear professional records; upholding professional standards and ethics; effectively approaching situations in different cultural settings; managing your finances and career; and consistently improving your professional practice. Developing your knowledge and skills in these areas will help you develop veterinary graduate attributes essential for long term effectiveness and success in your veterinary career.
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6102 Professional Skills 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg and A/Prof Christina Dart Session: Semester 1 Classes: Introductory lecture, practical classes and demonstrations, tutorials, field trips, workplace training in veterinary teaching hospitals, independent study Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice; empathy for and confidence in interactions with animals, One semester of study in each of general chemistry (physical and inorganic), organic chemistry, biology and biochemistry. Assessment: Practical examinations, oral presentations/examinations, written assignments/reflective statements, clinical supervisor feedback, Objective Structured Clinical Examination, formative self and peer assessment Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study students will be introduced to, and begin to develop confidence and competency in, fundamental professional skills relevant to veterinary practice. The skills will include basic animal handling, basic clinical skills, personal and professional attributes, basic laboratory skills and clinical experience in veterinary teaching hospitals. Successful completion of this unit of study requires students to: (1) Attend and actively participate in all compulsory classes, (2) Achieve at least a pass grade in all compulsory assessment tasks, and (3) Submit all compulsory documents (veterinary teaching hospital site contracts and skills logs, feedback forms etc.).
Textbooks
There is no prescribed textbook for this unit. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6103 Research and Enquiry 1A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Navneet Dhand Session: Semester 1 Classes: Large group classes, small group tutorials/ discussion groups, computer laboratory tutorials, research seminars, online resources and independent study. Assessment: Writing an abstract; Quiz; Assignment. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Research and enquiry is implicit in every aspect of every career path in veterinary science. This unit will equip students with skills in generating research evidence as well as in searching and critically evaluating available evidence. The candidate will develop the skills necessary to formulate relevant questions and to collate, evaluate and synthesise evidence to answer these questions. The candidate will gain knowledge and develop fundamental skills in designing and conducting field experiments, including clinical trials, and evaluating journal articles about such experiments. Skills will be developed in using spreadsheets and conducting statistical analyses for data collected during simple experiments. Guidelines for publishing clinical trials will be discussed to enable candidates to critically evaluate methods (design, conduct and analysis) of clinical trials presented in journal articles and marketing brochures.
Textbooks
There is no prescribed textbook for this unit. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6104 Foundations of Veterinary Science A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glenn Shea Session: Semester 1 Classes: Activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures Assumed knowledge: One semester of study in each of general chemistry (physical and inorganic), organic chemistry, biology and biochemistry. Assessment: Intra-semester exam; an intrasemester assignment; end of semester theory and practical exams. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, the basic gross anatomy, histology (microscopic anatomy) and physiology of the integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive, cardiovascular and respiratory systems of domestic mammals are considered. The dog is used as the main anatomical exemplar, although some comparative anatomical detail, particularly for the digestive system, is included. Clinical material is used both to illustrate normal structure and function, and to provide the anatomical, histological and physiological knowledge that underpins the clinical examination and investigative techniques of these systems, such as auscultation, palpation and haematology. The material in this unit will underpin the acquisition of relevant skills in the unit of study Professional Skills 1A. Examples of disease in animals created by structural abnormalities and dysfunction are used to illustrate the application of this knowledge. This unit will provide a thorough basis for more advanced applied, regional and comparative anatomical and physiological learning in later years of the DVM in paraclinical and clinical disciplines. The body systems studied in this unit provide a framework of the mammalian body that will be further developed in Foundations of Veterinary Science B.
Textbooks
Required: Dyce, KM, Sack, WO and Wensing, CJG (2010). Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy. 4th Edition. Elsevier, St Louis. Evans, HE and de LaHunta, A (2013). Miller's Anatomy of the Dog. 4th Edition. Elsevier, St Louis. Sjaastad V, Sand, O and Hove, K (2010). Physiology of Domestic Animals. 2nd Edition. Scandinavian Veterinary Press, Oslo.
VETS6105 Animal Management Systems 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A.Prof Imke Tammen Session: Semester 2 Classes: Large group classes and lectures, Small group tutorials/ discussion groups, On farm practicals, Independent study Prerequisites: VETS6102 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice, one semester of study in each of general chemistry (physical and inorganic), organic chemistry, biology and biochemistry Assessment: Theory exam, Group assignment with oral presentation and written component, Reflective statement, Formative online quizzes Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animal Management Systems 1 will introduce students to the husbandry, housing, feeding and management of the major production, performance and companion animals, as well as key economic influences on livestock production. It will establish animal welfare standards and concepts of biosecurity, ethics and breeding programs. Students will be equipped with the necessary knowledge to understand farming and animal management systems when attending placements. This unit of study will also provide a foundation on which to build an understanding of animals' disease.
