Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience

Unit of study descriptions

Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience

Year 1

Year 1 has the following 48 credit point structure:
AGEN1001 Shaping our Landscapes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Ampt Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lect, 1x2hr tut, 4x1 day (6.5hr) field (ave 2hrs/week) Prohibitions: AFNR1001 Assessment: 1x 2hr exam (40%), Field class reports (10%), Group work participation (10%), Journal (10%), Problem based learning project (30%) Practical field work: Preparation, revision and private study 3hrs/week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to help students develop understanding of our non-urban landscapes and the physical, biological, economic and cultural factors that have shaped them, with particular emphasis on the interaction between production and environment. It is a core first year unit for students in BScAgr, BEnvSys, BAgrEc, BResEc and BAnVetBioSc. The unit begins with a review of the current global issues around population, food, agriculture and environment and the place of Australia in this global context. Australia's current production (plant and animal based) and environmental systems and landscapes are described with an emphasis on the physical, biological, economic and cultural factors that have shaped them, concluding with an account of future production and environment scenarios. At the end of this unit, students should be able to describe global production and environment issues and key Australian landscapes and production systems, explain the factors that have shaped them and apply this understanding to a specific location and production system. They should analyse the situation of natural resource managers and evaluate the options available to them to maintain or improve profitable production and achieve sustainability. The students will gain research and inquiry skills through research-based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through on-line discussion postings, tutorial discussions and presentations and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups and individually.
Textbooks
To be advised during semester.
AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Irene Van Ekris Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hrs/week (lectures and practicals) Prerequisites: 6 credit points of junior Biology Assessment: practical skills assessment (30%), written assignment (20%), quizzes (50%) Practical field work: There will be several whole day practical classes at the Camden campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the management of animals in natural and man-made environments. At the end of this unit of study, students will understand: the characteristics of the management systems of the major domestic species used for production in Australia and in a world wide context; the characteristics and principles underpinning sustainable management of native animals in natural and man-made environments; an appreciation of the dependence of living organisms upon their environment; an appreciation of the husbandry practices and innovations that have been adopted by the production industries to retain their competitive advantage; a demonstrated capability in handling and husbandry of the major domestic production animal species, and an appreciation of the application of these skills to non-domestic species; a demonstrated understanding of the importance of high standards of animal welfare practice in the management of animals.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the unit content and for this reason no formal text is required. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course.
BIOL1001 Concepts in Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL1101, BIOL1991, BIOL1500, BIOL1901, BIOL1911 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology, however, students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February). Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments tests and lab quizzes (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Concepts in Biology is an introduction to the major themes of modern biology. The unit covers fundamental cell biology, with a particular emphasis on cell structure and function; the foundations of molecular biology from the role of DNA in protein synthesis to the genetics of organisms; and the theory of evolution and principles of phylogenetic analysis, including how these are used to interpret the origins of the diversity of extant organisms. Practical classes focus on students designing experiments, making and recording their observations and communicating their findings. The unit emphasises how biologists carry out scientific investigations, from the molecular and cellular level to the level of ecosystems. This unit of study provides a good foundation for intermediate biology units of study.
Textbooks
Knox R B et al. Biology, An Australian Focus. 4th ed. McGraw-Hill. 2010
OR
BIOL1911 Concepts in Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 80+ in HSC 2-unit Biology (or equivalent) or Distinction or better in a University level Biology unit Prohibitions: BIOL1991, BIOL1901, BIOL1101, BIOL1500, BIOL1001 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, tests, lab quizzes (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Concepts in Biology (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1001 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1901 participate in alternative components, which include a separate lecture and practical stream from BIOL1001. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
As for BIOL1001.
BIOL1002 Living Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr William Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2.5-hour practical per week and tutorials every few weeks. Prohibitions: BIOL1500, BIOL1902; BIOL1992 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology, however, students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February). Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, quizzes (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Living Systems deals with the biology of organisms as individuals, within populations and as part of communities and ecosystems. A broad range of taxa is presented, from bacteria to large plants and animals, and emphasis is placed on understanding the ways in which they can live in different habitats. Behaviour is discussed as a key process linking organismal-level processes to population and community dynamics. The importance of energy in living systems, and how elements are used and recycled in biological communities, are introduced as the basis of ecosystems. The unit of study includes lectures and laboratory classes on the physiology and behaviour of animals and plants, the ways in which organisms control and integrate their activities and the processes controlling dynamics of populations and community. These themes are revisited within applied contexts to discuss issues such as management and conservation. This unit of study provides a good foundation for intermediate biology units of study.
Textbooks
Knox R B et al. Biology. An Australian Focus. 4th ed. McGraw-Hill. 2010.
OR
BIOL1902 Living Systems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr William Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2.5-hour practical per week and tutorials every few weeks. Prerequisites: Distinction or better in the BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993, OR HSC Biology equal to 90 or greater Prohibitions: BIOL1500, BIOL1002; BIOL1992, BIOL1904, BIOL1905 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, quizzes, independent project (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1002 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1902 participate in alternative components, which include a separate lecture and practical stream from BIOL1001 as well as a field trip to collect data for projects. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
As for BIOL1002.
CHEM1001 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1906, CHEM1909, CHEM1901, CHEM1101, CHEM1905, CHEM1109, CHEM1903 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study, but students who have not undertaken an HSC chemistry course are strongly advised to complete a chemistry bridging course before lectures commence. Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignments (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of the unit of study is to provide those students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent) with a good grounding in fundamental chemical principles together with an overview of the relevance of chemistry. There is no prerequisite or assumed knowledge for entry to this unit of study. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
OR
CHEM1101 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1905, CHEM1906, CHEM1903, CHEM1001, CHEM1909, CHEM1109, CHEM1901 Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Mathematics Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry 1A is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC Chemistry course. Chemistry 1A covers chemical theory and physical chemistry. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
CHEM1002 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prerequisites: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or equivalent Prohibitions: CHEM1102, CHEM1902, CHEM1907, CHEM1904, CHEM1108, CHEM1908 Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
CHEM1002 builds on CHEM1001 to provide a sound coverage of inorganic and organic chemistry. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
OR
CHEM1102 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: One 3 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prerequisites: CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or a Distinction in CHEM1001 or equivalent Prohibitions: CHEM1904, CHEM1907, CHEM1902, CHEM1108, CHEM1908, CHEM1002 Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A and covers inorganic and organic chemistry. Successful completion of Chemistry 1B is an acceptable prerequisite for entry into Intermediate Chemistry units of study. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
ENVX1001 Introductory Statistical Methods

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop (Coordinator), Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/wk, 1x1 hr tutorial/wk, 1x2 hr computer practical/wk Prohibitions: MATH1005, BIOM1003, MATH1111, BUSS1020, MATH1015, MATH1001, STAT1022, MATH1011, STAT1021, MATH1906, ECMT1010, MATH1901, MATH1905 Assumed knowledge: 70 or more in HSC Mathematics Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x10%), practical exam (20%), theory exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core first year unit for the BEnvSys, BScAgr and BAnVetBioSc degrees. It provides the foundation quantitative skills that are needed in other units in the degrees and for further study in applied statistics. In the first half of the unit the emphasis is on statistics, topics covered include: describing data and its variability, probability, sampling and estimation, framing scientific hypotheses; estimating a single treatment mean via a confidence interval and testing for a particular mean via a z-test or t-test; estimating or testing the difference between two treatment means. In the second half of the unit the focus is on calculus, the topics being differentiation and integration in single and multiple dimensions. A particular emphasis is on the use of calculus for modelling biological and environmental data, for example the use of linear and non-linear functions. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the spreadsheet package Excel and the statistical package Genstat.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
VETS1018 Animal Bioscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Paul Sheehy Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 33 hrs /student practicals: 9 hrs /student tutorials: 1 hr /student Prerequisites: VETS1032 or BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 Assessment: Group Learning Activity (15%), Mid Semester Exam (20%), Final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The interaction of organic molecules, facilitated by cellular structure and driven by the ability to harness energy from the environment, constitutes the basis of life. The co-ordination and facilitation of these events is due primarily to proteins, which fulfill a variety of roles including the catalysis of chemical reactions (enzymes), as cell structural components and in the transport of signals and solutes. The blueprints for the myriad of protein structures and hence cellular function are stored in the cell nucleus in the form of DNA, as a series of information-carrying segments, or genes.
It is the co-ordinated expression of these genes and the mechanisms that enable the genetic code to be read and interpreted which form the basis of Cell Biology 1B. Of similar importance are the processes of DNA copying for the duplication of cells (mitosis/meiosis) and how these processes may be manipulated to diagnose or alleviate disease (recombinant DNA technology, DNA diagnosis, molecular immunology, cancer etc).
To gain an understanding of the underlying cellular and biochemical principles of disease, therapy and performance of animals and to depict the relevance of these fundamental cellular processes in an applied veterinary and animal science context is also a major goal of Cell Biology 1B.
Textbooks
VETS1018 Animal Bioscience Unit of Study Guide

