Marine Science and Management

Marine Science and Management

Graduate Certificate in Marine Science and Management

Students must complete 24 credit points, including:
(a) 12 credit points of core unit of study; and
(b) 12 credit points of elective units of study.

Graduate Diploma in Marine Science and Management

Students must complete 48 credit points across at least two of the defined areas of knowledge, including:
(a) 24 credit points of core units of study; and
(b) 12 credit points of elective units of study taken at the University of Sydney; and
(c) 12 credit points of elective units of study which may be taken from the other partner universities under the equivalent program (University of NSW, University of Technology Sydney, Macquarie University) via Cross Institutional Study.
Note: It is a requirement of the Graduate Diploma that students undertake units of study in a minimum of two of the four available areas of knowledge.

Master of Marine Science and Management (Coursework)

Students in the coursework pathway must complete 72 credit points across at least three of the defined areas of knowledge, including:
(a) 24 credit points of core units of study; and
(b) 36 credit points of elective units of study taken at the University of Sydney; and
(c) 12 credit points of elective units of study which may be taken from the other partner universities under the equivalent program (University of NSW, University of Technology Sydney, Macquarie University) via Cross Institutional Study.
Note: Subject to the availability of supervision and suitable projects, candidates with a distinction average in 24 credit points of study from the degree may be admitted to the research pathway.

Master of Marine Science and Management (Research)

Students in the research pathway must complete 72 credit points across at least three of the defined areas of knowledge, including:
(a) 48 credit points of core units of study; and
(b) 12 credit points of elective units of study taken at the University of Sydney; and
(c) 12 credit points of elective units of study which may be taken from the other partner universities under the equivalent program (University of NSW, University of Technology Sydney, Macquarie University) via Cross Institutional Study
Note: It is a requirement of the master's degree that students undertake units of study in a minimum of three of the four available areas of knowledge.

Areas of Knowledge

(a) Marine biology/Biological oceanography
(b) Marine geosciences/Coastal engineering
(c) Physical oceanography/Marine engineering
(d) Environmental Management/sustainability
Core Units
MARS5009 Topics in Australian Marine Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ana Vila-Concejo, Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 1 Classes: Please confirm start and finish of this unit of study with the Marine Science and Management Postgraduate Programme Coordinator. Weekly delivery on Thursday mornings 10 - 2pm at Sydney Institute of Marine Science (SIMS), Chowder Bay. Tutorial 10 - 10:45am, Practical 10:45 - 1pm, Lecture 1:15 - 2pm. Assessment: Practical exercises (50%), 1000 word report/assignment (20%), exam (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce students to current research undertaken in various disciplines of marine science in Australia. It will be a multi-institutional unit taught at the Sydney Institute of Marine Science (SIMS) with contributions from the four University partners of SIMS. Lectures and tutorials will be taught by leading marine science researchers. Topics will cover physical and biological oceanography, climate change, molecular ecology, aquaculture, marine biology and marine geosciences. In practical classes, students will analyse and interpret remote-sensing data from the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS), which provides comprehensive information on the biological and physical processes of Australia's coastal and oceanic waters.
Marine Geosciences / Coastal Engineering
MARS5001 Coastal Processes and Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ana Vila-Concejo, Dr Tristan Salles Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture, one 1 hour tutorial per week Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Assignment, presentation and quiz (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explains the major coastal processes and systems of relevance to coastal zone management. These include beaches, barriers and dunes; estuaries and inlets; and coral reefs. The interactions between these processes and systems that are of most relevance to coastal management are highlighted, including coastal hazards such as beach erosion. Anthropogenic impacts are also analysed. This unit includes an introduction to numerical modeling of coastal processes and systems using state-of-the-art modeling tools. The unit is presented in lectures and field excursions, the latter enabling each system to be examined first hand.
Environmental Management / Sustainability
MARS5004 Coastal Management Field School

