Graduate Diploma of Psychology

Unit of study descriptions 2015

PSYC2011 Brain and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002. Prohibitions: PSYC2911, PSYC2111 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, major assignment (1500-2000 word essay/report), minor assignment (short written practical exercise and/ or tutorial quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This Unit of Study examines a range of phenomena and principles in behaviour, learning and perception, and their relations to underlying neural substrates. The emphasis in learning is on instrumental conditioning and the principle of reinforcement, ranging from applications of this principle to its neural substrates. Also covered are motivational aspects of behaviour, such as punishment and avoidance, anxiety and depression, addiction, sex and appetite, together with related neurochemical mechanisms and the effects of various psychopharmacological agents on these processes. A number of perceptual phenomena will be studied, such as motion detection, recognition of faces, identification of emotion, hearing and hearing loss, taste discrimination, and chronic pain. The practical classes are designed for students with an interest in clinical and therapeutic Psychology, and will allow students to design and implement a behaviour modification programme.
PSYC2911 Brain and Behaviour (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: A distinction average in PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2111, PSYC2011 Assessment: 1 x 2 hour examination, 1 x 1500 word report, 1 x quiz, 1 x oral presentation/debate (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This Unit of Study focuses on the Behavioural Sciences, Neurosciences, and the study of perception. The lecture content is the same as PSYC2011, and examines a range of phenomena and principles in behaviour, learning and perception, and their relations to underlying neural substrates. The emphasis in learning is on instrumental conditioning and the principle of reinforcement, ranging from applications of this principle to its neural substrates. Also covered are motivational aspects of behaviour, such as punishment and avoidance, anxiety and depression, addiction, sex and appetite, together with related neurochemical mechanisms and the effects of various psychopharmacological agents on these processes. A number of perceptual phenomena will be studied, such as motion detection, recognition of faces, identification of emotion, hearing and hearing loss, taste discrimination, and chronic pain. The practical classes differ from PSYC2011, as it is targeted for those who would like to learn more about the experimental study of behaviour and the neurosciences. Students will gain hands-on laboratory experience in how the principles and phenomena of behavioural neuroscience may be studied experimentally.
PSYC2012 Statistics & Research Methods for Psych

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ben Colagiuri Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus one 1 hour lecture and one 1 hour tutorial per fortnight. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2112 Assumed knowledge: Recommended: HSC Mathematics, any level Assessment: One 2 hour final exam, class tests, one 1500 word written assignment, one 45 minute mid-semester exam (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The aim is to introduce students to fundamental concepts in statistics as applied to psychological research. These include summary descriptive statistics, an introduction to the principles and practice of research design, and the use of inferential statistics. Building upon this framework, the unit of study aims to develop each student's expertise in understanding the rationale for, and application of, a variety of statistical tests to the sorts of data typically obtained in psychological research.
PSYC2013 Cognitive and Social Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Fiona White Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002. Prohibitions: PSYC2113 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, major assignment (1500-2000 word essay/report), minor assignment (short written practical exercise and/or tutorial quiz) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit expands the depth and range of topics introduced in the first year lectures on Cognitive Processes, Developmental Psychology and Social Psychology. The section on Cognitive Processes focuses on current theories of memory, attention, problem solving and decision making and discusses the methods and issues involved in investigating these processes in both healthy individuals and people with cognitive disorders. The section on Developmental Psychology discusses early social and cognitive development. The section on Social Psychology examines salient topics in social psychology, such as impression management, social cognition, and prejudice.
PSYC2014 Personality and Intelligence 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Niko Tiliopoulos Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2114 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, major assignment (1500-2000 word essay/report), minor assignment (short written practical exercise and/or tutorial quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The main aim of this course is to introduce students to a number of influential theories in personality and intelligence. Students will be exposed to some conceptual analysis and will be expected to gain an understanding and be able to examine critically the various theories covered. Furthermore, students will be introduced to key topics in the scientific study and assessment of individual differences (Psychometrics) in personality and intelligence. The course will cover both conceptual (e.g. validity and reliability) and applied (e.g. Factor Analysis) elements of statistical psychometric inference.
PSYC3010 Advanced Statistics for Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sabina Kleitman, Dr Damian Birney Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2012 or PSYC2112) plus at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit of Study from PSYC2011, PSYC2911, PSYC2111, PSYC2013, PSYC2113, PSYC2014 and PSYC2114. Prohibitions: PSYC3201 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, class tests, 1500 word assignment, practical exercises (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study expands upon students' knowledge of the general linear model and its applications in the analysis of data from psychological research. The first half of the course introduces students to contrast analysis as an extension of ANOVA, which allows for more focused analysis of data where group comparisons are the primary interest. The second half focuses on multiple regression and its extensions, which are used when the primary interest is to predict or explain a particular variable based on a set of other variables.
Textbooks
Keith, Z. T. (2006). Multiple Regression and Beyond. New York: Pearson Education, Inc.
PSYC3011 Learning and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Evan Livesey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit from PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2013, PSYC2113, PSYC2014 or PSYC2114. Prohibitions: PSYC3209 Assumed knowledge: PSYC2012 or PSYC2112 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word prac report, tutorial quizzes (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit addresses the fundamental concepts and more important research findings related to contemporary theories of associative learning in animals and humans. It examines the application of such fundamental research to issues such as drug use and food choice. It is designed to foster skills in reading primary sources in this area, and provide the opportunity for hands-on experience in carrying out a research project.
Textbooks
Bouton, M. E. (2007). Learning and Behavior: A contemporary synthesis. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer.
PSYC3012 Cognition, Language and Thought