Year 2

Year 2 has the following 48 credit point structure:
AGEC1006 Economic Environment of Agriculture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prohibitions: AGEC1004, AGEC1003 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: 1x2hr exam (55%) and 1x50 min mid-semester exam (25%) and workshop papers (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To give students an overview of the structure, viability and importance of the agricultural sector in the Australian economy. It is a core unit of study in the BScAgr, BHortSc and BAnVetBioSc degrees. It is designed to give an understanding of the basic economic principles and how they relate to Australian agriculture. Students will look at basic economic theory and concepts and then apply these concepts to solve simplified versions of real problems faced by the agriculture and resource sectors. Students will look at the relationship between these concepts and the concepts learnt within their science related courses. Students will be able to analyse economic concepts and apply these concepts to real world scenarios. They will be able to synthesis and comprehend the relationship between the economic and science disciplines. The students will gain skills through workshop based tasks, information literacy and communication skills through the presentation of the workshop reports and discussion throughout the workshop.
Textbooks
HE Drummond and JW Goodwin, Agricultural Economics, 3rd edn (Prentice-Hall, 2011)
ANSC2005 Australia's Biodiversity in a Changing E

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: David Phalen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 credit points 3 lecture hours and 2-3 hours of practicals or tutorials/week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Junior level Biology units or equivalent; AGEN1001 Prohibitions: ANSC2004; VETS2015 Assumed knowledge: Basic anatomy and physiology and Australian farming systems Assessment: Practical quizzes (20%), Two hour exam (40%), Written assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The first half of this unit of study examines the diversity of terrestrial vertebrates in Australia and how they have adapted anatomically, physiologically and behaviorally to the various challenges of Australia's diverse environments. The second half of the unit of study explores how these vertebrate species are being impacted by the changing environment with special reference to the impact of invasive animals, the development of transportation infrastructure, urbanization, mining, climate change, emerging infectious diseases and globalization. A strong emphasis will be placed on the one health concept of the interrelatedness of biodiversity to ecosystem, domestic animal, and human health. Lastly this unit of study will demonstrate how traditional and new approaches are being applied to mitigate and reverse these impacts. The practical classes will allow students to apply what they have learned in class about the anatomical features of representative Australian vertebrates and relate these structures to the animals' physiological and environmental adaptations. The written assessment will increase the students¿ abilities to search electronic data bases in this field, formulate their ideas and express them in scientific writing style.
Textbooks
Conservation Biology for All. N. S. Sodhi, P. R. Ehrlich (eds). Oxford University Press, 2009. Free access online.
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop (Coordinator), A/Prof Willem Vervoort, A/Prof Peter Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/wk, 1x1 hr tutorial/wk, 1x2 hr computer practical/wk Prerequisites: ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 or MATH1015 Assessment: 1 × Exam during the Exam period (50%), 2 × Practical Tests (2x10%), 2 × Assessment Tasks (2x10%) and 8 Online Quizzes (8x1.25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is a core 2nd year unit for students in the BEnvSys, BScAgr and BAVBSc degrees. It consists of two parts. In the first part students will learn the basics of experimental design and investigate how to use an ANOVA to analyse experiments with more than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part an introduction to a branch of mathematics called linear algebra is given with an emphasis on the applications to statistics and modelling. In this part the students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression, and find patterns in datasets with many variables using principal components. During the practicals two software packages; Genstat and Excel, will be used to analyse real datasets. At the end of this unit, students will have learnt how to design and experiment and how to analyse data using ANOVA, regression and principal components, the basic methods needed for their future studies and careers.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
GENE2001 Agricultural Genetics 2

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Sharp Session: Semester 1 Classes: (3 lec, 3 prac/problem set)/wk Prerequisites: BIOL1001 or BIOL1002 or BIOL1101 or BIOL1901 or BIOL1911 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (60%) and 1x assignment of problem-type questions (20%) 4x on-line quizzes (4x5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This lecture and practical unit of study provides an introduction to the genetics and breeding of plants and animals. It provides an understanding for parallel and following courses. Lectures cover the basics of gene transmission and interaction, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, population and quantitative genetics, as well as the more applied aspects of plant and animal breeding and biotechnology. Practicals emphasise, with agricultural examples, the procedures of genetic and cytogenetic analysis, and the use of computers in simulation procedures in population genetics, quantitative inheritance and selection programs, and provide exposure to current plant and animal breeding and biotechnology.
ANSC3103 Animal Structure and Function A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter White Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3hrs/wk, laboratories/tutorials 3hrs/wk (note these will vary depending upon the week) Prerequisites: 12 credit points of junior Biology Assumed knowledge: AVBS1002 Assessment: assignments/presentations/online quiz (50%) and examinations (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animal Structure and Function A will develop an understanding of the role of the body systems in maintaining homeostasis in an animal's internal environment. In ASFA the structure and function of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, central nervous and integumentary systems of the body are explored in depth particularly with reference to the maintenance of homeostasis and an animal's perception of, and response to, its environment. The developed understanding of the normal functioning of these systems allows identification of the impact on the animal of abnormal function of these systems. A study of the structure and function of muscle will include its role in movement and as meat in a production setting. The overall goals of the Unit are (i) to enable students to develop a rich understanding of the relationships between body systems and structures (to be continued in ASFB). (ii) to develop generic skills particularly in group work and oral presentation,(iii) to develop an appreciation of the links between structure and function and their relevance to animal disease and production that will be further developed in Veterinary Pathogenesis as well as in advanced, applied studies in Behaviour in third year and in 4th year Animal Production.
ANSC3104 Animal Structure and Function B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cathy Herbert Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 3 hrs/wk, laboratories/tutorials 3 hrs/wk, activities will vary on a weekly basis Prerequisites: ANSC3103 Assumed knowledge: AVBS1002 Assessment: anatomy dissection project (20%), topic test (10%), assignment (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this Unit students will complete the study of the structure and function of organ systems in animals started in ANSC3103. The role of hormones and the immune systems will be investigated in relation to maintenance of internal homeostasis. An introduction to digestion and male and female reproductive anatomy and physiology will form the basis for further applied studies in these areas in third year Units of Study in Animal Nutrition and Animal Reproduction. There will be development of the generic skills of critically reading and writing.
Textbooks
For Animal Structure:
AVBS2001 Introductory Veterinary Pathogenesis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Higgins Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hrs/week (lectures and practicals) Prerequisites: (BIOL1001 or BIOL1911) and (BIOL1002 or BIOL1902) and ANSC3103 Corequisites: ANSC3104 Assumed knowledge: (CHEM1101 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1102 or CHEM1002) Assessment: Prac class exercises (15%), mid-semester exam (20%), practical exam (15%), written exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The overarching theme for this unit of study is the concept of the interaction between the host (or the animal), the agent of disease (genetics, physical, chemical and infectious agents) and environmental factors. In disease states, the host responds to the aetiological agent of disease and the environment through one of the basic five pathological processes that occur in tissues. These include inflammation and repair, degeneration and necrosis, circulatory disturbances, tissue deposits and pigments, and disorders of growth. A case based approach will be used whenever possible to illustrate these principles and enable the student to develop a problem solving approach and the skills of critical thinking.
Textbooks
McGavin, MD & Zachary JF 2007, Pathologic Basis of Disease 4th ed., Mosby
VETS1032 Animal Energetics and Homeostasis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Paul Sheehy Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 39 hrs/student practicals: 9 hrs/student tutorials: 1 hr/student Assumed knowledge: HSC level chemistry and/or biology would be an advantage Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x exam (20%) end of semester: 1 x 2 hr written exam (65%) other: 1 x Cytology Group Learning Exercise (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce students to the biology of the cell. Topics include cell structure and cellular metabolism. The cell structure component includes a description of cell membranes and organelles and the cellular metabolism component includes a discussion of metabolic pathways. An introduction to the contribution of the endocrine system to homeostasis of animals via their effects on animal metabolism and physiology will also be described. An understanding of commonly occurring disturbances to the production or action of hormones will be developed with clinical material being used to illustrate normal structure and function.
Textbooks
VETS1032 Animal Energetics and Homeostasis of Study Guide

