Bachelor of Veterinary Biology

Errata
Item Change Date
1

Please note the following units of study have been deleted from the BVetBiol/DVM course structure, commencing in 2014:

  • CHEM1001 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A
  • CHEM1002 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B

Please refer to the current Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine course structure, at this address: http://sydney.edu.au/vetscience/bvetbiol-dvm/structure.shtml

19/2/2014

Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

Year 1

Year 1 has the following 48 credit point structure: a core (36 credit points), and electives (12 credit points) selected from the list below.

Core Units of Study

BIOL1001 Concepts in Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL1911, BIOL1991 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology, however, students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February). Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments tests and lab quizzes (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Concepts in Biology is an introduction to the major themes of modern biology. The unit covers fundamental cell biology, with a particular emphasis on cell structure and function; the foundations of molecular biology from the role of DNA in protein synthesis to the genetics of organisms; and the theory of evolution and principles of phylogenetic analysis, including how these are used to interpret the origins of the diversity of extant organisms. Practical classes focus on students designing experiments, making and recording their observations and communicating their findings. The unit emphasises how biologists carry out scientific investigations, from the molecular and cellular level to the level of ecosystems. This unit of study provides a good foundation for intermediate biology units of study.
Textbooks
Knox R B et al. Biology, An Australian Focus. 4th ed. McGraw-Hill. 2010
Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study; thus this unit can be taken with BIOL1002/1902 or BIOL1003/1903/1993.
OR
BIOL1911 Concepts in Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 80+ in HSC 2-unit Biology (or equivalent) or Distinction or better in a University level Biology unit, or an ATAR of 95 or greater Prohibitions: BIOL1001, BIOL1991. Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, tests, lab quizzes (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Concepts in Biology (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1001 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1901 participate in alternative components, which include a separate lecture and practical stream from BIOL1001. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
As for BIOL1001.
Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study; thus this unit can be taken with BIOL1002/1902 or BIOL1003/1903/1993.
BIOL1002 Living Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr William Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2.5-hour practical per week and tutorials every few weeks. Prohibitions: BIOL1902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology, however, students who have not completed HSC biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February). Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, quizzes (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Living Systems deals with the biology of organisms as individuals, within populations and as part of communities and ecosystems. A broad range of taxa is presented, from bacteria to large plants and animals, and emphasis is placed on understanding the ways in which they can live in different habitats. Behaviour is discussed as a key process linking organismal-level processes to population and community dynamics. The importance of energy in living systems, and how elements are used and recycled in biological communities, are introduced as the basis of ecosystems. The unit of study includes lectures and laboratory classes on the physiology and behaviour of animals and plants, the ways in which organisms control and integrate their activities and the processes controlling dynamics of populations and community. These themes are revisited within applied contexts to discuss issues such as management and conservation. This unit of study provides a good foundation for intermediate biology units of study.
Textbooks
Knox R B et al. Biology. An Australian Focus. 4th ed. McGraw-Hill. 2010.
Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study; thus this unit can be taken with BIOL1001/1911/1991 or BIOL1003/1903/1993.
OR
BIOL1902 Living Systems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr William Figueira Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 2.5-hour practical per week and tutorials every few weeks. Prerequisites: Distinction or better in the BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 OR HSC Biology equal to 90 or greater OR an ATAR equal to 95 or greater Prohibitions: BIOL1002 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, quizzes, independent project (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1002 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1902 participate in alternative components, which include a separate lecture and practical stream from BIOL1001. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
As for BIOL1002.
Students should attempt no more than two of the three Junior BIOL units of study; thus this unit can be taken with BIOL1001/1911/1991 or BIOL1003/1903/1993.