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ana Vila-Concejo Session: Intensive October Classes: Fieldwork 80 hours block mode Assessment: Assignment and report (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The field school will be based around visits to a series of coastal sites along the NSW coast. The unit will include a series of introductory lectures followed by visits to the sites where both unit staff and local coastal managers and stakeholders will address the students on the nature of the site, its historical development and contemporary coastal management issues and solutions. Sites will be selected to the representative of both the range of coastal systems present along the NSW coast, as well as the range of management issues presented by the sites.
Marine Biology / Biological Oceanography
ENVI5904 Methods in Applied Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clare McArthur and A/Prof Will Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 3-hour lecture/tutorial per week; 1-2 full day field trips. Assessment: Tutorials, oral presentations and written reports (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Applied ecologists and managers need a good understanding of quantitative methods for assessing environmental impacts and the effectiveness of management and conservation strategies particularly where background variation (error) is inherently high. This unit is for those without a quantitative ecology background. It will introduce you to quantitative methods in the context of three ecological topics that are globally relevant: (1) Impact assessment where the perturbation is unreplicated, (2) Food security in marine ecosystems, and (3) Conservation and restoration in terrestrial ecosystems. The main question we address is how do we test whether any management action has been effective? Describing and understanding uncertainty will be explained in the context of precautionary principles. Issues about measuring biodiversity and the spatial and temporal problems of ecological systems will be introduced.
Additional Core Units: Master's Research Pathway Only
MARS5507 Marine Research Project A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised research Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Marine Science and Management core units with a 75% average or above Prohibitions: MARS5005 Assessment: Research Proposal (10%), research seminar (10%), thesis (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students taking MARS5507 must take MARS5508
This unit enables students who have completed earlier coursework to design and undertake a research project related to a marine science and/or management topic under the supervision of an appropriate member of staff. The unit is suitable for students who wish to learn how to undertake and complete an original research project, as well as students from industry and government organisations who wish to undertake a project that relates to their professional environment. The research topic should be arranged between the student and supervisor and must have a coastal or marine science and/or management focus. Potential topics range from modelling coastal impacts of predicted sea level rise, equilibrium shoreline profiles and reef microborer responses to environmental variables. The project topic may involve a field or lab component, or may be entirely literature-based. The project question and research design must be structured to be completed within one fulltime semester or two part-time semesters of study, including the literature review, field work, data analysis and report writing. MARS5507 and MARS5508 do not involve formal contact hours but students are required to work on the project in a continuous manner for the entire duration of the semester in which they are enrolled.
MARS5508 Marine Research Project B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised research Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Marine Science and Management core units with a 75% average or above Prohibitions: MARS5005 Assessment: Research Proposal (10%), research seminar (10%), thesis (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students taking MARS5507 must take MARS5508
This unit enables students who have completed earlier coursework to design and undertake a research project related to a marine science and/or management topic under the supervision of an appropriate member of staff. The unit is suitable for students who wish to learn how to undertake and complete an original research project, as well as students from industry and government organisations who wish to undertake a project that relates to their professional environment. The research topic should be arranged between the student and supervisor and must have a coastal or marine science and/or management focus. Potential topics range from modelling coastal impacts of predicted sea level rise, equilibrium shoreline profiles and reef microborer responses to environmental variables. The project topic may involve a field or lab component, or may be entirely literature-based. The project question and research design must be structured to be completed within one fulltime semester or two part-time semesters of study, including the literature review, field work, data analysis and report writing. MARS5507 and MARS5508 do not involve formal contact hours but students are required to work on the project in a continuous manner for the entire duration of the semester in which they are enrolled.
Electives
Marine Biology / Biological Oceanography
ENVI5705 Ecological Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Newsome Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 3-hour lecture per week, one 2-day field trip, one half-day field trip Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level Mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Case study, assignment, critical review, presentation (100%) Practical field work: One 2-day field trip, one half-day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces fundamental concepts of modern ecology for environmental scientists through a series of modules focussing on applied questions. Using case studies from Australia and internationally, students are exposed to the challenges of doing ecology and how cutting edge research is being applied to environmental management using evidence-based approaches. Meetings and discussions with people working in the field give students an insight into the ways that ecologists address ecological problems and how way they generate an understanding of natural systems. Students have the opportunity to consider different ways of doing science and ways of dealing with different kinds of data, including qualitative, quantitative, anecdotal and experimental approaches.
To be developed for offering in 2021: MARS4001 Coral Reefs, Science and Management
Marine Geosciences / Coastal Engineering
GEOG5001 Geographic Information Science A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin Davies Session: Semester 1 Classes: Six lectures plus six workshops. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Quiz and Assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study gives an overview of basic spatial data models, and enables students to understand the use of data from a variety of sources within a geographical information system (GIS). The analysis of spatial data, and its manipulation to address questions appropriate to planning or locational applications, will be addressed, as will the development of thematic maps from diverse data layers.
GEOG5004 Environmental Mapping and Monitoring

