Veterinary Studies

Students are advised to take note of the mode of instruction. In the Faculty of Veterinary Science, postgraduate coursework units of study are offered in four modes:

Supervised units of study are typically on campus with very few students. Enrolment in these units is dependent on agreement from a suitable supervisor. Some supervised units of study, e.g. research project units of study, may be taken by distance students with an approved internal or external supervisor.

Online units of study are offered online and may be taken by distance and involve regular participation in an online classroom. These units of study are subject to class size limitations.

International students living in Australia on a student visa must ensure that no more than 25 per cent of their course load consists of online units of study. There are no restrictions on enrolment in online units by international offshore students.

Residential intensive units of study require attendance for short periods, usually 3-5 days. These units are usually combined with further instruction online.

On campus units of study are typically offered in conjunction with honours-level undergraduate students, but may consist of small postgraduate classes on campus. Many of these classes are conducted at the faculty's Camden Campus, and students must be prepared to travel to or live at this campus at various times during their candidature.

Unit of study descriptions

Veterinary Studies

Graduate Certificate in Veterinary Studies

To qualify for the award of the graduate certificate a candidate must complete 24 credit points of approved coursework.

Graduate Diploma in Veterinary Studies

To qualify for the award of the graduate diploma a candidate must complete 36 credit points of approved coursework.

Master of Veterinary Studies

To qualify for the award of master a candidate must complete 48 credit points of approved coursework including:
a minimum of 36 credit points of coursework units of study;
And
a minimum of 6 credit points of case report or research project units of study.

Electives

Candidates will choose from the following Elective units of study. Some units of study may require permission from the unit of study coordinator for enrolment.
VETS7010 Animal Health Policy Development

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor: Kevin Doyle Session: Semester 2a Classes: Online (Semester 2 Weeks 1-7) Assessment: Semester 2, weeks 1-7) Assessment: Individual report (45%); Group report (40%); Participation (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
After studying the Principles of Animal Health Policy Development unit, students will be able to: Describe the structure and role of Australia's Veterinary Service; Outline the process of law making and policy development in relation to public health and animal health in Australia; Outline current policy issues relating to veterinary public health and animal health in Australia; Discuss strategies used to resolve conflicts among stakeholders and to address the economic, political, technical and social issues that may arise; Discuss the means whereby veterinary public health and animal health policy is monitored and enforced; Discuss evaluation and improvement strategies for animal health policy.
Textbooks
Colebatch HK. Policy. 3rd Edition 2009, Open University Press (McGraw-Hill) Policy Concepts in the Social Sciences series.
VETS7011 Data Analysis for Policy Making

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor: John Morton Session: Semester 2a Classes: Online (Semester 2 Weeks 1-7) Assessment: Participation in weekly online discussions and learning activities (15%); group assignment (30%); individual assignment (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
In this course, students will work with existing data. Issues of developing a study design will not be dealt with. students will however consider the impact of a particular study design on the interpretation of the data generated. after studying this unit students will be able to: identify potential sources of data and their strengths and weaknesses; identify and apply appropriate analytical and statistical methods for different purposes; analyse data using commonly available software programs; Identify and manage potential bias and confounding in data; describe and interpret the results of data analysis; incorporate the outcomes of data analysis in policy development.
Textbooks
Veterinary Epidemiology Thrusfield, M. 3E06, 2007 Blackwell Science, Oxford, UK.
VETS7012 Wildlife Epidemiology

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor: Colleen Duncan Session: Semester 2b Classes: Online (Semester 2 Weeks 8-14) Prerequisites: VETS7004 Assessment: Individual assignment (45%); Group assignment (40%); Participation (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Note: Elective Units of Study offered online will not normally be run with less than 6 participants. All units offered are subject to class size limitations.
After studying the Wildlife Epidemiology unit, you will be able to: Apply epidemiological concepts to wildlife populations. Explain the concept of disease ecology. Discuss issues relevant to disease determination in wildlife populations and explain the associated diagnostic challenges. Discuss alternate study methodologies and design a valid observational study for a wildlife population. Discuss design and analysis issues relevant to wildlife disease studies. Identify sources of wildlife animal health data and discuss wildlife health information systems. Critically review published literature on wildlife disease studies.
This unit is offered in alternate years to VETS7014 Aquatic Animal Epidemiology.
Textbooks
Thrusfield M. Veterinary Epidemiology. 3rd Edition. Oxford: Blackwell Science 2007
VETS7013 Risk Analysis

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Dr Michael Ward Instructor: Marta Hernandez-Jover Session: Semester 2a Classes: Online (Semester 2 Weeks 1-7) Assumed knowledge: Veterinary Epidemiology 1, Hazards to Human and Animal Health, Animal Health Economics, and Animal Health Policy Development will have provided some of the basic knowledge and skills required for this unit Assessment: Participation in weekly online discussions (15%) on-line quiz (15%); group assignment (30%); individual assignment (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
After studying Risk Analysis you will be able to: apply the terminology and major concepts, principles, tools and techniques used in risk management in an animal health context; analyse and evaluate the main approaches to risk management in animal health (including veterinary public health) and trade; evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of some of the tools used in risk management; synthesise the tasks and issues associated with risk management with your knowledge of animal and public health; approach risk communication with an understanding of the different methods of good risk communication and the relationship between risk perception and risk communication.
Textbooks
There is no single textbook that covers all of the topics explored in this unit. The unit does, however, draw heavily on the Australian and New Zealand Standard for Risk Management, AS/NZS:4360. 2004 and it is recommended that you are familiar with this document. The unit also draws on the OIE Handbook on Import Risk Analysis for Animals and Animal Products: Vols 1 & 2. 2004. As the name suggests, this reference document provides detail about import (or quarantine) risk analysis, but also some discussion about the application of risk analysis in broader field of animal health.
VETS7014 Aquatic Animal Epidemiology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor(s): Ed Peeler & Carol McClure Session: Semester 1b Classes: Online (Semester 1 Weeks 8-14) Corequisites: VETS7005 Assessment: Participation in weekly online discussions (15%), group assignment (40%); individual assignment (45%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Note: Elective Units of Study offered online will not normally be run with less than 6 participants. All units offered are subject to class size limitations.
After studying this unit, you will be able to: apply epidemiological concepts to farmed and wild aquatic animals; explain the requirements of import risk analysis for aquatic animals and identify sources of aquatic animal health data; explain the requirements of aquatic animal disease surveillance and targeted surveys; design analytic epidemiological studies; explain sources of bias in aquatic animal systems; contribute to investigations of fish kills.
Textbooks
Veterinary Epidemiology, Thrusfield, M., 3E06, 2007
VETS7015 Surveillance, Preparedness & Response

