Bachelor of Veterinary Science

Unit of study descriptions

Bachelor of Veterinary Science

Year 1

Please note that the BVetBiol/DVM is replacing the BVSc from 2014. BVSc Year 1 will not be offered from 2014.

Year 2

VETS2010 Animal Digestion and Nutrition

Credit points: 7 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hamutal Mazrier Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 63 hrs practicals: 18 hrs tutorials: 10 hrs Assumed knowledge: VETS1014, VETS1034 Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x theory quizz (12%); intra-semester take-home exam (2%); assignment (11%) end of semester: 1 x theory exam; 1 x practical exam (75%)
Animal Digestion and Nutrition is a unit of study that consists of an integrated series of lectures, practical classes, tutorials and workshops focusing on the comparative structure and the function of the digestive system along with classes exploring the principles and practice of nutrition and interactions between nutrients that influence health and production.
Textbooks
VETS2010 Animal Digestion and Nutrition Unit of Study Guide
VETS2012 Equine Anatomy

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glenn Shea Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 13 hrs; practicals: 52 hrs Assumed knowledge: VETS1014, VETS1034, VETS2011, VETS2010 Assessment: intra-semester: 2 x 1 hr written papers (one in-semester) (2x20%). end of semester: 1 x practical examination (40%); 1 x assignment (20%)
In this unit of study, the topographic and regional anatomy of the horse, a large domestic animal, is studied by sequential dissection of entire preserved horses. This unit of study also involves integration of knowledge of systemic anatomy, acquired from VETS1014, VETS1034, VETS2010 and VETS2011, allowing the student to develop an understanding of the regional anatomy of a domestic mammal, knowledge necessary for surgery units of study in later years. Clinically relevant regions are emphasized, and the relevance illustrated by reference to common clinical conditions.
Textbooks
VETS2012 Equine Anatomy Unit of Study Guide
VETS2013 Principles of Disease

Credit points: 8 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Krockenberger Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 74 hrs; practicals: 26 hrs Assumed knowledge: Veterinary Science Year 1 (Semesters 1 and 2) and Year 2 (Semester 1 only) Assessment: intra-semester: Online quizzes (7%); Practical Class Portfolio (8%); 1 x examination (10%) end of semester: 1 x practical examination (15%); 1 x theory examination (60%)
The overarching theme for this unit of study is the concept of disease as the result of interactions between the host, the agent of disease and environmental factors (HPEI). Diseases encountered in veterinary practice are used to illustrate these concepts. An understanding of the five fundamental pathological processes (general pathology) as host response to disease or the direct effect of agents of disease underpins this approach to disease. Physical, chemical, genetic and infectious agents of disease are introduced.
Previous subjects including anatomy, histology, physiology and cell biology lay the groundwork for this unit of study because it is essential to understand normal structure and function to be able to recognise and understand the implications of the disease state (abnormal structure and/or function).
Principles of Disease is vital in preparing the student for the specific disciplines studied in systemic pathology and studies of agents of disease (microbiology and parasitology), as well as for components of pharmacology in semester five of the course.
Textbooks
VETS2013 Principles of Disease Unit of Study Guide
VETS2008 Professional Practice 2

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Higgins Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures & Tutorials: 34hrs of presentations, tutorials and self directed learning. other: Independent Learning Project (18 hrs) Assumed knowledge: VETS1031 Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x ILP (S/U); 2 x ILP forms (3%); 1 x media release (17%); 1 x group presentation (15%) end of semester: 1 x examination (65%)
This unit provides opportunities for the student to understand and apply basic principles in veterinary practice management. In addition, students will further explore professional practice themes of animal welfare, communication and personal development.
During this unit of study, students are also required to successfully complete an Independent Learning Project (ILP) satisfactorily. The ILP is intended to assist your professional development in an approved area of your choosing.
Textbooks
VETS2008 PP2 Unit of Study Guide
VETS2011 Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology 2A

Credit points: 7 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Natasha Hamilton Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 43 hrs; practicals: 30 hrs; tutorials: 15 hrs Assumed knowledge: Veterinary Science Year 1 Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x 45 min assessment (20%) end of semester: 1 x 90 min exam (35%) other: 1 x group work assessment (20%); 1 x 40 min practical exam (25%)
This unit has been designed to extend knowledge obtained during Year 1 units in Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology and explore some mechanisms of animal dysfunction. It deals with nervous system structure and function, integument, thermoregulation and aging processes, and anatomy, physiology and histology of common domestic bird species, with emphasis on the chicken.
The unit focuses on the nervous system, how changes in structure and function cause dysfunction, and the development of skills used to recognise normal and abnormal animals. Students will learn through dissection and problem solving. They will be assessed on their ability to apply and use their knowledge, and the development of generic skills. Students will learn how neural function is determined by neural structures and their connections. Students will apply the principles covered in these topics to examine, describe, interpret and explain how animals perceive their environment, process and store information, and respond with voluntary and involuntary activities. The primary focus will be on normal animals, although specific lesions will be used to demonstrate the role of components of the nervous system in normal function. The skills and knowledge acquired during this unit will be further developed in units of study in later years of the course and will provide a basis for analysis of animals with abnormal neurological function in medicine.
The unit also covers avian anatomy and physiology, and the structure and role of the integument, as well as the normal processes of aging and thermoregulation. Tutorials and formative assessments on Blackboard will assist learning.
Textbooks
VETS2011 VAP2A Unit of Study Guide
VETS2016 Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology 2B

Credit points: 8 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Roslyn Bathgate Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 52 hrs; practicals: 31 hrs; tutorials: 7 hrs Assumed knowledge: VETS1014, VETS1034, VETS2010, VETS2011 Assessment: intrasemester: 1 x 1 hr examination (20%) end of semester: 1 x 2 hr theory (45%); 1 x 0.5 hr practical (20%) other: 1 x oral presentation (15%)
Topics studied in this unit of study include the gross anatomy, histology and physiology of: the male and female reproductive systems and mammary glands of domestic animals, fertility, pregnancy, embryology, parturition and prenatal and postnatal development and congenital abnormalities with an emphasis on clinical relevance and applied reproduction. Incorporated into this unit is a practical on the surface anatomy of the horse.
Textbooks
VETS2016 VAP 2B Unit of Study Guide
VETS2021 Veterinary Biometry

