Sustainability

Unit of study descriptions 2015

SUST5001 Introduction to Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tony Masters Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: One 2 to 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week presented in an intensive format with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Assessment: Essays, oral presentations, short written assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study will introduce students to the concepts and multidisciplinary nature of sustainability, starting with the physical basis of climate change and its impact on the environment and human development. This will be followed by several case studies covering Energy, Health, Development and Environment. The case studies will be presented by industry professionals and will illustrate sustainability issues currently before Australia- their origins, impacts and industry responses. The unit of study will provide students with a holistic systems lens through which to view their learning throughout the Masters program. This will underpin understanding of the integrated nature of sustainability and facilitate the challenging of silo-based assumptions- their own and those of others. The intention is to ground understanding of complex systems in the real world through the use of case studies that will demonstrate organisational change and problem solving in a world with competing values and conflicting views of what it means to live sustainably. Students completing the unit of study will have a "sustainability tool kit" to apply to sustainability issues in their professional and community activities.
SUST5002 Food and Water Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael D'Occhio Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 to 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week presented in an intensive format with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit explores the imperatives and challenges of ensuring an adequate supply of water and nutritious food in the face of changes in global markets, the environment and human population. These challenges will be examined in the context of access and potential trends in supply and demand. Factors influencing trends in supply include environmental degradation, climate change, energy scarcity, technology, changes in population and the patterns of global prosperity, growing urbanisation, and increased consumption. The unit will consider the underlying policy, economic and market-driven forces that play an important role in affecting both supply and demand. The needs of both developing and developed nations will be compared and the role of international, national and regional mechanisms will be discussed. Placing some emphasis on the relevance to Australia, the unit will explore available actions across a range of organisational levels such as communities, governments and NGOs.
SUST5003 Energy and Resources

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tony Vassallo Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 to 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week presented in an intensive format with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, classroom presentations, short written assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit will examine the critical roles that energy and resource usage play in global, national and local sustainability. The need for developed economies to decarbonise their energy supply and for developing countries to have access to clean energy and sustainable resources will require major changes in technology, policy and business systems. This unit of study will cover the fundamentals of energy and resource supply; sustainable supply and use of energy for industry, business and consumers; life cycle analysis; energy security and alternative energy systems. Students will gain an understanding of: different sources of energy and their uses; the economic, environmental and societal contexts of energy and resource use; the need and scope for a transition from conventional energy sources; sound principles for analysing different resource and energy supply options; the role of international agreements and federal policy in influencing resource and energy use.
SUST5004 Populations and Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tim Gill Session: Semester 2 Classes: Alternate full-day workshops and online tutorials on Thursdays in August, September and October. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit explores the extent to which environmental changes influence population demographics and health, and the extent to which demographic and secular changes impact on the physical environment. The influence of migration, conflict, food insecurity, scarce resources, droughts, flooding, heat stress, emerging and re-emerging infections and chronic health problems on poverty, ageing and dependency, physical, mental and social health and economic sustainability will be analysed alongside the elements needed to preserve the diversity and functioning of the ecosystem for future human survival. International models and policies for mitigating and/or adapting to the negative consequences of globalisation, urbanisation, overconsumption, and resource depletion will be analysed for their potential benefits and harms to sustainable population growth, optimal health and equitable distribution of essential resources.
SUST5005 Policy and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Rosemary Lyster Session: Intensive September Classes: Intensive classes for 4 full days in September 2015 Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Climate change, ecological sustainability, food security, resource scarcity, green technology and innovation, rising ocean levels, climate refugees, drought and 'water wars', are just some of the complex topics that now confront policy makers at all levels of government. This unit of study aims to provide students with an understanding of the issues surrounding the development and implementation of policies for sustainability. At all levels there are a range of stakeholders- policy makers, regulators, non-government organisations, industry, citizens and community groups- confronted by a complex ethical environment in their pursuit of different and sometimes competing agendas. As a result, policy and particular policy instruments may reflect conflict and compromise rather than consensus. Students will be introduced to: the role of analysis (scientific, economic, social and political etc) in providing an evidence base; the variety of instruments and institutions available for policy delivery; the lobbying process in influencing policy determination; and effectiveness of policy design and implementation including identification of 'winners' and 'losers'.
SUST5006 Sustainability: Business and Leadership

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Seymour Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 to 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week presented in an intensive format with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study will help build your understanding of the knowledge, skills and activities required to lead sustainability and change in, and with, businesses and organisations. The unit presents the relevance and importance of business mission and strategy, and will introduce the roles of corporate social responsibility, social entrepreneurship and impact measurement. It will also explore stakeholders associated with business (including shareholders, consumers and government) and how they can both motivate and impede change in the context of sustainability. Flexible and inclusive models of leadership will be introduced as we seek an appreciation of systems theory and its crucial place in understanding the complex nature of sustainability. Building on an understanding of distributed leadership and the nature of systems, action research and action learning are introduced as ideal frameworks to affect societal and organisational change. Learning will be facilitated through seminars, readings, as well as individual group projects.
PHYS5031 Ecological Econ & Sustainable Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Dey Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hour lecture and 1-hour tutorial per week. Assessment: Major essay, tutorial summary, and course compilation diary (100%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit will introduce selected recent topics from Ecological Economics, such as concepts of sustainability (definitions); comparisons with environmental economics, intergenerational discounting; time and equity in the climate change debate; valuing the environment; links between theories of well-being, consumerism and environmental impact; and cost benefit analysis. The unit sets the scene for the more detailed and specific units PHYS 5032, PHYS 5033, and PHYS 5034.
SUST5007 Research Project A

