Environmental Science

Unit of study descriptions

AFNR5511 Soil Processes, Assessment and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 Lec, 2 tutorials/wk, case study & oral presentations. Assessment: Essay (30%), Group discussions (20%), Case study report (30%), Group presentation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
Soils support agricultural and natural ecosystems and regulate environmental interactions between the hydrosphere and atmosphere. It is the quality of our soils that affect productivity, the environment, health and ultimately sustainability. However, challenges such as those presented by lack of plant nutrient supply, soil acidification, physical degradation, soil contamination, and loss of soil biodiversity are problems at a global scale that threaten the sustainability of the environment and society. As well as the threats the importance of maintaining a quality soil that regulates environmental interactions will be explored, such as soil as a sink for carbon affecting climate interactions or understanding how a rich soil biodiversity can contribute to food production affecting food security. To do this, this unit of study is concerned with exploring the key pedology, soil chemistry, soil physical and soil biological processes that drive these challenges to soil quality. Time will be spent investigating how the quality of the soil can be assessed, using the indicators of the mentioned soil processes, and how the resulting data can be aggregated and communicated in a meaningful way. Working with case studies, the students will identify problems that are assessed using soil quality or function analysis with the aim of identifying management options. The management options will be evaluated to determine their adoptability and implement ability. By investigating the case studies using soil quality or function analysis students will develop their research and enquiry skills. Assessing and developing adoptable management strategies the students will develop their skills in synthesising material from multiple sources and enhance their intellectual autonomy. By producing reports and presenting seminars the students will develop their communication skills.
Textbooks
Textbooks: D. Hillel, 2004. Introduction to Environmental Soil Physics, Elsevier Science, San Diego, CA USA
AFNR5512 Water Management and Variable Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hr workshop/week, practical work, project work Assumed knowledge: UG Maths or Physics or Hydrology. Assessment: Assignments (30%), project report (20%), 2 hr exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
This unit builds on knowledge gained in undergraduate soil science and crop science units to develop an understanding of catchment water management. Particular focus will be on the effect of climate variability and change on water management decisions on output and externalities (Salinity, landscape losses). At the completion of this unit student would be able to: Identify which climate variables will be most affected by climate change and variability; Evaluate which field and farm scale outputs will be most affected by climate change and variability; Develop scenarios based on distributions of climate variability; and Calculate the likely impacts of climate variability and change on streamflow, water availability and irrigation water demand using Monte Carlo techniques.
The open source software package SWAT will be used for most analysis and other open source software will be used if needed.
Textbooks
Rees W.G. 2001. Physical principles of remote sensing. 2nd ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
AFNR5705 Australian Forest Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Merchant Session: Semester 2 Classes: 28.5 hrs lecture/tutorial, 30 hrs fieldwork Assessment: One 2hr exam (20%), two reports (2x25%), two oral presentations (2x10%) and one field report (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
This unit of study is designed to enable students to participate in and improve the management of Australian forest ecosystems. Beginning with an introduction to the unique chemical, physical and ecological characteristics of Australian forests, this unit focuses on policy development and management prescriptions driven by fundamental processes of ecosystem function. Topics will encompass both tropical and temperate ecosystems with students given the opportunity to gain first hand observation of subtropical forest management practices by participating in a 4 day field exercise. At the end of this unit, students will be able to articulate strengths, weaknesses and improvements to the management of Australian forests for the purposes of production, conservation and climate change adaptation. Students will gain first-hand experience of land management practices as they pertain to Australian forest systems and communicate with industry and governmental groups.