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Prof Peter Thomson Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 26 hrs; practicals: 13 hrs Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: 4 x quizzes (30%); Assignment: 3 parts (30%); Final Exam: 1 x 1hr open book (40%)
This Unit of Study presents an introduction to those aspects of statistics that are relevant to veterinarians. It covers biological variability; descriptive statistics (numerical and graphical summaries); probability concepts; samples and populations; the normal distribution; hypothesis tests (one-and two-sample tests); confidence intervals; analysis of variance; regression and correlation; experimental design (basic principles, specific design types); and contingency tables. Extensive use is made of the statistical package Minitab.
Textbooks
VETS2021 Unit of Study Handbook
VETS2015 Veterinary Conservation Biology

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof David Phalen Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 45 hrs; practicals: 8 hrs Assumed knowledge: Material covered in classes in year 1 and year 2 of the BVSc Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x 120 min. examination (45%); 6 x in class quizzes (5%); 1 x avian anatomy laboratory examination (5%) end of semester: 1 x 120 min examination (45%)
Veterinary Conservation Biology covers the identification, anatomy, and physiology of Australia's unique native birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals. The course also details the threatening processes that are impacting Australia's environment and ecosystems. Processes discussed include climate change, urbanization, drought, agricultural practices, bush fires, invasive animal species, and disease. The third major focus of the course covers various aspects of in situ, and ex situ conservation, ethical issues related to wildlife conservation, and working with the media.
Textbooks
VETS2015 VCB Unit of Study Handbook
VETS2020 Veterinary Genetics

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Imke Tammen Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 26 hrs; tutorials: 12 hrs Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics, VETS1018 Assessment: Intra-semester: 1x practical assignment (poster) (30%) ; 1 x quiz (20%) end of semester: 1 x 1 hr examination (50%)
This Unit of Study presents an introduction to those aspects of genetics that are relevant to veterinarians. It covers the creation and use of genome assemblies and genetic maps; bioinformatics, single-locus traits and disorders; chromosomal abnormalities; non-Mendelian familial disorders; immunogenetics; parentage tests; conservation genetics; genetic variation in pests, parasites and pathogens; genetic and environmental control of inherited diseases; relationship and inbreeding; heritability; breed history and structure; selection and crossing; genetics of coat colours.
Textbooks
VETS2020 Veterinary Genetics Unit of Study Guide,

Year 3

VETS3018 Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare Sci

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Paul McGreevy Session: Semester 1 Classes: 24 x 1 hr lectures; 26 hrs x 1 hr practicals Assumed knowledge: Veterinary Science Years 1 - 2 Assessment: intrasemester: 2 x written assignments (50%) end of semester: 1 x 1 hr examination (50%)
Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare Science is the study of normal and abnormal behaviours in domestic and captive species. Animal Behaviour is one of the core knowledge areas for veterinarians because it facilitates the recognition of disease states and helps veterinarians to make informed comment on animal welfare issues. Additional training in the area would be required for those aspiring to become specialist veterinary behaviour therapists. The Unit of Study draws on knowledge of many aspects of animal husbandry, evolutionary biology and physiology, pharmacology and psychology. The course focuses on the importance of understanding ethology, learning theory and trainers' techniques and includes demonstrations from expert animal handlers and trainers.
Textbooks
VETS3018 Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare Science Unit of Study Guide
VETS3242 Animal Disease

Credit points: 8 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Katrina Bosward Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 63 hrs; practicals: 22 hrs; group work: 14 hrs Prerequisites: VETS3040, VETS3041 Corequisites: VETS3039 Prohibitions: VETS3038 Assumed knowledge: Veterinary Science semesters 1 to 5 Assessment: intra-semester: assignments (10%); 1 x exam (15%) end of semester: 1 x final exam (75%)
This unit extends and integrates knowledge in Principles of Disease, Veterinary Parasitology, Veterinary Microbiology, Veterinary Pathology, Veterinary Clinical Pathology and Veterinary Pharmacology. The Unit is presented in a series of disease cases in a herd or individual animal. For each case, students work through causative agents, differential diagnosis, diagnostic techniques and arrive at treatment and control solutions. The course includes diseases caused by a wide range of infectious organisms, as well as nutritional and genetic disease in a range of animals of veterinary interest.
Please note that students must be vaccinated against Q Fever in order to participate in some of the practical classes in this unit of study. Students who are not vaccinated against Q Fever will be required to do an additional assessment task in lieu of attending these practical classes.
Textbooks
VETS3242 Unit of Study Guide and course notes Animal Disease which contain a list of readings suitable for each case.
VETS3039 Professional Practice 3

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Higginis Session: Semester 2 Classes: 48 hrs of presentations, tutorials, small group work and self-directed learning. Prerequisites: VETS1031, VETS2008 Corequisites: VETS3242 Assessment: intra-semester: Group presentation and written report (35%) end of semester: 1 x examination (65%)
This unit provides students with material to aid their understanding of financial, legal and ethical perspectives in the management of cases and scenarios typical of veterinary practice life. There is a focus upon the legislative environment through a preliminary study of the various Acts and other legislation pertaining to the practice of veterinary science.
Other perspectives such as implications for practice management are also developed through scenarios linked to clinical material presented in other units of study this semester. Classes comprise student presentations supported by talks from appropriate authorities, lectures, tutorials and small group work. The majority of learning for this unit of study is completed in groups and hence there is an additional emphasis upon the development of teamwork skills and their application to veterinary practice.
Textbooks
VETS3039 Professional Practice 3 Unit of Study Guide
VETS3244 Small Animal Medicine and Therapeutics 1

Credit points: 8 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Niek Beijerink Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 78 x 1 hr; tutorials: 12 x 2 hr Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of semesters 1 to 5 of the BVSc Assessment: intra-semester: assignments (10%); examinations (40%). end of semester: 1 x final examination (50%)
Small Animal Medicine & Therapeutics 1 is the foundational unit of small animal veterinary medicine and expands on the application of the fundamental principles of Veterinary Pharmacology (VETS3013).
This Unit builds upon concepts of problem-solving and pathological processes explored earlier in the curriculum. It enables integration and application of knowledge learnt in Veterinary Anatomy & Physiology 1A, 1B, 2A and 2B (VETS1014, VETS1034, VETS2011, VETS2016), Principles of Disease (VETS2013), Veterinary Microbiology (VETS3040), Animal Disease (VETS3242), Veterinary Pathology (VETS3011) and Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology (VETS3013).
Through predominantly case-based teaching, this unit of study enables undergraduate veterinary students to develop clinical reasoning frameworks using the problem-oriented approach to medicine and lays the foundation for practicing as a small animal clinician. Further, this unit integrates veterinary pharmacology, enabling the development of specific therapeutic plans for small animal patients based on fundamental principles and evidence-based medicine.
Assessment: Small Animal Medicine & Therapeutics 1 includes assignments that provide students with the opportunity to develop foundational skills in clinical examination of the small animal patient, intra-semester evaluations and an end of semester examination.
Textbooks
VETS3244 Small Animal Medicine and Therapeutics 1 Unit of Study Guide.
VETS3243 Veterinary Clinical Pathology