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joy Murray Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Regular meetings at times by agreement with mentor Prerequisites: Any 36 credit points of the following: SUST5001, SUST5002, SUST5003, SUST5004, SUST5005, SUST5006, PHYS5031 Prohibitions: SUST5009, SUST5008 Assessment: Combination of 3 written reports, 3 presentations. Diary/Log, meeting attendance (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Students in teams of 2-4 members propose a research enquiry (possibly based on their employment). Ideally, students work in teams (although this may depend on any IP constraints of their employers). The project is multidisciplinary and should cover at least 2 sustainability theme areas (such as energy, health, development, environment) and be approved by the Unit Coordinator. The Unit Coordinator will appoint an academic mentor for each group from among the relevant researchers in the University. Students will keep a diary/log of their activities, to be submitted for assessment at the end of semester.
SUST5008 Research Project B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joy Murray Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Regular meetings at times by agreement with mentor Prerequisites: Any 36 credit points of the following: SUST5001, SUST5002, SUST5003, SUST5004, SUST5005, SUST5006, PHYS5031 Prohibitions: SUST5007 Assessment: Combination of 3 written reports, 3 presentations. Diary/Log, meeting attendance (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Students in teams of 2-4 members propose a research enquiry (possibly based on their employment). Ideally, students work in teams (although this may depend on any IP constraints of their employers). The project is multidisciplinary and should cover at least 2 sustainability theme areas (such as energy, health, development, environment) and be approved by the Unit Coordinator. The Unit Coordinator will appoint an academic mentor for each group from among the relevant researchers in the University. Students will keep a diary/log of their activities, to be submitted for assessment at the end of semester.
SUST5009 Research Project C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joy Murray Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Regular meetings at times by agreement with mentor Prerequisites: Any 36 credit points of the following: SUST5001, SUST5002, SUST5003, SUST5004, SUST5005, SUST5006, PHYS5031 Prohibitions: SUST5007 Assessment: Combination of 3 written reports, 3 presentations. Diary/Log, meeting attendance (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Students in teams of 2-4 members propose a research enquiry (possibly based on their employment). Ideally, students work in teams (although this may depend on any IP constraints of their employers). The project is multidisciplinary and should cover at least 2 sustainability theme areas (such as energy, health, development, environment) and be approved by the Unit Coordinator. The Unit Coordinator will appoint an academic mentor for each group from among the relevant researchers in the University. Students will keep a diary/log of their activities, to be submitted for assessment at the end of semester.
AFNR5502 Remote Sensing, GIS and Land Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Inakwu Odeh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week weeks 1-6, 1x1 project weeks 7-11, 1x1-¿ hour presentation scheduled for weeks 12 and 13, 1x3-hr practical weeks 1-6 Assessment: 1x 30 min presentation (10%), laboratory work reports (40%), Group discussion online (10%), 1x3500w project report (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
This unit of study is aimed at advanced techniques in Remote Sensing (RS), linked with Geographical Information Systems (GIS), as applied to land management problems. We will review the basic principles of GIS and then focus on advanced RS principles and techniques used for land resource assessment and management. This will be followed by practical training in RS techniques, augmented by land management project development and implementation based on integration of GIS and RS tools. The unit thus consists of three separate but overlapping parts: 1) a short theoretical part which focuses on the concepts of RS; 2) a practical part which aims at developing hands-on skills in using RS tools, and 3) an application-focused module in which students will learn the skills of how to design a land management project and actualise it using integrated GIS and RS techniques.
Syllabus summary: Lectures will cover: Overview of the basic principles of Geographical Information Science (GISc), Advanced principles of remote sensing, Land resource information and data capture using RS, Digital elevation modelling and terrain analysis using remote sensing; Image enhancement and visualization; Image classification and interpretation; RS data interpretation for land resource inventory; RS and GIS for land use and land cover change analysis; Coupling of models of land resource assessment with GIS and RS. Fifty percent of learning time will be devoted to the design and implementation of projects, which can be selected from GIS and RS applications in: agricultural land management, vegetation studies, water and catchment (hydrological) studies; land-cover and land-use change modelling, pesticide and herbicide environmental risk assessment, environmental impact analysis, land degradation modelling including soil salinity, soil erosion, etc.
Textbooks
Textbook: Jesen J. R. 2006. Remote sensing of the environment: an earth resource perspective. 2nd ed. Pearson Prentice Hall Upper Saddle, New Jersey.
AFNR5511 Soil Processes, Assessment & Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 Lec, 2 tutorials/wk, case study & oral presentations. Assessment: Essay (30%), Group discussions (20%), Case study report (30%), Group presentation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
Soils support agricultural and natural ecosystems and regulate environmental interactions between the hydrosphere and atmosphere. It is the quality of our soils that affect productivity, the environment, health and ultimately sustainability. However, challenges such as those presented by lack of plant nutrient supply, soil acidification, physical degradation, soil contamination, and loss of soil biodiversity are problems at a global scale that threaten the sustainability of the environment and society. As well as the threats the importance of maintaining a quality soil that regulates environmental interactions will be explored, such as soil as a sink for carbon affecting climate interactions or understanding how a rich soil biodiversity can contribute to food production affecting food security. To do this, this unit of study is concerned with exploring the key pedology, soil chemistry, soil physical and soil biological processes that drive these challenges to soil quality. Time will be spent investigating how the quality of the soil can be assessed, using the indicators of the mentioned soil processes, and how the resulting data can be aggregated and communicated in a meaningful way. Working with case studies, the students will identify problems that are assessed using soil quality or function analysis with the aim of identifying management options. The management options will be evaluated to determine their adoptability and implement ability. By investigating the case studies using soil quality or function analysis students will develop their research and enquiry skills. Assessing and developing adoptable management strategies the students will develop their skills in synthesising material from multiple sources and enhance their intellectual autonomy. By producing reports and presenting seminars the students will develop their communication skills.
Textbooks
Textbooks: D. Hillel, 2004. Introduction to Environmental Soil Physics, Elsevier Science, San Diego, CA USA.
AFNR5512 Water Management and Variable Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hr workshop/week, practical work, project work Assumed knowledge: UG Maths or Physics or Hydrology. Assessment: Assignments (30%), project report (20%), 2 hr exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