Textbooks
Reading material will be drawn upon from current literature in the field
AFNR5801 Climate Change: Process, History, Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Franks, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: 18 hrs lecture/tutorial, 12 hrs practical/field classes, 9 hrs field trip preparation Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of climate change processes and issues. Assessment: 2hr exam (40%), tutorials (20%), practical report from field exercise (manuscript format) (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
This unit provides students with an overview of current debates and approaches to understanding and quantifying interactions between the biosphere, oceans and atmosphere, as used around the world, and the consequences of those interactions for climate. The unit considers climate change on a variety of timescales. This unit will include a weekend field trip to Snowy Mountains field sites managed by the University of Sydney where students will be introduced to cutting edge, ongoing climate change research.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of selected book chapters, journal articles and other publications
ENVI5502 Environmental Research Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised research Prerequisites: Distinction average or better in 24 credit points of Environmental Science/ Environmental Science and Law core units Prohibitions: ENVI5501 Assessment: Written report and continuous assessment (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students taking ENVI5502 must take ENVI5503 and ENVI5504
A valuable opportunity to apply some of the knowledge gained from earlier coursework, ENVI5502, ENVI5503 and ENVI5504 consist of a research project as arranged between you (the student) and an appropriate supervisor. The project topic may contain a field or laboratory component, or may be entirely literature-based, but it must include an integrated analysis of an identified environmental problem. Potential topics range from ecotourism to pollution detection and monitoring, erosion to solar power, environmental law to conservation biology. The topic must be able to be completed within the timeframe of 16 weeks (one semester) of investigation, including the literature survey, sample and data collection, analysis of data and results, and write up of the report. This unit is not conducted by way of a number of contact hours per week for a semester. Instead, the student will work on the project full-time (aside from other study commitments) in a continuous manner. This unit of study is only available to students in the Master programs who have completed 24 credit points of study with a distinction average or better.
ENVI5503 Environmental Research Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised research Prerequisites: Distinction average or better in 24cp of Environmental Science/ Environmental Science and Law core units Prohibitions: ENVI5501 Assessment: Written report and continuous assessment (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students taking ENVI5502 must take ENVI5503 and ENVI5504
A valuable opportunity to apply some of the knowledge gained from earlier coursework, ENVI5502, ENVI5503 and ENVI5504 consist of a research project as arranged between you (the student) and an appropriate supervisor. The project topic may contain a field or laboratory component, or may be entirely literature-based, but it must include an integrated analysis of an identified environmental problem. Potential topics range from ecotourism to pollution detection and monitoring, erosion to solar power, environmental law to conservation biology. The topic must be able to be completed within the timeframe of 16 weeks (one semester) of investigation, including the literature survey, sample and data collection, analysis of data and results, and write up of the report. This unit is not conducted by way of a number of contact hours per week for a semester. Instead, the student will work on the project full-time (aside from other study commitments) in a continuous manner. This unit of study is only available to students in the Master programs who have completed 24 credit points of study with a distinction average or better.
ENVI5504 Environmental Research Project C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised research Prerequisites: Distinction average or better in 24cp of Environmental Science/ Environmental Science and Law core units Prohibitions: ENVI5501 Assessment: Written report and continuous assessment (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students taking ENVI5502 must take ENVI5503 and ENVI5504
A valuable opportunity to apply some of the knowledge gained from earlier coursework, ENVI5502, ENVI5503 and ENVI5504 consist of a research project as arranged between you (the student) and an appropriate supervisor. The project topic may contain a field or laboratory component, or may be entirely literature-based, but it must include an integrated analysis of an identified environmental problem. Potential topics range from ecotourism to pollution detection and monitoring, erosion to solar power, environmental law to conservation biology. The topic must be able to be completed within the timeframe of 16 weeks (one semester) of investigation, including the literature survey, sample and data collection, analysis of data and results, and write up of the report. This unit is not conducted by way of a number of contact hours per week for a semester. Instead, the student will work on the project full-time (aside from other study commitments) in a continuous manner. This unit of study is only available to students in the Master programs who have completed 24 credit points of study with a distinction average or better.
ENVI5705 Ecological Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 3-hour lecture per week. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level Mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Case study, assignment, critical review, presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study introduces fundamental concepts of modern ecology for environmental scientists through a series of modules focussing on applied questions. Using case studies from Australia, students are exposed to the challenges of doing ecology and how cutting edge research is being applied to environmental management using evidence-based approaches. Meetings and discussions with people working in the field give students an insight into the ways that ecologists address ecological problems and how way they generate an understanding of natural systems. Students have the opportunity to consider different ways of doing science and ways of dealing with different kinds of data, including qualitative, quantitative, anecdotal and experimental approaches
ENVI5707 Energy - Sources, Uses and Alternatives

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture and 1 hour seminar per week; field trips Assessment: Essay, comprehensive diary/notes from lectures, and presentation (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The environmental impacts and physical principles of energy generation and use are addressed in this unit of study. Major topics include discussion of the various energy sources, global energy resources, the economics associated with energy conversion, the politics and culture that surround energy conversion and use, and renewable energy technologies. A key aspect of the unit is the fostering of skills for performing simple but useful energy and greenhouse calculations. This unit of study includes several field trips to energy utilities and associated energy sites.