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor: Dorothy Geale and Mike Nunn Session: Semester 2a Classes: Online (Semester 2 Weeks 1-7) Assessment: Participation in weekly online discussions (15%) ; online quiz (15%) ; group assignment (35%); individual assignment (35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
After studying Surveillance, Preparedness & Response you will be able to: explain how surveillance contributes to the assessment and management of risks that affect public health, animal health, or trade; provide advice on the development of a surveillance strategy to meet defined objectives; describe a preferred framework for managing animal health emergencies.
Textbooks
Thrusfield M. Veterinary Epidemiology. 3rd Edition. Oxford: Blackwell Science 2007
VETS7016 Animal Health Data Management

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor: Dr John Morton Session: Semester 1b Classes: Online (Semester 1 Weeks 8-14) Assessment: Participation in weekly online discussions and learning activities (15%); group assignment (30%); individual assignment (55%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
After studying this unit students will be able to: Describe the important characteristics of the main epidemiological data types; Develop a data-collection form for an epidemiological study; Design a simple relational database for recording animal health-related data; Manage data in a computer spreadsheet, including importing, exporting, recoding, transforming and summarising data; Undertake descriptive analysis of data using computer spreadsheets or other appropriate software; Undertake descriptive analysis of data using computer spreadsheets or other appropriate software.
Textbooks
Cameron A. Sergeant ESG. Baldock FC. Data management for Animal Health. 2004 AusVet Animal Health Services, Brisbane
VETS7017 Food Safety

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Lecturers: Dr Siobhan Mor, Gary Muscatello Session: Semester 2b Classes: Online (Semester 2 Mon 23 Sep - Sun 10 Nov) Assessment: Participation in weekly online discussions and learning activities (15%); group assignment (40%); individual assignment (45%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
After completing Food Safety participants will be able to describe the respective roles and recent initiatives in food safety of the various government and industry organisations that make up the global, national and regional regulatory system for the safety of food of animal origin; Describe and critically analyse the key elements in food safety risk assessment and management and critically apply this to the analysis of a total quality management food safety system; Describe the critical aspects of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, management and prevention of the well-recognised bacterial food-borne pathogens; Identify emerging food-borne pathogens of animal origin and describe the critical aspects of the epidemiology that make them a particular public health concern; Describe the principles used in newer microbiological diagnostic tests and their application in food safety programs; Discuss the elements required for an effective national antimicrobial resistance management program; List the potential sources of and critically assess the potential public health threats posed by the presence of natural toxins and environmental contaminants in food of animal origin.
Textbooks
Torrence ME. Isaacson RE. eds. Microbial Food Safety in Animal Agriculture Current Topics. Iowa: Iowa State Press. 2003
VETS7020 Diagnostic Tests

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor: Prof Ian Gardner Session: Semester 1a Classes: Online (Semester 1 Weeks 1-7) Prerequisites: VETS7005 Veterinary Epidemiology 2 Assessment: Participation in online class (15%); Group assignment (40%); Individual assignment (45%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
After completing this unit, students will be able to: Understand and describe the biologic principles of common tests and how their inherent characteristics affect their accuracy and precision; Analyse and summarise data from a test evaluation or test comparison study; Critique published test evaluation studies and describe their strengths and weaknesses considering design and analysis guidelines in the veterinary medical literature; Incorporate quantitative test results in clinical decision making about an individual animal's disease status; Interpret test results from prevalence estimation studies involving single and multiple animal; opulations, from risk factor studies and from disease surveillance systems; Plan a disease surveillance system or disease survey and select a diagnostic test(s) (considering its strengths and weaknesses) to meet specified surveillance or survey objectives.
Textbooks
Dohoo, I., Martin, W. and Stryhn, H. Veterinary Epidemiologic Research 2nd edition (2009) AVC, Canada
VETS7021 Data Analysis for Epidemiology Research

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor:Navneet Dhand Session: Semester 2b Classes: Online (Semester 2 Weeks 8-14) Assessment: Participation in online discussions (15%), 2 Written assignments (85%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This Unit of Study, delivered by distance education using an online classroom, will using four case studies introduce students to the application of three statistical procedures (linear regression, logistic regression, survival analysis) in epidemiological research for animal health and public health. Approaches to account for the impact of confounding, effect modification and clustering suitable for these statistical procedures will be discussed.
After completing this unit, students will be able to: identify an appropriate statistical method for testing associations with a categorical and a continuous outcome; conduct descriptive and univariable regression analyses using standard statistical software; build multivariable linear and logistic models for measurg association of a variable with an outcome after accounting for other variables and confounders; interpret the output of regression analyses from standard statistical software and present the results in research papers and project reports; evaluate statistical results presented in epidemiology journals (such as Preventive Veterinary Medicine) and identify clustering in epidemiological data and have basic skills to account for clustering while analysing hierarchical data.
Textbooks
Veterinary Epidemiologic Research Dohoo, I., Martin, W. and Stryhn, H. 2nd edition (2009) AVC, Canada
VETS7025 Leadership, People and Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor: Residential facilitator: Karen Rodrigues On-line facilitator: Greg Cartan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Residential and Online. 5-day Residential session in February, Online classes (Semester 1, 1-14) Assessment: Residential (10%), Learning Journals (40%) Online participation (20%), Group Assignment (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
The Leadership, People and Organisations unit will aim to raise awareness of the need for leadership and management skills amongst veterinary public health professionals. Through experiential learning activities, group case study analysis and scenario based problem-solving activities, students will identify how they can develop effective management and leadership skills at the residential session. In the online classroom, students will use independent study and group learning to further explore aspects of leadership and working successfully within organisations.
After completing the Leadership, People and Organisations unit, students will be able to: explain the importance and principles of leadership in the context of animal health management and veterinary public health: discuss aspects of leadership such as personality, intelligence, values, cultural differences, motivations, self efficacy and perception: identify their own skill requirements: use and explain the principles of action learning: explain the effects of group dynamics in work teams: discuss how power and influence impact on success at work: analyse and develop their own leadership skills: explain how work design can affect organizational and team success: discuss organizational behaviour and culture: recommend strategies to transform organizations.
Textbooks
Organisational Behaviour: Emerging Knowledge. Global Insights. McShane, S., Olekalns, M & Travaglione, T 2013 4 Ed, McGraw Hill Australia Pty Limited: North Ryde: Australia
VETS7026 Leadership: Managing Change