Year 3

Year 3 has the following 48 credit point structure:

Core

All students complete:
AVBS3000 Professional Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Russell Bush Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6 preparatory workshops/seminars (throughout years 1-3), 4x1 hour industry seminars for case studies (year 3) Assessment: professional experience reports (65%), case studies (20%), essay on current animal issues (15%) Practical field work: 60 days of professional work experience to be completed by the commencement of fourth year Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Students are required to undertake professional development in University vacations as an integral and essential part of their overall training in the degree of Bachelor of Animal and Veterinary Bioscience. Students will complete 60 days of professional work experience throughout their program by the commencement of fourth year, including a minimum of 20 days spent on commercial animal production enterprises. Students will visit at least two different farming enterprises in the major and emerging animal production industries. The remaining 40 days will include at least one placement with an animal-related business or service provider, and experience in either a scientific research organisation or short scientific volunteer position. Students will undertake additional placements at relevant animal or animal-related businesses, farms or organisations as required to complete 60 days. A professional consultant-style report must be submitted after each placement. Seminars to promote awareness of career options and current issues in animal science will be provided on a regular basis by past graduates and other professionals working in the animal industries. Students are encouraged to attend as many of these as possible throughout their degree program, and are required to submit four case studies based on material presented in these seminars. Attendance at seminars is compulsory during third year. Students will also submit an essay on a current issue in the animal science area of their choice.
Textbooks
On-line resource material will be available
For students who elect not to complete a major:
ANSC3101 Animal Nutrition 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alex V. Chaves Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 2 h/week, lecture recording 1h/week and in situ and/or online laboratories 2-3 h/week Prerequisites: AVBS1002, (VETS1032 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901) Corequisites: AVBS2001 or MICR2024 Assessment: Assignments, including 5 individual reports from problem based learning (30%), 1 online middle term exam (35%), 1 oral or video presentation (25%), and 1 online end of term exam (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study builds upon principles discussed in AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management. The Unit is broadly divided into four sections, namely: estimating the nutritive characteristics of feeds; defining the nutrient requirements of animals; diet formulation; errors in feeding. The focus is on coming to an understanding of the assessment of nutritional adequacy and the avoidance and solving of nutritional problems, with a particular emphasis on animals used in agricultural production systems and wildlife. The principles discussed in this course will be expanded in the following year, in which species-specific systems will be described. The basis of successful feeding management is an understanding of the following: the composition of feeds; the digestibility and efficiency of utilisation of nutrients by the animal; the nutrient requirements of the animal; interactions between nutrients that influence health and production. And following from this, students will have the ability to formulate diets to meet animal requirements for a variety of purposes and under a variety of constraints; identify deficiencies, excesses and imbalances in diets and so avoid a decline in productive efficiency and/or a decline in health.
Textbooks
Students are encouraged to have an individual tablet PC or laptop with wireless connectivity (e.g.: ipad; Galaxy Note, etc.) during all classes. There is no required text for the course. A number of textbooks are available on reserve at the library. These include: 1 - Animal Nutrition by McDonald, P., Edwards, R.A., Greenhalgh, J.F.D. and Morgan, C.A. (2002) 6th ed. Pearson Education Limited, Harlow UK. Badham Library Call # 636.0852 3 E 2 - Feeds and Feeding (5th Edition) (Hardcover) by Tilden Wayne Perry, Arthur E. Cullison, Robert S. Lowrey (Authors). Publisher: Prentice Hall; 5 edition (November 19, 1998). Badham Library Call # 636.084 9 B 3 - Animal Feeds, Feeding and Nutrition, and Ration Evaluation CD-ROM (Hardcover) by David Tisch (Author). Publisher: Delmar Cengage Learning; 1 edition (October 5, 2005). Badham Library Call # 636.08557 5 4 - Animal Nutrition Science (Paperback) by G. Dryden (Author) Publisher: CABI; 1 edition (October 5, 2008). Badham Library Call # 636.0852 66 5 - Tables of Composition and Nutritional Value of Feed Materials Pigs, Poultry, Cattle, Sheep, Goats, Rabbits, Horses, Fish By Daniel Sauvant, Jean-Marc Perez, Gilles Tran Publisher: INRA (January, 2004). Badham Library Call # 636.0852 60 National Research Council (NRC) publications describing nutrient requirements of various species may also provide useful information; these publications can all be accessed online and are available on reserve at the library: - Nutrient Requirements of Poultry (NRC, 1994). Badham or Camden 636.50852 4 F - Nutrient Requirements of Swine (NRC, 1998). Badham or Camden 636.40852 7 G - Nutrient Requirements of Dairy Cattle (NRC, 2001). Badham or Camden 636.214 17D - Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle (NRC, 2000). Badham 636.213 27 G - Nutrient Requirements of Horses (NRC, 2007). Badham or Camden 636.10852 5 F There will be copies of this text on reserve and for purchase in the bookstore. Again, it is not essential to buy these text books. All the material required for the course will be presented in lecture and in the lecture notes, but the text may prove useful in understanding the lecture material.
ANSC3102 Animal Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Simon de Graaf Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 2 hrs/week, tutorials 1 hr/week, practicals 3 hrs/week Assumed knowledge: ANSC3104 Assessment: written and oral assignments (30%), mid-semester written exam (10%), end of semester written exam (60%) Practical field work: There will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a comprehensive programme on basic and applied aspects of male and female reproductive biology, with particular emphasis on livestock and domestic animals. The fundamental topics include reproductive cycles, sexual differentiation, gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, gestation and parturition. An understanding of the applications of advanced reproductive technologies is developed through lectures, tutorials and the assignments. In addition, practical instruction is given on semen collection and processing, manipulation of the reproductive cycle, artificial insemination, and pregnancy diagnosis in sheep and pigs. Classes are held at the Camperdown Campus in Sydney and at the Camden Campus Animal Reproduction Unit and Mayfarm piggery.
Textbooks
Senger, PL 2013, Pathways to pregnancy & parturition 3rd ed., Current Conceptions Inc
ANSC3108 Animal Genetics and Genomics 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof. Claire Wade Session: Semester 1 Classes: 6 hours per week mix of on-line/on-campus/excursion Prerequisites: Assumed Knowledge: Knowledge of biology, chemistry, genetics and statistics from, or equivalent to that in, the 1st and 2nd year Units of Study in the degrees in which this Unit is available. Assessment: On-line quizzes (40%), assignment(s) (20%), Practical reports (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This multi-modal unit of study provides experience in topics relating to the breeding of animals and animal genetic research, including domesticated species and populations. Students will have the option to choose two out of four available modules, namely: Companion Animal Breeding and Genetics; Medical and Behavioural Genetics; Food Animal Breeding and Genetics; and/or Gene Mapping. This will allow students the flexibility to choose modules that reflect their career aspirations. This unit will be delivered predominantly in the form of on-line modules, with practical classes and tutorials incorporated to emphasize responsible and effective breeding population management and elementary genetic research practices.
Textbooks
Introduction to Veterinary Genetics
For students who elect to undertake the major, the core 24 credit points for each major are listed in the relevent table. Core units may be taken in either Year 3 or Year 4 depending on prerequisite requirements.
One major may be taken in:
* Animal Genetics and Biotechnology (see list of required core units of study in Table 1)
* Animal Health and Disease (see list of required core units of study in Table 2)
* Animal Production Systems (see list of required core units of study in Table 3)
* Wildlife Conservation (see list of required core units of study in Table 4)

Elective units

Enrolment in elective units is subject to prerequisite and corequisite requirements, prohibitions and timetabling constraints. Special permission may be required to enrol in some units.
AGCH3025 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Foods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Roberts (Coordinator), Prof Les Copeland, Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x4-hr practical fortnightly Prohibitions: AFNR5102, AGCH3017, AGCH3024 Assumed knowledge: Equivalent to 6 credit points of Intermediate Biochemistry or Chemistry Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%) and 6 x lab reports (6x10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to give students an understanding of the properties of food constituents, and the interactions between these constituents during food processing, storage and digestion. The unit will develop an understanding of the relationship between form and functionality of constituents and the concept of fitness-for-purpose (i.e., quality) in converting agricultural products into foods. Students will gain an appreciation of the relationship between chemical composition and properties of macroconstituents (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids) and microconstituents (vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, flavour and anti-nutritional chemicals) and their functions in plant- and animal-based foods. The material presented in lectures and practical classes will enable students to develop research and inquiry skills and an analytical approach in understanding the biochemistry of foods, food processing and storage. On completing this unit, students will be able to describe the chemical and biochemical properties of major food constituents, and demonstrate an understanding of the functionality of these constituents in food processing and nutrition. Students will have gained experience in laboratory techniques used in industry for the analysis of some food products, and information literacy and communication skills from the preparation of practical reports.
Textbooks
Lecture and laboratory notes will be made available through Blackboard. There is no recommended textbook.
AGCH3033 Environmental Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Feike Dijkstra (Coordinator); Dr. Claudia Keitel; Dr. Malcolm Possell A/Prof. Balwant Singh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec & 3hr prac/wk Prerequisites: 12 cp of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: CHEM2404 Assumed knowledge: SOIL2003, LWSC2002 Assessment: Research Proposal (40%), Prac Report (40%), Presentation (15%), Class Participation (5%) Practical field work: Practical reports and essay writing. Preparation reading for practical or field trips, preparation for group presentation, exam preparation. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course provides basic concepts in environmental chemistry underpinning many of the environmental problems humans are faced with, with a focus on agricultural and natural ecosystems.