This unit builds on knowledge gained in undergraduate soil science and crop science units to develop an understanding of catchment water management. Particular focus will be on the effect of climate variability and change on water management decisions on output and externalities (Salinity, landscape losses). At the completion of this unit student would be able to: Identify which climate variables will be most affected by climate change and variability; Evaluate which field and farm scale outputs will be most affected by climate change and variability; Develop scenarios based on distributions of climate variability; and Calculate the likely impacts of climate variability and change on streamflow, water availability and irrigation water demand using Monte Carlo techniques.
The open source software package SWAT will be used for most analysis and other open source software will be used if needed.
Textbooks
Rees W.G. 2001. Physical principles of remote sensing. 2nd ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
AFNR5801 Climate Change: Process, History, Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Franks, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: 18 hrs lecture/tutorial, 12 hrs practical/field classes, 9 hrs field trip preparation Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of climate change processes and issues. Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of climate change processes and issues. Assessment: 2hr exam (40%), tutorials (20%), practical report from field exercise (manuscript format) (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
This unit provides students with an overview of current debates and approaches to understanding and quantifying interactions between the biosphere, oceans and atmosphere, as used around the world, and the consequences of those interactions for climate. The unit considers climate change on a variety of timescales. This unit will include a weekend field trip to Snowy Mountains field sites managed by the University of Sydney where students will be introduced to cutting edge, ongoing climate change research.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of selected book chapters, journal articles and other publications
ARCH9080 Urban Ecology, Design and Planning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Roderick Simpson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 1hr/wk for weeks 1-9, Tutorial 2hrs/wk weeks 1-9, 3hrs/wk weeks 10-13 Prohibitions: PLAN9048 Assessment: Assignment (25%), Presentation (25%), Case-study related report (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Architecture, Design and Planning
This unit will introduce the conceptual bases for sustainable development and explore how principles of sustainability can be introduced into land use planning and urban design, including environmental management and multi-criteria evaluation methodologies in three modules:
Module 1 will examine the evolution of urban areas in relation to their biophysical setting using the Sydney metropolitan area as a case study. This will lead to an understanding and appreciation of the urban ecology of the city in terms of the flows of materials, resources and energy, and the challenges presented by climate change and peak oil.
Module 2 will introduce principles of sustainability and the history and development of concepts of urban sustainability.
Module 3 will introduce methods and frameworks for evaluating and measuring sustainability.
BETH5203 Ethics and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Stacy Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x8hr Intensives; or Distance Education (online). Prerequisites: A three-year undergraduate degree in science; medicine; nursing; allied health sciences; philosophy/ethics; sociology/anthropology; history; or other relevant field; or by special permission. Prohibitions: BETH5206 Assessment: 5xOnline Quiz (50%); 1x2500wd essay (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online Faculty: Medicine (Sydney Medical School)
This unit provides students with an overview of the ethical and political issues that underlie public health and public health research. The unit introduces key concepts in public health ethics including liberty, utility, justice, solidarity and reciprocity, and introduces students to different ways of reasoning about the ethics of public health. A critical history of public health and an examination of public health law provide important context. Students also explore the ethical dimensions of central public health problems, including modifying lifestyles, managing communicable diseases, researching communities, responding to global health challenges and using evidence. Throughout, the emphasis is on learning to make sound arguments about the ethical aspects of public health policy, practice and research. Most learning occurs in the context of five teaching intensives, which are highly interactive and focus on the development and application of reasoning skills.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a book of readings (in digital format).
DESC9147 Sustainable Building Design Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Daniel Ryan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 5 day intensive (9am-5pm) Assessment: 2 x assignmenst (1 x 35%, 1 X 65%)) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Architecture, Design and Planning
This unit aims to develop a critical understanding in students of building design principles that reduce the impact of the built environment on energy, water and material resource flows.Students will gain an overview of technical strategies that reduce the environmental impact of buildings and develop an awareness of the benchmarks and metrics used to judge the implementation of environmental design principles. The unit pays particular attention to design principles that relate to the environmental performance of the building fabric and the thermal and hydraulic systems of buildings.
DESC9148 Sustainable Building Design Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Michael Muir Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5 day intensive (9am-5pm) Assessment: Individual Sustainable Design Case Study (40%); Individual Schematic Sustainable Design (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Architecture, Design and Planning
Unit content: Sustainable design frameworks; understanding energy, material and water flows between buildings and their environment; the principles of passive solar heating strategies in cold and temperate climates; strategies for controlling solar and other loads on the building fabric; principles of cooling by natural ventilation; low energy mechanical cooling strategies; hybrid and mixed-mode cooling strategies; water sensitive design; environmental and health impacts of building materials; embodied energy of building materials. By the completion of the unit students will be expected to demonstrate their knowledge of the relevant properties of building materials and construction elements which impact upon the environmental performance of buildings and to demonstrate their competence at applying this knowledge to the formulation of appropriate sustainable design strategies.
DESC9201 Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard de Dear Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5 day intensive (9am-5pm) Assessment: Lab-based assignment (40%); Exam (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Architecture, Design and Planning
Humans' thermal, visual, auditory and olfactory senses determine the perceived quality of a built environment. This unit analyses built environments in context of these human factors. This unit relates human experience of buildings to the main dimensions of Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ): thermal, acoustic, lighting and indoor pollution. This understanding of human comfort perceptions is contextualised by an understanding of the various approaches to the evaluation of built environmental performance. You will study post-occupancy evaluation tools and workplace productivity metrics. Regulations from Australia and abroad will be explored to understand their impact on acoustics, thermal comfort, lighting, indoor air quality and ventilation. The unit also pays particular attention to sustainability rating tools from around the world, including GreenStar, NABERS, LEED and BREEAM. This unit gives students extensive hands-on experience in laboratory- and field-based methods of IEQ research and building diagnostics. A recurring theme will be instrumental measurements of indoor environments, and how they can be analysed in relation to perceptual and behavioural data collected from occupants of those environments.
DVST6904 Rethinking Poverty

