Marine Science and Management

Unit of study descriptions 2015

AFNR5801 Climate Change: Process, History, Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Franks, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: 18 hrs lecture/tutorial, 12 hrs practical/field classes, 9 hrs field trip preparation Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of climate change processes and issues. Assessment: 2hr exam (40%), tutorials (20%), practical report from field exercise (manuscript format) (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
This unit provides students with an overview of current debates and approaches to understanding and quantifying interactions between the biosphere, oceans and atmosphere, as used around the world, and the consequences of those interactions for climate. The unit considers climate change on a variety of timescales. This unit will include a weekend field trip to Snowy Mountains field sites managed by the University of Sydney where students will be introduced to cutting edge, ongoing climate change research.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of selected book chapters, journal articles and other publications
CIVL5511 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 2hrs per week, Tutorial 2hrs per week, Laboratory 2hrs per week. Assumed knowledge: CIVL2201 AND CIVL2611 AND ENGG1802 AND MATH2061. This unit of study follows on from Fluid Mechanics CIVL2611, which provides the essential fundamental fluid mechanics background and theory, and is assumed to be known and fully understood. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%), Final Exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the conservation of mass and momentum in differential forms for viscous fluid flows. It provides the foundation for advanced study of turbulence, flow around immersed bodies, open channel flow, and turbo-machinery.
CIVL5670 Reservoir Stream & Coastal Eng

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/week; Tutorials 2 hrs/week. Assumed knowledge: CIVL3612 and MATH2061. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) Final Exam (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The objectives of this Unit of Study are to develop an understanding of the processes occurring in lakes, reservoirs, streams and coastal seas, and an introduction to transport and mixing in inland waters, and to the design the design of marine structures. The unit will cover the mass and heat budget in stored water bodies, mixing, and the implications for water quality. In streams, simple transport models will be introduced, and simple models for dissolved oxygen transport discussed. The basic equations for linear and non linear wave theories in coastal seas will be introduced, and wave forces on structures and an introduction to design of offshore structures will be discussed.
(Students who have previously studied CIVL3613 will only be permitted to enrol in this unit by approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.)
ENVI5705 Ecological Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 3-hour lecture per week. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Case study, assignment, critical review, presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study introduces fundamental concepts of modern ecology for environmental scientists through a series of modules focussing on applied questions. Using case studies from Australia, students are exposed to the challenges of doing ecology and how cutting edge research is being applied to environmental management using evidence-based approaches. Meetings and discussions with people working in the field give students an insight into the ways that ecologists address ecological problems and how way they generate an understanding of natural systems. Students have the opportunity to consider different ways of doing science and ways of dealing with different kinds of data, including qualitative, quantitative, anecdotal and experimental approaches
ENVI5809 Environmental Simulation Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Chapman Session: Semester 2a Classes: Six all day sessions Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Project plus report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study introduces participants to the power of simulation modelling in understanding and predicting behaviour of natural systems. It covers fundamental concepts, logic, and techniques (including sensitivity analysis), and develops skills in application to environmental problems such as catchment management and population dynamics.
ENVI5903 Sustainable Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson and Prof Phil Hirsch Session: Intensive July Classes: Two pre-departure lectures, 14-day field intensive. Assessment: Essay (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Field experience Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study constitutes an international field-based experience held in Indonesia during the July semester break. It explores the contested notions of sustainable development and sustainability through exposure to real world development dilemmas in one of Asia's most dynamic countries. We explore fundamental issues such as urbanization, resource scarcity and economic globalization. The unit of study involves lectures, in-situ readings and discussion groups, introduction to field methods, stakeholder meetings and experiential learning. Students interested in this unit should confirm their interest to the Unit Coordinator by the end of March of the year the field school will be held. There will be additional costs associated with this unit to cover food, accommodation, local transport and field assistance of about $1200 Students will also be required to arrange their own international travel to the starting point (either Bangkok or Jakarta).