AGCH3033 is a core unit for the BEnvSys degree and an elective unit suitable for the BScAgr, BResEc and BAnVetBioSc degrees, building on intermediate units in chemistry and biology.
Sources, reactions and fate of chemical species will be investigated in air, water, soil and biota. Case studies about human impacts on the environment will be integrated in the lectures, laboratory classes and field trip.
At the end students have an understanding of chemical concepts that are at the root of many environmental problems in agricultural and natural ecosystems. This unit will provide students with tools to identify and assess the chemistry behind environmental problems and will guide students in developing methods to manage these problems.
Students will enhance their skills in problem definition, assessing sources of information, team-work and effectively communicating environmental issues from a chemical perspective through laboratory reports and oral presentation.
Textbooks
Reference Books: Andrews et al. 2004. An Introduction to Environmental Chemistry.
AGEC2101 Market and Price Analysis

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Shyamal Chowdhury Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: AGEC1006 or (AGEC1003 and AGEC1004) or AGEC1002 or AGEC1102 or RSEC1031 or AGEC1031 Prohibitions: AGEC2001 Assessment: 1x1hr in-class mid-term exam (20%), 1x3000wd assignment (20%), 1x2hr final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on the nature of agricultural and resource commodity markets, market demand relationships, market supply relationships, price determination under alternative market structures, marketing margin relationships, derived demand for inputs, spatially and temporally related markets, market dynamics, price expectations, commodity futures markets and other pertinent topics. Applied examples from the agricultural and resource industries and the overall economy will be used throughout the semester as illustrations of the principles involved.
N.B. Available to 2nd year students in Faculty of Economics and Business.
Advised prerequisite: AGEC2105 or ECMT2110
AGEC2102 Agribusiness Marketing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Ubilava Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/fortnight Prerequisites: AGEC1006 or AGEC1102 or RSEC1031 Assessment: Group presentation (15%), 1x2000wd case study (25%), and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide an introductory understanding of agribusiness marketing in a modern context. The unit will provide students in the Sciences degrees with an understanding of how the economic theory taught in first year in AGEC1006 can be treated in an applied context. For BAgrEc students, it is an intermediate level unit in the Agribusiness major.
Students will study the theory relating to the firm-level marketing mix and marketing strategy. The emphasis will be on the organisation and trends of agribusiness marketing including value-adding and market power in the supply chain, market efficiency and international marketing by agribusiness firms.
The unit content is analytical, and draws on applied microeconomics to demonstrate how marketing decisions are made along the marketing chain. At the end of this unit students will be able to use marketing theory to analyse the steps in the marketing chain and be aware of the forces for change within that chain.
By completing this unit, students should have improved their ability to master key theories, identify and frame problems, organise knowledge, carry out individual and group research, and synthesise information. They should also have improved their information literacy skills, and communication skills through group presentations and individual research.
AGEC2103 Production Economics

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: ECON1001 or AGEC1006 or (AGEC1003 and AGEC1004) or RESEC1031 Prohibitions: AGEC2003 Assessment: 2 x assignments (40%) and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on microeconomic principles studied in first year and applies them to the analysis of firms' decisions. Emphasis is put on the formalization of the firm's problem and in the use of duality. The topics include: production functions (single and multi-output); distance functions and their use in the measurement of productivity; the decomposition of productivity and productivity changes; production under risk; cost and profit functions.
N.B. Available to 2nd year students in the Faculty of Economics and Business
Textbooks
Collection of readings
AGEC3101 Agribusiness Management