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (35%), 1x1hr Exam (15%), 1x1000wd Reading notes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Poverty reduction has always been a central development goal. Major international programs such as the UN's Millennium Goals place poverty at their centre. New explanatory concepts such as social exclusion, capability, social capital and sustainability have considerably expanded our thinking about its nature. Students will examine cases from many parts of the world of the way discourses, policies and development practices operate together, enabling an evaluation of contemporary approaches to poverty and their effects on those most vulnerable.
ECOP6108 Economic Management for Sustainability

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent Seminar presentation (15%), 1x1000wd seminar paper (15%), 1x2500wd Research essay (30%), x 1.5hr examination (30%), Seminar participation (10%), Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit introduces students to environmental economic theory, ecological economics, and other critical perspectives in order to develop an understanding of the parameters that define management of economy-environment interactions. Students will develop a critical appreciation of the systemic nature of the pressures imposed on environmental/ecological systems and the intractable problems this presents. The unit examines the different tendencies that inform environmental management and sustainable development; and the relative merits/weaknesses of the strategies and policies advanced.
EDPC5022 Design for Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Goodyear; Dr Kate Thompson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 2x1500wd short assignments (2x25%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening Faculty: Education and Social Work
This course provides a framework for considering many of the core problems facing those who carry out the work of educational design. It offers a model of the architecture of learning situations and focuses on three main design components that influence the character and outcomes of learning: the design of good learning tasks, the design of physical and digital resources and spaces for learning, and design intended to evoke convivial learning relationships. The course does not aim to teach specific design techniques - for example, the steps in Instructional Systems Design (ISD). Rather, it suggests ways of identifying which tools and techniques, from the many now available, are most likely to be appropriate for a specific design challenge. The course therefore offers an overview of selected, contemporary approaches, techniques and tools of relevance to designing for other people's learning. It also provides an opportunity to review empirical research on how designers design and what knowledge they draw upon in design work.
EDPC5024 Systems, Change and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lina Markauskaite Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 2x1500wd short assignments (2x25%) and 1x3000wd group project and presentation (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening Faculty: Education and Social Work
In this core unit we will use 'systems inquiry' as a conceptual framework to explore change and learning processes, on the individual, group and organisational level. We focus on a theory-based approach to change management and organisational learning, so that students can come to appreciate the complexity and non-linearity of bringing about change in schools, corporations and other organisations. Drawing on contemporary research in the learning sciences, we will explore group and individual learning and conceptual change processes. Students will apply modern conceptual change approaches to investigate their own learning process, and will gain hands-on experience as they apply systems inquiry concepts and methods to analyse change problems in their own professional environment.
ENVI5705 Ecological Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 3-hour lecture per week. Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Case study, assignment, critical review, presentation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study introduces fundamental concepts of modern ecology for environmental scientists through a series of modules focussing on applied questions. Using case studies from Australia, students are exposed to the challenges of doing ecology and how cutting edge research is being applied to environmental management using evidence-based approaches. Meetings and discussions with people working in the field give students an insight into the ways that ecologists address ecological problems and how way they generate an understanding of natural systems. Students have the opportunity to consider different ways of doing science and ways of dealing with different kinds of data, including qualitative, quantitative, anecdotal and experimental approaches
ENVI5708 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Feike Dijkstra Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 2-hour lecture and 1x practical per week; 1x field trip (weekend) Assessment: Presentation (15%), Laboratory Report (40%), Assignment (40%), Class Participation (5%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
The aim of the course is to introduce students to the major physical and chemical processes that control the concentration and dispersion of chemical pollutants in natural and impacted environments. The course will demonstrate how to use contaminant data effectively and how to judge the quality of chemical data. This knowledge will be used to design and to assess environmental projects, and to judge the magnitude of impact by human activity on environments and the risk posed by contaminants to ecosystem functioning. The course aims to provide present and future managers employed in environmental professions with the skills to use data with confidence and to make management decisions knowing the risks inherent in variable data quality. A field trip will be undertaken early in the semester.
ENVI5801 Social Science of Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One hour lecture and one hour seminar per week plus directed reading. Assessment: Essays and seminar participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit provides both a conceptual and an empirical foundation for the analysis of relationships between society, the environment and natural resources. In our recent past the rapid rate of global environmental change has necessitated a breakdown of traditional disciplinary boundaries in research and social scientists are increasingly called upon to work alongside natural scientists in unraveling the complexities of the human-environmental nexus. Students will examine a number of environmental issues and consider a variety of social science academic perspectives about environmental management.
ENVI5809 Environmental Simulation Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Chapman Session: Semester 2a Classes: Six all day sessions Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Project plus report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study introduces participants to the power of simulation modelling in understanding and predicting behaviour of natural systems. It covers fundamental concepts, logic, and techniques (including sensitivity analysis), and develops skills in application to environmental problems such as catchment management and population dynamics.
ENVI5903 Sustainable Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson and Prof Phil Hirsch Session: Intensive July Classes: Two pre-departure lectures, 14-day field intensive. Assessment: Essay (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Field experience Faculty: Science
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study constitutes an international field-based experience held in Indonesia during the July semester break. It explores the contested notions of sustainable development and sustainability through exposure to real world development dilemmas in one of Asia's most dynamic countries. We explore fundamental issues such as urbanization, resource scarcity and economic globalization. The unit of study involves lectures, in-situ readings and discussion groups, introduction to field methods, stakeholder meetings and experiential learning. Students interested in this unit should confirm their interest to the Unit Coordinator by the end of March of the year the field school will be held. There will be additional costs associated with this unit to cover food, accommodation, local transport and field assistance of about $1200 Students will also be required to arrange their own international travel to the starting point (either Bangkok or Jakarta).
GEOG5001 Geographic Information Science A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Chapman Session: Semester 1 Classes: Six lectures plus six workshops. Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
This unit of study gives an overview of basic spatial data models, and enables students to understand the use of data from a variety of sources within a geographical information system (GIS). The analysis of spatial data, and its manipulation to address questions appropriate to planning or locational applications, will be addressed, as will the development of thematic maps from diverse data layers.
GEOG5003 Environmental Remote Sensing