Textbooks
There is no required text for the course. A number of recommended textbooks, journal references and online resources that may prove useful in understanding lecture material or in the preparation of assessment tasks are listed in the handbook.
VETS6106 Professional Skills 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg and A/P Christina Dart Session: Semester 2 Classes: Introductory lecture, practical classes and demonstrations, tutorials, field trips, workplace training in veterinary teaching hospitals, independent study Prerequisites: VETS6102 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice; empathy for and confidence in interactions with animals, one semester of study in each of general chemistry (physical and inorganic), organic chemistry, biology and biochemistry Assessment: Practical examinations, oral presentations/ examinations, written assignments/ reflective statements, clinical supervisor feedback, Objective Structured Clinical Examination, formative self and peer assessment Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this Unit of study students will continue to develop confidence and competency in fundamental professional skills relevant to veterinary practice, building on their experiences in Professional Skills 1A. The skills will include basic animal handling and husbandry, basic clinical skills, personal and professional attributes, basic laboratory skills and clinical experience in veterinary teaching hospitals. Successful completion of this unit of study requires students to: (1) Attend and actively participate in all compulsory classes, (2) Achieve at least a pass grade in all compulsory assessment tasks, and (3) Submit all compulsory documents (veterinary teaching hospital site contracts and skills logs, feedback forms etc.).
Textbooks
There is no prescribed textbook for this unit. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required
VETS6107 Research and Enquiry 1B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Large group classes, small group tutorials/ discussion groups, computer laboratory tutorials, online resources and independent study. Prerequisites: VETS6103 Assessment: Study design assignment; participation; end-of-semester exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will contribute to graduates being able to create new knowledge and understanding through the process of research and enquiry. Within Research and Enquiry 1B students will continue to develop the skills necessary to synthesise evidence. This will be based within the context of using and interpreting diagnostic tests (module 1), and designing observational studies (module 2) to answer animal health and production questions relevant to veterinary science and allied professions. Scenarios that include client-owned individual animals within a clinical setting; herds, flocks and other groups of animals; and national control programs will be used to explain principles and purpose of sensitivity and specificity of diagnostics tests, and the principles of study design (such as target populations, case definition, sampling and measurement). Research and Enquiry 1B will focus on research in observational studies, building on Research and Enquiry 1A skills and knowledge in clinical trials. Students will critically incorporate available evidence (including peer-reviewed and non-peer reviewed literature) and practice communication skills. Additionally students will become familiar with basic statistical methods to evaluate evidence, a framework for animal ethics in research and cultural competence as it relates to conducting research (module 3).
Textbooks
Thrusfield, M.V. Veterinary Epidemiology. 2013, 3rd ed., ISBN 1118713419
VETS6108 Foundations of Veterinary Science B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Mark Krockenberger Session: Semester 2 Classes: Activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures. Prerequisites: VETS6104 Assumed knowledge: 2 semesters of chemistry, 1 semester of biology, 1 semester of biochemistry Assessment: Quizzes, individual and group assignment, end of semester theory exam, end of semester practical exam. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Understanding normal structure and function of the animal body is critical to understanding disease and dysfunction and as such, principles of preventative and therapeutic intervention. The overarching purpose of this unit of study is to provide an advanced understanding of the normal structure and function of the major co-ordinating Systems of the mammalian body and preliminary contextual understanding of the important concepts of pathophysiology and general pathology. The unit of study is underpinned by an understanding of basic concepts and the frameworks of structure and function achieved in the Foundations of Veterinary Science A. This Unit of Study will provide the foundation for advanced learning in DVM year 2 of systemic pathology, pathophysiology and aetiopathogenesis in the setting of the major organ systems in the context of clinical scenarios of companion and production animals.
Textbooks
Dyce, KM, Sack, WO and Wensing, CJG (2010). Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy. 4th Edition. Elsevier, St Louis.; Evans, HE and de LaHunta, A (2013). Miller's Anatomy of the Dog. 4th Edition. Elsevier, St Louis.; Samuelson, DA (2007). Textbook of Veterinary Histology. Elsevier, St Louis.; Sjaastad V, Sand, O and Hove, K (2010). Physiology of Domestic Animals. 2nd Edition. Scandinavian Veterinary Press, Oslo.; Zachary, JF and McGavin, MD (2012). Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 5th edition. Mosby, Elsevier.