ENVI5708 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Feike Dijkstra (Coordinator); A/Prof. Thomas Bishop; Dr Floris van Ogtrop. Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 2-hour lecture and 1x practical per week; 1x field trip (weekend) Assessment: Writing Assignment (30%), Prac Report (30%), Presentation and Peer Review (15%), Computer Lab (10%), 2 Quizzes (15%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
The aim of the course is to introduce students to the major physical and chemical processes that control the concentration and dispersion of chemical pollutants in natural and impacted environments. The course will demonstrate how to use contaminant data effectively and how to judge the quality of chemical data. This knowledge will be used to design and to assess environmental projects, and to judge the magnitude of impact by human activity on environments and the risk posed by contaminants to ecosystem functioning. The course aims to provide present and future managers employed in environmental professions with the skills to use data with confidence and to make management decisions knowing the risks inherent in variable data quality. A field trip will be undertaken early in the semester.
ENVI5801 Social Science of Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert Fisher Session: Semester 1 Classes: One hour lecture and one hour seminar per week plus directed reading. Assessment: Essays and seminar participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit provides both a conceptual and an empirical foundation for the analysis of relationships between society, the environment and natural resources. In our recent past the rapid rate of global environmental change has necessitated a breakdown of traditional disciplinary boundaries in research and social scientists are increasingly called upon to work alongside natural scientists in unraveling the complexities of the human-environmental nexus. Students will examine a number of environmental issues and consider a variety of social science academic perspectives about environmental management.
ENVI5809 Environmental Simulation Modelling

Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Chapman Session: Intensive June,Semester 2,Semester 2a Classes: Six all day sessions Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level Mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Project plus report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study introduces participants to the power of simulation modelling in understanding and predicting behaviour of natural systems. It covers fundamental concepts, logic, and techniques (including sensitivity analysis), and develops skills in application to environmental problems such as catchment management and population dynamics.
ENVI5903 Sustainable Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yayoi Lagerqvist, Dr Jeff Neilson Session: Intensive July Classes: Two pre-departure lectures, 14-day field intensive. Assessment: Essay and presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Field experience Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study constitutes an international field-based experience held in Southeast Asia during the July semester break. It explores the contested notions of sustainable development and sustainability through exposure to real world development dilemmas in one of Asia¿s most dynamic countries. We explore fundamental issues such as urbanization, sustainable livelihood, resource scarcity and economic globalization. The unit of study involves lectures, in-situ readings and discussion groups, introduction to field methods, stakeholder meetings and experiential learning. Students interested in this unit should confirm their interest to the Unit Coordinators by the end of March of the year the field school will be held. There will be additional costs associated with this unit to cover food, accommodation, local transport and field assistance of about $1,200. Students will also be required to arrange their own international travel to the starting point (either Vientiane or Jakarta depending on the specific location of the course).
ENVI5904 Methods in Applied Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 3-hour lecture per week for 8 weeks. Assessment: Tutorials, oral presentations and written reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
No assessment of potential environmental impacts is possible without relevant information about the ecological consequences. This unit is for those without a quantitative ecology background, to explain the need to quantify and what are relevant measures. Describing and understanding uncertainty will be explained in the context of precautionary principles. Issues about measuring biodiversity and the spatial and temporal problems of ecological systems will be introduced. Field experience will also be available (up to two of six hour sessions) subject to weather, tides and available staffing; please note that these sessions are voluntary.
GEOG5001 Geographic Information Science A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Chapman Session: Semester 1 Classes: Six lectures plus six workshops. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study gives an overview of basic spatial data models, and enables students to understand the use of data from a variety of sources within a geographical information system (GIS). The analysis of spatial data, and its manipulation to address questions appropriate to planning or locational applications, will be addressed, as will the development of thematic maps from diverse data layers.
GEOG5004 Environmental Mapping and Monitoring

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Cowell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and one three hour practical per week. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The unit introduces methods associated with acquiring data in the field and examines issues associated with application of spatial data to environmental monitoring, terrain mapping and geocomputing. Students will learn both theoretically and practically how environmental data is collected using different remote sensing techniques, (pre)processing methods of integrating data in a GIS environment and the role of spatial data in understanding landscape processes and quantifying environmental change.
GEOS5501 Human Rights and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 2a Classes: 4 hours of class contact per week Assessment: Essays, reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
This Unit of Study addresses the connections between human rights and the environment. We examine an array of environmental and natural resource management challenges through a human rights lens. Students will develop the skills to describe, interpret and analyse the relationship between environmental issues and human rights norms. We study the complexity of the human rights / environmental nexus in both conservation and development contexts. Topics include conservation and protected areas, rivers and dams, mining, climate change and forests. Throughout the course we consider the value, and limitations, of a human rights based approach to environmental decision making.