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Scott Lindsay Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 36 x 1hr practical/tutorials: 6 x 2 hrs Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of semesters 1 to 5 of the BVSc Assessment: intra-semester: Tutorial / practical evaluation (10%), 1 x 1hr open book written exam (20%) end of semester: 1 x 2hr open book written exam (70%)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology involves the application of pathological, biochemical, haematological, microbiological and parasitological techniques and test results to clinical aspects of veterinary science. Special attention, throughout the course, is given to the application and interpretation of tests used in the diagnosis, prognosis and management of clinical disease through case report analysis. Material on disease is provided for companion and farm animals as well as wildlife. This course builds on Veterinary Pathology, Veterinary Microbiology, and Veterinary Parasitology; integrates horizontally with Small Animal Medicine and Animal Disease taught within the same semester; and prepares students for both small animal practice and large animal health and production and clinical practice.
Textbooks
VETS3243 Unit of Study Guide and Blackboard site contain detailed information and notes for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.
VETS3040 Veterinary Microbiology

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqui Norris Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 56 hrs; practicals: 9 hrs Prerequisites: VETS2013 Assumed knowledge: Veterinary Science Years 1 - 2 Assessment: intra-semester: Case-based theory examination (15%); Assignment: Development of a visual learning tool for microbiology (20%) end of semester: Case-based theory examination (45%); Case-based practical examination (20%)
Veterinary Microbiology encompasses veterinary bacteriology, virology, and mycology. This unit of study uses clinical cases and research studies to 1) explore the unique features of these infectious agents, 2) explore their role in the development of animal disease; 3) critically analyse the strategies used for their diagnosis, treatment and control; and 4) encourage an evidence based approach to investigating clinical problems. Veterinary microbiology is based on an understanding of the structure and function of bacteria, viruses and fungi of veterinary significance as well as the pathological and immunological processes taught in Principles of Disease VETS2013. Veterinary Microbiology helps to prepare students for Animal Disease VETS3242, clinical subjects and life in veterinary practice.
Textbooks
Textbook of Veterinary Microbiology (VETS3040) and Animal Disease (VETS3242): Virology, Mycology and Special Bacteria. University of Sydney. 2013
VETS3041 Veterinary Parasitology

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jan Slapeta Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 39 hrs; practicals: 24 hrs; tutorials: 8 hrs Prerequisites: VETS2013 Assumed knowledge: Veterinary Science Years 1 - 2 Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x examination (10%); 1 x practical exercise (5%); 1 x group project on a topical area of parasitology (20%) end of semester: 1 x practical examination (25%) which will require some identification of parasites of veterinary importance; 1 x written examination (40%)
Veterinary Parasitology is a study of the common diseases of companion and commercial animals caused by protozoan, nematode, platyhelminth, insect and acarine parasites. The course includes the biology of parasites, with emphasis on principles of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, epidemiology, treatment and control of parasitic diseases. Veterinary Parasitology assumes an understanding of basic biological principles and knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of animals. The unit is a preparation for VETS3242 Animal Disease.
Textbooks
VETS3041 Veterinary Parasitiology Unit of Study Guide
VETS3011 Veterinary Pathology

Credit points: 7 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Derek Spielman Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures: 65 hrs Prerequisites: VETS2013 Assumed knowledge: Veterinary Science Years 1 - 2 Assessment: intra-semester: ICAPs (20%), 1 x mid-semester practical examination (10%) end of semester: 1 x theory examination (60%), 1 x practical examination (10%) Practical field work: Practicals: 20 hrs gross and microscopic pathology plus description and interpretation, 4 hrs necropsy technique and 4 hrs histopathology tutorial; Case-based learning activities including tutorials: 16 hrs timetabled for these activities for group discussions and microscopy.
Veterinary Pathology is the study of disease and disease processes in animals and includes learning skills to understand and recognise disease in a range of animal species. Pathology is one of the core knowledge areas for veterinarians and additional training in the area would be required for those aspiring to become specialist veterinary pathologists.
The course is a practically-orientated systemic pathology unit that builds on the knowledge of normal structure and function, general pathology and agents of disease, developed in years 1, 2 and 3 of the degree.
Horizontal integration with units of study addressing infectious agents of disease (Veterinary Microbiology and Veterinary Parasitology) is encouraged.
The Integrative Case-based Applied Pathology (ICAP) component strongly integrates preclinical and paraclinical knowledge in a relevant clinical diagnostic setting and develops a diagnostic pathology reporting approach. This component allows the student to use knowledge and skills in pathology to build a diagnostic approach to disease.
Topics within the unit of study are strongly vertically integrated into Veterinary Clinical Pathology in Year 3 Semester 2.
Textbooks
VETS3011 Veterinary Pathology Unit of Study Guides
VETS3013 Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Merran Govendir Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 36 hrs; tutorials: 16 hrs Prerequisites: VETS2013 Assumed knowledge: Veterinary Science Years 1 - 2 Assessment: intra-semester assessment: Quizz, oral and written task (30%) end of semester: 1 x 1 hr examination (70%)
Pharmacology is the study of the safe use of drugs in the therapy and prevention of animal diseases. Toxicology refers to pharmacologically active toxins which adversely affect animals. These subjects build on knowledge learnt in Chemistry, Cell Biology and Veterinary Physiology and provide the basis to understand how pharmacological agents work at their site of action and how they behave in the body. In order to link the diseases of animals and their therapy the course runs parallel with Units of Study in Veterinary Pathology, Veterinary Microbiology and Veterinary Parasitology. The application of knowledge learnt in Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology is a major component of clinical veterinary science.
The Unit covers the principles of drug action and then deals with a range of drug classes pertinent to veterinary science and the peculiarities of drugs in the core species.
Textbooks
VETS3013 Veterinary Pharmacology & Toxicology Unit Study Guide