Year 2

Year 2 of the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine has the following 48 credit point structure:
VETS6201 The Veterinary Professional 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Higgins Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 week intensive at start of semester 1, then tutorials, lectures, presentations and independent study throughout the semester Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 Assessment: Completion of independent learning project and associated forms, Presentation with peer feedback, self and peer assessment of leadership and teamwork competencies; written exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study introduces the student to intermediate professional skills for approaching disease investigation and engaging with presenting signs. It also builds on and extends their knowledge of professional competencies introduced in Year 1 and required as an effective veterinary professional. Key themes include clinical communication and professional reasoning, introduction to physical examination and disease investigation, lifelong learning, risk management and self-care, professionalism, legislation and ethics, cultural competence, emotional intelligence, practice management and leadership. Developing and extending their knowledge and skills in these areas will help students attain veterinary graduate attributes essential for long term effectiveness and success in their veterinary career. An integral part of this unit of study is an opportunity to extend their professional capabilities in an area of personal interest through the Independent Learning Project, allowing them to extend and differentiate their abilities from others in future employment applications.
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6202 Professional Skills 2A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg and Assoc Prof Christina Dart Session: Semester 1 Classes: Introductory lecture, Practical classes and demonstrations, Tutorials, Workshops; Independent study Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 Assessment: Practical examinations, Oral presentations/examinations, Written assignments/reflective statements, Clinical supervisor feedback, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), Formative self and peer assessment Practical field work: Field trips, Workplace training in Veterinary Teaching Hospitals Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is assumed that student have a basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice; empathy for and confidence in interactions with animals
In this unit of study students will continue in the development of their confidence and competency in, fundamental professional skills relevant to veterinary practice. These will include animal handling, clinical and laboratory skills, as well as the development of relevant personal and professional attributes, and clinical experience in veterinary teaching hospitals. Successful completion of this unit of study requires students to: (1) Attend and actively participate in all compulsory classes, (2) Achieve at least a pass grade in all compulsory assessment tasks, and (3) Submit all compulsory documents (veterinary teaching hospital site contracts and skills logs, feedback forms etc.).
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6203 Research and Enquiry 2A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Merran Govendir Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures and tutorials Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 Assessment: Synthesis of an animal ethics proposal (40%), Synthesis of a visual communication task (30%), Online quiz (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will continue to build on previous Research and Enquiry 1A and 1B units of study. This unit will continue to expand students¿ appreciation of the contribution of research to the veterinary sciences and develop their skills in the synthesis and communication of new and existing knowledge. Where possible this unit will integrate with the UoS Principles of Animal Disease A VETS6204 by utilising content and examples from the relevant module/s as triggers to explore this unit¿s themes. The themes for this unit are to i) synthesise an animal ethics proposal that complies with the Australian code for the care and use of animals for scientific purposes with an emphasis on the `3Rs (reduction, replacement and refinement) of animal use; ii) elaborate on principles introduced in Research and Enquiry 1B to explore diagnostic test validation in a laboratory and field settings using pathogen susceptibility testing to anti-infective drugs as an exemplar and how the results are interpreted with reference to population data from both the animals and pathogens (with this theme culminating in consideration of the `prudent use¿ of anti-infectives; iii) appreciate and utilise effective practices in the generation of visual communication tools and verbal presentation techniques and iv) explore the skills and tools applied to investigate a disease outbreak or herd problem involving one premise or event
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6204 Principles of Animal Disease A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Derek Spielman Session: Semester 1 Classes: Activities will vary weekly, but will be a mix of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures. Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 Assessment: Intrasemester (35%); end of semester written examinations and practical exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A fundamental understanding of disease and dysfunction is critical to applying principles of preventative and therapeutic interventions in veterinary practice. This unit of study provides a thorough grounding in knowledge and skills for a wide range of veterinary disciplines including veterinary pathology, veterinary clinical pathology, immunology, veterinary microbiology, veterinary parasitology, animal behaviour, veterinary pharmacology and veterinary diagnostic imaging. An integrated multi-disciplinary approach will highlight the underlying pathophysiology and aetiopathogenesis of clinical and subclinical disease affecting several major body systems. This unit will emphasise a pathobiological approach to investigations providing a logical diagnostic framework to facilitate students¿ understanding of disease and disease investigation. This unit of study will utilise scenarios from companion animals, production animals and wildlife to contextualise problems involving haematology, disorders of growth, dermatopathology, reproductive system pathology, gastrointestinal pathology, as well as behavioural manifestations during disease and the investigation of sudden (unexpected) deaths. The use of case-based scenarios will motivate and direct students to develop the concepts and principles underscoring therapeutics and disease control and management programs. The unit provides the foundation for integrated parasite/pest management (IPM) strategies. In addition, vector-, water- and food- borne diseases and transboundary diseases will be included enabling students to understand their relevance to the human-animal bond, public health, trade and biosecurity. Reinforcing the development and maintenance of normal structure and function will highlight abnormalities associated with specific clinical presentations and disease entities. This unit of study integrates with the concepts and skills taught within VETS6203 (Research and Enquiry 2A) and VETS6202 (Professional skills 2A) to prepare students for the clinical units of study in DVM 3.
Textbooks
Beveridge I and Emery D (2015) Australasian Animal Parasites Inside and Out. Australian Society for Parasitology. http://parasite.org.au/publications/australian-animal-parasites-inside-and-out/, Zachary and McGavin (2012) Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 5th Ed. Mosby. Refer to specific module outlines for relevant recommended texts.