CHEM1001 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1101, CHEM1109, CHEM1901, CHEM1903 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study, but students who have not undertaken an HSC chemistry course are strongly advised to complete a chemistry bridging course before lectures commence. Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignments (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of the unit of study is to provide those students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent) with a good grounding in fundamental chemical principles together with an overview of the relevance of chemistry. There is no prerequisite or assumed knowledge for entry to this unit of study. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
OR
CHEM1101 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Corequisites: Recommended concurrent units of study: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics Prohibitions: CHEM1001, CHEM1109, CHEM1901, CHEM1903 Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Mathematics Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Chemistry 1A is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC Chemistry course. Chemistry 1A covers chemical theory and physical chemistry. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
CHEM1002 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prerequisites: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or equivalent Prohibitions: CHEM1102, CHEM1108, CHEM1902, CHEM1904 Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
CHEM1002 builds on CHEM1001 to provide a sound coverage of inorganic and organic chemistry. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
OR
CHEM1102 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: One 3 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prerequisites: CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or a Distinction in CHEM1001 or equivalent Corequisites: Recommended concurrent units of study: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics Prohibitions: CHEM1002, CHEM1108, CHEM1902, CHEM1904 Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A and covers inorganic and organic chemistry. Successful completion of Chemistry 1B is an acceptable prerequisite for entry into Intermediate Chemistry units of study. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
ENVX1001 Introductory Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop (Coordinator), Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/wk, 1x1 hr tutorial/wk, 1x2 hr computer practical/wk Prohibitions: MATH1111, MATH1011, MATH1001, MATH1901, MATH1906, MATH1015, MATH1005, MATH1905, BIOM1003, ECMT1010, BUSS1020, STAT1021, STAT1022 Assumed knowledge: 70 or more in HSC Mathematics Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x10%), practical exam (20%), theory exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is a core first year unit for the BEnvSys, BScAgr and BAnVetBioSc degrees. It provides the foundation quantitative skills that are needed in other units in the degrees and for further study in applied statistics. In the first half of the unit the emphasis is on statistics, topics covered include: describing data and its variability, probability, sampling and estimation, framing scientific hypotheses; estimating a single treatment mean via a confidence interval and testing for a particular mean via a z-test or t-test; estimating or testing the difference between two treatment means. In the second half of the unit the focus is on calculus, the topics being differentiation and integration in single and multiple dimensions. A particular emphasis is on the use of calculus for modelling biological and environmental data, for example the use of linear and non-linear functions. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the spreadsheet package Excel and the statistical package Genstat.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
VETS1018 Animal Bioscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Paul Sheehy Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 33 hrs /student practicals: 9 hrs /student tutorials: 1 hr /student Prerequisites: VETS1032 or BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 Assessment: Group Learning Activity (15%), Mid Semester Exam (20%), Final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The interaction of organic molecules, facilitated by cellular structure and driven by the ability to harness energy from the environment, constitutes the basis of life. The co-ordination and facilitation of these events is due primarily to proteins, which fulfill a variety of roles including the catalysis of chemical reactions (enzymes), as cell structural components and in the transport of signals and solutes. The blueprints for the myriad of protein structures and hence cellular function are stored in the cell nucleus in the form of DNA, as a series of information-carrying segments, or genes.
It is the co-ordinated expression of these genes and the mechanisms that enable the genetic code to be read and interpreted which form the basis of Cell Biology 1B. Of similar importance are the processes of DNA copying for the duplication of cells (mitosis/meiosis) and how these processes may be manipulated to diagnose or alleviate disease (recombinant DNA technology, DNA diagnosis, molecular immunology, cancer etc).
To gain an understanding of the underlying cellular and biochemical principles of disease, therapy and performance of animals and to depict the relevance of these fundamental cellular processes in an applied veterinary and animal science context is also a major goal of Cell Biology 1B.
Textbooks
VETS1018 Animal Bioscience Unit of Study Guide