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor: Shashanna Evans Session: Semester 1a Classes: 3-day Residential session in February, Online classes (Semester 1 Weeks 1-7) Prerequisites: VETS7025 Assessment: Case analysis (15%), individual assignments (70%), online participation (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
The Leadership: Managing Change unit of study will cover advanced leadership and management issues in veterinary public health. A key role for managers and leaders is managing change. The aims of this course are to: introduce you to selected theories and concepts which underpin the practice of change management; explore the roles that you and others play in initiating and facilitating organisations to change; provide you with frameworks for analysing and understanding your own experience of change in organisations; identify the range of key skills you need to effectively lead and implement change; assess your own change skills and recognise the special abilities you have already developed.
This unit looks at change on many levels, beginning with a micro focus on the individual and culminating with a more macro view of the whole organisational system. It balances practical skill building with a solid foundation of theoretical understanding. In this unit of study students will explore managing change around three central concepts: the change agent; change perspectives; change and organisations.
Textbooks
Organizational Change Senior, B. and Fleming, J. (2010), 4th Edition, Prentice Hall, Essex.
VETS7027 Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Lecturer: Juergen Oschadleus Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3-day Residential session in July, Online classes Assessment: Individual Assignments (35%) Online Participation: (15%) Residential Presentation (10%) Group Project (40%) either individual assignments or a combination of a group and individual assignment. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit of study is an introduction to project management for students whose main objective is to develop a range of skills in the field of Veterinary Public Health Management. The unit of study is composed of a 3-day residential and distance education, together totalling 150 hours. As a result, not every area of project management can be covered in depth. The unit concentrates on the project management processes and deliverables in order to give the student a solid grounding in project management. Obviously project management also involves other areas such as leadership, "soft skills" and the strategic aspects of projects. While some soft skills specific to project management are covered, other leadership and team management aspects are not covered in this unit of study. They are however covered in the Leadership units of study that are core to the Veterinary Public Health Management Program.
After completing Project Management, students will be able to: define project context, project phases and project knowledge areas; use common project management terminology; define project initiation stage processes and deliverables; define the processes required to execute and control the project plan; define project closing processes and to create a project review report (PRR) as part of a process to continually improve their understanding of project management; discuss the complexities and challenges of project management; propose effective strategies to deal with these complexities and challenges.
Students will also be able to define project planning stage processes and create a project plan including a: Stakeholder Management Plan; Scope Management Plan; Time Management Plan; Cost Management Plan; Quality Management Plan; Communications Management Plan; HR Management Plan; Risk Management Plan.
Textbooks
Revised: An Introduction to Project Management, With Brief Guides to Microsoft Project 2010 and @task Schwalbe K., 3rd ed. CreateSpace, 2010 (ISBN: 978-1451551648)
VETS7028 Leadership Skills

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Instructor(s): Shashanna Evans Session: Semester 1b Classes: Online (Semester 1 weeks 8-14) Assessment: Online participation (15%); individual assignments (85%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This unit of study seeks to enable the development of key managerial skills.Topic areas include: social intelligence and communication skills; strategy and decision making skills; ethics; management systems and organisational design; You will also be taught how to lead teams, manage yourselves and your careers, and also how to engage your stakeholders in the process of developing these skills.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbook.
VETS8002 Genetic Evaluation and Breeding

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Chris Moran Instructor: Assoc Prof Julius van der Werf Session: Semester 2 Classes: Residential and Online Prerequisites: VETS8004 Assessment: MCQs (10%) Problem Sets (10%) Case Study (40%) Tests (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
Note: This unit is core in the Animal Breeding Management stream of the Postgraduate Program in Animal Science.
This unit of study builds on the knowledge gained in VETS8004 Advanced Animal Genetics to enable students to enhance their understanding of quantitative genetics and apply them to animal breeding programs. The unit will be taught online with one short residential session in Armidale and is a core unit of study in the Animal Breeding Management course. After completing Genetic Evaluation and Breeding, students will be able to: Apply quantitative genetic principles in animal breeding programs; Explain commonly used genetic evaluation methods; Discuss the issues involved in breeding program design; Discuss the potential influence of new reproductive and genetic technologies on animal breeding programs; Independently solve common animal breeding problems.
Textbooks
GENE422/522 Genetic Evaluation and Breeding Program Design course notes UNE School of Environmental and Rural Science
VETS8003 Advanced Applications of Animal Breeding