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bree Morgan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and two 6 hour practicals per semester. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces methods for mapping environmental signatures in coastal and marine systems, using both biogeochemical analysis and GIS technologies. Students will learn, theoretically and practically, how environmental data is collected using a range of different methodologies (field and computer based), and application of this data to understanding landscape processes and quantifying environmental change. Students will acquire skills in applying environmental mapping techniques to interpreting key Earth surface processes and understanding the substantial impacts that humans can have on these, in terms of both contamination and remediation.
MARS5007 Coral Reefs and Climate Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jody Webster Session: Semester 1a Classes: University based delivery: Prefield trip tutorials and lectures. Field based delivery: Lectures, seminars and tutorials. Individual consultations to develop concepts in research, independent research and oral presentation. Assessment: Written assignments: essay and project report; oral presentations; seminar and lecture participation (100%). Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit provides an in - depth understanding of the key geological, oceanographic, biological and economic factors effecting global climate change and coral reef response, with specific reference to the future and fate of the Great Barrier Reef. Predictions of worst and best case scenarios for the future of coral reef systems are discussed in the context of the latest science, and in light of how this science should underpin future management strategies and policy. On campus learning activities will include a series of background lectures and research seminars, and tutorials on the development of a major research project. A major aspect of this unit is the independent research project conducted in the field (Great Barrier Reef) under the supervision of the course instructors. The unit concludes with a series of oral presentations based on student research. Assessment tasks will consist of an essay, a research seminar, and a research project report and presentation. The field intensive component of the course is held at One Tree Island or Heron Island or Orpheus Island Research Stations and will run over 6-8 days and there will be an additional course fee for transport, food and accommodation, expected to be about $700 (ex. travel to and from Gladstone/Townsville).
Physical Oceanography / Marine Engineering
CIVL9612 Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kapil Chauhan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CIVL9201 AND CIVL9611 AND (ENGG9802 OR CIVL9802). This unit of study follows on from Fluid Mechanics CIVL9611, which provides the essential fundamental fluid mechanics background and theory, and is assumed to be known and fully understood. Assessment: Through semester assessment (65%) and Final Exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the conservation of mass and momentum in differential forms for viscous fluid flows. It provides the foundation for advanced study of turbulence, flow around immersed bodies, open channel flow, pipe flow and pump design.
CIVL5670 Reservoir, Stream and Coastal Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Amin Chabchoub Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: (CIVL3612 OR CIVL9612) AND MATH2061 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objectives of this unit of study are to develop an understanding of the processes occurring in lakes, reservoirs, streams and coastal seas, an introduction to transport and mixing in inland waters, and to the design the design of marine structures. The unit will cover the mass and heat budget in stored water bodies, mixing, and the implications for water quality. In streams, natural river systems will be discussed, and the principles of sediment transport and scour, monitoring and management will be introduced. The basic equations for linear and nonlinear wave theories in coastal seas will be introduced, and wave forces on structures and an introduction to design of offshore structures will be discussed.
Environmental Management / Sustainability
AFNR5801 Climate Change: Process, History, Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Franks (Coordinator), Dr Dan Penny, Dr Malcolm Possell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 18 hours lectures/tutorials, 12 hours practicals/field classes, 9 hours field trip preparation Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of climate change processes and issues. Assessment: 2-hour exam (40%), tutorials (20%), practical report from field exercise (manuscript format) (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an overview of current debates and approaches to understanding and quantifying interactions between the biosphere, oceans and atmosphere, as used around the world, and the consequences of those interactions for climate. The unit considers climate change on a variety of timescales. This unit will include a weekend field trip to Snowy Mountains field sites where students will be introduced to climate change research.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of selected book chapters, journal articles and other publications
ENVI5809 Environmental Simulation Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tristan Salles Session: Semester 2a Classes: Six all day sessions Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level Mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Project plus report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces participants to the power of simulation modelling in understanding and predicting behaviour of natural systems. It covers fundamental concepts, logic, and techniques (including sensitivity analysis), and develops skills in application to environmental problems such as catchment management and population dynamics.
ENVI5903 Sustainable Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson Session: Intensive July Classes: Two pre-departure lectures, 14-day field intensive. Assessment: Essay and presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit of study involves additional costs.