Year 4

VETS4235 Intensive Animal Health and Production

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Groves Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 37 hrs; practicals: 13 hrs; tutorials: 2 hrs (optional attendance at more) Prerequisites: Successful completion of BVSc Years 1 to 3 and semester 1, Year 4 Assessment: intra-semester: Assignments (60%) = 1 assignment per species; end of semester: 1 x final examination (40%)
This course covers three intensive animal industries: pigs, chickens (broiler and layer operations) and aquaculture.
This unit of study will provide students with an understanding of the major factors driving the profitability and sustainability of these industries. The emphasis is on epidemiology, management and preventive medicine, with consideration given to welfare aspects of intensively housed animals. Students will be provided with the basic skills to resolve production and profit-limiting problems on farms. Diagnosis and treatment of common conditions affecting fisheries and aquaculture species will be presented. Practical classes are designed to provide students with the opportunity to observe and participate in specialized husbandry and diagnostic practices undertaken on farms. They will gain experience handling representatives of the common fish species and performing common clinical procedures. Poultry pathology post mortems will be practiced.
Textbooks
VETS4235 Unit of Study Handbook. Blackboard contains detailed information and notes.
VETS4135 Large Animal Health and Production 1

Credit points: 10 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alison Gunn Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 88 hrs; practicals: 42 hrs clinical skills practicals Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of BVSc Years 1 to 3 Assessment: intra-semester: Examinations x 2 (20%); end of semester: Examinations x 2 (60%); other: Case studies x 2 (20%). Students must achieve a pass (50% or greater final mark) in both the ruminant and equine components of VETS4135 to satisfactorily pass the unit of study.
Large Animal Health and Production 1 is a large unit that combines the teaching of equine, bovine and ovine medicine and surgery in a practical setting where student's progress from the fundamental clinical and surgical problems as would be encountered in a rural mixed practice. Much of the lecture course utilises problem-based learning using a case-based approach. This approach is designed to augment skills developed in other disciplines including animal husbandry, anatomy, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, veterinary medicine and veterinary surgery. The course is designed to assist the student in learning effective problem solving skills, determination of differential diagnoses and the judicious use of appropriate diagnostic aids when attempting to reach a diagnosis. Options and approaches to commonly used therapeutic measures are included. The learning is integrated across species and deals with the major body systems, such as cardiac, respiratory, neuromuscular, ocular, skin, alimentary and renal disorders, and also includes an introduction to herd and flock diseases in livestock. The practical classes are designed to augment and expand the student's experiences in large animal clinical skills.
Textbooks
VETS4135 Large Animal Health and Production 1 Unit of Study Guide. Blackboard contains detailed information and notes.
VETS4233 Large Animal Health and Production 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 23 hrs Camden Campus; practical classes: 47 hrs Camden Campus; other: 8 hrs TILHAPS Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of BVSc Years 1 to 3 and semester 1, Year 4 and VETS4135 Large Animal Health & Production 1 Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x Examination (40%); end of semester: 1 x Examination (50%); other: TILHAPS (10%), practical examinations x 3. Students must achieve a pass (50% or greater final mark) in both the ruminant and equine components of VETS4233 to satisfactorily pass the unit of study.
Large Animal Health and Production 2 is aimed at developing deep learning approaches to solving problems of ruminant (mainly bovine, but also ovine and caprine) production, and equine medicine and reproduction. In addition to lectures and practical classes, it uses a case-based approach to deliver group case studies on-line for student presentations, known as TILHAP's (teaching innovations in livestock health and production). These cases require integration of pathological and epidemiological investigative skills to provide evidence based solutions in the management of disease and productivity problems in a 'whole farm' setting. The course is designed to advance student learning in preparation for the intramural and extramural clinical placements encountered in final year. The practical classes will continue to build the confidence of students in handling large animals in rural mixed and public practice settings.
Textbooks
VETS4233 Large Animal Health and Production 2 unit of study guide. Blackboard contains detailed information and notes.
VETS4236 Preparation Veterinary Practice

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Higgins Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 days in Semester 1; 2 days in Semester 2 Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of BVSc Years 1 to 3; satisfactory completion of pre-clinical and preparatory clinical extramural studies program Assumed knowledge: VETS1030; VETS1031; VETS1033; VETS2008; VETS3039 Assessment: intra-semester: Extramural practical report - equal weighting for each species report (100%); Online Task S/U; Participation S/U
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
Note: Departmental permission required for enrolment in the following sessions: Semester 1.
This unit of study will prepare students for their final year Work Integrated Learning Program and veterinary career. Students will review professional practice themes in relation to final year rotations and new graduate life. The assessment requirements, administrative policies and procedures, and access to distance learning resources, including the use of our Virtual Veterinary Campus during final year, will also be discussed.
Learning activities include lecture presentations, seminars, small group tutorials, self-completion tasks and skills checks. Note: Departmental permission required for enrolment in the following sessions: Semester 1.
Textbooks
VETS4236 Unit of Study Handbook. WebCT e-learning site contains detailed information, notes and links to reference papers for this unit of study.
VETS4132 Small Animal Medicine and Therapeutics 2

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Linda Vogelnest Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 33 hrs; practicals: 15 hrs; tutorials: 4 hrs Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of semesters 1 to 6 of the BVSc Assumed knowledge: Veterinary Science years 1-3 Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x examination (15%); end of semester: 1 x examination (60%); other: 1 x exotics assignment (10%); 1 x derm cytology practical examination (5%); 1 x derm tutorial performance (10%)
In this unit of study, students will continue to develop their skills in problem solving, diagnosis and therapeutics through a case based study of body systems. Students will further refine their ability to collect data appropriate for a case (history and physical examination), evaluate medical cases through a logical; evidence based diagnostic approach and determines the appropriate approach to therapeutics.
This unit of study includes dermatology in small animals and briefly exotics. A logical diagnostic approach to dermatological diseases is emphasised, and diseases grouped and compared based on their major clinical presentations. Appropriate use of, maximising yield from, and correct interpretation of diagnostic tests is also emphasised, and reinforced in practical classes. Therapeutic options after confirmation of diagnosis are discussed. Case studies are worked through in tutorials to reinforce the need for a sound and logical diagnostic approach to all skin diseases. This unit of study also includes medicine of caged birds, reptiles and small mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs, rats/mice). A wide range of avian species will be covered including water fowl, psittacine and passerine birds. The collection and analysis of clinical, necropsy and clinicopathologic information to investigate bird and flock problems is addressed. The course will cover the anatomy and physiology of reptiles and small mammals applicable to clinical examination and common problems encountered in practice in Australia.
This unit of study also includes gastrointestinal (GIT) medicine, covering common GIT diseases and stressing the importance of a logical diagnostic approach to disease.
This unit of study integrates vertically with Veterinary Pharmacology and Small Animal Medicine and Therapeutics 1, Animal Disease and Veterinary Clinical Pathology, and horizontally with Large Animal Health and Production.
Textbooks
VETS4132 Unit of Study Guide. Blackboard contains detailed information and notes.
VETS4133 Veterinary Anaesthesia and Surgery 1