Electives

AGEN1001 Shaping our Landscapes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Peter Ampt (Coordinator), Dr Elizabeth Nolan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lect, 1x2hr tut, 4x1day (6.5hr) field (ave 2hrs/week) Prohibitions: AFNR1001 Assessment: 1x 2hr exam (40%), Field class reports (10%), Group work participation and reflection (10%), Tutorial group journal (20%), Problem based learning project (20%) Practical field work: Preparation, revision and private study 3hrs/week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to help students develop understanding of our non-urban landscapes and the physical, biological, economic and cultural factors that have shaped them, with particular emphasis on the interaction between production and environment. It is a core first year unit for students in BScAgr, BEnvSys, BResEc, BAgEc and BAnVetBioSc from the Vet Faculty.
The unit begins with a review of the current global issues around population, food, agriculture and environment and the place of Australia in this global context. Australia's current production (plant and animal based) and environmental systems and landscapes are described with an emphasis on the physical, biological, economic and cultural factors that have shaped them, concluding with an account of future production and environment scenarios.
At the end of this unit, students should be able to describe global production and environment issues and key Australian landscapes and production systems, explain the factors that have shaped them and apply this understanding to a specific location and production system. They should analyse the situation of natural resource managers and evaluate the options available to them to maintain or improve profitable production and achieve sustainability.
The students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through on-line discussion postings, tutorial discussions and presentations and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups and individually.
Textbooks
To be advised during semester.
AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Irene Van Ekris Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hrs/week (lectures and practicals) Prerequisites: 6 credit points of junior Biology Assessment: practical skills assessment (30%), written assignment (20%), quizzes (50%) Practical field work: There will be several whole day practical classes at the Camden campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will explore the management of animals in natural and man-made environments. At the end of this unit of study, students will understand: the characteristics of the management systems of the major domestic species used for production in Australia and in a world wide context; the characteristics and principles underpinning sustainable management of native animals in natural and man-made environments; an appreciation of the dependence of living organisms upon their environment; an appreciation of the husbandry practices and innovations that have been adopted by the production industries to retain their competitive advantage; a demonstrated capability in handling and husbandry of the major domestic production animal species, and an appreciation of the application of these skills to non-domestic species; a demonstrated understanding of the importance of high standards of animal welfare practice in the management of animals.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the unit content and for this reason no formal text is required. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course.
PHYS1004 Physics 1 (Environmental & Life Science)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 10 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Corequisites: Recommended concurrent Units of Study: (MATH1003 or MATH1903) and (MATH1005 or MATH1905). Prohibitions: PHYS1003, PHYS1902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or equivalent. Assessment: 3-hour exam plus laboratories and assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: It is recommended that PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 be completed before this unit
This unit of study has been designed specifically for students interested in further study in environmental and life sciences. The lecture series contains modules on the topics of properties of matter, electromagnetism, and radiation and its interactions with matter.
Textbooks
College Physics: A Strategic Approach by Knight, Jones and Field, 2nd edition, with Mastering Physics. Addison-Wesley. 2012. Course lab manual.

Year 2

Year 2 has the following 48 credit point structure: a core (36 credit points), and electives (12 credit points) selected from the list below.