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: AGEC2103 or AGEC2003 or AGEC1006 Prohibitions: AGEC3001, AGEC1102, AGEC3103 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%) and 1x50 min mid-semester exam (15%) and 1 assignment (25%) and workshop reports (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to introduce decision making problems encountered by firms and agribusiness firms and general methods of solving microeconomic decision making problems. It is unit of study that builds on knowledge gained in junior units of study in particular AGEC1006, AGEC2103 and AGEC2102. Students will review production economics and activity analysis and show how budgeting methods can be used to relate them. They will extend these budgeting techniques to problems of time and risk, using capital and parametric budgeting. Students will also be introduced to linear programming and show how this tool is a practical method of solving decision making problems. Students will learn to consider methods for solving decision making problems where the outcomes are not known with certainty. The students will gain skills through workshop based tasks, an assignment, information literacy and communication skills through the presentation of the workshop reports and discussion throughout the workshop.
AGRO3004 Managing Agro-Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Brett Whelan (Coordinator), Dr Daniel Tan, Dr Lachlan Ingram, Prof. Michael D¿Occhio. Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture/wk; 1x 2hr tutorial/practical each week. Half-day field trips during weeks 3. 9, 10, 11 (no lecture or tutorial those weeks). Prerequisites: (BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or PLNT2003 or AGEN 2001) and SOIL2003. Assessment: 3x quizzes (30%), 1 x Viva Voce (30%), 1x 2hr exam (40%). Practical field work: Half-day field trips during weeks 3. 9, 10, 11 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide a solid introductory understanding of the biology and management of cropping systems, with a focus on major Australian broad acre crops. The course examines a typical crop cycle, with an emphasis on cereals, especially wheat. An overview of the main crops grown in Australia is presented. The relationship between crop growth and soil and aerial environments is discussed, and the importance of water and water-use efficiency is highlighted. The physiology of crops--including germination, photosynthesis, vegetative and reproductive growth and development, transpiration, photosynthate partitioning, and mineral nutrient acquisition and use--is studied as the basis of crop yield and production. Biological processes associated with seed (grain) development are described. Weed management, pasture management, and precision agriculture are discussed in theoretical and practical terms, and an introduction to crop adaptation and breeding is presented. Successful students will attain the ability to appreciate and analyse some of the most important limitations to crop yield and production in Australia and how those limitations can be minimized or overcome through science-based planning and management practices.
Textbooks
Reference Books;
AGRO4005 Livestock Production Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Luciano A. Gonzalez Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 x 1 hr/week and practicals/tutorials 3 hr/week Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Biology or equivalent Assumed knowledge: Junior plant and animal biology (or equivalent), junior chemistry biology, intermediate crop and animal production, nutrition and physiology (or equivalent). Assessment: Mid-term exam (15%), final exam (30%), practical reports (10%), case study assignment (40%), seminar presentation (5%). Practical field work: At least 4 visits to livestock enterprises and the supply chain Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit examines livestock production following a whole system approach by integrating animals, vegetation, environment (soil, water, air and climate) and management, and analysing the interactions between them. The unit builds on principles delivered in core (AGEN1001, AGEN1004 and AGEN2006) and elective (ANSC3101, AVBS4012) units of study for those students interested in pursuing a career in Animal Science. The focus of this unit is on beef cattle and sheep. Particularities and commonalities of these livestock systems will be presented.
The pasture/grassland section examines the relationship between livestock production, forage quality and quantity in both native and sown pastures, impact of weeds, and grazing management. Interactions between climate, forage and animal production are also addressed. The animal component of this unit integrates concepts in grazing ecology, nutrition, reproduction, animal behaviour and welfare, and economics to develop skills in managing the production process for improved productivity, production efficiency and environmental stewardship. A special characteristic of this unit is the strong focus on simulation models decision support systems, and new technologies. Computer-based and field classes will provide direct experience in business management of livestock production systems and skills in record keeping and data handling. Students completing this unit will acquire skills to examine and manage livestock enterprises following a whole-system approach required in roles as consultants, advisors or managers of sustainable livestock enterprises.
Teaching Staff: A/Professor Luciano Gonzalez (Coordinator), Dr Lachlan Ingram.
ANSC3105 Animal Biotechnology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Prof. Peter Williamson Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 3 hrs/wk, tutorials 1 hr/wk, seminars/workshops 0.25 hrs/wk, laboratories 0.5 hrs/wk Prerequisites: AVBS1002 and GENE2001 Assessment: seminars (20%), essay (20%), 2 hr exam (60%) Practical field work: excursions, self-directed learning, supervised reading, computer aided instruction 1.25 hrs/wk Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Lectures, tutorials, laboratories (PCR, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics), seminars and supervised reading and directed learning instruction will cover the application of biotechnology to animal productivity, disease control, the development of new products from animals and the impact of altered micro-organisms and plants on animals. A firm foundation in molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology is provided, with an emphasis on relevance in animals. Regulation of gene expression in vivo and in expression systems, monitoring of gene expression including microarrays and proteomics, gene mapping, genomics, including nextgen sequencing, and gene discovery are all discussed in contexts relevant to domestic animals. Genetic modifications of animals including transgenesis and gene knockout, and methods for achieving these modifications including cloning by nuclear transfer are detailed. Basic skills in bioinformatics are developed to access and utilise the vast information resources available. Legal methods of protecting intellectual property are described. Finally animal biotechnology is reviewed from an ethical perspective. Animal Biotechnology explores alternative and complementary technologies to the breeding technologies covered in the core Animal Genetics unit of study.
ANSC3109 Animal Genetics and Genomics 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jaime Gongora Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hours per week mix of on-line/on-campus/excursion Prerequisites: Assumed Knowledge: Knowledge of biology, chemistry, genetics and statistics from, or equivalent to that in, the 1st and 2nd year Units of Study in the degrees in which this Unit is available. Assessment: On-line quizzes (40%), assignment(s) (20%), Practical reports (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This multi-modal unit of study provides experience in topics relating to animal genetic research and animal population assessment and management, including domesticated or managed 'wild' species and populations. Students will have the option to choose two out of four available modules, namely: Domestic animal population and immunogenetics; Wildlife Conservation Genetics; Emerging issues in genetics and/or Comparative Genomics and Sequence Analysis. This unit will be delivered predominantly in the form of on-line modules, with practical classes and tutorials incorporated to emphasize population management to maintain genetic health and diversity and analytical sequencing methods to assess population diversity.
AVBS3001 Agents of Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gary Muscatello Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3hrs/wk, laboratories/tutorials 2hrs/wk, group work 1hr/wk Prerequisites: AVBS2001 Assumed knowledge: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-2 Assessment: 1500wd individual review (25%), 1000wd scenario-based group assignment (15%), 2hr exam (50%), MCQ (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to examine and appreciate the diversity of various disease causing agents (microbiological and parasitological) of significance to animal industries and the various strategies employed by those agents in the host-pathogen-environment interaction. This study is based on an understanding of the physical, chemical and genetic characteristics of infectious agents of disease and builds on the pathological and immunological processes taught in AVBS2001 Introductory Veterinary Pathogenesis. A scenario/case based approach will be used whenever possible to enable the students to develop problem solving approaches and skills in critical thinking. Cases selected will be those that best illustrate particular concepts and/or are of particular significance to the animal/veterinary industry. Research and industry focus activities will infuse the subject content and student learning outcomes of this unit. This unit is located at the Camperdown campus.
Textbooks
A unit of study handbook and CE6 e-learning site will contain detailed information and notes for this unit.
AVBS3002 Laboratory Disease Investigation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Higgins Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 2 hrs/wk, laboratories/tutorials 4 hrs/wk (note these will vary depending upon the week) Prerequisites: AVBS2001, AVBS3001 Assumed knowledge: (CHEM1101 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1102 or CHEM1002), BIOL1001 and BIOL1002, ANSC3103 and ANSC3104 and (BIOM2001 or ENVX2001) Assessment: assignments (60%), quiz (15%), theory exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to develop an investigative approach and familiarity with laboratory techniques, ethics and safety in preparation for honours or postgraduate training in disease research or disease investigation. Students will work through actual disease research or investigation scenarios via directed and self-directed, individual and group tasks.
Textbooks
There is no set text for this unit. Students will use primary literature and source various library texts as required for their investigations.
AVBS3003 Wildlife Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Catherine Herbert Session: Semester 1 Classes: Variable (see timetable), including 2-3hr/wk of lectures, 6 x 3 hr tutorials, one compulsory 2-day field trip (either on a weekend or during the mid semester break) Prerequisites: 24CP from second year core units of study Assumed knowledge: All core Units of Study in Year 1 and 2 of BAnVetBioSc degree or equivalent. Assessment: Written and oral group project (20%); written assignment (20%); tutorial participation (10%); Field trip report (10%); end of semester 2hr exam (40%); compulsory 2-day field trip. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study describes and evaluates key contemporary challenges faced by wildlife management professionals and conservation biologists. A key component of the course is to give students an appreciation of different stakeholder perspectives in wildlife management and how rigorous scientific method can be used to inform wildlife management decisions, using contemporary examples. This unit of study also explores the techniques and methods for undertaking wildlife research, with an emphasis on terrestrial vertebrate species. On completion of this unit, students will have experience in articulating and acknowledging various stakeholder views, both orally and in written form, and understand the processes involved in formulating an evidence-based management approach to contentious wildlife management scenarios.
Textbooks
Students should consult lecturers for recommended reading
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
Textbooks
Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3010 Tropical Wildlife Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Greenless Session: Intensive February Classes: 5-day Field School, followed by 5 days of classes at Sydney University. Prerequisites: 12cp Intermediate BIOL; or 6cp Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL2010, BIOL3910, BIOL2910 Assessment: One 2-hour theory exam, one 1-hour practical exam, one 2000-word report, one 3000-word paper, one 15-minute oral presentation (100%). Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit runs in February. It cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. The unit is only available in ODD years (2015, 2017…) but students may apply for entry into an alternative Intermediate field unit in EVEN years..
Australia has a unique terrestrial vertebrate fauna, but also has the worst record of recent mammalian extinctions. Because of Australia's unusual climate, landforms, and the rarity of many species, the management of our native wildlife presents special challenges for biologists, conservationists and land managers. This unit of study addresses the biogeography, ecology and management of Australia's terrestrial fauna. The subject comprises of a five-day field course at Mary River Park in the Northern Territory. During the course, students will learn how to carry out wildlife surveys, how to identify animals, how to track wildlife, and how to design and complete a field experiment. The field trip will be complemented by guest lectures from experts in the fields of evolution, ecology and wildlife management. A one day field trip to Litchfield National Park will be held on the last day of the field course.
BIOL3013 Marine Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ross Coleman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 4-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) Prohibitions: BIOL3913 Assessment: Practical reports, data exercises and exams (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We will examine in detail processes that are important for the establishment and maintenance of marine communities. Lectures will expose students to the key ideas, researchers and methodologies within selected fields of marine biology. Laboratory sessions and field excursions will complement the lectures by providing students with hands-on experience with the organisms and the processes that affect them. Students will develop critical analysis and scientific writing skills while examining the current literature.
ENTO2001 Introductory Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tanya Latty Session: Semester 2 Classes: (2x1hour lecture, 1x3hour practical, 1x1hour insect collection)/week, commencing week 1. Prerequisites: 12 cp of first year biology Prohibitions: BIOL2917, BIOL2017 Assessment: 1 x 2hr exam (50%), lab quizzes and manual (20%), 1 x insect collection (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an introduction to insects, the most abundant group of organisms. The course begins with insect external and internal anatomy, feeding modes, life cycles and behaviour. Real world examples are used to demonstrate the ecological roles insects play in natural and agricultural ecosystems (e.g. pollinators, herbivores, predators, parasitoids, disease vectors). This knowledge is then linked to aspects of applied entomology: insecticides, biological control, habitat manipulation, integrated pest management, medical entomology and insect conservation. Practical sessions focus on insect morphology and taxonomy, so that students learn to identify common insect orders and families. Students must make a representative insect collection. This course forms the basis of students' entomological knowledge for BScAgr and BHortSc degrees and lays the foundation for future study in entomology.
Textbooks
Required: Zborowski, P. & Storey, R. 1995. A field guide to insects in Australia. Reed New Holland, Sydney. 207 pp.
ENVI3112 Environmental Assessment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Phil McManus Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2-hour lecture per week and one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (GEOS2121 or GEOS2921) and 6 additional credit points of intermediate units Prohibitions: ENVI3912, ENVI3004, ENVI3002 Assessment: Literature review, individual report, presentation (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on environmental impact assessment as part of environmental planning. It seeks to establish a critical understanding of environmental planning and the tools available to improve environmental outcomes. The unit of study addresses the theory and practice of environmental impact statements (EIS) and environmental impact assessment processes (EIA) from scientific, economic, social and cultural value perspectives. Emphasis is placed on gaining skills in group work and in writing and producing an assessment report, which contains logically ordered and tightly structured argumentation that can stand rigorous scrutiny by political processes, the judiciary, the public and the media.
ENVX3002 Statistics in the Natural Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop (Coordinator), Dr Floris Van Ogtrop (Coordinator). A/Prof Peter Thompson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2 hr workshop/wk, 1x3 hr computer practical/wk Prerequisites: ENVX2001 or BIOM2001 or STAT2012 or STAT2912 or BIOL2022 or BIOL2922 Assessment: 1 × Exam during the Exam period (50%), 5 × Assessment Tasks (5x10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the analysis of data they may face in their future careers, in particular data that are not well behaved, they may be non-normal, there may be missing observations or they may be correlated in space and time. In the first part, students will learn how to analyse and design experiments based on the general linear model. In the second part, they will learn about the generalisation of the general linear model to accommodate non-normal data with a particular emphasis on the binomial and poisson distributions, in addition to modelling non-linear relationships. In the third part linear mixed models will be introduced which provide the means to analyse datasets that do not meet the assumptions of independent and equal errors, for example data that is correlated in space and time. At the end of this unit, students will have learnt a range of advanced statistical methods and be equipped to apply this knowledge to analyse data that they may encounter in their future studies and careers.
Textbooks
Recommended readings:
SOIL2003 Soil Properties and Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Balwant Singh (Coordinator), Prof Alex McBratney, A/Prof. Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures and 1x3hr practical/week, commencing week 1, and a compulsory field excursion to be held on the Thursday and Friday in the week preceding the first semester. Assessment: Soil description report (10%), Quizzes (or Essay) (15%), Practical exercise book (20%), Practical exam (15%) and Written exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts within pedology, soil physics and soil chemistry. These concepts are part of the grounding principles that underpin crop and animal production, nutrient and water cycling, and environmental sustainability taught by other units of study in the Faculty. Students will participate in a two-day field excursion in the first week of semester to examine some common soils of the Sydney Basin, they will also learn to describe soil, and measure soil chemical and physical properties in the field. Referring to common soil profiles of the Sydney Basin, students will concentrate on factors affecting soil formation, the rudiments of soil description, and analysis of soil properties that are used in soil classification. Students will also develop knowledge of the physics of water and gas movement, soil strength, soil chemical properties, inorganic and organic components, nutrient cycles and soil acidity in an agricultural context. At the end of this unit students will become familiar with the factors that determine a soil's composition and behaviour, and will have an understanding of the most important soil physical and chemical properties. Students will develop communication skills through essay, report and practical exercises. The final report and laboratory exercise questions are designed to develop team work and collaborative efforts.
Textbooks
Campbell, K.O. & Bowyer, J.W. (eds) (1988). The Scientific Basis of Modern Agriculture. Sydney University Press.