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Chris Moran Instructor: Assoc Prof Julius van der Werf Session: Semester 1 Classes: Mode: Residential and online Prerequisites: VETS8004 Assessment: Literature Review 5,000 - 6,000 words of formal written assignment (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
Note: This Unit of Study is elective in the Animal Breeding Management stream of the Postgraduate Program in Animal Science.
By completing this unit of study, students should be able to: apply skills in quantitative genetics in simulated cases based in each of the major industry groupings; develop optimal breeding objectives and design effective breeding programs, both within and across farming units.
VETS8004 Advanced Animal Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor: Dr Claire Wade Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 3 hrs/wk, practicals 3 hrs/wk Prohibitions: ANSC3107 Assumed knowledge: GENE2001 or MBLG2072 or MBLG2972 or equivalent Assessment: Practicals with associated reports and on-line quizzes (25%), Mid Semester on-line examination (25%), Final Examination (50%) Practical field work: Practicals with associated reports and on-line quizzes (25%), Mid Semester on-line examination (25%), Final Examination (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
The unit of Study explores in detail genetic aspects of commercial animal populations and investigates options for the practical application of genetics to improve animal productivity. It is designed to provide the background material, fundamental concepts and data analysis methods for breeding strategies in the animal industries. The unit of study develops basic principles of population and quantitative genetics from Agricultural Genetics. It provides essential background and context to the molecular principles expanded in Animal Biotechnology. Animal Genetics provides the justification for the application for advanced reproductive technologies presented in Animal Reproduction.
At the end of this Unit of Study, students will demonstrate an understanding of: the principles of population genetics and the concepts of relationship and inbreeding, and adverse effects of this inbreeding; the principles of quantitative genetics including the concepts of genetic variance, heritability and repeatability, and methods for the identification and selection of superior livestock; the use of multi-trait selection procedures to increase the overall economic value of populations of animals; the constraints to production gains using genetic selection programmes and advantages obtained through crossbreeding; the practical application of selection and crossing in animals; the application of genomic and reproductive technologies in Animal breeding. Introductory bioinformatics, genomics, cytogenetics and conservation biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Nicholas, FW (2010) Introduction to Veterinary Genetics (3rd Ed) October 2009, ©2010, Wiley-Blackwell, Iowa, USA ISBN: 978-1-4051-6832-8
VETS8005 Advanced Animal Biotechnology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor: Assoc Prof Peter Williamson Session: Semester 2 Classes: On-campus lectures 3 hrs/wk, tutorials 1 hr/wk, seminars/workshops 0.25 hrs/wk, laboratories 0.5 hrs/wk Prohibitions: ANSC3105 Assessment: Seminars (20%), essay (20%), 2 hr exam (60%) Practical field work: Excursions, self-directed learning, supervised reading, computer aided instruction 1.25 hrs/wk Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Lectures, tutorials, laboratories (PCR, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics), seminars and supervised reading and directed learning instruction will cover the application of biotechnology to animal productivity, disease control, the development of new products from animals and the impact of altered micro-organisms and plants on animals. A firm foundation in molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology is provided, with an emphasis on relevance in animals. Regulation of gene expression in vivo and in expression systems, monitoring of gene expression including microarrays and proteomics,
gene mapping, genomics, including nextgen sequencing, and gene discovery are all discussed in contexts relevant to domestic animals. Genetic modifications of animals including transgenesis and gene knockout, and methods for achieving these modifications including cloning by nuclear transfer are detailed. Basic skills in bioinformatics are developed to access and utilise the vast information resources available. Legal methods of protecting intellectual property are described. Finally animal biotechnology is reviewed from an ethical perspective. Animal Biotechnology explores alternative and complementary technologies to the breeding technologies covered in the core Animal Genetics unit of study.
Textbooks
No set textbook for this unit of study.
VETS8006 Advanced Animal Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor(s): Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 h/week, lecture recording 1hr/week and in situ and/or online laboratories 2-3 hr/week Prohibitions: ANSC3101 Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of Biochemistry Assessment: Assignments, including 5 individual reports from problem based learning (30%), 1 online middle term exam (35%), 1 oral or video presentation (25%), and 1 online end of term exam (10%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This Unit of Study builds upon principles discussed in ANSC1002 (Concepts of Animal Management). The Unit is broadly divided into four sections, namely: estimating the nutritive characteristics of feeds; defining the nutrient requirements of animals; diet formulation; errors in feeding. The focus is on coming to an understanding of the assessment of nutritional adequacy and the avoidance and solving of nutritional problems, with a particular emphasis on animals used in agricultural production systems and wildlife. The principles discussed in this course will be expanded in the following year, in which species-specific systems will be described. The basis of successful feeding management is an understanding of the following: the composition of feeds; the digestibility and efficiency of utilisation of nutrients by the animal; the nutrient requirements of the animal; interactions between nutrients that influence health and production. And following from this, students will have the ability to formulate diets to meet animal requirements for a variety of purposes and under a variety of constraints; identify deficiencies, excesses and imbalances in diets and so avoid a decline in productive efficiency and/or a decline in health.
Textbooks
Students are encouraged to have an individual tablet PC or laptop with wireless connectivity (e.g.: ipad; Galaxy Note, etc.) during all classes. There is no required text for the course. A number of textbooks are available on reserve at the library. These include:
VETS8008 Advanced Animal Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor(s): Dr Simon de Graaf Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/week, tutorials 1 hr/week, practicals 3 hrs/week. Prohibitions: ANSC3102 Assumed knowledge: ANSC3104 or equivalent Assessment: Written and oral assignments (30%), mid-semester written exam (10%), end of semester written exam (60%) Practical field work: There will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study provides a comprehensive programme on basic and applied aspects of male and female reproductive biology, with particular emphasis on livestock and domestic animals. The fundamental topics include reproductive cycles, sexual differentiation, gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, gestation and parturition. An understanding of the applications of advanced reproductive technologies is developed through lectures, tutorials and the assignments. In addition, practical instruction is given on semen collection and processing, manipulation of the reproductive cycle, artificial insemination, and pregnancy diagnosis in sheep and pigs. Classes are held at the Camperdown Campus in Sydney and at the Camden Campus Animal Reproduction Unit and Mayfarm piggery.
Textbooks
Senger, PL 2013, Pathways to pregnancy & parturition 3rd ed., Current Conceptions Inc.
VETS8013 Special Topics in Animal Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor(s): Supervisors on arrangement. Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised. Tutorials, seminars, essays and directed reading. Assessment: Assessment negotiated under supervision - 6,000 words or equivalent. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will allow students to be supervised in specific areas of study that are not covered in any existing postgraduate units. The purpose of this unit may include: interest in specific practical skill area, allowing greater depth of skill development following from core units of study; interest in enhanced knowledge of a particular subject matter; additional learning required to support a research project. Students must discuss learning outcomes, methods for achieving them, assessment and assessment criteria with their supervisor and submit documentation to the Sub Dean for Postgraduate Coursework by the census date of the relevant semester.
At the end of this Unit of Study, students will be able to: discuss the major issues associated with their subject area; interpret and critically evaluate scientific material or information in their subject area; make informed decisions in their subject area and implement them; clearly communicate understanding of their subject area.
Textbooks
No prescribed text.
VETS8014 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor: Dr Peter White Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 3hrs/wk, laboratories/tutorials 3hrs/wk (note these will vary depending upon the week) Prerequisites: 12 credit points of junior Biology Prohibitions: ANSC3103 Assumed knowledge: AVBS1002 or equivalent Assessment: Assignments/presentations/online quiz (50%) and examinations (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Animal Structure and Function A will develop an understanding of the role of the body systems in maintaining homeostasis in an animal's internal environment. In ASFA the structure and function of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, central nervous and urinary integumentary systems of the body are explored in depth particularly with reference to the maintenance of homeostasis and an animal's perception of, and response to, its environment. The developed understanding of the normal functioning of these systems allows identification of the impact on the animal of abnormal function of these systems. A study of the structure and function of muscle will include its role in movement and as meat in a production setting. The overall goals of the Unit are (i) to enable students to develop a rich understanding of the relationships between body systems and structures (to be continued in ASFB). (ii) to develop generic skills particularly in group work and oral presentation,(iii) to develop an appreciation of the links between structure and function and their relevance to animal disease and production that will be further developed in Veterinary Pathogenesis as well as in advanced, applied studies in Behaviour in third year and in 4th year Animal Production
Textbooks
For the animal structure component of the unit:
VETS8017 Technologies of Animal Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor: Dr Chris Grupen Session: Int March Classes: Residential: One month intensive starting approximately one week before Semester 1 to week 3. About 50% practical tuition at Camden, and a practical field trip to Arthursleigh, with remainder a mix of self-directed (on-line) learning, case studies and presentations. Assumed knowledge: Please contact instructor before enrolment to discuss prior experience in animal handling and reproduction. Assessment: Written report (max. 2,500 words) (60%), Oral presentation (20%), Practical component (20%) Practical field work: Approximately 50% practical tuition at Camden and a practical field trip to Arthursleigh Campus: Camden Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This Unit of Study is designed specifically for students wishing to extend their skills and knowledge of artificial breeding technologies, and will particularly suit students intending to work in the artificial breeding industries, or in rural mixed practice, and students interested in pursuing research in reproduction and biotechnology. The practical work will primarily focus on sheep and cattle, but the Unit of Study will be of interest to those wishing to work with other species, including companion animals, pigs, laboratory animals and wildlife. The Unit of Study will integrate the disciplines of quantitative and molecular genetics, animal health, nutrition, and reproduction, including advanced reproductive technologies as applied to managed breeding and assisted reproduction programs. Students will gain practical skills in artificial insemination, embryo transfer, gamete preservation and banking, pregnancy diagnosis, molecular genetics (proof of parentage, marker assisted selection), selection of breeding stock, and management of breeding programs. By the end of this unit students will be able to: Advise on implementation and management of artificial breeding programs in production animals, companion animals, and wildlife; Demonstrate proficiency in the legal, ethical and animal welfare aspects in managing artificial breeding programs; Design and manage an artificial breeding program in sheep or cattle, including appropriate selection of breeding stock; Perform breeding soundness examinations on sheep and cattle; Perform artificial insemination, embryo recovery and transfer, and pregnancy diagnosis in sheep and cattle; Advise on appropriate nutritional regimes for breeding stock; Advise on health requirements and management for breeding stock, and on the international transfer of semen and embryos; Students will also be able to describe: Artificial breeding techniques applicable to pigs, companion animals and wildlife; Techniques of gamete and embryo preservation and banking; Advanced biotechnology techniques applicable to the AB industries.
VETS8018 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor: Dr Cathy Herbert Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 3 hrs/wk, laboratories/tutorials 3 hrs/wk, activities will vary on a weekly basis Prerequisites: VETS8014 Prohibitions: ANSC3104 Assessment: Anatomy dissection project (20%), topic test (10%), critical review (20%), final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In this Unit students will complete the study of the structure and function of organ systems in animals started in VETS8014. The role of hormones and the immune systems will be investigated in relation to maintenance of internal homeostasis. An introduction to digestion and male and female reproductive anatomy and physiology will form the basis for further applied studies in these areas in MAnSci Units of Study in Animal Nutrition and Animal Reproduction. There will be development of the generic skills of critically reading and writing.
Textbooks
For Animal Structure:
VETS8031 Animal Health and Disease Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor: Dr Wendy Muir Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3..5 hrs/wk lectures, 0.5 hr/wk tutorials, 2 hrs/wk practical (on average) Prohibitions: AVBS4001 Assumed knowledge: ANSC3104, AVBS3001, (Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3) or equivalent Assessment: Participation in field trips (pass/fail), assignments (50%), 1.5 hr exam (50%) Practical field work: 2 day field trip to Arthursleigh farm Campus: Camden Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This Unit of Study extends your understanding of animal health from knowledge gained in units completed in earlier study. In particular we look at general aspects of animal health and disease in terms of epidemiology, exotic/emergency diseases of risk to Australia and principles of vaccines and vaccinations. Health and disease issues relevant to various species, including sheep, cattle, pigs, poultry, fish and wildlife are presented by experts in these fields. A range of management and interventional strategies that are currently in use to minimise the impact of disease are also discussed. After completing this Unit of Study, students will demonstrate an understanding of:
the principles of animal management that are implemented to optimise health and to reduce the incidence and severity of disease; the fundamental principles of disease in animal populations; specific infectious diseases of consequence for growth, reproduction and for the production of meat, wool, milk and eggs; approaches to their control and prevention through environmental and nutritional management, and interventional techniques such as vaccination programmes. These are considered in the context of commercial animal production and the health of wildlife animals. A two day field trip to Arthursleigh farm which focuses on the management of sheep, cattle and wildlife, and a visit to the research and development field station of an international animal health company reiterate many aspects of the unit of study.
Textbooks
Students are advised to consult lecturers for recommended texts
VETS8032 Advanced Dairy Production & Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Prof Sergio (Yani) Garcia Other Participating staff: Assoc. Prof. Kendra Kerrisk, Dr Pietro Celi, Dr Cameron Clark, Assoc. Prof. John House, Nicolas Lyons, Victoria Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures up to 3 hrs/wk, practicals 3 hrs/wk Assumed knowledge: Enrolled students are expected to have some understanding of key components of the dairy production system, including basic knowledge of animal physiology and nutrition. Assessment: Whole farm professional report (30%), Pracs assessments, (30%), 1 hr exam (40%) Practical field work: Visit to commercial dairy farms and different systems of production in 3 or 4 regions of NSW (a minimum of 8 commercial farms will be visited during the semester) Campus: Camden Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will explore the various aspects of dairy farming and the dairy industry from a scientific point of view. The lectures are a mix of the principles on which sound dairy farming is based and practical examples of how this operates in practice. Focus is placed on integrating knowledge to gain understanding on the system of production as a whole.
At the end of this unit of study, students will demonstrate a solid understanding of: the characteristics of the dairy industry in Australia and in a world wide context; the key components of pasture-based dairy systems; principles and practices of pasture and feeding management; the application of new technologies to improve efficiency and productivity (particularly automatic milking).
In addition, students will demonstrate an appreciation of key aspects of reproduction and lactation physiology; the integration of knowledge of genetics and reproduction into the type of herd improvement structure set up in the dairy industry; the application of ruminant physiology knowledge to developing feeding programs for dairy cows; the extension of basic reproductive physiology onto the dairy farm using case studies as examples; the economics of the dairy farm business. Practical classes include milking cows; grazing and feeding management of dairy cows; calf rearing; and visits to commercial farms ranging from small pasture-based dairy farms to a feed-lot operation milking over 2,000 cows.
Note 1: Pracs assessments marks will be a combination of assistance (0.4) and completion of short questionaries about the prac or the farm visit (0.6)
Note 2: the professional report is basically a dairy system planning exercise reported in a professional (non academic) style. Students will be given budgeting tools and full explanations to assist with this task at the beginning of the course. The report is individual although this may depend on number of students enrolled.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the course content and for this reason no formal text is required. However, the following books can be used as basic bibliography for consultation during the course:
VETS8034 Food Safety Assessment and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor: Dr Gary Muscatello Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 3 hrs/wk, tutorial/practicals 2 hrs/wk Prohibitions: AVBS4004 Assumed knowledge: All core Units of Study in Years 1, 2 and 3 of BAnVetBioSc degree or equivalent. Assessment: Assessment: 1000wd individual report (20%), 1000wd group assignment (20%), 2hr exam (50%), MCQ (10%) Practical field work: 2 field trips (compulsory) 16 hrs total Campus: Camden Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This Unit of Study focuses on the issues and practices in the animal industry relevant to food safety and zoonotic disease. This unit will cover general food safety issues, including risk assessment and hazard analysis of microbes and chemicals. Food-borne diseases of animal origin and their impact on public heath will be explored through the examination of zoonotic diseases in scenario-based learning activities. In these processes diagnostic and strategic methods of investigating, controlling and preventing food-borne disease outbreaks will be explored. Students will be introduced to national and international animal and human health policy pertaining to food safety regulations and surveillance initiatives and strategies that underpin these policies. Students in this unit will be introduced to the issues regarding emerging food-borne pathogens and current industry driven topics. By the end of the unit, students should have global and local perspective on the major food-borne diseases, surveillance and control programs. This unit is located at the Camden Campus.
Textbooks
Torrence ME & Isaacson RE (eds) 2003, Microbial food safety in animal agriculture current topics, Iowa State Press, Ames, Iowa
VETS8035 Feed Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor: TBA Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 3 hrs/wk Prohibitions: AVBS4005 Assumed knowledge: ANSC3101, (Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3) or equivalent. Assessment: Poster (10%), oral presentation (10%), article (20%), lab book and feed formulation exercise (20%), two hour written exam (40%) Practical field work: Practicals/field work 3hrs/wk Campus: Camden Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Feed accounts for approximately 70% of the input costs associated with animal industries, including both monogastric (poultry and pigs, laboratory animals) ruminants (feedlot cattle and sheep) and caecal fermenters (horses, rabbits). The "feed industry" is described as the largest supporting industry for animal agriculture and is a major employer of graduates (undergraduate and postgraduate). Feed technology is a broad topic and includes aspects of feed ingredient characteristics, feed manufacturing, feed additive biotechnology and applied nutrition. The course will provide in-depth understanding of the feed industry, factors influencing ingredient variability and availability (physical and economic), methods and applications of processing of ingredients to increase nutritional value, assessment of digestibility, and feed additives and supplements. All facets of the production and regulation of feed production will be discussed relative to their importance in animal agriculture and food production. Expect applied practical information as well as fairly detailed nutritional biochemistry.
Textbooks
Leeson, S & Summers, JD Commercial Poultry Nutrition
VETS8039 Aquatic Animal Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructors: Joy Becker Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2hrs/wk, tutorials 1hr/wk, practicals 3hrs/wk Assumed knowledge: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 or equivalent. Assessment: Written and/or oral assignments (40%), written practical report (20%), exam 2 hrs (40%) Campus: Camden Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The Unit of Study explores in detail aspects of commercial aquaculture, including global trends in aquaculture development. Other topics include water quality, feeding, management, health and disease, genetics and reproduction, environmental impact and economic constraints to production. The unit of study emphasises methods to improve aquacultural productivity. It builds on basic principles of anatomy, physiology, nutrition, genetics and health and disease presented in your undergraduate study. At the end of this Unit of Study, students will demonstrate an understanding of the principles of: the context of aquaculture in global food production; husbandry, management and welfare of aquaculture species; comparative aspects of husbandry in aquaria, domestic, commercial; health and disease relevant to aquaculture; nutrition of aquaculture species; reproduction and genetics of species in aquaculture; water quality and environmental impact of aquaculture; economics and marketing of aquaculture products.
VETS8042 Advanced Sheep and Beef Production