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Christina Dart Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: anaesthesia 15 hrs, surgery 28 hrs; practicals: anaesthesia 9 hrs, surgery 18hrs; tutorials: anaesthesia 2 hrs Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of BVSc Years 1 to 3 Assessment: intra-semester: Anaesthesia: 1 x examination (20%); Surgery: 2 x examinations (15%), practical class assessments (5%) end of semester: Anaesthesia: 1 x final examination (30%); Surgery: 1 x final examination (30%)
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Surgery 1 is an introductory course that builds on a number of pre-clinical Units of Study including physiology, pharmacology, anatomy and physics; and it precedes a more species-based approach to clinical issues. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Surgery 1 develops skills in two key areas of Clinical Science. This Unit of Study is designed to impart basic principles and skills in both anaesthesia and surgery of small and large animal species. The course comprises a series of lectures and tutorial/practical classes, as well as an online component.
Within the scope of Veterinary Anaesthesia the course teaches students about the planning and implementation of safe and humane anaesthesia for small and large animals. It incorporates the principles of modern veterinary anaesthesia and covers patient assessment; pre-anaesthetic preparation; patient monitoring; different anaesthetic agents and techniques for different species; equipment used in anaesthesia; and managing common anaesthetic complications.
In addition to lectures and practical classes, participation in the neutering clinic gives students the opportunity to perform anaesthesia in a patient and as such includes pre-anaesthetic patient assessment, developing a plan for anaesthesia and pain management, administration of anaesthesia, monitoring the anaesthetised patient as well as managing recovery from anaesthesia.
Within the scope of Veterinary Surgery the course addresses the principles and practice of soft tissue and orthopaedic surgery in companion and large animals using an integrated, systems and problem-orientated approach. Practical classes provide instruction and practice in basic techniques and procedures such as wound closure, biopsy, laparotomy, dentistry, and other common surgical procedures.
Participation in the neutering clinic gives students the opportunity to perform recovery anaesthesia and participate in castration and ovariohysterectomy procedures.
Students are expected to achieve a level of understanding and capability at the end of this unit of study that will enable them to progress into Veterinary Anaesthesia and Surgery 2.
Textbooks
VETS4133 Unit of Study Guide. Blackboard contains detailed information and notes.
VETS4234 Veterinary Anaesthesia and Surgery 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Neil Hannan Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: Anaesthesia 17 hrs; Surgery 33 hrs; practicals: Anaesthesia 9 hrs; Surgery 17 hrs Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of BVSc Years 1 to 3 and semester 1, Year 4 and VETS4133 Veterinary Anaesthesia & Surgery 1 Assessment: Intra-semester: Anaesthesia: 1 x examination (16%); Surgery: 1 x examination (12%), 1 x practical class assessment (6%) end of semester: Anaesthesia: 1 x oral examination (8%); 1 x written examination (16%); Surgery: 1 x written examination (42%)
Note: Camden Campus
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Surgery 2 is a continuation of VAS1. It builds on the principles and skills of anaesthesia and surgery introduced in VAS1. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Surgery 2 further develops skills in two key areas of Clinical Science. The course comprises a series of lectures and practical classes, as well as an online component.
The focus is primarily on dogs, cats, horses and production animals; however discussion of other species is included.
Within the scope of Veterinary Anaesthesia the course teaches students about the planning and implementation of safe and humane anaesthesia for small and large animals. It incorporates the principles of modern veterinary anaesthesia and covers anaesthesia for different species and for common disease conditions; equipment used in anaesthesia; pain management; and management of complications including cardiopulmonary arrest.
In addition to lectures and practical classes, participation in the neutering clinic gives students the opportunity to perform anaesthesia in a patient and as such includes pre-anaesthetic patient assessment, developing a plan for anaesthesia and pain management, administration of anaesthesia, monitoring the anaesthetised patient as well as managing recovery from anaesthesia.
Within the scope of Veterinary Surgery the course develops further the principles and practice of soft tissue and orthopaedic surgery in companion and large animals. Practical classes provide instruction and practice in the basic techniques of wound management as well as more advanced procedures such as fracture fixation, surgery for cruciate ligament rupture, gastrointestinal surgery and urinary tract surgery.
Participation in the neutering clinic gives students the opportunity to perform recovery anaesthesia and participate in castration and ovariohysterectomy procedures.
Students are expected to achieve a level of understanding and capability at the end of this unit of study that will enable them to progress into final year.
Textbooks
VETS4234 Unit of Study Handbook. Blackboard contains detailed information and notes.
VETS4134 Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mariano Makara Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures: 38 hrs; practicals/tutorials: 26 hrs Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of BVSc Years 1 to 3 Assessment: intra-semester: assignment/s and examination (40%) end of semester: 1 x final examination (60%)
This course commences with an introduction to important fundamental concepts in Diagnostic Imaging, including radiation safety. Following this is a systems based approach that covers the radiographic appearance of the normal structure and function of the various organ systems commonly investigated by radiology.
Students will then be taught to recognise, describe and diagnose the changes in structure and function related to diseases that are commonly found on radiographs. The course also includes an introduction to special radiological techniques (including radiological contrast studies used to further demonstrate disease), digital radiology, advanced imaging techniques (MRI & CT), and the role of Ultrasound in the diagnosis of soft tissue disease.
Textbooks
VETS4134 Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging Unit of Study Guide
VETS4232 Veterinary Public Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jenny-Ann Toribio Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures: 44 hrs; tutorials: 8 hrs Assumed knowledge: BVSc Years 1 to 3 and semester 1, Year 4 Assessment: intra-semester: 2 x Applied VPH assignment (40%); end of semester: 1 x final written examination (60%); other: Food /Abattoir assessment. Practical field work: Practical field work: Practical Field Work: Preparation for Abattoir workshop (2 day course held in July 2013 as preparation for on-site abattoir placement). On-site abattoir placement (extramural placement completed by the end of July 2014)
This unit encompasses 3 modules: veterinary epidemiology, food and zoonoses. Knowledge of these prepares veterinarians to play a vital role in maintaining human and animal health. Veterinary epidemiology which is the study of disease patterns provides understanding of the occurrence of human and animal disease necessary for effective control. Veterinarians have an increased role in relation to food from clinical practice to food standards regulation.
The 2-day Preparation for abattoir workshop held in July 2013 on the Camden campus is preparation for students to undertake a 3-day compulsory extramural placement at an abattoir during vacation periods prior to the end of July 2014.
It is a requirement that students are vaccinated against Q Fever before attending the Preparation for abattoir workshop held on the Camden campus and the On-site abattoir placement.
Zoonoses are important for veterinary occupational health and safety and for the health of our clients and the community. Integrated case weeks address veterinary responsibility in relation to biosecurity in clinical practice and to emergency animal disease response. This course in Veterinary Public Health builds on Veterinary Pathology, Veterinary Microbiology, Veterinary Parasitology, Animal Disease and Professional Practice 3. Topics will integrate vertically with Animal Disease and Small Animal Medicine and Therapeutics and horizontally with Large Animal Health and Production and Intensive Animal Health and Production.
Textbooks
Rabinowitz PM and Conti LA (2010) Human-Animal Medicine - Clinical approaches to zoonoses, toxicants and other shared health risks. Saunders, Maryland Heights, Missouri.