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Sally Andrews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2013 or PSYC2113) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology unit from PSYC2011, PSYC2911, PSYC2111, PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2014 or PSYC2114. Prohibitions: PSYC3205 Assumed knowledge: PSYC2012 or PSYC2112 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, 2000 word prac report, practical exercise(s) (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit extends the theories and methods of investigating memory and attentional processes discussed in PSYC2013 to consider a number of domains of higher cognitive processing. One strand of the course will focus on the cognitive processes involved in speech perception, language comprehension, language production, and reading. The remainder of the course will deal with the cognitive processes involved in reasoning and skill acquisition. The practical program will expose students to a variety of the research methods used to investigate higher cognitive processes, develop their understanding of how these methods can be used to investigate hypotheses about mental processes and consider applications of cognitive research to real-world problems and issues.
PSYC3013 Perceptual Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Alais Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit from PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2013, PSYC2113, PSYC2014, PSYC2114 or ANAT2010 Prohibitions: PSYC3210 Assumed knowledge: PSYC2012 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, one 2000 word report, tutorial quiz, group presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Perception poses many challenges: how do we see colour and movement? How do we perceive surfaces and materials? How does combining information from multiple senses improve our perception? This unit draws on behavioural and neurophysiological perspectives to deepen understanding of current research topics in perception. The emphasis is on how visual information is processed to accomplish functions such as perceiving a single edge, extracting the contours that form a face, or the spatial relations needed to call offside on the sports field. Students also gain conceptual tools for evaluating the empirical and theoretical worth of recent research in perception. During the tutorial component of the course students will develop a practical experiment in which they formulate and test a hypothesis. In this way students gain important research experience that gives them valuable insight into the scientific process as it exists both in professional work and in the empirical research project required for the Honours degree.
Textbooks
Sensation & Perception, Third Edition
PSYC3014 Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Corbit Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Either ((PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111) and at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit from (PSYC2012 or PSYC2112), (PSYC2013 or PSYC2113), (PSYC2014 or PSYC2114)) OR ((PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111 or PSYC2013) and ANAT2010 and PCOL2011) Prohibitions: PSYC3215, PSYC3204, PSYC3914 Assumed knowledge: PSYC2113 or PSYC2013 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one major essay/report 2000-2500 words, tutorial quiz and participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. The implications of focal cognitive deficits in neurological patients for models of normal cognitive function will also be explored. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration, and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. In addition to lectures, a practical component will cover basic neuroanatomy, histology and neuropharmacology, and will introduce students to experimental and case-study approaches to studying neurosciences.
PSYC3914 Behavioural & Cognitive Neuroscience Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Corbit Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 2 hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction or above across (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111) Prohibitions: PSYC3215, PSYC3014, PSYC3204 Assumed knowledge: PSYC2113 or PSYC2013 Assessment: 1 x 2 hour exam (end of semester), 1 x 1 hour quiz (mid-semester), 1 x presentation, 1 written assignment (lab report), attendance and participation in tutorial/practical exercises (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study will focus on approaches to studying neurosciences incorporating molecular, pre-clinical and clinical models of brain function. These biological models of brain function will be linked with behavioural, affective and cognitive function and dysfunction. The implications of focal cognitive deficits in neurological patients for models of normal cognitive function will also be explored. Specific topics to be covered will be selected from the following areas: sensorimotor integration, and the neural and molecular basis of learning and memory, attention, language, visual cognition and praxis. The lecture material will be the same as for PSYC3014, however, the practical class is targeted for those who would like to learn more about the experimental study of behaviour and the neurosciences. The practical component of the advanced stream will cover basic neuroanatomy, histology and neuropharmacology and will introduce students to experimental approaches to studying brain-behaviour relationships in a group-run, in-class experiment that will be conducted over the course of the semester.
PSYC3015 Personality and Intelligence 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carolyn MacCann Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (PSYC2014 or PSYC2114) and (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911 or PSYC2111 or PSYC2012 or PSYC2112 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2113) Assumed knowledge: (PSYC2012 or PSYC2112); (PSYC2013 or PSYC2113) Assessment: One 2 hour exam; one major written assignment (1500 words), one minor written assignment (750 words), and tutorial activities (in-class quizzes and/or presentations) (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The aim of this unit of study is to provide an overview of the different areas of research and practice in personality, intelligence, and individual differences. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of different theoretical models of personality, intelligence, and metacognition and encouraged to critically evaluate these theories based on the supporting research evidence. The methods of conducting and evaluating individual differences research will also be a focus of the course. Students will be encouraged to take multiple perspectives, evaluating theories of personality and intelligence in terms of their empirical and theoretical support as well as their potential applications.