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 one hour lectures and a 4 hour practical per week Assumed knowledge: Knowledge or experience equivalent to GEOG5001 (Introduction to GIS) Assessment: Assignments, practicals (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The unit of study explores how remote sensing has enabled the science of Earth Observation to become the most valuable and widely-used tool for characterising and quantifying Earths vegetation, geology and marine ecosystems. The study introduces the physical processes that influence how light interacts with materials of the Earth's surface, which is the basis for Earth Observation. The course uses state-of-the-art, industry-standard software to introduce many different techniques in the analysis and interpretation of remotely sensed data. We will explore different kinds of remotely sensed data, starting from a simple colour photograph to multispectral and hyperspectral data gathered from satellites and aircraft. Earth Observation is becoming an essential skill for anyone interested in the natural environment - skills which are applicable across a wide range of science and environmental disciplines. Starting off simply, you will acquire the skills and knowledge to enable you to map and quantify vegetation and geology using image data acquired in different parts of the world. The objective of this course is to 'demystify' the use of satellite data and to provide the essential theoretical and practical skills to enable students to process data acquired by Earth Observation satellites and aircraft.
GEOG5004 Environmental Mapping and Monitoring

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Cowell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours of lectures and one three hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes a sound understanding of scientific principles, HSC level mathematics and understanding of basic statistics. Assessment: Assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
The unit introduces methods associated with acquiring data in the field and examines issues associated with application of spatial data to environmental monitoring, terrain mapping and geocomputing. Students will learn both theoretically and practically how environmental data is collected using different remote sensing techniques, (pre)processing methods of integrating data in a GIS environment and the role of spatial data in understanding landscape processes and quantifying environmental change.
GOVT6135 Global Environmental Politics

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Essay (50%), Seminar participation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the environment as a political and policy issue. Although relatively recent, the environment has become a full-fledged public policy issue exerting influence in local, national and international arenas. The unit will first focus on the specific features of the policy that influences the capability of contemporary societies to enhance the management of environmental resources and of public goods in general. Second, it discusses the development of environmental policy in Western countries, with a particular emphasis on the European Union. Third, a grid for the analysis of environmental policy will be presented, with a discussion of the main actors (political, institutional and socio-economic) involved in it and of the factors (interests and ideas) influencing their positions. Fourth, the unit briefly discusses environmental conflicts and consensual approaches used for tackling them.
GOVT6222 Australian Enviro Politics & Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Schlosberg Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x1000wd seminar papers (2x15%); 1x3000wd research paper (50%); seminar preparation and participation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will offer a broad survey of environmental politics and policy in Australia. It will provide an introduction to the issues raised, the stakeholders and movements involved, analysis of the discourses used and potential policies to be implemented, an overview of the political issues and pressures involved, and reflection on the actual implementation of a range of policies at the local, state, and national level. Australian environmental politics will also be examined in comparative perspective.
GOVT6223 Topics in Environmental Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x 1000wd Seminar paper (30%), 1x3400wd Essay (50%), 1x600wd equivalent Oral Presentation (10%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will offer a broad overview of a key contemporary issue in environmental politics. Topics could include climate change policy, environmental justice, food security and politics, sustainable cities, or timely issues in the Australian or global context. The goal will be to ground these issues in the relevant literatures of politics and environmental studies. Check with the unit coordinator or Department for the particular topic to be addressed in any given semester.
GOVT6316 Policy Making, Power and Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Short Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Long Essay (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit focuses on the nature of public policy and the processes by which it is produced. Relevant issues are common to all nation states, although they take specific forms in each individual country. First, the unit takes an overview of public policy - dealing with basic themes such as 'What is policy?' through to different approaches to understanding the policy process. These include policy cycles, rationality, interest groups, institutions, and socio-economic interests. Second, it maps out and examines the main components of public policy making: actors, institutions and policy instruments. Third, it focuses on aspects of policy-making processes which often attract a high level of attention from analysts. These include problem definition, agenda setting, decision-taking, policy implementation, policy evaluation and crisis policy-making. Fourth, it examines wider issues in terms of the state and who ultimately holds power over the making and shaping of public policy. Finally, it examines the 'bigger pictures' of long term policy trends, and the extent to which national policy making capacities and processes have been affected by globalisation. Assessments offer a large element of flexibility, allowing students to concentrate on areas of particular interest.
GOVT6331 Public Management and Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr in-class group work/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Case study (50%), 1x1000wd Case study outline (10%), 1x2hr Examination (30%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit outlines some of the most important developments in contemporary public management and governance and how these relate to the everyday practices of those working in the public sector. It uses examples drawn from a number of OECD countries to: critically analyse the forces that have driven the move towards 'public management'; examine the theory and practice of 'public governance'; evaluate the merits of these developments; and apply this knowledge to better understand specific developments across different contexts.
HPOL5000 Introduction to Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x 2-day workshops, online lectures and discussions Assessment: 1 x 1500wd written assignment (30%); 1 x 3000wd written assignment (50%); Online learning quiz (5%); online problem based learning exercise (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus Faculty: Medicine (Sydney Medical School)
To develop a critical and comparative understanding of the history, theory and practice of health policy. To give an overview of the political choices and frameworks - national and global - that shape policymaking.
Learning objectives:
- acquire a critical understanding of the basic history and features of the Australian health system
- understand the main frameworks used to analyse and make policy
- understand the main issues in the translation of policy into practice
- demonstrate the capacity to apply these understandings in particular settings through case studies.
Content:
This unit explores the main structures and institutions that make health policy. The unit examines debates over policy frameworks, and the evidence and advocacy in setting priorities. Conflicts over health policy will be placed in broader contexts - comparing different health systems and assessing global influences. Case studies will be used to examine the relationships between policy and practice.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other recommended reading materials will be available on the unit's eLearning site
HPOL5007 Global Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carmen Huckel Schneider, Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus or online. 2 x 2 day workshops plus 4 tutorials (tutorials offered face-to-face or online) Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (35%), Tutorial discussion papers or online discussion (15%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online Faculty: Medicine (Sydney Medical School)
This unit explores the impact of globalization the health of populations and policy making processes. It also investigates the potential to improve health outcomes globally through policy. The aim of this course is to equip students with the knowledge and skills to identify and articulate political and policy processes at the global level, become familiar with institutions and actors involved in global health policy and utilize strategies for influencing policy making at the global level. The unit will explore global health threats that transcend national boundaries; especially those whose causes or results transcend the capacity of individual states to influence. We analyse the influence and power of institutions and actors in the development and implementation of global health policy, including the World Health Organisation, UNICEF, the World Bank, the WTO, the Gates Foundation and NGOs. We will also investigate the governance of global health policy responses. Teaching will make extensive use of current case studies from recognised experts in the field.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London.
IBUS5002 Strategy, Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Seymour Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: IBUS5001 Assessment: individual assignments (40%), group assignment (30%), and final exam (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Business (Business School)
This foundation unit provides an introduction to the essential concepts and frameworks relevant to the fields of strategy, innovation and entrepreneurship. Topics covered include the key elements of business strategy, including developing a business mission, understanding the external environment, reviewing internal resources and capabilities, and business and corporate strategy. The importance of entrepreneurial activity and the challenges faced by startup ventures, as well as examples of successful and unsuccessful business innovations, are highlighted. The emphasis of the unit is on understanding the strategic activity of both startup and established businesses with a focus on issues relevant to entrepreneurs as well as business managers.
IBUS6005 Ethical International Business Decisions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fanny Salignac Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week from week 1 to week 13 Assessment: Group assignments (40%), final exam (30%), and individual assignments (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Business (Business School)
In order to succeed in international business, both corporations and individuals need broad decision-making abilities. Business decision-making tools yield more coherent and justifiable results when used with an understanding of the ethical, social and environmental aspects of the process. This applies to various situations in the international business setting including business relations with government, customers, employees, and NGOs. This unit is designed to look at these non-financial elements in the decisions made within the international business context. Upon completion of this unit, students will have enhanced skills and knowledge relevant to the understanding of ethical issues and ethical decisions making in international business organisations.
IBUS6011 New Business Opportunities and Startups