Year 4

Coursework

Enrolment in elective units is subject to prerequisite and corequisite requirements, prohibitions and timetabling constraints.
AGRO4005 Livestock Production Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Luciano A. Gonzalez Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 x 1 hr/week and practicals/tutorials 3 hr/week Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Biology or equivalent Assumed knowledge: Junior plant and animal biology (or equivalent), junior chemistry biology, intermediate crop and animal production, nutrition and physiology (or equivalent). Assessment: Mid-term exam (15%), final exam (30%), practical reports (10%), case study assignment (40%), seminar presentation (5%). Practical field work: At least 4 visits to livestock enterprises and the supply chain Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit examines livestock production following a whole system approach by integrating animals, vegetation, environment (soil, water, air and climate) and management, and analysing the interactions between them. The unit builds on principles delivered in core (AGEN1001, AGEN1004 and AGEN2006) and elective (ANSC3101, AVBS4012) units of study for those students interested in pursuing a career in Animal Science. The focus of this unit is on beef cattle and sheep. Particularities and commonalities of these livestock systems will be presented.
The pasture/grassland section examines the relationship between livestock production, forage quality and quantity in both native and sown pastures, impact of weeds, and grazing management. Interactions between climate, forage and animal production are also addressed. The animal component of this unit integrates concepts in grazing ecology, nutrition, reproduction, animal behaviour and welfare, and economics to develop skills in managing the production process for improved productivity, production efficiency and environmental stewardship. A special characteristic of this unit is the strong focus on simulation models decision support systems, and new technologies. Computer-based and field classes will provide direct experience in business management of livestock production systems and skills in record keeping and data handling. Students completing this unit will acquire skills to examine and manage livestock enterprises following a whole-system approach required in roles as consultants, advisors or managers of sustainable livestock enterprises.
Teaching Staff: A/Professor Luciano Gonzalez (Coordinator), Dr Lachlan Ingram.
ANSC3106 Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Greg Cronin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hrs/wk (including lectures, demonstrations, discussions and practical activities) Prerequisites: AVBS1002 Prohibitions: VETS3018 Assessment: assignments/presentations (50%), theory exam (50%) Practical field work: A full day excursion to the Camden campus, and full day excursions to Symbio wildlife zoo and a centre involved in training racehorses Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3 builds on the understanding of animal form and operation that students have developed in prior Units. In Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3, the behavioural and physiological responses of mammals, birds and fish to stressors related to husbandry, housing, transport, slaughter, training and performance are explored in some detail. This Unit enables students to develop a three-dimensional appreciation of the responses of animals to common interventions that arise in the context of interacting with humans, including the domestication of livestock species and the management of wildlife. The principles of animal responses to stress are illustrated with production species as the main examples.
Contemporary approaches to the scientific measurement of animal stress and welfare, based on an appropriate selection of scientific disciplines including ethology, psychology, physiology and neuroscience, are assessed with an emphasis on livestock species. Genetic, environmental and evolutionary determinants of pain, stress and fear responses in animals are considered in the light of what is known about cognition and motivation in animals. Methods for assessing and enhancing animal environments and husbandry systems are examined and the impact on animal welfare of stockmanship is explored in the context of human-animal interactions. Finally, the design and conduct of scientific experiments are assessed with a focus on animal ethics and current welfare issues.
Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science 3 includes a compulsory library-based assignment that provides students with an opportunity to select one species on which they report a summary of scientific advances that may contribute to animal welfare.
Other assessment tasks involve the preparation of written or oral reports of the practical class activities. Students are expected to be familiar with press articles and scientific papers on the topic of animal welfare and to contribute to classroom discussions.
Textbooks
The recommended textbook for the animal structure component of the unit is:
AVBS4001 Animal Health and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Muir Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3.5 hrs/wk lectures, 0.5 hr/wk tutorials, 2 hrs/wk practical (on average) Prerequisites: ANSC3104, AVBS3001, (Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3) Assessment: participation in field trips (pass/fail), assignments (50%), 1.5 hr exam (50%) Practical field work: 2 day field trip to Arthursleigh farm Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study extends your understanding of animal health from knowledge gained in units completed in earlier years, including AVBS2001 Introduction to Veterinary Pathogenesis and AVBS3001 Agents of disease. In particular we look at general aspects of animal health and disease in terms of epidemiology, exotic/emergency diseases of risk to Australia and principles of vaccines and vaccinations. Health and disease issues relevant to various species, including sheep, cattle, pigs, poultry, fish and wildlife are presented by experts in these fields. A range of management and interventional strategies that are currently in use to minimise the impact of disease are also discussed. After completing this Unit of Study, students will demonstrate an understanding of:
the principles of animal management that are implemented to optimise health and to reduce the incidence and severity of disease; the fundamental principles of disease in animal populations; specific infectious diseases of consequence for growth, reproduction and for the production of meat, wool, milk and eggs; approaches to their control and prevention through environmental and nutritional management, and interventional techniques such as vaccination programmes. These are considered in the context of commercial animal production and the health of wildlife animals. A two day field trip to Arthursleigh farm which focuses on the management of sheep, cattle and wildlife, and a visit to the research and development field station of an international animal health company reiterate many aspects of the unit of study.
Textbooks
Students are advised to consult lecturers for recommended texts
AVBS4002 Dairy Production and Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Sergio (Yani) Garcia. Participating staff: Assoc. Prof. Kendra Kerrisk, Dr Pietro Celi, Dr Cameron Clark, Assoc. Prof. John House, Nicolas Lyons, Victoria Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures up to 3 hrs/wk, practicals 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: Assumed Knowledge: Enrolled students are expected to have some understanding of key components of the dairy production system, including basic knowledge of animal physiology and nutrition. Assessment: Whole farm professional report (30%), Pracs assessments, (30%), 1 hr exam (40%) Practical field work: Visit to commercial dairy farms and different systems of production in 3 or 4 regions of NSW (a minimum of 8 commercial farms will be visited during the semester) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the various aspects of dairy farming and the dairy industry from a scientific point of view. The lectures are a mix of the principles on which sound dairy farming is based and practical examples of how this operates in practice. Focus is placed on integrating knowledge to gain understanding on the system of production as a whole.
At the end of this unit of study, students will demonstrate a solid understanding of: the characteristics of the dairy industry in Australia and in a world wide context; the key components of pasture-based dairy systems; principles and practices of pasture and feeding management; the application of new technologies to improve efficiency and productivity (particularly automatic milking).
In addition, students will demonstrate an appreciation of key aspects of reproduction and lactation physiology; the integration of knowledge of genetics and reproduction into the type of herd improvement structure set up in the dairy industry; the application of ruminant physiology knowledge to developing feeding programs for dairy cows; the extension of basic reproductive physiology onto the dairy farm using case studies as examples; the economics of the dairy farm business. Practical classes include milking cows; grazing and feeding management of dairy cows; calf rearing; and visits to commercial farms ranging from small pasture-based dairy farms to a feed-lot operation milking over 2,000 cows.
Note 1: Pracs assessments marks will be a combination of assistance (0.4) and completion of short questionaries about the prac or the farm visit (0.6)
Note 2: the professional report is basically a dairy system planning exercise reported in a professional (non academic) style. Students will be given budgeting tools and full explanations to assist with this task at the beginning of the course. The report is individual although this may depend on number of students enrolled.
AVBS4003 Wildlife and Evolutionary Genetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jaime Gongora Session: Semester 2 Classes: Variable consisting of up to 6hrs/week (students advised to consult weekly timetable) of lectures, tutorials, computer simulations and practical classes. This unit will be taught at the Camperdown campus Prerequisites: ANSC3107, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 Assessment: written and oral assignment (30%), practical reports/class contribution (20%), final written exam (50%) Practical field work: Field trips to the Tempe Lands site and Lane Cove National Park Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on the role and animal and veterinary biosciences in the field of wildlife management. The unit encourages an approach that spans management, wildlife biology and laboratory sciences. In recognition of the power of genetics as a tool in wildlife management and research, a large component of this course reviews fundamental genetic principals and their application in the disciplines of molecular, evolutionary and conservation genetics and focuses on how we use genetic theory and knowledge to better understand and conserve our wildlife.
At the end of this unit of study, students will demonstrate an understanding of: important issues in wildlife management in Australia and the Asia-pacific region; project management as it applies to multifaceted wildlife research and management issues; application of a range of genetic and physiological methods to the study of ecological issues; the use of appropriate analytical methods and molecular markers in wildlife conservation and management; the underlying genetic structural design of the natural world and how this reflects and influences evolutionary processes in healthy and diseased populations; the use of molecular information to test hypotheses about evolutionary, ecological and social structure of species; how to critically review the ways in which genetic principals are applied to the management and conservation of species; the use of appropriate analytical methods and molecular markers in wildlife conservation and management; how to conduct an investigation into a management problem in wildlife including project design and management recommendations.