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor: Dr Russell Bush Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 3hrs/wk, practicals 3hrs/wk Prohibitions: AVBS4012 Assumed knowledge: and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 or equivalent. Assessment: Case study (10%), practical report (15%), meat grading (15%), excursion report (20%) and written exam (40%) Practical field work: 5 day study tour to the Riverina Practical field work: 5 day study tour to the Riverina Campus: Camden Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces the concepts of sheep (wool and meat) and beef cattle production in the Australian environment within the context of world food and fibre consumption and production. The key products as well as domestic and export markets for these are presented. The course provides an historical perspective of the basis for each of these industries and describes each of the production systems designed to meet the demand for these products.
Production in both the tropical and temperate regions of Australia will be covered and include the key elements of extensive grazing and intensive feedlot systems. Major issues will include breeds and breeding systems, basic nutrition and production practices and animal welfare issues as they affect the quality and quantity of product marketed.
The concepts of first stage processing of both meat and fibre products in abattoirs and top-making plants respectively will be presented. The major factors that influence the quality of product and therefore grading and market demand will be presented.
Lecture material will be supported with appropriate practical classes and a 5 day study tour to the Riverina to evaluate different commercial production systems. Students will also have an opportunity to compete in the annual Inter Collegiate Meat Judging (ICMJ) competition as a member of the University of Sydney team. This competition involves teams from numerous universities throughout Australia as well as Japan and the USA.
Textbooks
Anderson RS, Edney ATB 1991 Practical animal handling, Pergamon Press
VETS8043 Advanced Pig and Poultry Production