ENVI5904 Methods in Applied Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 3-hour lecture per week for 8 weeks. Assessment: Tutorials, oral presentations and written reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
No assessment of potential environmental impacts is possible without relevant information about the ecological consequences. This unit is for those without a quantitative ecology background, to explain the need to quantify and what are relevant measures. Describing and understanding uncertainty will be explained in the context of precautionary principles. Issues about measuring biodiversity and the spatial and temporal problems of ecological systems will be introduced. Field experience will also be available (up to two of six hour sessions) subject to weather, tides and available staffing; please note that these sessions are voluntary.
GEOG5001 Geographic Information Science A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Chapman Session: Semester 1 Classes: Six lectures plus six workshops. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study gives an overview of basic spatial data models, and enables students to understand the use of data from a variety of sources within a geographical information system (GIS). The analysis of spatial data, and its manipulation to address questions appropriate to planning or locational applications, will be addressed, as will the development of thematic maps from diverse data layers.
GEOG5004 Environmental Mapping and Monitoring

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Cowell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and one three hour practical per week. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The unit introduces methods associated with acquiring data in the field and examines issues associated with application of spatial data to environmental monitoring, terrain mapping and geocomputing. Students will learn both theoretically and practically how environmental data is collected using different remote sensing techniques, (pre)processing methods of integrating data in a GIS environment and the role of spatial data in understanding landscape processes and quantifying environmental change.
MARS5001 Coastal Processes and Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ana Vila-Concejo Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture, one 1 hour tutorial, one 3 hour practical per week for 6 weeks Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Assignment, presentation and quiz (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study explains the major coastal processes and systems of relevance to coastal zone management. These include rocky coasts and bluffs; beaches, barriers and dunes; and estuaries and inlets. The interactions between these processes and systems that are of most relevance to coastal management are highlighted, including coastal hazards such as beach erosion, dune migration, bluff retreat, coastal flooding and inlet closure/opening. Anthropogenic impacts are also analysed. The unit is presented in lectures and field excursions, the latter enabling each system to be examined first hand.
MARS5004 Coastal Management Field School

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Cowell Session: Intensive October Classes: Fieldwork 80 hours block mode Assessment: Assignment and report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
The field school will be based around visits to a series of coastal sites along the NSW coast. The unit will include a series of introductory lectures followed by visits to the sites where both unit staff and local coastal managers and stakeholders will address the students on the nature of the site, its historical development and contemporary coastal management issues and solutions. Sites will be selected to the representative of both the range of coastal systems present along the NSW coast, as well as the range of management issues presented by the sites.
MARS5006 Coral Reefs, Science and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Maria Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: University base delivery: prefield trip tutorial (1-hour), twelve lectures (1-hour each). Field based delivery: two seminars (1-hour each), two tutorials - individual consultations to develop concepts in research (1-hour each), independent research and oral presentation. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Written assignments: essay and project report; oral presentations; seminar and lecture participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Field experience Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides an in - depth overview of the key biological and non-biological processes that make up coral reef ecosystems. There is a focus on the biogeographic, oceanographic and physiological processes underlying the integrity of global tropical reef systems. The Great Barrier Reef is used as a case study to explore emerging concepts on the influence of natural and anthropogenic processes on the integrity of global coral reef ecosystems. Learning activities will include a series of background lectures and research seminars and tutorials in the development of a major research project. A major aspect of this unit is an independent research project conducted under the supervision of the course instructors. The unit concludes with a series of oral presentations based on student research. Assessment tasks will consist of one essay, essay topic presentation and a research project report and presentation. The curriculum in this unit is based on current research and course notes will be provided. This is a field intensive course held at One Tree Island Research Station. The course is ex-Gladstone Queensland and students are expected to make their own way there. The field component of the unit will be run over 4-6 days and there will be an additional course fee for transport, food and accommodation, expected to be $700.