VETS6205 Animal Management Systems 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter White Session: Semester 2 Classes: Classes will be a mixture of lectures, practical and tutorials Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 and VETS6201 and VETS6202 and VETS6203 and VETS6204 Assessment: Practical/oral assessment, Written Assignment, Online quizzes: formative and summative Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is assumed that students have a basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice, biology and biochemistry
Animal management Systems 2 will build on and extend student knowledge gained in Animal Management Systems 1 including the husbandry, housing, feeding and management of the major production, performance and companion animals, as well as key economic influences on livestock production. Using an animal welfare focus, students will build their knowledge of the concepts of biosecurity, nutrition, and breeding. Students will be equipped with further knowledge to help them understand farming and animal management systems and provide a foundation on which to develop an appreciation of disease management that will be taught in subsequent years.
Textbooks
Handbooks and online resources. Lucas and Southgate, Aquaculture: farming aquatic animals and plants (2nd edition, 2012). Huntington, Peter, Jane Myers, and Elizabeth Owens. Horse Sense: the guide to horse care in Australia and New Zealand. Landlinks Press, 2004. Cottle DJ ed. International Sheep and Wool Handbook. NPU, 2010. P. McDonald, R.A. Edwards, J.F.D. Greenhalgh, C.A. Morgan, L.A. Sinclair and R.G. Wilkinson. Animal Nutrition (7th edition published in 2011) (Prentice Hall).
VETS6206 Professional Skills 2B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg and Assoc Prof Christina Dart Session: Semester 2 Classes: Introductory lecture, Practical classes and demonstrations, Tutorials, Workshops; Independent study Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 and VETS6201 and VETS6202 and VETS6203 and VETS6204 Assessment: Practical examinations, Oral presentations/examinations, Written assignments/reflective statements, Clinical supervisor feedback, Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), Formative self and peer assessment Practical field work: Field trips, Workplace training in Veterinary Teaching Hospitals Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is assumed that student have a basic knowledge of clinical veterinary practice; empathy for and confidence in interactions with animals
In this unit of study students will continue in the development of their confidence and competency in, fundamental professional skills relevant to veterinary practice. These will include animal handling, clinical and laboratory skills, as well as the development of relevant personal and professional attributes, and clinical experience in veterinary teaching hospitals. Successful completion of this unit of study requires students to: (1) Attend and actively participate in all compulsory classes, (2) Achieve at least a pass grade in all compulsory assessment tasks, and (3) Submit all compulsory documents (veterinary teaching hospital site contracts and skills logs, feedback forms etc.)
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6207 Research and Enquiry 2B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Jenny-Ann Toribio Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures and tutorials Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 and VETS6201 and VETS6202 and VETS6203 and VETS6204 Assessment: Proposal for research 25%, Communication tool 25%, Outbreak investigation assignment 50% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will build on previous Research and Enquiry units in Year 1 and 2 of the DVM. It will consolidate and extend student skills relevant to the planning and conduct of research, and to applications of enquiry and investigation encountered across units in Year 3 and rotation placements in Year 4. Skills in evidence based practice will be extended to the evaluation and conduct of systematic reviews relevant to a clinical question; consideration of the investigation of outbreaks involving multiple premises and the application of surveillance to inform evaluation of disease risk; and in communication to identification of communication tools appropriate for conveying research outcomes to specific target audiences. Awareness of ethical issues in research will be extended to research that involves sourcing data from people and the requirements for a human ethics application. Each student will prepare a project brief for research in an area of the veterinary science of interest to the student and receive feedback on the proposed work. Where appropriate, this unit will integrate with VETS6208 Principles of Animal Disease B by utilizing content and examples across aligned modules.
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this unit of study. Students will be directed to appropriate resources as required.
VETS6208 Principles of Animal Disease B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rachael Gray Session: Semester 2 Classes: Activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures. Prerequisites: VETS6101 and VETS6102 and VETS6103 and VETS6104 and VETS6105 and VETS6106 and VETS6107 and VETS6108 and VETS6201 and VETS6202 and VETS6203 and VETS6204 Assessment: Intrasemester (40%); end of semester written examinations and practical exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A fundamental understanding of disease and dysfunction is critical to the application of principles of preventative and therapeutic intervention in the veterinary clinical setting. This unit of study will provide a thorough grounding in knowledge and skills for a wide range of veterinary disciplines including veterinary pathology, veterinary clinical pathology, immunology, veterinary microbiology, veterinary parasitology, animal behaviour, veterinary pharmacology and veterinary diagnostic imaging. An integrated multi-disciplinary approach will be used to highlight the underlying pathophysiology and aetiopathogenesis of clinical and subclinical disease within the setting of several major body systems. This unit will emphasise a pathobiological approach to the investigative process providing a logical framework for diagnostics to facilitate students¿ understanding of disease and disease investigation. This unit of study will utilise scenarios from companion animals, production animals and wildlife to contextualise problems of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, urinary system, musculoskeletal system, nervous system, endocrine system, as well as behavioural problems and the investigation of sudden (unexpected) death. The unit provides the foundation for integrated parasite/pest management (IPM) strategies. In addition, vector-, water- and food- borne diseases and transboundary diseases will be included enabling students to understand their relevance to the human-animal bond, public health, trade and biosecurity. Reinforcement of the development and maintenance of normal structure and function will be employed to highlight abnormalities associated with specific clinical presentations and disease entities. The unit of study is underpinned by the knowledge and understanding of animal disease and the investigative approach achieved in Principles of Animal Disease A in DVM 2 semester 1, and integrates with the concepts and skills taught within VETS6207 (Research and Enquiry 2B) and VETS6206 (Professional skills 2B) to prepare students for the clinical units of study in DVM 3.
Textbooks
Beveridge I and Emery D (2015) Australasian Animal Parasites Inside and Out. Australian Society for Parasitology. http://parasite.org.au/publications/australian-animal-parasites-inside-and-out/. Zachary and McGavin (2012) Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease. 5th Ed. Mosby. Discipline specific texts and readings will be provided within each module.