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Bronwyn Darlington, Jarrod Ormiston (intensive session) Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Semester 1 & 2: 1x 3 hr lecture/seminar per week; Intensive session: 2 x 3hr lecture/workshops pre-departure (Sydney), 30hrs lecture/workshops in country action-research, 1 x 3hr seminar post trip (Sydney) Prohibitions: WORK6112, IBUS5011 Assumed knowledge: IBUS5002, or completion of at least 24 credit points Assessment: Individual assessment (70%), group assignment (10%), and group presentation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Business (Business School)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
For small open economies such as Australia's, new business opportunity identification and exploitation are often critical to firms' long-term growth and survival. Identifying new markets, developing new products and implementing new business models are highly-regarded and valuable skills for entrepreneurs and business managers alike. In addition to exploring the special problems (and advantages) associated with entrepreneurial start-ups, the unit explores commercialisation and corporate venturing. Topics include opportunity recognition, strategy development, business planning and investor documentation, venture capital and other funding sources, as well as entrepreneurial and creative leadership. The unit is structured around learning from engaged practice, and requires students to work with startup and early stage businesses.
IBUS6014 Intellectual Property Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBA Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr seminar/wk Assumed knowledge: IBUS5002, or completion of at least 24 credit points Assessment: Individual assessment (30%), group assignment (15%), group presentation (15%), and final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Business (Business School)
Intellectual property (IP) represents theproperty of an individual's mind, intellect, and proprietary knowledge.There are a number of means ofprotecting IP, including patents, copyright andtrademarks.Creating IP does not necessarily meanan individual own the rights to use it, as most forms require individuals to take formal steps toregister their IP and obtain the legal rights of ownership(both in Australiaand internationally).This unit covers aspects including the concept of IP, how to identify andprotect it in a local and international context, creating theconditions toencourage and leverage IP in a commercial context, how to manage a portfolio ofIP, and enforcement scenarios. The unit concentrates on how to utilise IP tocreate, controland exchange value, with particular attention paid to thepractice of open innovation.
IBUS6016 Social Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jarrod Ormiston Session: Intensive December,Intensive July,Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Semester 1: 1x 3h lecture/workshop per week; Intensive sessions: 2 x 3hr lecture/workshops pre- departure (Sydney), 30hrs lecture/workshops in country, 1 x 3hr seminar post trip (Sydney) Assumed knowledge: IBUS5002, or completion of at least 24 credit points Assessment: Individual assignments (55%), group assignment (30%) and presentation (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Business (Business School)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Social entrepreneurs are committed to furthering a social mission through enterprises that rank social, environmental or cultural impact on a par with, or even above, profit. Intersecting the business and not-for profit worlds, social entrepreneurship addresses many complex local and global problems. This unit critically introduces the concept and develops frameworks for understanding social entrepreneurship (also referred to as social enterprise and social innovation). Teaching and learning utilises case studies, and includes the opportunity to apply theory to real-world experiences. Topics include creating innovative social enterprises, sustainable business models, philanthropy and funding, impact assessment, and leadership. The unit is structured around learning from engaged practice, and provides the opportunity to work with social enterprises.
INFS5001 Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Petri Hallikainen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Early Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: INFS6014 Assessment: group assignment (25%), individual assignment (30%), and final exam (45%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Business (Business School)
Based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) this unit introduces the end-to-end project management lifecycle. Students learn how to select appropriate projects based on their alignment with an organisation's strategy and then how to manage those projects successfully from initiation through execution to completion. The unit covers the essential components of effective project management and how to apply them in an integrated manner. The unit also explores both the technical and behavioural aspects of project management - including Microsoft Project - and students gain experience in critically analysing the application of concepts in specific project contexts. As organisations increasingly structure their activities on a project basis, the unit is of value to a range of discipline specialisations. The unit can also contribute to achievement of internationally recognised accreditation from the Project Management Institute (PMI).
LAWS6061 International Environmental Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rosemary Lyster, Ms Kate Owens Session: Intensive May Classes: Apr 17, 18 & 20, 21 (9-5) Assessment: 2500wd problem-based assignment (30%) and 5500wd essay (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Law (Sydney Law School)
Note: Students seeking further study in international environmental law may undertake LAWS6922 Advanced International Environmental Law.
This unit aims to provide students with an overview of the development of international environmental law throughout the twentieth century. Attention will primarily be devoted to the international law and policy responses to global and regional environmental and resource management issues. Basic principles will be discussed prior to taking a sectoral approach in looking at the application of international environmental law in specific issue areas. The unit includes material on implementation of international environmental law in the Asia Pacific region. Relevant Australian laws and initiatives will be referred to from time to time. The focus is on law and policy that has been applied to deal with environmental problems in an international and transboundary context.
LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning & the Common Law System