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Academic Supervisor: Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Instructor: Dr Jeff Downing Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hrs/wk Prohibitions: AVBS4008 Assumed knowledge: (Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3) OR (Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3) or equivalent Assessment: Written exam (50%) (Poultry and Pigs 50:50), in course evaluations and case study - Pigs (25%), Broiler growth study report and in course evaluations - Poultry (25%) Practical field work: Visits to an intensive pig/poultry farm, feed mill and poultry production and processing units when biosecurity restrictions allow Campus: Camden Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is composed of two parts, a Poultry Production component and a Pig Production component. The course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the production of eggs and poultry meat and pork. The individual components examine various aspects of the poultry and pig production systems important in maintaining efficiency and profitability. It investigates aspects of breeding, nutrition, housing, growth performance, heath, welfare, reproductive capability, waste management, marketing and current industry issues. This unit will expand on some aspects of previous year 3 units of study in animal structure and function, nutrition and reproduction. There is a broiler growth study which comprises a significant part of the practical work in the Poultry component. There is a strong emphasis on assessment being built into the course work as this is considered to be more relevant to learning in the final year.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the Australian pig industry and for this reason no formal text is required. There are many sites (industry, academic institutions and government departments) on the Web which provide excellent information. Links to these will be provided. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course. Often poultry specific text books are obsolete very quickly, it would be important to use trade information. The library subscribes to breeder management guides and general poultry production journals as well as specific poultry scientific journals.
VETS8044 Advanced Animal Behaviour & Welfare Sci