Year 5

VETS5356 Rural Mixed Practice Intramural

Credit points: 10 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tony D. Mogg Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 54-day practicum Prerequisites: Veterinary Science Years 1 - 4 completed Prohibitions: VETS5336 Assessment: Intrasemester: Assignment/s; Supervisor Report Forms; Written Reports; Oral Communication Tasks; Unit of Study Examinations
This unit of study provides students with an opportunity to practically apply the knowledge and skills they have developed during years 1 to 4 in a university rural mixed practice.
Through participation in professional activities students are expected to develop their communication skills with the public, staff and colleagues. Student interns must achieve a satisfactory grade in all five services (anaesthesia, equine, livestock, pathology and small animals) to fulfil the requirements of this unit of study (including passing all unit of study examinations).
Textbooks
Veterinary Student Internship Placement Program Intramural Rotations Unit of Study Guide
VETS5357 Rural Mixed Practice Extramural

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof John House Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 18-day Practicum Prerequisites: Successful completion of Veterinary Science Years 1 - 4 Assessment: Intra-semester: Assignment/s: Supervisor Report (S/U); Case Log (S/U); Communication Task (S/U)
This unit of study provides students with an opportunity to practically apply the knowledge and skills they have developed during years 1 to 4. In particular, they will gain experience in livestock and equine practice. Through participation in professional activities students are expected to develop their communication skills with the rural community, staff and colleagues, and gain an insight into the career opportunities of a Rural Mixed Practice. Student interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the practice, typically taking on the role and schedule of a full time supervised associate.
Textbooks
VETS5357 Rural Mixed Practice Extramural Unit of Study Guide and Blackboard contains detailed information & notes.
VETS5359 Small Animal Practice Extramural

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Fawcett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: practicals: 4-week practicum Prerequisites: Successful completion of BVSc Years 1 - 4 Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x introductory letter; 1 x site contract; 1 x learning agreement form; 1 x skills report form; 1 x rotation feedback form; 1 x supervisor report (S/U); 3 x case reports (S/U); 1 x communication task (S/U)
The small animal practice extramural rotation builds on skills, knowledge and attributes, developed throughout the entire course and is designed to enable veterinary student interns to gain a holistic understanding and experience of small animal practice prior to graduation. Veterinary student interns are placed at a Faculty of Veterinary Science approved small animal practice of their choice for a one month rotation. During this time interns are expected to negotiate workplace tasks with their extramural supervisor that enable the achievement of learning outcomes linked to the development of graduate attributes.
Interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the practice, typically taking on the role and schedule of a full time, supervised veterinary associate.
During the rotation interns are expected to participate in three meetings with the extramural supervisor and complete a communication task.
Textbooks
Year 5 Extramural Rotations Unit of Study Guide
VETS5360 Elective Rotation 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Bennett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Successful completion of BVSc Years 1-4 Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x supervisor report (S/U); 1 x written assignment (S/U); 1 x communication task (S/U) Practical field work: 18-day practicum
This Unit of Study involves placement at a Faculty approved location linked to the veterinary student intern's career interest area. Suitability of locations will be negotiated between the veterinary intern and elective Unit of Study Coordinator. Interns will be under the supervision of an extramural supervisor who will liaise with Faculty, review the aims of the rotation with the intern, and assess the performance of the intern via a standard report form.
Interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the placement, typically taking on the role and schedule of a full time, supervised veterinary associate. The requirements of this rotation include the completion of the following documents: an introductory letter to the placement at least four weeks prior to the rotation; a site contract; learning agreement form; skills report form; and rotation feedback form. During the rotation interns are expected to participate in three meetings with the extramural supervisor and complete a communication task.
Textbooks
Handbook for Extramural Rotations
VETS5361 Elective Rotation 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Bennett Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 18-day practicum Prerequisites: Successful completion of BVSc Years 1-4 Assessment: intra-semester: 1 x supervisor report (S/U); 1 x written assignment (S/U); 1 x communication task (S/U)
This Unit of Study involves placement at a Faculty approved location linked to the veterinary student intern's career interest area. Suitability of locations will be negotiated between the veterinary intern and elective Unit of Study. Interns will be under the supervision of an extramural supervisor who will liaise with Faculty, review the aims of the rotation with the intern, and assess the performance of the intern via a standard report form.
Interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending the practice, typically taking on the role and schedule of a full time, supervised veterinary associate. The requirements of this rotation include the completion of the following documents: an introductory letter to the placement at least four weeks prior to the rotation; a site contract; learning agreement form; skills report form; and rotation feedback form. During the rotation interns are expected to participate in three meetings with the extramural supervisor and complete a communication task.
Textbooks
Handbook for Extramural Rotations
VETS5362 Public Practice