PSYC3016 Developmental Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Micah Goldwater Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2013 or PSYC2113 and at least one other Intermediate Psychology unit from PSYC2011, PSYC2911, PSYC2111, PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2014 and PSYC2114. Prohibitions: PSYC3206 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, two short (600 & 750 words) essays, one extended (1200 word) essay (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit examines our understanding of human psychological development, focusing on selected issues and empirical traditions within the discipline of Developmental Psychology. Students are expected to gain an understanding of the theoretical influences that have come to dominate developmental research, and students will also be introduced to a range of theoretical and research approaches in contemporary Developmental Science. These include: attachment, gender role and identity, conceptual development, children's thinking, social cognition, moral reasoning and behaviour, self-understanding and self-worth, and the role of genetic and environmental influences on development. The course will also consider applications of developmental research and theory in developmental psychopathology and in educational contexts, as well as exploring children's experience of art, literature and drama. Students are expected to gain knowledge of, and develop a critical approach to, the analysis of current research and theoretical issues in these areas.
PSYC3017 Social Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ilan Dar-Nimrod Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC2013 or PSYC2113 and at least one other Intermediate Psychology Unit of Study from PSYC2011, PSYC2911, PSYC2111, PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2014 and PSYC2114. Prohibitions: PSYC3212 Assumed knowledge: PSYC2012 or PSYC2112. Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2500 word research report, and tutorial presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit continues the coverage of topics in Social Psychology begun in PSYC1001 and PSYC2013. The unit is divided into topic areas, where the emphasis is on evaluating theories and the relevant evidence. Topics areas include: antisocial behaviours, discrimination, the self, emotion, ostracism, and interpersonal attraction. Tutorials provide first-hand experience of research by involving students in a small group research project based on topics covered in the lectures. The tutorials also provide an opportunity to discuss issues pertaining to each step of the research process (e.g., ethical issues that underlie social psychological research, proper practice when collecting and handling data, how to communicate research findings in written and verbal form).
PSYC3018 Abnormal Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ilona Juraskova Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: At least two intermediate Psychology units of study from PSYC2011, PSYC2911, PSYC2111, PSYC2012, PSYC2112, PSYC2013, PSYC2113, PSYC2014 and PSYC2114 Prohibitions: PSYC3203 Assumed knowledge: (PSYC2012 or PSYC2112) and (PSYC2014 or PSYC2114) Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 or 2500 word essay, quiz, participation and tutorial presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study critically examines core issues in Abnormal Psychology, concerning the description, explanation and treatment of psychological disorders. The unit of study will include topics such as:
(a) Adult abnormal psychology: Anxiety disorders (specific phobias, panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, OCD); Addictive disorders (drug, alcohol, gambling); Eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa); Mood disorders (dysthymia, major depressive disorder, cyclothymia, bipolar disorder); Schizophrenia, Personality disorders.
(b) Child abnormal psychology: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity disorder; Conduct disorder; Anxiety disorders, Depression.
Textbooks
Rieger, E. (Ed.) (2008) Abnormal Psychology: Leading researcher perspectives. Sydney: McGraw-Hill Education. (2nd Ed).
PSYC3020 Applications of Psychological Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catalina Lawsin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of junior psychology and 12 credit points in Intermediate Psychology Prohibitions: PSYC3019 Assessment: One 2 hour examination (50%), one 2500 word written assignment (30%), class quizzes (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The aim of this unit is to introduce students to various ways in which psychological theory and research can be applied in the real world. In particular, this unit will focus on Health Psychology, Forensic Psychology, and Organisational Psychology. The Health Psychology component of this course may include investigation into why we engage in risky health behaviours including smoking, overeating and alcohol use; inequalities in health including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island health; dealing with chronic illness including death & dying, and survivorship. The Forensic Psychology component of the course may include investigation into lie detection, criminal offenders, victims of crime, and eyewitness memory. The Organisational Psychology component of the course may focus on personnel selection, training in organisations, performance measurement, workplace motivation, and leadership.
HPSC3023 Psychology & Psychiatry: History & Phil

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Hans Pols and Dr Fiona Hibberd Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 2 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (at least 12 credit points of intermediate HPSC Units of study) OR (a CR or above in one HPSC intermediate Unit of Study) OR (12 intermediate credit points in psychology). Prohibitions: PSYC3202 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge about the history of modern science as taught in HPSC2100 AND the principles of philosophy of science as taught in HPSC2101 OR knowledge of the various sub-disciplines within Psychology. Assessment: 1x 2500wd essay (45%) and 1x2hr exam (45%) class participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Across the unit we examine one of the most interesting aspects of the history and philosophy of science. viz., the scientific practices and assumptions involved in making human beings an object of study. We will examine the ways in which psychologists and psychiatrists have investigated human nature, the kinds of experimental approaches they have developed to that end, the major controversies in this field, and the basic philosophical assumptions that have been made in the sciences of human nature. We investigate the developments of psychological theories and investigative methods as well as the development of psychiatric theory, treatment methods, and institutions.
Textbooks
Leahey, TH (2004). A History of Psychology: Main currents in Psychological Thought. Pearson. Upper Saddle River, N.J. Course reader.