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Academic Supervisor: Prof Assoc Prof Alex Chaves Lecturer: Dr Greg Cronin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Classes: 6 hrs/wk (including lectures, demonstrations, discussions and practical activities) Prerequisites: AVBS1002 or equivalent Prohibitions: VETS3018 Assumed knowledge: All year 1-3 core components for AnVetBSc or equivalent Assessment: Scientific essay (30%); oral presentations (15%); practical reports based on class activities (55%). Practical field work: Practical class activities will be held following lectures at the Camden campus Campus: Camden Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Advanced Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science builds on the understanding of animal form and operation that students have developed in prior Units. In Advanced Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science, the behavioural and physiological responses of mammals, birds and fish to stressors related to husbandry, housing, transport, slaughter, training and performance are explored in some detail. This Unit enables students to develop a three-dimensional appreciation of the responses of animals to common interventions that arise in the context of interacting with humans, including the domestication of livestock species and the management of wildlife. The principles of animal responses to stress are illustrated with production species as the main examples.
Contemporary approaches to the scientific measurement of animal stress and welfare, based on an appropriate selection of scientific disciplines including ethology, psychology, physiology and neuroscience, are assessed with an emphasis on livestock species. Genetic, environmental and evolutionary determinants of pain, stress and fear responses in animals are considered in the light of what is known about cognition and motivation in animals. Methods for assessing and enhancing animal environments and husbandry systems are examined and the impact on animal welfare of stockmanship is explored in the context of human-animal interactions. Finally, the design and conduct of scientific experiments are assessed with a focus on animal ethics and current welfare issues.
Advanced Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science includes a compulsory library-based assignment that provides students with an opportunity to select one species on which they report a summary of scientific advances that may contribute to animal welfare.
Other assessment tasks involve the preparation of written or oral reports of the practical class activities
Textbooks
The recommended textbook for the animal structure component of the unit is:
In addition to the coursework units of study offered by the faculty, students may enrol in the following electives from other faculties. Some units of study may require permission from the unit of study coordinator for enrollment.
BETH5000 Critical Concepts in Bioethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert Irvine Session: Semester 2 Classes: 13x2hr seminars or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode. Assumed knowledge: A three-year undergraduate degree in science, medicine, nursing, allied health sciences, philosophy/ethics, sociology/anthropology, history, or other relevant field, or by special permission. Assessment: 1x 750wd review (15%) and 1x 1500wd essay (35%) and 1x 2000-2500wd essay (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Evening or On-line
This unit of study offers a critical review of the field of bioethics. The course canvasses different ways that bioethics is 'made-up' in discourse, thought and practice, and the meaning of 'bioethics' historically and in contemporary society. Mapping some of the key literature on current on-going debates and contentions, the seminars explore different perspectives that people have of bioethics from points within and outside of the discipline and why bioethics and bioethical dilemmas have become important objects of popular and professional concern. Topics include the moral and ethical dimensions of advances in biomedical science and biotechnology, patient privacy and its limits, the virtuous bioethicist, narrative in bioethics, going public in bioethics, bioethics across cultures, feminist bioethics, bioethics and non-human animals, and, environmental bioethics in the clinic and public. Learning activities will include seminars and small group discussion.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a book of readings (in digital format). Supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
BETH5202 Human and Animal Research Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ainsley Newson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x8hr intensive or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode. Assumed knowledge: A three-year undergraduate degree in science, medicine, nursing, allied health sciences, philosophy/ethics, sociology/anthropology, history, or other relevant field, or by special permission. Assessment: Continuous assessment (short weekly tasks) (20%); 1x1500wd briefing paper (30%); 1x2500wd position paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line
This unit of study introduces students to research ethics in its social context. It explores the philosophical underpinnings of the research endeavour including the justifications for engaging in research, research priorities and research integrity. The unit also reviews the history of research and the impact of research abuse on subjects, both human and animal. International and national guidelines for ethical human and animal research will be covered and participants are encouraged to develop practical skills in relation to their own research. The second part of the unit investigates current areas of controversy and public interest in research.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a book of readings (in digital format). Most supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
BETH5203 Ethics and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Ian Kerridge Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x8hr Intensives; or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face block mode. Prohibitions: BETH5206 Assumed knowledge: A three-year undergraduate degree in science, medicine, nursing, allied health sciences, philosophy/ethics, sociology/anthropology, history, or other relevant field, or by special permission. Assessment: Continuous assessment (short weekly tasks) (20%); 1x1000wd essay (30%); 1x2500wd essay (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line
This unit of study provides students with an overview of the broader philosophical, ethical, socio-political and cultural issues that underlie public health and public health research. Students will first review the history of public health and examine the values that underpin health promotion and disease prevention. The second part of the unit examines the place of facts and values in public health and the construction and use of information, with particular reference to evidence-based-medicine. The third part of the unit examines the cultural, moral and social context of public health including the social determinants of health, the construction of health services, the determination of research priorities and issues relating to human rights and global health.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a book of readings (in digital format).
WILD5001 Australasian Wildlife: Introduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mathew Crowther Session: Int August Classes: Intensively taught unit, the remainder of the unit will involve personal study and project activity. See the Wildlife Health and Population Management website for dates. Assessment: Assessments for each unit may include practical work, field studies, student presentations and written reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit of study provides an introduction to the wildlife of Australasia, an overview of the present status of that wildlife, and an understanding of both conservation problems and management solutions. Issues in wildlife management are exemplified using a broad range of vertebrate species occupying different environments. Emphasis is placed on providing students with a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach to wildlife health and management, and on developing expertise in recognising and solving a broad range of problems in field populations. The unit integrates lectures, practical work and supervised study, and offers students the opportunity to work through real-world wildlife conservation problems relevant to their individual backgrounds.
WILD5002 Australasian Wildlife: Field Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mathew Crowther Session: Int Sept Classes: Intensively taught unit. See the Wildlife Health and Population Management website for dates. Assessment: Assessments for each unit may include practical work, field studies, student presentations and written reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit of study provides a first-hand introduction to the wildlife of Australasia, a practical overview of the present status of that wildlife, and an understanding of both conservation problems and management solutions. Issues in wildlife management are exemplified using sampling and diagnostic methods on a broad range of vertebrate species occupying different environments. The unit follows on from WILD5001 and provides practical experience via a five day field trip at the university farm "Arthursleigh" near Marulan NSW.
WILD5003 Wildlife Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof DN Phalen Session: Int Sept Classes: September intensive: 4 days on the Camden campus, one day on the Sydney Campus Assessment: The assessment of this unit occurs both in the full-time week and in individual written assignments done in the student's own time. The full-time week contributes (40%) of the total mark through a group project ending in a presentation to the class. The remaining (60%) comes from a written assignment of 5,000 due 4 weeks after the end of class. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit of study provides an introduction to the health issues confronting wildlife in Australasia, an overview of the health status of that wildlife, and an understanding of both the investigation of health problems and the effective management of these. Issues in wildlife disease management are exemplified using a broad range of vertebrate species occupying different environments. Emphasis is placed on providing students with a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach to wildlife health, and on developing expertise in recognising and solving a broad range of health problems in field populations. The unit is taught intensively in a full-time week on the Camden campus (4 days) and the Sydney Campus (1day). The unit integrates lectures, practical work and supervised study, and offer students the opportunity to work through real-world wildlife conservation problems relevant to their individual backgrounds.
Textbooks
There are no set textbooks for this unit of study.
WILD5004 Vertebrate Pest Management