MARS5007 Coral Reefs and Climate Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jody Webster Session: Semester 1a Classes: University based delivery: Prefield trip tutorials and lectures. Field based delivery: Lectures, seminars and tutorials. Individual consultations to develop concepts in research, independent research and oral presentation. Assessment: Written assignments: essay and project report; oral presentations; seminar and lecture participation (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Science
This unit provides an in - depth understanding of the key geological, oceanographic, biological and economic factors effecting global climate change and coral reef response, with specific reference to the Great Barrier Reef. Predictions of worst and best case scenarios for the future of coral reef systems are discussed in the context of the latest science, and in light of how this science should underpin future management strategies and policy. Learning activities will include a series of background lectures and research seminars, and tutorials on the development of a major research project. A major aspect of this unit is an independent research project conducted under the supervision of the course instructors. The unit concludes with a series of oral presentations based on student research. Assessment tasks will consist of an essay, a research seminar, and a research project report and presentation. This is a field intensive course held at either One Tree Island or Heron Island or Orpheus Island Research Stations. This unit will be run over 6-8 days and there will be an additional course fee for transport, food and accommodation, expected to be about $700 (ex. travel to and from Gladstone/Townsville).
MARS5009 Topics in Australian Marine Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: The unit will start on Thursday 6th March and will finish Thursday 5th June with a one week mid-semester break from 18 - 25 April. Weekly delivery on Thursday mornings 10 - 2pm at Sydney Institute of Marine Science (SIMS), Chowder Bay. Tutorial 10 - 10:45am, Practical 10:45 - 1pm, Lecture 1:15 - 2pm. Assessment: Practical exercises (50%), 1000 word report/assignment (20%), exam (30%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study will introduce students to current research undertaken in various disciplines of marine science in Australia. It will be a multi-institutional unit taught at the Sydney Institute of Marine Science (SIMS) with contributions from the four University partners of SIMS. Lectures and tutorials will be taught by leading marine science researchers. Topics will cover physical and biological oceanography, climate change, molecular ecology, aquaculture, marine biology and marine geosciences. In practical classes, students will analyse and interpret remote-sensing data from the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS), which provides comprehensive information on the biological and physical processes of Australia's coastal and oceanic waters.
MARS5505 Marine Research Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised research Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Marine Science and Management core units with a 75% average or above. Prohibitions: MARS5005 Assessment: Research Proposal (10%), research seminar (10%), thesis (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students taking MARS5505 must take MARS5506
This unit enables students who have completed earlier coursework to design and undertake a research project related to a marine science and/or management topic under the supervision of an appropriate member of staff. The unit is suitable for students who wish to learn how to undertake and complete an original research project, as well as students from industry and government organizations who wish to undertake a project that relates to their professional environment. The research topic should be arranged between the student and supervisor and must have a coastal or marine science and/or management focus. Potential topics range from modelling coastal impacts of predicted sea level rise, equilibrium shoreline profiles and reef microborer responses to environmental variables. The project topic may involve a field or lab component, or may be entirely literature-based. The project question and research design must be structured to be completed within one fulltime semester or two part-time semesters of study, including the literature review, field work, data analysis and report writing. MARS5505 and MARS5506 do not involve formal contact hours but students are required to work on the project in a continuous manner for the entire duration of the semester in which they are enrolled.
MARS5506 Marine Research Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised research Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Marine Science and Management core units with a 75% average or above. Prohibitions: MARS5005 Assessment: Research Proposal (10%), research seminar (10%), thesis (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students taking MARS5505 must take MARS5506
This unit enables students who have completed earlier coursework to design and undertake a research project related to a marine science and/or management topic under the supervision of an appropriate member of staff. The unit is suitable for students who wish to learn how to undertake and complete an original research project, as well as students from industry and government organizations who wish to undertake a project that relates to their professional environment. The research topic should be arranged between the student and supervisor and must have a coastal or marine science and/or management focus. Potential topics range from modelling coastal impacts of predicted sea level rise, equilibrium shoreline profiles and reef microborer responses to environmental variables. The project topic may involve a field or lab component, or may be entirely literature-based. The project question and research design must be structured to be completed within one fulltime semester or two part-time semesters of study, including the literature review, field work, data analysis and report writing. MARS5505 and MARS5506 do not involve formal contact hours but students are required to work on the project in a continuous manner for the entire duration of the semester in which they are enrolled.
