Doctor of Clinical Psychology / Master of Science

Unit of study descriptions 2014

PSYC6032 Health Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Catalina Lawsin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 13 three-hour lectures Prerequisites: PSYC6051 Assessment: Health Intervention Assessment (100%)
Health Psychology is the aggregate of the specific educational, scientific, and professional contributions of the discipline of psychology applied to the promotion and maintenance of health, the prevention and treatment of illness, and the identification of etiologic and diagnostic correlates of health, illness, and related dysfunction (Matarazzo, 1980). This course aims to understand the relationships between psychological and physical functioning across a range of medical disorders and the way in which cognitive and behavioural factors influence psychological and physical functioning of those with health related problems. The course will be concerned with theories and interventions that promote health related behaviours and improve quality of life for people with medical problems. The course will aim to investigate theories and practice in the areas of adjustment to illness, adherence to medical treatments, working with patients with chronic illness, facilitating doctor-patient communication and dealing with death and dying. In addition, the psychological issues relevant to particular illnesses will be discussed.
PSYC6049 Child Psychological Disorders

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Hawes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 12 three-hour lectures Assessment: Clinical role-play (including videotaped interview and written self-critique) (100%)
This course introduces current perspectives on child and adolescent psychopathology, examining the historical development and current status of theory and practice. Core theories are presented within a developmental-ecological framework and examined in relation to the etiology and course of common internalising and externalising disorders. Skills training addresses basic family consultation as well as multi-method forms of assessment (e.g., interviewing, observation, self-report) and intervention (e.g., parent skills training, individual and group child therapy). Attention is also given to essential aspects of professional practice related to school and community contexts, ethics, and the scientist-practitioner model.
PSYC6051 Adult Psychological Disorders

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maree Abbott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 15 four-hour lectures/practicals Assessment: Written examination; Clinical viva (100%)
This course is designed to introduce students to therapeutic work with common psychological problems of adulthood through a series of lectures and practical skills-based sessions. Micro-counselling and cognitive-behavioural interviewing skills are reviewed and practiced. Diagnostic assessment, mental status examination and cognitive behavioural case formulation are taught with a view to developing individual treatment plans. Skills training in cognitive behavioural strategies are combined with theoretical knowledge about different disorders to form strong theory-practice links. Emphasis is placed upon the learning of strong practical skills in the application of evidence-based therapies to the common psychological disorders encountered in adulthood, such as anxiety disorders, mood disorders and eating disorders.
PSYC6055 Advanced Adult Psychological Disorders

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maree Abbott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 three to six-hour lectures, discussion, clinical observation. Half day clinical observation (MHRT). Prerequisites: PSYC6051 Assessment: Assignment (3 Qs: 250-300 words each); Mental Health Review Tribunal Report (500 words) (100%)
The advanced adult therapy component will cover major mental health problems such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anorexia nervosa, posttraumatic stress and drug and alcohol problems. It will also include a workshop on working with older adults and cover issues that relate to the Mental Health Review Tribunal process. Students will gain exposure to the Mental Health Review Tribunal process via direct observation as part of this unit.
PSYC6056 Advanced Seminars

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Caroline Hunt Session: Semester 2 Classes: 7 three-hour seminars, 2 five to six-hour seminars Prerequisites: PSYC6051 Assessment: Written assessment for complex cases OR In class presentation for Neuropsychology (100%)
This course is designed to provide students with advanced level training in the clinical and professional practice of clinical psychology. The advanced level seminars will include seminars on difficult to treat or complex cases (eating disorders; anxiety and depressive disorders), advanced neuropsychology, clinical supervision, working in private practice, child protection, and may include seminars by visiting clinical academics.
PSYC6058 Clinical Internship and Case Seminars 5

Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Caroline Hunt and Dr Judy Hyde Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Case and Research seminars: 13 two-hour seminars; Placement: 2 days/week for 24 weeks. Assessment: Case and Research Seminars: attendance, case report, research presentation; Placement: contract, mid-placement review, end of placement review, log, trainee's evaluation (100%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
This course provides students with a range of therapy and assessment experiences in accordance with their clinical and research interests. The specific nature of learning outcomes will depend upon the setting for the placement, the patient group and the nature of the clinical work. Students will also attend case and research seminars, where students present their research findings and complex clinical cases for discussion which pose either diagnostic dilemmas or difficulties in treatment.
PSYC6061 Clinical Internship and Case Seminars 4

Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Caroline Hunt and Dr Judy Hyde Session: Semester 1 Classes: Case and research seminars: 13 two-hour seminars; Placement: 2 days/week for 24 weeks. Assessment: Case and research seminars: attendance, case presentation, case report, literature review; Placement: contract, mid-placement review, end of placement review, log, trainee's evaluation (100%)
This course provides students with a range of therapy and assessment experiences in accordance with their clinical and research interests. The specific nature of learning outcomes will depend upon the setting for the placement, the patient group and the nature of the clinical work. Students will also attend case and research seminars where students present their research findings and complex clinical cases for discussion which pose either diagnostic dilemmas or difficulties in treatment.
PSYC6065 Psychological Assessment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Suncica Sunny Lah and Dr David Horry Session: Semester 1 Classes: 13 three or four-hour lectures Assessment: WAIS-IV Pass out; Adult Report Writing assignment; WISC-IV Pass out; Child Case assignment (100%)
This course introduces students to the basic theory and the general practice of neuropsychological assessment in children and adults. It will foster clinical approach that relies on integration of information obtained from a clinical history with results obtained on testing. It will develop conceptual framework for understanding of core developmental disorders and assessment of these disorders. The course will focus on the following components of cognition: intelligence, memory, attention, executive abilities and achievement. Students will be taught how to administer, score and interpret a variety of tests in these areas and how to report the results in written form.
PSYC6066 Clinical Internship and Case Seminars 3

Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Caroline Hunt and Dr Judy Hyde Session: Semester 2 Classes: Case and Research Seminars: 13 two-hour seminars; Placement: 2 days/week for 24 weeks Assessment: Case and research seminars: attendance, case presentation, case report; Placement: contract, mid-placement review, end of placement review, log, trainee's evaluation (100%)
This course provides students with a range of therapy and assessment experiences in accordance with their clinical and research interests. The specific nature of learning outcomes will depend on the setting for the placement, the patient group and the nature of the clinical work. Students will also attend case and research seminars, where students present their research findings and complex clinical cases for discussion that pose either diagnostic dilemmas or difficulties in treatment.
PSYC6067 Clinical Internship 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Caroline Hunt and Dr Judy Hyde Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1.5-2-days/week for 24 weeks Assessment: Contract; Mid-placement review; End of placement review; Log; trainee's evaluation (100%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
This unit is designed to provide trainees with intensely supervised practice in conducting the fundamentals of clinical assessment, formulation, treatment planning and treatment implementation for adult patients, psychometric assessments for adults and children/adolescents, and child, adolescent and family work for those students undertaking this component of the placement. A cognitive-behavioural approach is predominant in this placement for adult work, although supervisors may allow variation for particular cases. It will also provide an introduction to the practice of conducting psychometric assessments. An adult and child psychometric assessment case will be undertaken in Placement 1 under the intense supervision. One to three further cases will be required to be undertaken over Placements 1 and 2 under less intense supervision until competency is reached in the administration, scoring, interpretation and report writing for these assessments. If a trainee is not competent after a total of five cases have been completed, the CPU will set further requirements. Trainees will be allocated to psychometric cases as required and as they become available. All trainees will also have the equivalent of one semester of child, adolescent and family therapy under the supervision of clinical psychologists with expertise in this area. This is offered for trainees either in Placement 1 or Placement 2. Trainees may be offered the opportunity to run a group at some point in Placement 1 or Placement 2 subject to availability. Trainees will be allocated to supervisors for adult and child, adolescent and family therapy. While supervisors vary in the way they offer supervision, with a mixture of individual, group and observation formats being offered, supervision is intense and with a high level of observation by supervisors throughout this placement.
PSYC6068 Clinical Internship 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Caroline Hunt and Dr Judy Hyde Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1.5-2 days/week for 24 weeks Assessment: Contract; Mid-placement review; End of placement review; Log; trainee's evaluation (100%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
This unit of study is designed to extend clinical assessment formulation, treatment planning, and treatment implementation skills and knowledge for adult patients. It also extends trainees' knowledge and experience conducting and interpreting psychometric assessments. Trainees will be allocated to new supervisors for this internship and supervision methods will become less intense, more individual and begin to reflect formats available in external placements. Those trainees who have not undertaken child, adolescent and family therapy or conducted group therapy will be offered these formats in this placement.
PSYC6069 Ethics and Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stephen Touyz Session: Semester 1 Classes: 10 four-hour seminars; 5 two-hour clinical observations; 13 two-hour case and research seminars. Assessment: Child protection assessment; ethics clinical viva; weekly clinical log; attendance at weekly case and research seminars; research preferences form; preliminary research proposal (100%). Students must demonstrate satisfactory performance on all assessments to satisfy requirements for this unit of study.
This course will introduce students to the highest standards of ethical and clinical practice in clinical psychology. The course will strengthen theory-practice links by exposing students to a range of mental health presentations and ethical and professional practice issues that present in the Psychology Clinic. Students will also attend weekly case and research seminars with cases and research presented by students in senior years.
A. Ethics and Professional Practice - This component will familiarise students with relevant codes of conduct, ethical issues, and legislation pertaining to contemporary practice in clinical psychology. These wide ranging seminars will cover Psychology Board of Australia, Guardianship Tribunal and College of Clinical Psychologists of the Australian Psychological Society.
B. Clinical Observation - This component is designed to introduce students to the work of clinical psychology strengthening theory-practice links, by exposing students to a range of mental health presentations seen in the Psychology Clinic. Specific issues relevant to ethical and professional clinical practice will also be covered, including writing case notes, and dealing with difficult issues in both the therapeutic and supervisory relationship. This work may be supplemented by viewing of the clinical work of experts in the field of Clinical Psychology. Students will be required to submit a weekly clinical log with the de-identified details of patients, their presenting problem and their treatment, as observed. The course coordinator must sign logs prior to their submission.
C. Case and Research Seminars - Attendance at the case seminars introduces students to history taking, conducting a mental status examination, formulation, diagnosis and treatment. These clinical case conferences will allow students to recognise a wide range of psychiatric diagnoses, the interrelationships between medical illness and psychiatric/psychological symptomatology as well as working within a multidisciplinary framework. Students are required to attend the research seminars and are expected to attend the School Colloquium. During this semester, students will commence the process of exploring potential research areas and negotiating supervision arrangements with academic staff. The Postgraduate Coordinator (Clinical Research), using information collected from the Research Preferences form, suggest up to three academics with interests in the nominated areas. In addition, an afternoon slot will be scheduled when the Postgraduate Coordinator (Clinical Research) will be available to discuss research interests, if students wish to do so. It is expected that students spend one day per week across their first year on their research project. At the end of the first semester, it is expected that students will have agreed on a research supervisor and topic area and completed the research contract to be submitted with the preliminary research proposal form. As outlined in the Research section of the DCP/MSc Course Handbook.