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: S1CIMR (Group A) & S1CIAP (Group B): Assoc Prof Belinda Smith and S2CIAU (Group C) & S2CISE (Group D): Mr Michael Skinner Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive March,Intensive September Classes: Group A: Mar 3 to 6 (9-5) Group B: Mar 20, 21 & Apr 10, 11 (9-5) Group C: Jul 28 to 31 (9-5) Group D: Sep 4, 5 & 18, 19 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6881 Assessment: in-class test (25%) and take-home exam (75%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Law (Sydney Law School)
Note: International students who are required to enrol in this unit must undertake classes during the first week of their study. Health Law and Public Health students should enrol in LAWS6881 Introduction to Law for Health Professionals in lieu of LAWS6252, if available. This unit is not available to MLawIntDev students who have been granted a reduced volume of learning. Students must attend all classes on the timetabled dates as prescribed for their enrolled session/group. An Absent Fail grade may be granted to students who fail to attend the correct session/group.
This is a compulsory unit for all postgraduate students who do not hold a law degree or equivalent from a common law jurisdiction entering the: Master of Administrative Law and Policy; Master of Business Law; Master of Environmental Law; Master of Environmental Science and Law; Master of Global Law; Master of Health Law; Master of International Business and Law; Master of Labour Law and Relations; Master of Law & International Development as well as Graduate Diplomas offered in these programs. The unit has been designed to equip students with the necessary legal skills and legal knowledge to competently apply themselves in their chosen area of law. Instruction will cover the legislative process; the judiciary and specialist tribunals; precedent; court hierarchies; legal reasoning; constitutional law; administrative law; contracts; and torts. Some elements of the unit will be tailored in accordance with the requirements of the particular specialist programs.
MIPH5116 Culture, Health, Illness and Medicine

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cynthia Hunter Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 day workshop; 1 x 2hr seminar per week for 7 weeks; also offered fully online. Assessment: 1x3000word essay (75%) and 1x1hr class facilitation (25%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Medicine (Sydney Medical School)
This unit aims to provide an integrated and interpretive approach to an understanding of health-related behaviours of populations in international settings, by synthesizing anthropological knowledge and methodology, and the interactions of culture, biology, psychology and environment. The teaching process is by student-led, lecturer-guided, discussion based review and critical analysis of relevant topics. During the unit, students will explore a range of issues in global and multicultural health from an anthropological perspective. Methodological approaches will encompass ethnography and other anthropological data collection methods. The issues covered will include cultural influences on health, illness and healing, such as indigenous and traditional beliefs and systems, gender and cultural change and the impact of modernization and development on illness and healing. The impact examines disease and illness patterns - their distribution and persistence, mental illness and culture and attitudes towards the use of medications; and the provision of culturally sensitive and appropriate services. The emphasis will be on covering a range of topic areas relevant to the students enrolled, and those of particular importance in contemporary international and multicultural health contexts.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MKTG5001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: case analysis presentation (10%), in-class discussion (8%), mid-term exam (20%), team presentation (15%), team marketing plan (25%), final exam (20%), and research participation (2%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Business (Business School)
This unit introduces students to the basic principles and language of marketing theory and practice. Marketing principles are examined in relation to a wide variety of products and services, in both commercial and non-commercial domains. A strong emphasis is placed on strategy planning and the marketing decision process. Students learn via the analysis of case studies drawn from the Asia-Pacific region, as well as the USA. The unit is presented in four sections. These are: (a) introduction to marketing and the marketing management process, (b) strategic issues in marketing - focusing on the preliminary analyses that are required before a marketing decision can be made, (c) the marketing mix - a detailed look at the components that make up a marketing plan, and (d) marketing planning, implementation and control processes. Students gain practical experience in analysing marketing situations and developing a comprehensive marketing plan.
NURS5002 Social Contexts of Health

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 10x2-hr lectures, and 8x2-hr tutorials Assessment: essay (40%) and group work (10%) and written examination (50%) Campus: Mallett Street, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Nursing (Sydney Nursing School)
The main focus of this unit is on the social determinants of health through a critical analysis of the relationships between social factors (e. g, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, employment) and patterns of health and illness across the lifespan in contemporary Australia. The unit includes a module that introduces students to epidemiology, the study of causes and patterns of disease within defined populations. This unit is underpinned by the understanding that ideas and beliefs about health, illness and care are intrinsically connected to particular social and historical contexts. Some of these ideas and beliefs relevant to Australia today will be explored. The unit also introduces students to the study of cultural competence as it relates to health care in contemporary Australia.
PACS6914 Conflict-Resolving Media