Core Units of Study

ANSC3101 Animal Nutrition 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alex V. Chaves Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 2 h/week, lecture recording 1h/week and in situ and/or online laboratories 2-3 h/week Prerequisites: AVBS1002, (VETS1032 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901) Corequisites: AVBS2001 or MICR2024 Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of Biochemistry Assessment: Assignments, including 5 individual reports from problem based learning (30%), 1 online middle term exam (35%), 1 oral or video presentation (25%), and 1 online end of term exam (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This Unit of Study builds upon principles discussed in AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management. The Unit is broadly divided into four sections, namely: estimating the nutritive characteristics of feeds; defining the nutrient requirements of animals; diet formulation; errors in feeding. The focus is on coming to an understanding of the assessment of nutritional adequacy and the avoidance and solving of nutritional problems, with a particular emphasis on animals used in agricultural production systems and wildlife. The principles discussed in this course will be expanded in the following year, in which species-specific systems will be described. The basis of successful feeding management is an understanding of the following: the composition of feeds; the digestibility and efficiency of utilisation of nutrients by the animal; the nutrient requirements of the animal; interactions between nutrients that influence health and production. And following from this, students will have the ability to formulate diets to meet animal requirements for a variety of purposes and under a variety of constraints; identify deficiencies, excesses and imbalances in diets and so avoid a decline in productive efficiency and/or a decline in health.
Textbooks
Students are encouraged to have an individual tablet PC or laptop with wireless connectivity (e.g.: ipad; Galaxy Note, etc.) during all classes. There is no required text for the course. A number of textbooks are available on reserve at the library. These include: 1 - Animal Nutrition by McDonald, P., Edwards, R.A., Greenhalgh, J.F.D. and Morgan, C.A. (2002) 6th ed. Pearson Education Limited, Harlow UK. Badham Library Call # 636.0852 3 E 2 - Feeds and Feeding (5th Edition) (Hardcover) by Tilden Wayne Perry, Arthur E. Cullison, Robert S. Lowrey (Authors). Publisher: Prentice Hall; 5 edition (November 19, 1998). Badham Library Call # 636.084 9 B 3 - Animal Feeds, Feeding and Nutrition, and Ration Evaluation CD-ROM (Hardcover) by David Tisch (Author). Publisher: Delmar Cengage Learning; 1 edition (October 5, 2005). Badham Library Call # 636.08557 5 4 - Animal Nutrition Science (Paperback) by G. Dryden (Author) Publisher: CABI; 1 edition (October 5, 2008). Badham Library Call # 636.0852 66 5 - Tables of Composition and Nutritional Value of Feed Materials Pigs, Poultry, Cattle, Sheep, Goats, Rabbits, Horses, Fish By Daniel Sauvant, Jean-Marc Perez, Gilles Tran Publisher: INRA (January, 2004). Badham Library Call # 636.0852 60 National Research Council (NRC) publications describing nutrient requirements of various species may also provide useful information; these publications can all be accessed online and are available on reserve at the library: - Nutrient Requirements of Poultry (NRC, 1994). Badham or Camden 636.50852 4 F - Nutrient Requirements of Swine (NRC, 1998). Badham or Camden 636.40852 7 G - Nutrient Requirements of Dairy Cattle (NRC, 2001). Badham or Camden 636.214 17D - Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle (NRC, 2000). Badham 636.213 27 G - Nutrient Requirements of Horses (NRC, 2007). Badham or Camden 636.10852 5 F There will be copies of this text on reserve and for purchase in the bookstore. Again, it is not essential to buy these text books. All the material required for the course will be presented in lecture and in the lecture notes, but the text may prove useful in understanding the lecture material.
ANSC3103 Animal Structure and Function A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter White Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3hrs/wk, laboratories/tutorials 3hrs/wk (note these will vary depending upon the week) Prerequisites: 12 credit points of junior Biology Assumed knowledge: AVBS1002 Assessment: assignments/presentations/online quiz (50%) and examinations (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Animal Structure and Function A will develop an understanding of the role of the body systems in maintaining homeostasis in an animal's internal environment. In ASFA the structure and function of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, central nervous and integumentary systems of the body are explored in depth particularly with reference to the maintenance of homeostasis and an animal's perception of, and response to, its environment. The developed understanding of the normal functioning of these systems allows identification of the impact on the animal of abnormal function of these systems. A study of the structure and function of muscle will include its role in movement and as meat in a production setting. The overall goals of the Unit are (i) to enable students to develop a rich understanding of the relationships between body systems and structures (to be continued in ASFB). (ii) to develop generic skills particularly in group work and oral presentation,(iii) to develop an appreciation of the links between structure and function and their relevance to animal disease and production that will be further developed in Veterinary Pathogenesis as well as in advanced, applied studies in Behaviour in third year and in 4th year Animal Production.
ANSC3104 Animal Structure and Function B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cathy Herbert Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 3 hrs/wk, laboratories/tutorials 3 hrs/wk, activities will vary on a weekly basis Prerequisites: ANSC3103 Assumed knowledge: AVBS1002 Assessment: anatomy dissection project (20%), topic test (10%), assignment (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In this Unit students will complete the study of the structure and function of organ systems in animals started in ANSC3103. The role of hormones and the immune systems will be investigated in relation to maintenance of internal homeostasis. An introduction to digestion and male and female reproductive anatomy and physiology will form the basis for further applied studies in these areas in third year Units of Study in Animal Nutrition and Animal Reproduction. There will be development of the generic skills of critically reading and writing.
Textbooks
For Animal Structure:
AVBS2001 Introductory Veterinary Pathogenesis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Higgins Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hrs/week (lectures and practicals) Prerequisites: (BIOL1001 or BIOL1911) and (BIOL1002 or BIOL1902) and ANSC3103 Corequisites: ANSC3104 Assumed knowledge: (CHEM1101 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1102 or CHEM1002) Assessment: Prac class exercises (15%), mid-semester exam (20%), practical exam (15%), written exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The overarching theme for this unit of study is the concept of the interaction between the host (or the animal), the agent of disease (genetics, physical, chemical and infectious agents) and environmental factors. In disease states, the host responds to the aetiological agent of disease and the environment through one of the basic five pathological processes that occur in tissues. These include inflammation and repair, degeneration and necrosis, circulatory disturbances, tissue deposits and pigments, and disorders of growth. A case based approach will be used whenever possible to illustrate these principles and enable the student to develop a problem solving approach and the skills of critical thinking.
Textbooks
McGavin, MD & Zachary JF 2007, Pathologic Basis of Disease 4th ed., Mosby
VETS1032 Animal Energetics and Homeostasis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Paul Sheehy Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 39 hrs/student practicals: 9 hrs/student tutorials: 1 hr/student Assumed knowledge: HSC level chemistry and/or biology would be an advantage Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x exam (20%) end of semester: 1 x 2 hr written exam (65%) other: 1 x Cytology Group Learning Exercise (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will introduce students to the biology of the cell. Topics include cell structure and cellular metabolism. The cell structure component includes a description of cell membranes and organelles and the cellular metabolism component includes a discussion of metabolic pathways. An introduction to the contribution of the endocrine system to homeostasis of animals via their effects on animal metabolism and physiology will also be described. An understanding of commonly occurring disturbances to the production or action of hormones will be developed with clinical material being used to illustrate normal structure and function.
Textbooks
VETS1032 Animal Energetics and Homeostasis of Study Guide