PHYS5032 Techniques for Sustainability Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke and Prof Manfred Lenzen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Comprehensive diary/notes from lectures (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study offers an introduction to quantitative analysis techniques including multivariate regression, uncertainty analysis, climate modelling, structural decomposition, and dynamic systems modelling, with a strong emphasis on demonstrating their usefulness for environmental problem-solving. This unit will show how mathematics can be brought to life when utilised in powerful applications to deal with environmental issues. Throughout the unit of study, example applications will be described, including studies on ecosystem trophic chains, mapping of household consumption and environmental impact, wind turbine assessment, and the effect of land use patterns on threats to species.
PHYS5033 Environmental Footprints and IO Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke and Prof Manfred Lenzen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Comprehensive diary/notes from lectures, including a quantitative example (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study will provide an introduction to economic input-output theory and input-output analysis, with a focus on environmental applications such as carbon footprints and life-cycle analysis. The unit first explores national and global economic and environmental accounting systems and their relationships to organisational accounting. Second, it will present variants of the basic accounts, such as global multi-regional input-output systems and social accounting systems. Third, it will introduce the basic input-output calculus conceived by Nobel Prize Laureate Wassily Leontief, and provide concrete examples for how to apply this calculus to data published by statistical offices. The unit will then show how to integrate economic and environmental accounts, and generate boundary-free environmental footprint assessments. Students will walk away from this unit equipped with all skills needed to calculate footprints, and prepare sustainability reports for any organisation, city, region, or nation, using organisational data, economic input-output tables and environmental accounts.
SUST5005 Policy and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Rosemary Lyster Session: Intensive September Classes: Intensive classes for 4 full days in September 2015 Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Climate change, ecological sustainability, food security, resource scarcity, green technology and innovation, rising ocean levels, climate refugees, drought and 'water wars', are just some of the complex topics that now confront policy makers at all levels of government. This unit of study aims to provide students with an understanding of the issues surrounding the development and implementation of policies for sustainability. At all levels there are a range of stakeholders- policy makers, regulators, non-government organisations, industry, citizens and community groups- confronted by a complex ethical environment in their pursuit of different and sometimes competing agendas. As a result, policy and particular policy instruments may reflect conflict and compromise rather than consensus. Students will be introduced to: the role of analysis (scientific, economic, social and political etc) in providing an evidence base; the variety of instruments and institutions available for policy delivery; the lobbying process in influencing policy determination; and effectiveness of policy design and implementation including identification of 'winners' and 'losers'.
WILD5001 Australasian Wildlife: Introduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mathew Crowther Session: Intensive August Classes: Intensively taught unit, the remainder of the unit will involve personal study and project activity. See the Wildlife Health and Population Management website for dates. Assessment: Assessments for each unit may include practical work, field studies, student presentations and written reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Veterinary Science
This unit of study provides an introduction to the wildlife of Australasia, an overview of the present status of that wildlife, and an understanding of both conservation problems and management solutions. Issues in wildlife management are exemplified using a broad range of vertebrate species occupying different environments. Emphasis is placed on providing students with a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach to wildlife health and management, and on developing expertise in recognising and solving a broad range of problems in field populations. The unit integrates lectures, practical work and supervised study, and offers students the opportunity to work through real-world wildlife conservation problems relevant to their individual backgrounds.
WILD5002 Australasian Wildlife: Field Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mathew Crowther Session: Intensive September Classes: Intensively taught unit. See the Wildlife Health and Population Management website for dates. Assessment: Assessments for each unit may include practical work, field studies, student presentations and written reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Veterinary Science
This unit of study provides a first-hand introduction to the wildlife of Australasia, a practical overview of the present status of that wildlife, and an understanding of both conservation problems and management solutions. Issues in wildlife management are exemplified using sampling and diagnostic methods on a broad range of vertebrate species occupying different environments. The unit follows on from WILD5001 and provides practical experience via a five day field trip at the university farm "Arthursleigh" near Marulan NSW.