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Siobhan Mor Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4 week practicum Prerequisites: successful completion of BVSc Year 1-4 Prohibitions: VETS5358 Assumed knowledge: BVSc Years 1-4 Assessment: (1) Supervisor Report Form; (2) Written report (approx 3000 words); (3) Communication task (under local supervision)
This unit of study involves a 4 week rotation with a public agency or company involved in servicing the livestock industries and/or public health. Student interns will be under the supervision of District Veterinarians, Veterinary Officers or other senior staff members approved by Faculty and may be involved in ongoing agency projects, including field investigation and implementation of animal health plans, animal health policy and regulation, and laboratory services and research. In Australia, the majority of placements are with the Livestock Health and Pest Authorities (LHPA, soon to be called Local Land Services, LLS) of NSW, the Department of Primary Industry (DPI) or equivalent in each state, and the Australian Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF). Other Faculty approved agencies, including research and diagnostic laboratories, are also allowed. Pre-approved overseas locations are encouraged, particularly for international students in their home state or country or students keen to work in developing countries. Students unable to be placed with an extramural agency may do the placement intramurally. Placements involving a substantial amount of clinical work or work with small animals are not generally acceptable for this Unit of Study. The placement provides practical opportunities to build on and apply knowledge acquired in semester 8, particularly in veterinary public health, livestock industry legislation, quarantine, food production and hygiene, livestock disease control and prevention, herd health, animal welfare and relevant basic and clinical veterinary science disciplines. Student interns are expected to fully participate in agreed activities whilst attending this placement, typically taking on the role and schedule of a full time supervised associate. During the rotation, students are required to complete a Written Report (approximately 3,000 words) and undertake a Communication Task (under local supervision). The topics for these are to be negotiated with the local supervisor who may suggest relevant local issues for these tasks.
Textbooks
None
VETS5363 SA Referral Medicine and Primary Care

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Vanessa R Barrs Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4 week practicum Prerequisites: successful completion of BVSc Year 1-4 Corequisites: none Prohibitions: VETS5345, VETS5346 Assumed knowledge: BVSc Years 1-4 Assessment: A satisfactory grade for both referral medicine and primary care components of the unit of study are necessary to achieve an overall satisfactory grade for this unit of study. Rotation performance and communication task is assessed using the supervisor report. Written assessments including case log, discharge statements, night plan, cases assessments and critical review of the literature. Communication task: A 5 to 7 minute presentation on a commonly encountered medical condition. Topics to be decided in week 1 of the rotation.
This unit of study aims to consolidate the theory of small animal internal medicine and apply it to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, and to providing routine health care prophylaxis to companion animals. It
aims to provide case-material to facilitate application of the problem-orientated approach to investigative medicine. In this rotation emphasis will be placed on acquiring appropriate skills in history taking, advanced physical examination, including (but not restricted to) abdominal palpation, thoracic auscultation (including
murmur identification, grading and localisation and respiratory auscultation), fundoscopy and non-invasive blood pressure measurement. Interpretation of clinicopathological test results will be an integral part of the rotation.
Cases will form the basis of interactive collegiate discussions on identification and assessment of problems on a patient-to-patient basis. Interns will become proficient in professional case-handover procedures through daily presentation of cases at clinical rounds.
As in other UVTHS rotations, interns will participate in other hospital activities including collection of samples for diagnostic tests, developing treatment plans, routine health management, disease management, management of patients in hospital and medical record keeping.
Learning Resources
Medicine Rounds
Clinical Rounds commence at 8.30am sharp Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday in the feline tutorial room and cage-side in feline or canine ICU at 4pm on Thursday and Friday. Clinical Rounds are an important mechanism by which interns may demonstrate both their problem orientated approach to medicine and their communication
skills with colleagues, during succinct 5 to 10 minute presentations. Where cases include diagnostic imaging, interns should review the films and present them.
Medicine Tutorials
Medicine tutorials will be conducted by members of the medicine and primary care teams throughout the rotation. Tutorials will include routine health prophylaxis, practical skills tutorial and selected topics in internal medicine.
On-line case materials
Students will participate in on-line learning through case studies accessed via Virtual Practitioner. These case studies have been designed to allow student interns to work through clinical problems at their own pace and during times that they are not otherwise occupied with clinical duties.
Textbooks
Veterinary Internal Medicine. Ettinger. S, Feldman N, 7th Edition, Elsevier 2011, Volumes 1 and 2.
VETS5364 SA Surgery and Diagnostic Imaging

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mariano Makara Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4 week practicum Prerequisites: successful completion of BVSc Year 1-4 Prohibitions: VET5348 Assumed knowledge: BVSc Years 1-4 Assessment: Students must achieve satisfactory grades in all assessment tasks in both Small animal Suregy and Diagnostic imaging. Assessment includes the Supervisor Report Form, Written report and Communication task
This unit of study consists of a 4-week placement in Small Animal Surgery and Diagnostic Imaging at the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Sydney (UVTHS). Two weeks are spent in Referral Surgery and two weeks in Diagnostic Imaging. During this unit of study, student interns will be under the day-to-day supervision of UVTHS veterinarians, nurses and administrative staff, the Unit of Study Co-ordinators, the UVTHS Practice Co-ordinator (rosters and absences) and the Hospital Superintendent.
Unit of Study Aims/Goals
This unit of study provides student interns with the opportunity to practise skills and apply knowledge gained in previous units of study, in a general and referral practice setting. It builds on knowledge from prior units of study and expects that all student interns will demonstrate a broad understanding of the context of veterinary practice and be capable of applying skills in information literacy and written and oral communication.
The key focus of this unit of study is to enable student interns to practise and be given formative assessment in clinically-relevant techniques such as physical examination, diagnostic sample collection, medical record keeping, basic surgical techniques, critical analysis of information from different sources, analysis of case-related information, development and implementation of treatment plans and evaluation of outcomes. In addition, student interns will gain an appreciation of the importance of client-veterinarian-patient and veterinarian-colleague interactions from the moment the client makes an appointment through resolution of the presenting problem and beyond. The interaction between first opinion and referral services, and support services such as anaesthesia, and clinical pathology will also be emphasized.
During the Diagnostic Imaging Sub-rotation student interns will apply knowledge gained in VETS4134 (Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging). During this sub-rotation, students are expected to obtain radiographic images of the thorax, abdomen, axial and appendicular skeleton of small animals. They are also expected to be able to perform a basic ultrasonographic exanimation of the canine or feline abdomen and to determine the appropriate imaging modality required to adequately assess a region of interest. Additionally, students will apply previous knowledge by identifying radiographic signs of common diseases in small animals, creating lists of differential diagnosis and communicating these findings to peers.
Students will need to have a satisfactory grade for both the Surgery and Imaging components of the Unit of Study to achieve an overall satisfactory (pass) grade for the whole Unit of Study.
Description of the Surgery Part of the Unit of Study
Surgical Rounds - Morning Rounds 8.30am sharp: Surgery tutorial room
Student interns should come prepared to answer questions regarding all aspects of management of patients in their care and answer questions from their peers and UVTHS staff.
Surgical Discussion
Surgery tutorials are conducted by members of the surgery team throughout the placement. Times and lengths of the tutorials depend on work load. Student interns are also encouraged to prepare and present a short presentation of an important surgical topic to their group and a member of the surgery team.
Online Surgical Challenges and Quizzes
These case studies have been designed to allow student interns to work through clinical problems at their own pace and during times that they are not otherwise occupied with clinical duties. Four cases are activated each week, and these are found on Sydney eLearning. Log onto Sydney eLearning and go to the Small Animal Surgery Site. Open the Small Animal Surgery Folder and click on the Surgery Challenge folder.
Student interns should ensure that they have reviewed the 4 cases (either together or as a team) prior to the orthopaedics tutorial at the end of the week (often Thursday afternoon). Preparing for and attending this tutorial should improve interns' competence in:
Collating historical information and findings of a thorough physical examination to formulate a problem list
Developing a diagnostic plan and interpreting diagnostic aids
Establishing a diagnosis
Development of therapeutic plans and discussion of their implementation and likely outcomes
Spey clinic - Spey clinic is held once a week (currently Tuesdays). Students will perform speys and/or castrates on client owned animals under supervision.
Description of Diagnostic imaging part of the Unit of Study
Imaging tutorials - Imaging tutorials will take place once a week and will be conducted by Helen Laurendt and Kathy Hughes. These tutorials will be focus on principles of image formation of diagnostic radiology, diagnostic ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.
Imaging Rounds - Monday to Friday, 8:00am: Radiology reading room
Student interns should be prepared to present and discuss the imaging studies acquired the day before. Students should be prepared to discuss imaging techniques and to put imaging findings in the context of the overall case workout.
Imaging Presentations - Imaging Presentations will take place during the last day of the Imaging rotation. Student interns will be required to present one of the cases they have worked on during their rotation. Emphasize will be placed on communication of imaging findings, interpretation and differential diagnosis. Students will be encouraged to follow the case presentation with a short literature review.
Textbooks
Small Animal Surgery. Fossum T (ed). 4th Edition. Mosby, 2012.
VETS5365 SA Anaesthesia and Emergency Medicine