GOVT6135 Global Environmental Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Essay (50%), Seminar participation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the environment as a political and policy issue. Although relatively recent, the environment has become a full-fledged public policy issue exerting influence in local, national and international arenas. The unit will first focus on the specific features of the policy that influences the capability of contemporary societies to enhance the management of environmental resources and of public goods in general. Second, it discusses the development of environmental policy in Western countries, with a particular emphasis on the European Union. Third, a grid for the analysis of environmental policy will be presented, with a discussion of the main actors (political, institutional and socio-economic) involved in it and of the factors (interests and ideas) influencing their positions. Fourth, the unit briefly discusses environmental conflicts and consensual approaches used for tackling them.
MARS5001 Coastal Processes and Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ana Vila-Concejo Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture, one 1 hour tutorial, one 3 hour practical per week for 6 weeks Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Assignment, presentation and quiz (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study explains the major coastal processes and systems of relevance to coastal zone management. These include rocky coasts and bluffs; beaches, barriers and dunes; and estuaries and inlets. The interactions between these processes and systems that are of most relevance to coastal management are highlighted, including coastal hazards such as beach erosion, dune migration, bluff retreat, coastal flooding and inlet closure/opening. Anthropogenic impacts are also analysed. The unit is presented in lectures and field excursions, the latter enabling each system to be examined first hand.
MARS5006 Coral Reefs, Science and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Maria Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: University base delivery: prefield trip tutorial (1-hour), twelve lectures (1-hour each). Field based delivery: two seminars (1-hour each), two tutorials - individual consultations to develop concepts in research (1-hour each), independent research and oral presentation. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Written assignments: essay and project report; oral presentations; seminar and lecture participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Field experience Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides an in - depth overview of the key biological and non-biological processes that make up coral reef ecosystems. There is a focus on the biogeographic, oceanographic and physiological processes underlying the integrity of global tropical reef systems. The Great Barrier Reef is used as a case study to explore emerging concepts on the influence of natural and anthropogenic processes on the integrity of global coral reef ecosystems. Learning activities will include a series of background lectures and research seminars and tutorials in the development of a major research project. A major aspect of this unit is an independent research project conducted under the supervision of the course instructors. The unit concludes with a series of oral presentations based on student research. Assessment tasks will consist of one essay, essay topic presentation and a research project report and presentation. The curriculum in this unit is based on current research and course notes will be provided. This is a field intensive course held at One Tree Island Research Station. The course is ex-Gladstone Queensland and students are expected to make their own way there. The field component of the unit will be run over 4-6 days and there will be an additional course fee for transport, food and accommodation, expected to be $700.
MARS5007 Coral Reefs and Climate Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jody Webster Session: Semester 1a Classes: University based delivery: Prefield trip tutorials and lectures. Field based delivery: Lectures, seminars and tutorials. Individual consultations to develop concepts in research, independent research and oral presentation. Assessment: Written assignments: essay and project report; oral presentations; seminar and lecture participation (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
This unit provides an in - depth understanding of the key geological, oceanographic, biological and economic factors effecting global climate change and coral reef response, with specific reference to the Great Barrier Reef. Predictions of worst and best case scenarios for the future of coral reef systems are discussed in the context of the latest science, and in light of how this science should underpin future management strategies and policy. Learning activities will include a series of background lectures and research seminars, and tutorials on the development of a major research project. A major aspect of this unit is an independent research project conducted under the supervision of the course instructors. The unit concludes with a series of oral presentations based on student research. Assessment tasks will consist of an essay, a research seminar, and a research project report and presentation. This is a field intensive course held at either One Tree Island or Heron Island or Orpheus Island Research Stations. This unit will be run over 6-8 days and there will be an additional course fee for transport, food and accommodation, expected to be about $700 (ex. travel to and from Gladstone/Townsville).
PHYS5031 Ecological Econ and Sustainable Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2.5-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Essay and comprehensive diary/notes from lectures (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit will introduce selected recent topics from Ecological Economics, such as concepts of sustainability (definitions); comparisons with environmental economics, intergenerational discounting; time and equity in the climate change debate; valuing the environment; links between theories of well-being, consumerism and environmental impact; and cost benefit analysis. The unit sets the scene for the more detailed and specific units PHYS5032, PHYS5033, and PHYS5034.