PSYC6070 Neuropsychology and Disability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Suncica Sunny Lah Session: Semester 1 Classes: 12 two to three-hour lectures Assessment: Essay/case analysis (100%)
This unit of study is concerned with neuropsychological and pervasive developmental disorders, and related forms of disability across the lifespan. Students will be introduced to the neuro-cognitive and behavioural correlates of a range of neurological, developmental, and medical conditions (including traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, autism, dementia, etc.) in children and adults. The course aims to develop students' understanding of functional brain organisation, recovery of function and rehabilitation, and principles of early intervention in these areas. In addition, attention will be given to evidence-based methods for assessing and intervening in cognitive, behavioural, and emotional problems commonly encountered in these populations. Lectures will include theoretical components, case presentations and discussions.
PSYC6071 Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Louise Sharpe Session: Semester 1 Classes: Research and conferral with supervisor as appropriate Assessment: Systematic review; Research presentation; Ethics proposal (100%)
This unit of study requires students to undertake significant work on their research project and aims for students to be in a position to start collecting data for their projects during this semester or at the latest by the beginning of semester 2. During this semester it is expected that students will submit relevant applications for research ethics, so that they are in a position to commence data collection in this semester, no later than the middle of their second year. Evidence of submission of an ethics proposal must be completed in order to pass this unit of study. Students will also present a formal research proposal presentation, where they will receive formal feedback from the Postgraduate Coordinator (Clinical Research), as part of requirements for PSYC6073 Case and Research Seminars 2. In addition, students must complete a systematic review relevant to their research. This topic of the review can be chosen in consultation with the supervisor and will be formally assessed by the Associate Supervisor of the Research Project. It is expected that supervisors will collaborate with students in choosing the topic, agreeing on relevant papers for the review and providing feedback on the first draft of the review prior to submission. Conducting a systematic review is an extremely time-consuming task. It involves many steps, including choosing the research question, identifying relevant papers, extracting key information from those papers and summarizing the findings. Therefore, students should start working towards this review early in the year or will find the task very difficult to complete within the time frame. The systematic review will be examined by the associate supervisor. The supervisor and student should negotiate with the associate supervisor about eventual authorship issues prior to commencing the systematic review. The associate supervisor should not be involved in the writing of the draft, but if the associate supervisor is to be an author it is expected that they would review the draft using track changes and make a significant contribution to the review sufficient to justify authorship.
PSYC6072 Case and Research Seminars 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stephen Touyz Session: Semester 2 Classes: 13 two-hour case and research seminars Assessment: Research proposal; Attendance at case and research seminars; Attendance at the School of Psychology Colloquium (100%). Students must demonstrate satisfactory performance on all assessments to satisfy requirements for this unit of study.
This unit of study will continue the case and research seminars introduced in PSYC6069 Ethics and Professional Practice. The unit of study will comprise attendance at formal weekly presentations, where Year 2 students will present a clinical case for discussion and Year 3 students will present their research findings. All students are required to attend throughout the semester, and are expected to attend the School Colloquium. It is expected that students will spend one day per week during this semester researching their chosen topic. Students are expected to be meeting with their supervisors during this semester to finalise aspects of their study design and methodology. If the research involves the recruitment of clinical samples off-site, students should expect to meet with their key individuals who will be involved with their research off-campus to negotiate the details of their project, the recruitment of subjects and to ensure its feasibility. Students are required to submit a formal written research proposal, which will form the basis of the research proposal presentation in the following semester.
PSYC6073 Case and Research Seminars 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stephen Touyz Session: Semester 1 Classes: 13 two-hour case and research seminars Assessment: Research presentation; Case report; Attendance at case and research seminars; Attendance at the School of Psychology Colloquium (100%). Students must demonstrate satisfactory performance on both assessments to satisfy requirements for this unit of study.
This unit of study will continue the case and research seminars introduced in PSYC6072 Case and Research Seminars 1. The unit of study will comprise attendance at formal weekly presentations, where Year 2 students will present a clinical case for discussion and Year 3 students will present their research findings. All students are required to attend throughout the semester and are expected to attend the School Colloquium. Students are to prepare a written case report.
PSYC6074 Advanced Models of Therapy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Rhodes Session: Semester 2 Classes: 14 five to six-hour seminars Prerequisites: PSYC6051 Assessment: Family therapy assignment; Counter-transference assignment; Schema therapy assignment; Attachment-based psychotherapy assignment; Dialectical Behaviour Therapy role play assignment; Integrated Approaches to Psychotherapy class participation (100%). Students must demonstrate satisfactory performance on all assessments to satisfy requirements for this unit of study.
This course is designed to provide students with advanced level training in psychotherapeutic approaches. For example, this course will deal with responses to complex human problems, including family problems and personality disorders, from a wider variety of clinical orientations. It focuses on a range of advanced models of therapy, including family therapy, dialectic behavior therapy, schema therapy and integrated approaches to psychotherapy, and will include from time to time, seminars by visiting clinical academics or practitioners with expertise in specific therapeutic approaches. Cognitive Therapy, Dialectical Behaviour Therapy and Attachment based psychotherapy are optional: Students may attend all lectures but are only expected to attend two of three optional seminars AND complete the relevant assesment of your choice.