Year 3

Year 3 of the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine has the following 48 credit point structure:
VETS6301 Veterinary Public Practice

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Siobhan Mor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Intensive at start of semester, then lectures throughout the semester Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Assessment: group theory-based assignment (30%), theory-based quiz (25%), written examination (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Veterinarians make vital contributions - at local, regional and global levels - to some of the most pressing challenges facing modern society, including emerging infectious diseases, food safety and food security, and antimicrobial resistance. This unit introduces you to the knowledge and technical skills that underpin the roles of veterinary professionals in serving the public good. Specifically, this Unit of Study will prepare you to: contribute to Emergency Animal Disease (EAD) response; oversee animal welfare and food safety in abattoirs; and advise clients, community members and policy developers on risks associated with zoonotic diseases and how to minimise them. During the intensive, you will participate in lectures, interactive tutorials and practicals designed to integrate prior learning on epidemiology, animal welfare, pathology, microbiology, and parasitology within the context of EAD response and food safety. You will also be introduced to the global frameworks that support animal health at an international level. During the semester, you will participate in tutorials focussed on risk management and risk communication in practice settings in relation to a number of common zoonotic disease scenarios in Australia. Legislation relevant to the above areas will be introduced throughout the unit.
VETS6302 Clinical Foundations

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Christina Dart Session: Semester 1 Classes: introductory lectures, independent study, tutorials, practical classes and demonstrations Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Assessment: online quiz (30%) to be undertaken in the early part of the semester, written theory assignment (70%) to be undertaken at the end of the semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will facilitate foundational clinical knowledge and skills in disciplines including anaesthesia, surgery, medicine, imaging, therapeutics and infection control. This foundational unit of study will sit at the beginning of semester 1. The student will study fundamental concepts for practicing safe and humane sedation administration (chemical restraint), general anaesthesia, and pain relief in animal species. Foundational surgical concepts will include principles of wound healing, surgical suture materials and their use, haemostasis principles, and aseptic techniques as part of foundational principle of infection control in practice. Foundational knowledge and skills in diagnostic imaging will encompass radiography and ultrasonography principles, radiological safety, and principles of image interpretation. The students will be introduced to concepts of prescribing therapeutics in clinical and non-clinical veterinary practice, including rationalisation of use based on disease priority, safety, efficacy, patient response, disease prevalence, and by considering owner and regulatory constraints. Students will advance understandings of diagnostic frameworks and case management in veterinary medicine through clinical reasoning, utilising an evidence based approach, and remaining cognisant and sensitive to clients¿ needs and constraints.
VETS6303 Small Animal Practice A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Chris Tan, Ms Joanna Whitney, Dr Fernando Martinez Taboada Session: Semester 1 Classes: activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials and lectures Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Corequisites: VETS6302 Assessment: intra-semester theory-based examination (20%) delivered mid-semester, intra-semester theory-based written assessment (15%) delivered at the end of semester, end-of-semester theory-based examination (65%) delivered at the end of semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Mastering essential clinical competencies and the application of the problem-oriented approach is essential for the transition into clinical practice. This unit of study will consolidate the skills and knowledge from DVM1 and DVM2 in a case-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of common clinical syndromes in small animals. An integrated multi-disciplinary approach will be used to highlight the importance and interrelatedness of all aspects of clinical practice (medicine, surgery, anaesthesia, behaviour, pharmacology and diagnostic imaging) in case management. Consideration of the responsibilities of small animal clinicians with regard to infection control, zoonoses and public health in the context of clinical practice will form part of this unit. The unit will provide grounding in the basic principles of diagnosis and treatment of urogenital, neurological, ophthalmological, cardiorespiratory, endocrinological, musculoskeletal, behavioural, alimentary, dermatological, haematological and oncological conditions. It focuses on developing the students¿ day one skills and professional attitude required for their clinical placements. Practical classes and small group learning will be included in the teaching of this unit to allow students to develop clinical thinking, practical skills and communication proficiencies.
Textbooks
Students will be directed by teaching staff to required texts
VETS6304 Livestock Practice A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennie Mohler, Dr Michael Reynolds, Associate Professor John House Session: Semester 1 Classes: activities will vary weekly, but will be a mix of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Corequisites: VETS6302 Assessment: intra-semester theory exam (40%), end-of-semester theory and practical exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Livestock Practice A combines the teaching of ruminant (primarily bovine) and porcine medicine and surgery in a practical setting where student¿s progress from the fundamental clinical and surgical problems as would be encountered in a rural mixed practice. Much of the lecture course utilises problem-based learning using a case-based approach. This approach is designed to augment skills developed in other disciplines including animal husbandry, anatomy, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, veterinary medicine and veterinary surgery. The course is designed to assist the student in learning effective problem solving skills, determination of differential diagnoses and the judicious use of appropriate diagnostic aids when attempting to reach a diagnosis. Options and approaches to commonly used therapeutic measures are included. The learning is integrated across species and deals with the major body systems, such as cardiac, respiratory, neuromuscular, ocular, skin, alimentary and renal disorders, and also includes an introduction to herd and flock diseases in livestock. The practical classes are designed to augment and expand the student¿s experiences in large animal clinical skills.
VETS6305 Equine Practice A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg Session: Semester 1 Classes: tutorials and case discussions, independent study Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Corequisites: VETS6302 Assessment: mid-semester scenario-based essay (20%), mid-semester oral presentation of written assignment (pass/fail), end-of-semester practical examination (pass/fail), end-of-semester case-based theory written examination (80%) Practical field work: Practical classes and demonstrations, Workplace training at the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden (UVTHC) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Equine Practice A and B will assist students in developing the knowledge, skills and attitudes relevant to equids required of a 'day-one' graduate in rural mixed practice. These units of study will provide the foundations for equine and mixed practice clinical placements in DVM Year 4. Equine Practice A will build on the content of DVM Years 1 and 2, and VETS6302 Clinical Foundations, and will expose students to a wide range of aspects of equine practice using a case-based pedagogic approach.
Textbooks
Equine Clinical Medicine, Surgery and Reproduction, Munroe, G and Weese, S (eds), Manson, 2011.
VETS6306 Exotic and Wildlife Practice

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof David Phalen Session: Semester 1 Classes: large group classes, independent study Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Corequisites: VETS6302 Assessment: case-based written theory examination (50%) delivered mid-semester, case-based written theory examination (50%) delivered at the end of semester Practical field work: Practical classes and demonstrations, Workplace training at the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden (UVTHC) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will cover the basic husbandry of commonly kept exotic pets and wildlife species presented to veterinarians. Applied anatomy of these species will be taught so that students will be able to safely handle these animals, complete physical examinations of them, collect diagnostic samples from them, interpret radiographs and other images of them, treat them, and undertake common surgical procedures on them. Common disease processes and their manifestations, treatments, and prevention will be discussed. Upon completion of this unit of study, students will be comfortable seeing these species in their practice for routine appointments, and will be aware when referral to a specialist is indicated.
VETS6307 Research and Enquiry 3A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jan Slapeta, Prof Michael Ward Session: Semester 1 Classes: individual and group consultation with advisor and advisors, respectively. independent study on professionally focused project Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Assessment: progress report on professionally focused projectapproved by advisor and assessor (pass/fail) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit forms a first part of a capstone experience in which the student formulates a question based on systematic investigation of a topic related to a discipline in veterinary medicine or an allied health science, under the guidance of a research advisor and peers under independent review. The investigation can include lab/bench, field/clinic research or secondary data analysis. The investigation must demonstrate independent data collection, critical analysis and reflection on existing dimension of knowledge. Literature reviews are not acceptable.
VETS6308 Veterinary Practice Management