Electives

ANSC2004 Animal Conservation Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jaime Gongora Session: Semester 2 Classes: variable consisting of up to 6hrs/week of lectures (students advised to consult weekly timetable), tutorials, computer simulation and practical classes, lectures will involve guest speakers from specialist areas Prerequisites: (BIOL1001 or BIOL1911) and ( BIOL1002 or BIOL1902) and GENE2001 Prohibitions: VETS2015 Assessment: Written mid-semester assessment /quizzes/poster (66.7%) and final exam (33.3%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will cover the identification, anatomy, and physiology of Australia's unique native birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals. The course also details the threatening processes that are impacting Australia's environment and ecosystems. Processes discussed include climate change, urbanisation, drought, agricultural practices, bush fires, invasive animal species, and disease. The third major focus of the course covers various aspects of in situ, and ex situ conservation, ethical issues related to wildlife conservation, and working with the media. The unit provides an introduction to wildlife and conservation genetics. Assignments will build on the knowledge gained in lectures and practical classes and allow students to investigate topics related to this unit that may be of special interest to them as individuals and a group.
Textbooks
Burgman, MA & Lindermayer, DB 1998, Conservation biology for the Australian environment, Surrey Beatty & Sons Pty Ltd
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop (Coordinator), Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/wk, 1x1 hr tutorial/wk, 1x2 hr computer practical/wk Prerequisites: ENVX1001 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 and MATH1015 Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x10%), practical exam (20%), theory exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is a core 2nd year unit for students in the BEnvSys, BScAgr and BAnVetBioSc degrees. It consists of three parts. In the first part students will investigate how to use an ANOVA to analyse experiments with more than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part an introduction to a branch of mathematics called linear algebra is given with an emphasis on the applications to statistics and modelling. In the final part students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression. During the practicals two software packages; Genstat and Excel, will be used to analyse real datasets. At the end of this unit, students will have learnt how to analyse data using ANOVA and regression, the basic methods needed for their future studies and careers. The students will gain research and inquiry skills through completion of weekly computer work and assessable exercises. Information literacy and communication skills will be developed through weekly computer work.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:

Year 3 has the following 48 credit point structure

Details of Year 3 units of study will be made available in 2014.

Year 4 has the following 48 credit point structure

Details of Year 4 units of study will be made available in 2014.

Year 5 has the following 48 credit point structure

Details of Year 5 units of study will be made available in 2014.

Year 6 has the following 48 credit point structure

Details of Year 6 units of study will be made available in 2014.

Unit of study descriptions