This unit of study constitutes an international field-based experience held in Southeast Asia during the July semester break. It explores the contested notions of sustainable development and sustainability through exposure to real world development dilemmas in Southeast Asia. We explore fundamental issues such as urbanization, sustainable livelihood, resource scarcity and economic globalization. The unit of study involves lectures, in-situ readings and discussion groups, introduction to field methods, stakeholder meetings and experiential learning. Students interested in this unit should confirm their interest to the Unit Coordinators by the end of March of the year the field school will be held. There will be additional costs associated with this unit to cover food, accommodation, local transport and field assistance of about $1,200. Students will also be required to arrange their own international travel to the starting point (either Vientiane or Jakarta depending on the specific location of the course).
PHYS5032 Techniques for Sustainability Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2.5-hour lecture including tutorial per week Assessment: Two assignments based on weekly homework sheets (80%), quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study offers a practical introduction to quantitative analysis techniques including multiple regression, uncertainty analysis, integration, structural decomposition, and dynamic systems modelling, with a strong emphasis on demonstrating their usefulness for environmental problem-solving. This unit will show students how mathematics can be brought to life when utilised in powerful applications to deal with environmental and sustainability issues. Throughout the unit of study, example applications will be explained, including climate modelling, ecosystem trophic chain analysis, linking household consumption and environmental impact, identifying socio-demographic drivers of environmental change, and the uncovering the effect of land use patterns on threats to species.
PHYS5033 Environmental Footprints and IO Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arunima Malik and Prof Manfred Lenzen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Comprehensive diary/notes from lectures, including a quantitative example, and in class tests (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study will provide students with practical skills for carrying out environmental footprinting calculations: for individuals, companies, organisations or nations. In particular, this unit will provide a comprehensive introduction to input-output analysis for identifying impacts embodied in regional, national and global supply chains. This unit focuses on contemporary environmental applications such as emissions, energy-use, water, land, loss of animal & plant species; and also social applications such as employment, poverty and child labour. The unit first explores national and global economic and environmental accounting systems and their relationships to organisational accounting. Second, it presents cutting-edge techniques enabling the global analysis of environmental and social impacts of international trade. Third, it offers hands-on practical activities for mastering the input-output techniques conceived by Nobel Prize Laureate Wassily Leontief, and provides a step-by-step recipe for undertaking boundary-free environmental and social footprinting for sectors and organisations. Students will walk away from this unit equipped with useful skills needed to calculate footprints, and prepare sustainability reports for any organisation, city, region, or nation, using organisational data, economic input-output tables and environmental accounts. Students will also benefit from enrolling in PHYS5034 for a sound understanding of the role of input-output analysis within the field of Life-Cycle Assessment.
SUST5005 Law, Policy and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Rosemary Lyster Session: Intensive October Classes: Intensive classes for 4 full days in October Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Class presentation and short essay (1,500-2,000 w, 20%) and long essay (6,000 w, 80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Block mode
Note: This unit of study involves essay-writing. Academic writing skills equivalent to HSC Advanced English or significant consultation via the Writing Hub is assumed.
This unit examines how policy-makers engage with and implement policies and legal requirements for regulating ecologically sustainable development. Meeting the needs of a growing global population while at the same time maintaining the health of the environment, which provides the life support system for humanity, is the central policy challenge of the 21st century. Key sustainability challenges include: avoiding dangerous climate change, safeguarding biological diversity, providing food security, coping with resource scarcity, and promoting green technology including low-carbon energy generation. These issues provide acute challenges for governments given that they cut across a range of policy areas, and require long-term planning rather than short-term decision-making. The unit examines how policy-makers at international, national and sub-national scales consider and respond to sustainability issues. Students will be introduced to: the role of analysis (economic, legal, political, scientific and social etc) in providing an evidence base for decisions; the variety of instruments and institutions available for policy delivery; how the lobbying process influences policy determination; and effectiveness of policy design and implementation. The unit also examines how decision-making is influenced by stakeholders, including industry, nongovernmental organisations and citizens. It will be seen that sustainability policy design and implementation in the real world involves reconciling competing agendas and interests, and that trade-offs are often made that may strengthen or weaken the effectiveness of sustainability policies. Offered through the Sydney Law School, this unit introduces students to the legal imperatives (both international and national) which inform and mandate policy choices.