Credit points: 5 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Heide Kloeppel Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4 week practicum; tutorials; self-directed learning activities Prerequisites: successful completion of BVSc Year 1-4 Prohibitions: VETS5347 Assumed knowledge: BVSc Years 1-4 Assessment: Students must achieve satisfactory grades in all assessment tasks in both the Small Animal Anaesthesia & Emergency Medicine components, to achieve an overall satisfactory grade in this UoS. Assessment of clinical performance and competency will be assessed using a Supervisor Report Form. Written assessment tasks include activity log, analgesia plan, pain assessment sheet, anaesthetic records, intensive care monitoring record and skills report; Communication tasks include case presentation at rounds, presentation of a journal article and critical review.
This unit of study comprises a 4-week practicum in Small Animal Anaesthesia and Emergency Medicine.
The Small Animal Anaesthesia component provides student interns with an opportunity to apply the principles and practices of veterinary anaesthesia introduced to them in VETS4133 (Veterinary Anaesthesia and Surgery 1) and VETS4234 (Veterinary Anaesthesia and Surgery 2) in the clinical setting of a large small animal veterinary hospital. This practicum is designed to give student interns exposure and experience in clinical anaesthesia to help develop a deeper understanding of this discipline and prepare them for veterinary practice. Student interns are involved in the management of a wide variety of cases from the time the patient is admitted up until when the patient has fully recovered from anaesthesia . This unit of study aims to foster a culture of shared leadership, team-work, professional conduct, compassion towards animal patients and open communication in the work environment. Student interns participate in all activities undertaken by the UVTHS Anaesthesia Unit staff, including (but not restricted to) pre-anaesthetic examination, formulation of anaesthesia and analgesia plans, induction and maintenance of anaesthesia, record keeping and post-operative care (including pain management). Student interns will learn and practice the many technical skills required to perform general anaesthesia including physical examination, intravenous catheterisation, endotracheal intubation, collection of blood for diagnostic testing. After completing the anaesthesia component of this unit of study, student interns will be able to choose the appropriate anaesthetic protocol for anaesthesia in healthy (ASA 1 and 2) small animal patients and induce and maintain anaesthesia in dogs and cats with a degree of proficiency acceptable for a new graduate (refer to the Faculty of Veterinary Science Graduate Attributes).
The Emergency Medicine component of this unit of study gives students experience and training in the management of emergency cases and the care of hospitalised patients after-hours. Students will have the opportunity to practice clinically-relevant techniques such as history taking, physical examination, diagnostic sample collection, interpretation of radiolographs and ultrasound, medical record keeping, critical analysis of case-related information, development and implementation of treatment plans and evaluation of outcomes. There is a focus on triage, treatment and management of cases presenting in an emergency situation. The aim of this sub-rotation is to learn how to approach a patient presented as an emergency, to generate a problem list and to prioritise treatment of the most life threatening problems. In addition, interns should gain an appreciation of the holistic nature of veterinary practice, the importance of client-veterinarian, veterinarian-patient and collegial interactions, from the moment the client makes an appointment through resolution of the presenting problem and beyond.
As part of this unit of study, students will participate in other University Veterinary Teaching Hospital activities including intensive care duty and weekend duty.
Textbooks
Tranquilli WJ, Thurmon JC and Grimm KA (2007) Lumb & Jones' Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia, 4th Edition, Wiley-Blackwell

Honours Elective

VETS5400 Honours Elective

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Roslyn Bathgate Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Veterinary Sciences Years 1-4; Years 2-4 WAM =>70 Assessment: Intrasemester: Supervisor Report (S/U) and Communication Task (S/U) for each placement. Research Supervisor Report (S/U); Oral defence (S/U); and Dissertation (5,000 words) Practical field work: 2 x 18-day practicums
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission from Faculty to Enrol
This unit of study provides veterinary student interns who have attained a suitable WAM based upon academic achievements in years 2-4 with the opportunity to develop greater proficiency in research within a veterinary related discipline of their choice. Eligible students may enrol in the honours unit of study instead of the two standard elective rotations offered in final year.
Note: Permission from Faculty is required to enrol.