PHYS5032 Techniques for Sustainability Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke and Prof Manfred Lenzen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Comprehensive diary/notes from lectures (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study offers an introduction to quantitative analysis techniques including multiple regression, uncertainty analysis, integration, structural decomposition, and dynamic systems modelling, with a strong emphasis on demonstrating their usefulness for environmental problem-solving. This unit will show how mathematics can be brought to life when utilised in powerful applications to deal with environmental issues. Throughout the unit of study, example applications will be described, including climate modelling, ecosystem trophic chain analysis, linking household consumption and environmental impact, identifying socio-demographic drivers of environmental change, and the uncovering the effect of land use patterns on threats to species.
PHYS5033 Environmental Footprints and IO Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke and Prof Manfred Lenzen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Comprehensive diary/notes from lectures, including a quantitative example (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study will provide an introduction to economic input-output theory and input-output analysis, with a focus on environmental applications such as carbon footprints and life-cycle assessment. The unit first explores national and global economic and environmental accounting systems and their relationships to organisational accounting. Second, it will present global multi-regional input-output systems enabling the analysis of environmental impacts of international trade. Third, it will offer hands-on instruction to master the basic input-output calculus conceived by Nobel Prize Laureate Wassily Leontief, and provide a step-by-step recipe for how to undertake boundary-free environmental footprinting by integrating economic and environmental accounts, and by applying Leontief's calculus to data published by statistical offices. Students will walk away from this unit equipped with all skills needed to calculate footprints, and prepare sustainability reports for any organisation, city, region, or nation, using organisational data, economic input-output tables and environmental accounts. Students will also benefit from also enrolling in PHYS5034 for a sound understanding of the role of input-output analysis within the field of Life-Cycle Assessment.
PHYS5034 Life Cycle Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2.5-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Essay and comprehensive diary/notes from lectures (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study will cover the areas of the philosophy, techniques, applications and standards of Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA). It will introduce Process Analysis, Input-Output Analysis and Hybrid Analysis. Current LCA tools will be discussed. Case studies and business applications as well as global standards such as the GHG Protocol for accounting for scopes 1, 2 and 3 emissions and ISO standards will provide a context. The unit of study will culminate with practical exercises using current software tools to provide students with hands-on experience of preparing a comprehensive Life-Cycle Assessment of an application of their choice. Students will also benefit from also enrolling in PHYS5033 for a sound understanding of input-output analysis as the basis of hybrid LCA methods.
RESP5001 Integrated Environmental Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof D Dragovich Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Four 4-hour lectures and two 4-hour laboratory classes per semester Assessment: One research proposal, One literature review and one oral presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit will provide an opportunity for students to synthesize and draw conclusions from their coursework experience and learning, and to enable them to revise and/or develop the necessary skills for engaging with environmental research as part of their intellectual and/or professional growth. The unit focuses on skills in cross-disciplinary problem identification and the use of integrated analysis to address environmental challenges. Other skills include critical reading and critical writing, undertaking a literature review, understanding how research is conducted and published, library search techniques, use of referencing systems like EndNote, and matters relating to intellectual property and authorship.
RSEC5432 Environmental Economics

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tihomir Ancev Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week commencing week 1, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Assessment: Report and presentation from the practical experience in environmental economics (20%), one (1 hr.) mid-term exam (30%), and two hour (2 hr.) final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
The unit provides theoretical and empirical background necessary for a resource economist to be able to successfully function when faced with various environmental problems. The unit investigates economic aspects of a range of environmental issues. The studied concepts are exemplified with environmental problems related to agriculture (soil salinity, algal blooms, overgrazing etc.) as well as with environmental problems typical to Australia. The guiding economic themes are: competing uses of the environment / externalities, market failure, the importance of property rights, optimal allocation of pollution abatement, and the processes for making choices relating to non-market goods. Some social issues with environmental impacts are studied through exploration of the problems of population size and distribution, economic growth, and environmental regulation.