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sanaa Zaki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 week intensive (lectures and tutorials) at start of semester, presentations and independent study throughout the semester Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Assessment: groupwork assessment (60%) during intensive block, multiple-choice question (mcq) theory examination (40%) scheduled for the end of semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit extends students¿ foundational knowledge and skills for working effectively as a veterinary professional, by introducing key concepts in Practice Management. The unit also builds on and extends students¿ application of professional competencies introduced in VETS6101 The Veterinary Professional 1 and VETS6201 The Veterinary Professional 2 including communication, teamwork, cultural competence, professional reasoning and leadership. It utilises a case-based approach to aid understanding of financial, legal and ethical perspectives in the management of problems encountered in Veterinary Practice. Students are given opportunities to review, critically evaluate and present their findings on case studies that reflect real life veterinary challenges. This is supplemented with keynote presentations from professional experts in business, finance and law. Specifically this will facilitate students¿ preparedness for clinical placements in DVM4 and Clinical Practice beyond graduation.
VETS6309 Small Animal Practice B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Chris Tan, Ms Joanna Whitney, Dr Fernando Martinez Taboada Session: Semester 2 Classes: activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials and lectures Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6303 Assessment: intra-semester theory-based examination (20%) delivered mid-semester, intra-semester written assessment (15%) delivered at the end of semester, theory-based written examination (65%) delivered at the end of semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Mastering essential clinical competencies and the application of the problem-oriented approach is essential for the transition into clinical practice. This unit of study will consolidate the skills and knowledge from DVM1 and DVM2 in a case-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of common clinical syndromes in small animals (cats, dogs, ferrets, rabbits, and rodents. An integrated multi-disciplinary approach will be used to highlight the importance and interrelatedness of all aspects of clinical practice (medicine, surgery, anaesthesia, behaviour, pharmacology and diagnostic imaging) in case management. Consideration of the responsibilities of small animal clinicians with regard to infection control, zoonoses and public health in the context of clinical practice will form part of this unit. The unit will provide grounding in the basic principles of diagnosis and treatment of urogenital, neurological, ophthalmological, cardiorespiratory, endocrinological, musculoskeletal, behavioural, alimentary, dermatological, haematological and oncological conditions. It focuses on developing the students¿ day one skills and professional attitude required for their clinical placements. Practical classes and small group learning will be included in the teaching of this unit to allow students to develop clinical thinking, practical skills and communication proficiencies.
Textbooks
Students will be directed by teaching staff to required texts
VETS6310 Livestock Practice B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennie Mohler, Dr Michael Reynolds, A/Prof John House Session: Semester 2 Classes: activities will vary weekly, but will be a mix of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6304 Assessment: intra-semester theory exam (40%), end-of-semester theory and practical exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Livestock Practice will develop deep learning approaches to solving problems of ruminant (mainly bovine, but also ovine and caprine) production, and reproduction. In addition to lectures and practical classes, it uses a case-based approach to deliver group case studies on-line for student presentations, known as TILHAP¿s (teaching innovations in livestock health and production). These cases require integration of pathological and epidemiological investigative skills to provide evidence based solutions in the management of disease and productivity problems in a `whole farm¿ setting. The course is designed to advance student learning in preparation for the intramural and extramural clinical placements encountered in final year. The practical classes will continue to build the confidence of students in handling large animals in rural mixed and public practice settings.
VETS6311 Equine Practice B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg Session: Semester 2 Classes: tutorials and case discussions, independent study Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6305 Assessment: mid-semester scenario-based essay (20%), mid-semester oral presentation of written assignment (pass/fail), end-of-semester practical examination (pass/fail), end-of-semester case-based theory written examination (80%) Practical field work: Practical classes and demonstrations, Workplace training at the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Camden (UVTHC) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Equine Practice A and B will assist students in developing the knowledge, skills and attitudes relevant to equids required of a 'day-one' graduate in rural mixed practice. These units of study will provide the foundations for equine and mixed practice clinical placements in DVM Year 4. Equine Practice B will build on the content of DVM Years 1 and 2, VETS6302 Clinical Foundations, and VETS6305 Equine Practice A, and will expose students to a wide range of aspects of equine practice using a case-based pedagogic approach.
Textbooks
Equine Clinical Medicine, Surgery and Reproduction, Munroe, G and Weese, S (eds), Manson, 2011.
VETS6312 Intensive Animal Practice

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Hick Session: Semester 2 Classes: activities will vary from week to week, but will be a mixture of practical classes, tutorials, workshops and lectures Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6302 Assessment: mid-semester theory-based case studies (30%), mid-semester practical class evaluations (15%) (5% each for aquaculture, pigs, and poultry), end-of-semester written theory examination (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will provide students with an understanding of the major factors driving the profitability and sustainability of fish, poultry and pig industries. The emphasis is on epidemiology, management and preventive medicine, with Page 6 consideration given to welfare aspects of intensively housed animals.which are essential knowledge and skills required for a sound approach to identifying and solving health problems and improving production and welfare. Students will be equipped with the approaches required to practice veterinary medicine across the entire range of contexts in intensive animal industries. The focus will be on disease and health management in the context of Australian production systems with an awareness of exotic diseases and different diseases in these industries at an international level. The general principles of health and disease of the relevant species learnt previously will be developed into a sound approach to clinical practice. Clinical skills and diagnostic modalities including pathology specific to the intensive animal will be developed. The course will expand beyond individual animal medicine to integrated health and production management and regulatory roles for health professionals for diseases of significance to regulation, human health and trade.
VETS6313 Research and Enquiry 3B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Michael Ward, A/Prof Jan Slapeta Session: Semester 2 Classes: individual and group consultation with advisor and advisors, respectively; independent study on professionally focused project Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208 Assessment: manuscript on professionally focused project evaluated by advisor and reviewed by assessor (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit forms the second and final part of a capstone experience in which the student will systematically investigate a topic to test a hypothesis under the guidance of a research advisor and peers under independent review. The unit is a logical progression from VETS6307. The cap-stone experience project will culminate in preparation of a manuscript in the style of an appropriate scientific journal and present the results of the investigation in either an oral or poster presentation to peers and faculty. Literature reviews are not acceptable.