Students are expected to immerse themselves into the field of conservation, evolutionary genetics and wildlife to develop the ability to critically evaluate the subject. There will be a substantial amount of reading required for the course. There is no formal text; students will be directed to a recommended reading list of both primary and secondary literature.
Textbooks
Primary reading material (Journals):
AVBS4004 Food Safety Assessment and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gary Muscatello Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 3 hrs/wk, tutorial/practicals 2 hrs/wk Prerequisites: AVBS3001, AVBS4001, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 Assessment: 1000wd individual report (20%), 1000wd group assignment (20%), 2hr exam (50%), MCQ (10%) Practical field work: 2 field trips (compulsory) 16 hrs total Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study focuses on the issues and practices in the animal industry relevant to food safety and zoonotic disease. This unit will cover general food safety issues, including risk assessment and hazard analysis of microbes and chemicals. Food-borne diseases of animal origin and their impact on public heath will be explored through the examination of zoonotic diseases in scenario-based learning activities. In these processes diagnostic and strategic methods of investigating, controlling and preventing food-borne disease outbreaks will be explored. Students will be introduced to national and international animal and human health policy pertaining to food safety regulations and surveillance initiatives and strategies that underpin these policies. Students in this unit will be introduced to the issues regarding emerging food-borne pathogens and current industry driven topics. By the end of the unit, students should have global and local perspective on the major food-borne diseases, surveillance and control programs. This unit is located at the Camden Campus.
Textbooks
Torrence ME & Isaacson RE (eds) 2003, Microbial food safety in animal agriculture current topics, Iowa State Press, Ames, Iowa
AVBS4005 Feed Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: To be advised Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: ANSC3101, (Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3) Assessment: poster (10%), oral presentation (10%), article (20%), lab book and feed formulation exercise (20%), two hour written exam (40%) Practical field work: Practicals/field work 3hrs/wk Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Feed accounts for approximately 70% of the input costs associated with animal industries, including both monogastric (poultry and pigs, laboratory animals) ruminants (feedlot cattle and sheep) and caecal fermenters (horses, rabbits). The "feed industry" is described as the largest supporting industry for animal agriculture and is a major employer of graduates (undergraduate and postgraduate). Feed technology is a broad topic and includes aspects of feed ingredient characteristics, feed manufacturing, feed additive biotechnology and applied nutrition. The course will provide in-depth understanding of the feed industry, factors influencing ingredient variability and availability (physical and economic), methods and applications of processing of ingredients to increase nutritional value, assessment of digestibility, and feed additives and supplements. All facets of the production and regulation of feed production will be discussed relative to their importance in animal agriculture and food production. Expect applied practical information as well as fairly detailed nutritional biochemistry.
Textbooks
Leeson, S & Summers, JD Commercial Poultry Nutrition
AVBS4008 Intensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Downing Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hrs/wk Prerequisites: (Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3) OR (Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3) Assessment: Written exam (50%) (Poultry and Pigs 50:50), in course evaluations and case study - Pigs (25%), Broiler growth study report and in course evaluations - Poultry (25%) Practical field work: Visits to an intensive pig/poultry farm, feed mill and poultry production and processing units when biosecurity restrictions allow Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is composed of two parts, a Poultry Production component and a Pig Production component. The course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the production of eggs and poultry meat and pork. The individual components examine various aspects of the poultry and pig production systems important in maintaining efficiency and profitability. It investigates aspects of breeding, nutrition, housing, growth performance, heath, welfare, reproductive capability, waste management, marketing and current industry issues. This unit will expand on some aspects of previous year 3 units of study in animal structure and function, nutrition and reproduction. There is a broiler growth study which comprises a significant part of the practical work in the Poultry component. There is a strong emphasis on assessment being built into the course work as this is considered to be more relevant to learning in the final year.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the Australian pig industry and for this reason no formal text is required. There are many sites (industry, academic institutions and government departments) on the Web which provide excellent information. Links to these will be provided. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course. Often poultry specific text books are obsolete very quickly, it would be important to use trade information. The library subscribes to breeder management guides and general poultry production journals as well as specific poultry scientific journals.
AVBS4009 Aquaculture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joy Becker Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2hrs/wk, tutorials 1hr/wk, practicals 3hrs/wk Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 Assessment: written and/or oral assignments (40%), written practical report (20%), exam 2 hrs (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Unit of Study explores in detail aspects of commercial aquaculture, including global trends in aquaculture development. Other topics include water quality, feeding, management, health and disease, genetics and reproduction, environmental impact and economic constraints to production. The unit of study emphasises methods to improve aquacultural productivity. It builds on basic principles of anatomy, physiology, nutrition, genetics and health and disease presented in other units of study in BAnVetBioSc. At the end of this Unit of Study, students will demonstrate an understanding of the principles of: the context of aquaculture in global food production; husbandry, management and welfare of aquaculture species; comparative aspects of husbandry in aquaria, domestic, commercial; health and disease relevant to aquaculture; nutrition of aquaculture species; reproduction and genetics of species in aquaculture; water quality and environmental impact of aquaculture; economics and marketing of aquaculture products.
AVBS4012 Extensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Russell Bush Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3hrs/wk, practicals 3hrs/wk Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 Assessment: case study (10%), practical report (15%), meat grading (15%), excursion report (20%) and written exam (40%) Practical field work: 5 day study tour to the Riverina Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the concepts of sheep (wool and meat) and beef cattle production in the Australian environment within the context of world food and fibre consumption and production. The key products as well as domestic and export markets for these are presented. The course provides an historical perspective of the basis for each of these industries and describes each of the production systems designed to meet the demand for these products.
Production in both the tropical and temperate regions of Australia will be covered and include the key elements of extensive grazing and intensive feedlot systems. Major issues will include breeds and breeding systems, basic nutrition and production practices and animal welfare issues as they affect the quality and quantity of product marketed.
The concepts of first stage processing of both meat and fibre products in abattoirs and top-making plants respectively will be presented. The major factors that influence the quality of product and therefore grading and market demand will be presented.
Lecture material will be supported with appropriate practical classes and a 5 day study tour to the Riverina to evaluate different commercial production systems. Students will also have an opportunity to compete in the annual Inter Collegiate Meat Judging (ICMJ) competition as a member of the University of Sydney team. This competition involves teams from numerous universities throughout Australia as well as Japan and the USA.
AVBS4019 Equine Science and Industry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Natasha Hamilton Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 2hrs/wk; practicals/tutorials/discussion activities 3-4 hrs/wk Prerequisites: Year 1-3 Animal and Veterinary Bioscience Corequisites: ANSC3106 Assessment: Horse competency report (10%); information sheet reports (20%); mid-semester exam (20%); group work oral presentations (25%); final exam (25%) Practical field work: 2 offsite excursions to a racetrack and a commecrial horse stud Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study will give students wishing to work in the equine industries a strong scientifically based background in this field. The emphasis is on developing the students' basic knowledge of all facets of equine management, including day to day care, nutrition, reproduction, training and exercise physiology. Students will be introduced to the structure of equine industries in Australia, and basic horse handling and husbandry skills will be taught. By the end of the unit the students will have good understanding of the working physiology of the horse, management of the both the individual and populations of horses, in addition to basic care and treatment of common diseases and injuries.
BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Neville Firth Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL. Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the regulation, impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, and the genetic engineering of animals and plants. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.
GENE4015 Cytogenetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Sharp; animal component coordinator, Dr Jaime Gongora Session: Semester 2 Classes: Equivalent of 2 lecture/tutorials & 3 practicals/week Prerequisites: (BIOM2001 or ENVX2001) and GENE2001 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (25%), 1x750wd Practical report (10%) and 1x1000wd Fact Sheet (15%) 1x1200wd Laboratory report (20%), 1x2000wd Assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a final year elective in the two degrees, BScAgr, and BAnVetBiosci. Approximately a half of the face-to-face contact hours will be given as an intensive, and this section of the unit will be held during the mid-year break before semester 2. Lecture and practical work in cytogenetics, especially of plant and animal species of applied interest in plant agriculture, animal agriculture and other applied interest in animal genetics, such as companion, native and endangered species. The lecture component covers the molecular nature of chromosomes and their transmission, variation in chromosome behaviour, both normal and disease related. In addition, the uses of chromosome engineering to produce variation in plants and animals will also be covered. The practical component covers the technologies used to study chromosomes or both plants and animals, both mitotic and meiotic chromosomes, and molecular techniques such as in situ hybridisation, gene activity and chromosomal protein localisation. On completion, students will be able to apply cytogenetic knowledge and technologies to species of eukaryotes of economic significance, and know how cytogenetic processes have affected the development of these species.