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: Intensive delivery over 5 days (total 30hrs) Prohibitions: SCWK6935 Assessment: 2x2500wd Commentaries (80%), Seminar participation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines media representations of conflict and their influence on the behaviour of those involved. It introduces creative ways for journalists, media development workers and media activists to apply principles of conflict resolution. Students diagnose 'war journalism' and 'peace journalism', and analyse conflict in a journalism context. Theories of news and concepts of objectivity and responsibility are critically explored. Students gain practical skills in peace journalism and media activism as well as devising peace journalism interventions in conflict-affected areas.
PHYS5032 Techniques for Sustainability Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke and Prof Manfred Lenzen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Comprehensive diary/notes from lectures (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study offers an introduction to quantitative analysis techniques including multivariate regression, uncertainty analysis, climate modelling, structural decomposition, and dynamic systems modelling, with a strong emphasis on demonstrating their usefulness for environmental problem-solving. This unit will show how mathematics can be brought to life when utilised in powerful applications to deal with environmental issues. Throughout the unit of study, example applications will be described, including studies on ecosystem trophic chains, mapping of household consumption and environmental impact, wind turbine assessment, and the effect of land use patterns on threats to species.
PHYS5033 Environmental Footprints and IO Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke and Prof Manfred Lenzen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week Assessment: Comprehensive diary/notes from lectures, including a quantitative example (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study will provide an introduction to economic input-output theory and input-output analysis, with a focus on environmental applications such as carbon footprints and life-cycle analysis. The unit first explores national and global economic and environmental accounting systems and their relationships to organisational accounting. Second, it will present variants of the basic accounts, such as global multi-regional input-output systems and social accounting systems. Third, it will introduce the basic input-output calculus conceived by Nobel Prize Laureate Wassily Leontief, and provide concrete examples for how to apply this calculus to data published by statistical offices. The unit will then show how to integrate economic and environmental accounts, and generate boundary-free environmental footprint assessments. Students will walk away from this unit equipped with all skills needed to calculate footprints, and prepare sustainability reports for any organisation, city, region, or nation, using organisational data, economic input-output tables and environmental accounts.
PHYS5034 Life Cycle Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Dey Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture and 1-hour tutorial per week Assessment: Major essay, seminar presentation and course diary compilation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Science
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study will cover the areas of the philosophy, techniques, applications and standards of Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA). It will include Process Analysis, Input-Output Analysis and Hybrid Analysis. Current LCA tools will be discussed. Case studies and business applications as well as global standards such as the GHG Protocol for accounting for scopes 1,2 and 3 emissions and ISO standards will provide a context. Students will also benefit from also enrolling in PHYS5033 for a sound understanding of input-output based Hybrid LCA methods.
RSEC5431 Benefit Cost Analysis

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2 hr lecture/wk, commencing week 1, 1x1hr tutorial/wk, commencing week 2 Assessment: 1 x oral presentation (5%), 1 x written individual essay (20%), 1 x 1hr mid-semester exam (25%), 1 x 2hr final examination (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
This unit provides a detailed treatment of benefit-cost analysis and its use in public sector decision making and project evaluation. The underpinning concepts in welfare economics are analysed in detail, such as economic efficiency, criteria for assessing social welfare improvements, and economic surplus measures. Procedures of undertaking a benefit-cost analysis are presented, and tools of non-market valuation for environmental assets are covered in detail. These techniques include both stated and revealed preference techniques, including contingent valuation, choice modeling, hedonic pricing and travel cost methods.
RSEC5432 Environmental Economics

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tihomir Ancev Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week commencing week 1, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Assessment: Report and presentation from the practical experience in environmental economics (20%), one (1 hr.) mid-term exam (30%), and two hour (2 hr.) final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
The unit provides theoretical and empirical background necessary for a resource economist to be able to successfully function when faced with various environmental problems. The unit investigates economic aspects of a range of environmental issues. The studied concepts are exemplified with environmental problems related to agriculture (soil salinity, algal blooms, overgrazing etc.) as well as with environmental problems typical to Australia. The guiding economic themes are: competing uses of the environment / externalities, market failure, the importance of property rights, optimal allocation of pollution abatement, and the processes for making choices relating to non-market goods. Some social issues with environmental impacts are studied through exploration of the problems of population size and distribution, economic growth, and environmental regulation.
Textbooks
Perman, R., Y. Ma, J. McGilvray and M. Common. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics. Pearson, 3rd Ed. 2003
RSEC5433 Economics of Mineral & Energy Industries

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tihomir Ancev Session: Semester 2 Classes: (2 lec, 1 tut)/wk Assessment: excursion attendance and report (25%); one (1 hr.) mid-term exam (30%) and one (2 hr.); two hour (2 hr.) final exam (45%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Agriculture and Environment
The unit provides theoretical and empirical background on the economics of minerals exploration, extraction and marketing and on the economics of energy generation, distribution and use. The economics of minerals and energy commodity markets will be discussed and analysed. The interactions of mineral extraction and energy generation activities with other natural resources and the environment will be of particular interest (e.g. mine site remediation, land use conflicts). Sustainability and prospects for long term efficient use of these resources, as well as the development and use of alternative technologies will also be discussed. In addition, institutional and policy issues (e.g. regulatory reform), will be analysed. The unit will discuss the main aspects of the markets for minerals and energy, market structure, business environment and price movements. The unit will also provide an introductory discussion on the markets for derivatives (options, futures, forward, swaps) on minerals and energy commodities.
Textbooks
T. J. Brennan, L. K. Palmer, and A. S. Martinez, Alternating Currents: Electricity Markets and Public Policy, Resources for the Future Press, Washington D.C., 2002.
TPTM6470 Sustainable Transport & Logistic Systems

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Stephen Greaves Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 3 hour lectures (same day) every other week. Refer to timetable for further details. Assessment: individual homework exercise (25%), pop quizzes (2) (20%), team project with group and individual component (40%), and team presentation with group and individual component (15%) Campus: Burren Street, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Business (Business School)
How can we accommodate the rapidly expanding movement of passengers and freight in a way that is environmentally and socially sustainable into the future? This unit introduces students to the major environmental issues that must be considered in contemporary transport and logistics operations including climate change, regional and local air pollution, noise pollution and safety. The focus then turns to specific modes, focusing initially on passenger transport, where we identify the major trends working against sustainability and the range of regulatory, behavioural, pricing, and voluntary strategies available to try to reverse these trends. We then introduce the notion of 'green' logistics and what regulators and companies can/should be doing to facilitate more sustainable practices in the shipment of freight. We then consider the issues/challenges around sustainable aviation and international shipping practice. Finally, we consider the critical issue of safety and what strategies have/could be employed to mitigate the impacts. Throughout the unit, we focus on what is going on in both the developed and emerging world nations, where the challenges are potentially on a different order of magnitude. The unit is of particular value to students majoring in transport, logistics, environmental planning, and urban planning.