Year 4

Year 4 of the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine has the following 48 credit point structure:
VETS6401 Small Animal Clinics A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mara Hickey Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week clinical rotation specifically in the fields of primary accession and emergency medicine at the UVTHS Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form, activity log, skills log, communication task, individual summative examination Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: The majority of the unit of study will involve practical work in the form of clinical practice, facilitated in a rotational format. Students will be involved in the handling, examination, diagnostic procedures and treatment of various small animal species.
This unit of study will provide students with essential experience and training in the management of emergency cases and the care of hospitalised patients at the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Sydney (UVTHS). Students will have the opportunity to practice clinically-relevant techniques such as history taking, physical examination, diagnostic sample collection, interpretation of radiographs and ultrasound, medical record keeping, critical analysis of case-related information, development and implementation of treatment plans and evaluation of outcomes. The focus will be on triage and care of cases presenting in an emergency situation. In addition, students will intergrate various learning activities to effectively diagnose and treat patients and develop skills to enhance the client-veterinarian and veterinarian-patient relationship and form effective collegial teams.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6402 Small Animal Clinics B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alastair Mair Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week practicum; tutorials; self-directed learning activities Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form, activity log, skills log, communication task, individual summative examination Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: This unit of study involved four weeks of practical clinical experience at the UVTHS, focusing on developing clinical knowledge and skills in the area of veterinary anaesthesia.
This unit of study is designed to provide student interns with essential exposure to and experience in small anaesthesia and surgery. This study forms a placement which is part of an integrated approach to the delivery of small animal practice related content over the four years of the DVM programme, the over-arching aim of which is to prepare DVM graduates with the day-one knowledge, skills and attitudes required to succeed in the small animal clinical environment. It will be comprised of two weeks of practical clinical experience in each small animal surgery and anaesthesia. Student interns are involved in the management of a wide variety of cases requiring surgery and /or anaesthesia, from the time of admission until discharge from the hospital. They will be integrated into the daily activities of the anaesthesia and surgery unit. Emphasis will be placed on problem oriented approach to making medical and therapeutic decisions and which integrate judgments based on previous material and evidence-based disease management approaches in the various clinical veterinary science disciplines, as well as laboratory diagnostics.
Textbooks
Tranquilli WJ, Thurmon JC and Grimm KA (2007) Lumb and Jones' Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, 4th Edition, Wiley-Blackwell Hall WL, Clarke KW and Trim CM (2013) Veterinary Anaesthesia, 11th Edition, Harcourt Publishers Ltd. King LG and Boag A (2007) BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Emergency and Critical care, 2nd Edition, BSAVA
VETS6403 Small Animal Clinics C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mariano Makara Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: a one-week clinical rotation through the AREPH; a one-week clinical rotation with the diagnostic imaging team at the UVTHS; and a two-week clinical rotation with the medicine tram at the UVTHS Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: individual assessment of clinical capabilities through client communication and interactions, presentations at rounds, and patient care outcomes, assessed daily during the one-week AREPH rotation Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: The majority of the unit of study will involve practical work in the form of clinical practice, facilitated in a rotational format. Students will be involved in the handling, examination, diagnostic procedures and treatment of dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, exotic pets and wildlife.
This unit of study consolidates the theory of avian, reptile, exotic pet and wildlife medicine and surgery, as well as of canine and feline internal medicine and diagnostic imaging, and applies this theory to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in patients presenting to the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Sydney (UVTHS) and the Avian Reptile and Exotic Pet Hospital (AREPH). Case material will be used to develop student's use of the problem-orientated approach in patient assessment. During placements, acquiring appropriate skills in history-taking, physical examination, interpretation of diagnostic imaging modalities and clinicopathological test results, routine clinical procedures and implementation of treatments will be emphasised. Cases will form the basis of interactive collegiate discussions on patient-specific identification and assessment of problems. Student interns will participate in clinical activities, including client communication, collection of samples for diagnostic tests, acquisition of diagnostic images, developing treatment and nutrition plans, routine health management, disease management, management of patients in hospital, and medical record-keeping.
Textbooks
Ettinger SJ and Feldman EC (ed) (2010) Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine: Diseases of the Dog and the Cat 7th Ed. Elsevier Saunders, St Louis. (ISBN: 9781416065937) Additional reference books and online resources will be available during the rotations.
VETS6404 Small Animal Clinics D

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Jenni Green Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two-week practical experience Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form, activity/case log, skills log, communication task, individual summative examination Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: The majority of the unit of study will involve practical work in the form of general clinical practice. Students will be involved in the handling, examination, diagnostic procedures and treatment, and wellness management of animals commonly presented in small animals practice.
This unit of study comprises two weeks of blended practical clinical experience. Student interns will be involved in the management of a wide variety of cases such as they are presented to general practice in a non-metropolitan setting. They will apply consultations skills, clinical reasoning, and consolidate knowledge of abnormal and normal presentions to determine animal health. They conduct wellness and preventative health consultation and perform immunisation, and formulate and conduct diagnostic and treatment plans withing the context of general practice. They recognise life threatening and serious conditions and initiate appropriate treatment. Student interns will formulate a rational approach to further investigation or patient referral taking into account owner preferences and financial constraints and they prepare documentation for referring patients. During this placement student interns will solidify knowledge and skills in anaesthesia and surgery by undertaking routine neutring procedures in dogs and cats. Emphasis will be placed on problem oriented approach and on making evidence based medical and therapeutic decisions, which integrate judgments based on previous foundational material including principles and approach to health and disease management.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6405 Large Animal Clinics A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Tony D. Mogg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week practical experience, including routine clinical activities, rounds, tutorials, and practical classes Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form, clinical anatomy quiz, attendance and performance at clinical rounds, treatment facilitations, and tutorials, communication task, skills log, activity log, individual summative examination Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Four weeks of practical experience in clinical environments focusing on multiple disciplinary areas required to facilitate effective equine clinical assessment and care.
This unit of study incorporates multiple aspects of equine practice, including anaesthesia, diagnostic imaging, medicine, reproduction and surgery, with a strong focus on the primary care aspects of equine practice. The placement experience includes a range of routine clinical activities, rounds, tutorials and practical classes, designed to provide a balance between clinical and didactic learning opportunities. This placement is part of an integrated approach to the delivery of equine practice related content over the four years of the DVM programme, the over-arching aim of which is to prepare DVM graduates with the day-one knowledge, skills and attitudes required to succeed in the equine clinical environment.
Textbooks
Equine Clinical Medicine, Surgery and Reproduction, Munroe, G and Weese, S (eds), Manson, 2011.
VETS6406 Large Animal Clinics B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Jennie Mohler Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two-week practical experience Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form, attendance and performnance during clinical rounds and tutorials, overnight field trip, communication task, skills log, activity log, individual summative examination Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Two weeks of clinical practical experience in working with livestock, ruminant, and herd populations via the University Livestock Veterinary Service at Camden campus.
The University Livestock Veterinary Service provides routine herd health and medicine services to dairy clients, and a 24-hour amulatory service to local livestock owners. This unit of study will be facilitated within this service through a two-week, livestock and ruminant health focused practical experience. Veterinary student interns will be expected to participate in all facets of the clinic activities. Practical experiences in this unit of study will encompass the further development of problemsolving skills, clinical knowledge and acumen, and technical and commuication skills relevant to conditions found in ruminant species, as wellas laboratory diagnostic and pathophysiological considerations. Practical work will also provide students with important knowledge and experience in dairy production and animal welfare, and in the relationship between ruminant health and food quality and safety relevant to human populations.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6407 Lab Investigations of Clinical Disease