Honours

Students in the Honours program enrol in 24 credit points of year 4 coursework units (including any major units), and the following four units of study:
AVBS4015 Research Project A1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Muir Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students must attend the compulsory course "Introduction to Animal Research" which is usually held in the week prior to the start of semester. There is no regular face-to-face teaching. The equivalent of 6 hours per week will be allocated from the course work timetable for research project activity. Relevant workshops, for example on scientific writing and statistical analysis will be completed during the sessions when the student is enrolled in AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017 and AVBS4018. Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3. Students need to have obtained a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining a first class honours grade, and must have the approval of the faculty to enrol. Corequisites: AVBS4016, AVBS4017, AVBS4018 Prohibitions: AVBS4014, AVBS4013 Assessment: written preliminary research proposal, literature review on the research topic, oral presentation on the research proposal, oral presentation on the research at the end of the project, research capabilities, written manuscript (assessment tasks scheduled throughout the four units comprising Research Project A (AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017, ABVS4018) with the final grade averaged over all four units) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Research Project A is composed of 24 credit points and consists of units AVBS4015 (Research Project A1), AVBS4016 (Research Project A2), AVBS4017 (Research Project A3) and AVBS4018 (Research Project A4). The units need to be taken in chronological order, commencing with enrolment in unit AVBS4015, which must be completed in a semester prior to unit AVBS4018. All four units are connected to the overall completion of the research project. Prior to start of this unit of study, students after consultation with an academic(s) and/or researcher(s) choose an area of research interest and this will form the basis of the entire Research Project A program (24 credit points in total). In unit AVBS4015 students will be required to undertake assessment tasks and conduct research activities.
At the end of this Unit of Study, students will:
Identify a research area, define a problem that impacts on animals and analyse this problem using information from various sources; critically evaluate current research (experimental design, statistical analysis, technical limitations) and identify where the present knowledge limiting for the chosen research topic; assimilate and manage information from within and across disciples to provide new concepts or understanding in the area of research; become familiar with scientific principles of research and the ethical use of animals in research; undertake research related to the project; meet set assessment tasks designed to develop written and oral presentation skills; apply the range of interpersonal skills necessary to work with peers and other researchers; meet deadlines and maintain accurate records related to the project.
Textbooks
No textbooks are required
AVBS4016 Research Project A2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Muir Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: There is no regular face-to-face teaching. The equivalent of 6 hours per week will be allocated from the course work timetable for research project activity. Relevant workshops, for example on scientific writing and statistical analysis will be completed during the sessions when the student is enrolled in AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017 and AVBS4018. Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3. Students need to have obtained a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining a first class honours grade, and must have the approval of the faculty to enrol. Corequisites: AVBS4015, AVBS4017, AVBS4018 Prohibitions: AVBS4013, AVBS4014 Assessment: See AVBS4015 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will actively work on the research projects identified at the start of unit AVBS4015. This is will include, where appropriate, undertaking animal and laboratory studies, collection and analysis of samples and data, recording of data, continue to evaluate information from various sources and meet set assessment deadlines.
See under AVBS4015 for further information.
AVBS4017 Research Project A3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Muir Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The equivalent of 6 hours per week will be allocated from the coursework timetable for research project activity. Relevant workshops, for example on scientific writing and statistical analysis will be completed during the sessions when the student is enrolled in AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017 and AVBS4018 Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3. Students need to have obtained a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining a first class honours grade, and must have the approval of the faculty to enrol. Corequisites: AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4018 Prohibitions: AVBS4014, AVBS4013 Assessment: See AVBS4015 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
See under AVBS4015 and AVBS4016.
AVBS4018 Research Project A4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Muir Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: There is no regular face-to-face teaching. The equivalent of 6 hours per week will be allocated from the coursework timetable for research project activity. Relevant workshops, for example on scientific writing and statistical analysis will be completed during the sessions when the student is enrolled in AVBS4015, AVBS4016, AVBS4017 and AVBS4018. Prerequisites: AVBS4015, Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3. Students need to have obtained a second/third year WAM commensurate with obtaining a first class honours grade, and must have the approval of the faculty to enrol. Corequisites: AVBS4016, AVBS4017 Prohibitions: AVBS4014, AVBS4013 Assessment: See AVBS4015 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
See under AVBS4015 and AVBS4016. Students must complete unit AVBS4018 in a separate semester to unit AVBS4015, and AVBS4015 must be completed prior to AVBS4018.