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Tony Buckmaster Session: Int August Classes: The Unit is taught in a full-time week at the university farm "Arthursleigh" near Marulan NSW. There are lectures, tutorials, and a variety of practical classes. Assessment: The assessment of this unit occurs both in the full-time week and in individual written assignments done in the student's own time. The full-time week contributes (40%) of the total mark through a number of individual and syndicate tasks, with presentations to the group. The remaining 60% comes from two written assignments of 3000 words (20%) and 5000 words (40%) respectively. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Vertebrate pests occur in many parts of the world, and can pose significant problems for management of habitat, agricultural productivity, human and wildlife health. This unit focuses on vertebrates that have been introduced to new environments, and considers in detail the impacts and management of pest vertebrates in Australia. Steps in pest management are reviewed, from problem analysis to acceptable levels of control, using case studies of cane toads, rabbits, house mice and red foxes. Traditional mortality methods of management are reviewed, and emphasis placed on developing methods based on fertility control. The Unit is taught in a full-time week at the university farm "Arthursleigh" near Marulan NSW. There are lectures, tutorials, and a variety of practical classes.
Textbooks
Unit of Study Handbook is the primary reference.
WILD5005 In Situ Wildlife Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mathew Crowther Session: Int October Classes: Intensively taught unit. See the Wildlife Health and Population Management website for dates. Assessment: Assessments for each unit may include practical work, field studies, student presentations and written reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Wildlife populations do not remain static, but change in size and composition over both time and space. The challenge for managers is to recognise when change in target populations exceeds acceptable limits and intervention is necessary. This unit of study develops skills in assessing population status and recognising differences between 'small populations' and 'declining populations'. It introduces methods used in population pattern analysis, demographic analysis, threat and resource assessment, and determination of health, emphasising the value of a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach to problem recognition and resolution. This course is taught at both the Royal National Park and the main campus of the University of Sydney.
WILD5006 Ex Situ Wildlife Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Derek Spielman Session: Int May Classes: The Unit is taught in a full-time week in May at Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo, NSW. Assessment: The assessment of this unit occurs both in the full-time week and in an individual written assignment done in the students' own time. The full-time week contributes (40%) of the total mark through a group presentation on the status in the wild and in captivity of a species in the Taronga Western Plains Zoo. The remaining (60%) comes from a written assignment of 5,000 words on a successful species survival plan that involves a significant ex situ component. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Wildlife populations are under a variety of threats, most of which result from human activities. Modern conservation biology seeks practical solutions to these problems using a wide variety of options. These options may include captive breeding and re-introduction programs, provided that a range of biological, ethical and politico-economic issues are addressed. This unit of study provides students with the tools to evaluate the likely cost-effectiveness of such programs. It also develops knowledge of the technologies available to capture and translocate wildlife, and of the planning required to ensure the best possible chance of success. The unit is taught in a full-time week at Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo, NSW. The unit integrates lectures, tutorials, practical work and site visits and offers students the opportunity to examine real problems in the conservation and management of threatened wildlife populations using relevant case studies.
Textbooks
Unit of Study Handbook is the primary reference.
WILD5009 Research Project

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings throughout semester to be arranged with supervisor. Prerequisites: Credit average or greater in 24 credit points from the program including WILD5001 and WILD5002 Assessment: Independent research project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Core for the Masters program
A valuable opportunity to apply some of the knowledge gained from earlier coursework, WILD5009 comprises a research project on a topic with significant emphasis on wildlife health and/or population management, as arranged between the student and an appropriate supervisor. This research experience is highly valued by prospective employers as it shows a willingness and ability to undertake guided but independent research. The project is not conducted by way of contact hours per week for a semester. Instead the student is expected to work on the project full-time and in a continuous manner for the semester. This unit of study is available only to students enrolled in the Master of Applied Science (Wildlife Health and Population Management).