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Mark B. Krockenberger Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: two intensive weeks of teaching (one based at Camden, one at Camperdown) comprising morning and afternoon laboratory sessions Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: group case report due at the end of each week of the rotation (20%), individual take-home written examination due by the end of the rotation (20%), individual communication task due at the end of each week of the rotation (10%), individual examination to take place at the end of the year (50%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: The unit of study is entirely practical, utilising diagnostic accessions to perform and interpret laboratory testing.
This unit of study provides the capstone experience for the paraclinical disciplines of pathobiology. It focuses on the implementation of a diagnostic approach, utilising the strengths of the disciplines of diagnostic pathology (anatomical and clinical), microbiology, and parasitology, to further develop students' understanding of the utility and limitations of laboratory-based diagnostic tools in clinical practice. The learning context will foster: (1) a scientific, discipline-based systematic approach to apply an understanding of normal function, homeostasis, pathophysiology, mechanisms of health/disease, and the natural history and manifestations of important animal diseases during diagnosis; (2) an understanding of the principles and hands-on experiences in physical and laboratory diagnostic methods and interpretation (including diagnostic pathology, clinical pathology, microbiology, parasitology and necropsy); and (3) an emphasis on problem solving that results in making and applying medical judgments based on sound evidence provided by laboratory-based testing.
Textbooks
No required texts.
VETS6408 Public, Industry, or Community Placement

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Siobhan Mor Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week practical experience rotation, 3-day placement Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105, VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form (to be graded either proficient, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory), activity log, skills log, communication task Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Four weeks of practical experience of professional practice as required within a public, industry, or community-based body that serves the public good and/or underprivileged communities that lack regular access to veterinary services directly involved in servicing the livestock industries and/or public health. Students will also undertake a 3-day placement at an export abattoir.
This unit of study enables student interns to identify the importance of veterinarians outside of conventional clinical practice in contributing to animal and human health and wellbeing. The unit involves a four-week rotation with a public or private organisation that serves the public good and/or underprivileged communities that lack regular access to veterinary services. In addition, students will undertake a 3-day placement at an export abattoir. Organisations that may be suitable for this placement include (but are not limited) to those involved with: Animal ethics and animal welfare; Veterinary legislation and animal policy; Veterinary product development; Population health and conservation; Diagnostic services; Zoonoses and food safety; Laboratory and epidemiological research; Outbreak investigation, disease surveillance and response; Animal disease control programs; Community-based animal programs.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6409 Extramural Placement 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Bennett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week period of practical experience in an approved rural or remote practice/placement Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105,VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form (to be graded either proficient, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory), activity log, skills log, communication task Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This unit of study involves placement at a Faculty-approved external rural or remote location linked to the veterinary student intern's career interest area. Suitability of placements will be negotiated between the veterinary intern and the unit of study coordinator. Interns will be under the supervision of an extramural supervisor who will liaise with Faculty, review the aims of the rotation with the intern, and assess the performance of the intern via a standard report form. Interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the placement, typically taking on the role and schedule of a fulltime, supervised veterinary associate. The requirements of this rotation include the completion of the following documents: an introductory letter to the placement at least four weeks prior to the rotation; a site contract; learning agreement form; skills report form; and rotation feedback form. During the rotation interns are expected to participate in three meetings with the extramural supervisor and complete a communication task.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6410 Extramural Placement 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Bennett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week period of practical experience in an approved rural or remote practice/placement Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105,VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form (to be graded either proficient, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory), activity log, skills log, communication task Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This unit of study involves placement at a Faculty-approved external location linked to the veterinary student intern's career interest area. Suitability of placements will be negotiated between the veterinary intern and the unit of study coordinator. Interns will be under the supervision of an extramural supervisor who will liaise with Faculty, review the aims of the rotation with the intern, and assess the performance of the intern via a standard report form. Interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the placement, typically taking on the role and schedule of a full-time, supervised veterinary associate. The requirements of this rotation include the completion of the following documents: an introductory letter to the placement at least four weeks prior to the rotation; a site contract; learning agreement form; skills report form; and rotation feedback form. During the rotation interns are expected to participate in three meetings with the extramural supervisor and complete a communication task.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6411 Extramural Placement 3

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Bennett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week period of practical experience in an approved rural or remote practice/placement Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105,VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form (to be graded either proficient, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory), activity log, skills log, communication task Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This unit of study involves placement at a Faculty-approved external location linked to the veterinary student intern's career interest area. Suitability of placements will be negotiated between the veterinary intern and the unit of study coordinator. Interns will be under the supervision of an extramural supervisor who will liaise with Faculty, review the aims of the rotation with the intern, and assess the performance of the intern via a standard report form. Interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the placement, typically taking on the role and schedule of a full-time, supervised veterinary associate. The requirements of this rotation include the completion of the following documents: an introductory letter to the placement at least four weeks prior to the rotation; a site contract; learning agreement form; skills report form; and rotation feedback form. During the rotation interns are expected to participate in three meetings with the extramural supervisor and complete a communication task.
Textbooks
No texts required.
VETS6412 Extramural Placement 4

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Bennett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: four-week period of practical experience in an approved rural or remote practice/placement Prerequisites: VETS6101, VETS6102, VETS6103, VETS6104, VETS6105,VETS6106, VETS6107, VETS6108, VETS6201, VETS6202, VETS6203, VETS6204, VETS6205, VETS6206, VETS6207, VETS6208, VETS6301, VETS6302, VETS6303, VETS6304, VETS6305, VETS6306, VETS6307, VETS6308, VETS6309, VETS6310, VETS6311, VETS6312, VETS6313 Assumed knowledge: All content from Years 1, 2, and 3 of the DVM Assessment: supervisor report form (to be graded either proficient, satisfactory, or unsatisfactory), activity log, skills log, communication task Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This unit of study involves placement at a Faculty-approved external location linked to the veterinary student intern's career interest area. Suitability of placements will be negotiated between the veterinary intern and the unit of study coordinator. Interns will be under the supervision of an extramural supervisor who will liaise with Faculty, review the aims of the rotation with the intern, and assess the performance of the intern via a standard report form. Interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the placement, typically taking on the role and schedule of a full-time, supervised veterinary associate. The requirements of this rotation include the completion of the following documents: an introductory letter to the placement at least four weeks prior to the rotation; a site contract; learning agreement form; skills report form; and rotation feedback form. During the rotation interns are expected to participate in three meetings with the extramural supervisor and complete a communication task.
Textbooks
No texts required.