Textbooks
Perman, R., Y. Ma, J. McGilvray and M. Common. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics. Pearson, 3rd Ed. 2003
SUST5002 Food and Water Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael D'Occhio Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 to 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week presented in an intensive format with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit explores the imperatives and challenges of ensuring an adequate supply of water and nutritious food in the face of changes in global markets, the environment and human population. These challenges will be examined in the context of access and potential trends in supply and demand. Factors influencing trends in supply include environmental degradation, climate change, energy scarcity, technology, changes in population and the patterns of global prosperity, growing urbanisation, and increased consumption. The unit will consider the underlying policy, economic and market-driven forces that play an important role in affecting both supply and demand. The needs of both developing and developed nations will be compared and the role of international, national and regional mechanisms will be discussed. Placing some emphasis on the relevance to Australia, the unit will explore available actions across a range of organisational levels such as communities, governments and NGOs.
SUST5005 Policy and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ed Couzens Session: Intensive October Classes: Intensive classes for 4 full days in September 2015 Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Opinion article (1500w; 20%) and Research essay (4000 w; 80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit examines how policy-makers engage with and implement policies of ecologically sustainable development. Meeting the needs of a growing global population while at the same time maintaining the health of the environment, which provides the life support system for humanity, is the central policy challenge of the 21st century. Key sustainability challenges include: avoiding dangerous climate change, safeguarding biological diversity, providing food security, coping with resource scarcity, and promoting green technology including low-carbon energy generation. These issues provide acute challenges for governments given that they cut across a range of policy areas, and require long-term planning rather than short-term decision-making. The unit examines how policy-makers at international, national and sub-national scales consider and respond to sustainability issues. Students will be introduced to: the role of analysis (scientific, economic, social and political etc) in providing an evidence base for decisions; the variety of instruments and institutions available for policy delivery; how the lobbying process influences policy determination; and effectiveness of policy design and implementation. The unit also examines how decision-making is influenced by stakeholders and 'rent-seekers', including industry, nongovernmental organisations and citizens. It will be seen that sustainability policy design and implementation in the real world involves reconciling competing agendas and interests, and that trade-offs are often made that may strengthen or weaken the effectiveness of sustainability policies.
WILD5001 Australasian Wildlife: Introduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mathew Crowther Session: Intensive August Classes: Intensively taught unit, the remainder of the unit will involve personal study and project activity. See the Wildlife Health and Population Management website for dates. Assessment: Assessments for each unit may include practical work, field studies, student presentations and written reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Veterinary Science
This unit of study provides an introduction to the wildlife of Australasia, an overview of the present status of that wildlife, and an understanding of both conservation problems and management solutions. Issues in wildlife management are exemplified using a broad range of vertebrate species occupying different environments. Emphasis is placed on providing students with a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach to wildlife health and management, and on developing expertise in recognising and solving a broad range of problems in field populations. The unit integrates lectures, practical work and supervised study, and offers students the opportunity to work through real-world wildlife conservation problems relevant to their individual backgrounds.
WILD5002 Australasian Wildlife: Field Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mathew Crowther Session: Intensive September Classes: Intensively taught unit. See the Wildlife Health and Population Management website for dates. Assessment: Assessments for each unit may include practical work, field studies, student presentations and written reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Veterinary Science
This unit of study provides a first-hand introduction to the wildlife of Australasia, a practical overview of the present status of that wildlife, and an understanding of both conservation problems and management solutions. Issues in wildlife management are exemplified using sampling and diagnostic methods on a broad range of vertebrate species occupying different environments. The unit follows on from WILD5001 and provides practical experience via a five day field trip at the university farm "Arthursleigh" near Marulan NSW.
WILD5004 Vertebrate Pest Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Tony Buckmaster Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: The Unit is taught in a full-time week at the university farm "Arthursleigh" near Marulan NSW. There are lectures, tutorials, and a variety of practical classes. Assessment: The assessment of this unit occurs both in the full-time week and in individual written assignments done in the student's own time. The full-time week contributes (40%) of the total mark through a number of individual and syndicate tasks, with presentations to the group. The remaining 60% comes from two written assignments of 3000 words (20%) and 5000 words (40%) respectively. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Veterinary Science
Vertebrate pests occur in many parts of the world, and can pose significant problems for management of habitat, agricultural productivity, human and wildlife health. This unit focuses on vertebrates that have been introduced to new environments, and considers in detail the impacts and management of pest vertebrates in Australia. Steps in pest management are reviewed, from problem analysis to acceptable levels of control, using case studies of cane toads, rabbits, house mice and red foxes. Traditional mortality methods of management are reviewed, and emphasis placed on developing methods based on fertility control. The Unit is taught in a full-time week at the university farm "Arthursleigh" near Marulan NSW. There are lectures, tutorials, and a variety of practical classes.
Textbooks
Unit of Study Handbook is the primary reference.